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The Ubyssey Sep 29, 1967

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Array Editor solves traffic jam:
sprout wings, my son
By STUART GRAY
Ubyssey  City  Editor
We could hear the traffic
snarl from 1,000 feet up.
That's how it was Thursday
when I, Ubssey photo editor
Kurt Hilger and lensman Chris
Blake sacrificed our breakfasts
to chortle at UBC's early morning traffic chaos.
But, jam it all, it wasn't
funny.
For 40 minutes of sharp
banks in a rented seaplane, we
watched thousands of cars
merrily merge into crawling,
hapless animals.
The worst snarl was along
southwest Marine Drive, where
students whipped along at the
legal limit of 50 mph, then
bogged down in a mile of
single-lane, bumper-nudging
frustration.
University Boulevard was
the second most serious offender, in conspiracy with
Westbrook Crescent. As five
or six cars edged from West-
brook ■ onto University, scores
of cars in a line back to the
isolated    University    Hill
Church,  trickled past the bottleneck.
Meanwhile, long bare
patches gleamed on Chancellor
Boulevard, on which traffic
trundled smoothly until a
delay at northwest Marine
Drive. This, curving up from
Spanish Banks, bore relatively
little traffic.
Our vigil over a teeming
campus began about 7:55 a.m.
and lasted until 8:35 a.m. Peak
traffic flow was about 8:15
a.m.
The flight supported statistics released later by AMS
president Shaun Sullivan.
Taken during the 24 hours of
a Wednesday last March, they
reveal the following:
Chancellor bore the heaviest
traffic from 8 to 9 p.m., with
1,202 cars. These, however,
tended to be spread out, thus
enabling  smoother flow.
During the same period,
1,034 cars on University became clogged before the West-
brook bottleneck.
Southwest Marine boasted
979 cars — and a lengthy tie-
up where the double lane became single because of unfinished construction. The
same situation is causing current blockage.
During the flight, it was
evident how close to saturation parking lots are.
Sullivan's statistics show
10,999 parking stickers issued
so far this year. This includes
7,529 for students, 1,370 for
faculty, and 1,200 to staff. By
comparison, there are only
9,260 parking spots.
UBC traffic officals estimate
14,000 cars enter and leave
UBC daily.
The official key to the present traffic trauma is Sixteenth
Avenue, now being extended.
Sixteenth will continue from
Blanca to southwest Marine,
intersecting with Westbrook
along the way. It is exeptced
to be finished in a year.
"The long range plan calls
for Sixteenth to be the major
access route," said Sullivan.
"It is expected to carry 4,500
cars a day. But right now,
with a good rain, it would be
a washout."
UBYSSEY
VER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1967
,48 \,
Crises threaten
to choke library
— kurt hilger phelo
NOW, WAIT A MINUTE! Or two or ten or more. Aerial
photo, taken Thursday at 8:05 a.m., shows typical traffic
jam on University Boulevard as all rush to 8:30 lectures.
While you wait, find your car in picture.
By MIKE FINLAY
A series of crises threaten to choke the UBC
library, and no relief is in sight.
"Book and study space in the existing library
will be totally gone by 1969, capital funds for
building are nil, and the grant with which most
books are bought will be gone by early 1963,"
said acting librarian Inglis Bell.
"We need to go ahead with several very
necessary projects, but lack the money.
"An undergraduate library, administrative
and staff work space, and a science library are
particularly needed," he said.
"Capital funds for building, and operating
funds for books and administration come out of
the university budget.
"This budget depends entirely on how much
the provincial government decides to give the
university."
Last year, Bell said, the central library received no building capital.. Grants went toward
the building of the forestry and agricultural
libraries.
"These are very small libraries catering to
specific groups," he said.
"The library is treated very well as far as
operating grant are concerned, but we need
more money for books."
A study made possible by a grant from the
Donner Canadian Foundation is considering the
best way to make use of the facilites of the overcrowded library.
The computerized study, begun last year and
now totalling 9,000 pages, aims to determine
which books are most widely use, most urgently
needed, in which library, and by whom.
Library officials hope the stacks may be reorganized to make books in great demand more
readily available.
"But it is pointless to determine what new
volumes are needed when no money exists to
purchase them," Bell said.
"A storage library for lesser used books is
also needed but other library needs have priority.
"It is so crowded here that if new staff were
required we would have no place to put them."
Committee positions open
Alma Mater Society treasurer Dave Hoye
Thursday issued an urgent last call for students
to serve on four advisory committees.
Hoye said applications are still needed for the
bookstore, food services, housing and library
committees.
Bookstore and food services committee members will be appointed Monday night by student
council but applications are still being accepted
by AMS second vice-president Kim Campbell.
"We need the best possible people on these
committees," Hoye said.
"Food services, the bookstore, housing and
traffic and parking have no competition.
"Each committee will be dealing with a
monopoly," he said.
Hoye claimed the committees deal with services that are "poorly planned, indifferently administered, and have insensitive policies."
"Monopolies should be directed by the people
they serve — the students and faculty," he said.
Hoye said top bureaucrats in each department
attend the meetings.
Housing, library, and traffic committee members will be picked on Oct. 9.
Todays Ubyssey
PAGE  6 BUDGET
PAGE  7 PAGE FRIDAY
PAGE 17. CLUB'S DAY Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, September  29,   1967
RUBBERY EGGS
Totem residents come and go
but gripes remain the same
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
Totem Park may be restocked with freshmen, but many old
complaints remain, according to its student resident head.
The first is food, said Doug Ante, president of the Totem
Park Resident's Association.
Screams over rubbery egg and cold toast breakfasts notwithstanding, a major gripe is the lack of communication between
food services and the student body.
Ruth Blair, director of food services, wants to establish a
food committee, he said, but it is not formed yet.
Meanwhile, residents pay 19 cents more per day for their
food than last year.
Damage assessments are another complaint, said Ante.
Housing administration is improving its policy, he said "But
I didn't sign anything making me responsible for others, yet if
they can't find the culprit, they charge the whole floor," he said.
"It's not a mature way of living."
About housing regulations, Ante said: "Late night restrictions
apply only to women.
"And everyone ignores the drinking policy." But, he said,
the rule against drinking is justified, because the great majority
of people in Totem are under 21.
Ante's personal beef is student apathy.
This year residence students are largely self-governing.
Freshmen residents do not come forward to fill executive
posts open to them, he claims.
Meanwhile, Don Munton, chairman of the Alma Mater
Society housing committee, is preparing a 25 page questionnaire
to determine present housing conditions as well as future wants
and needs.
"It will provide a basis on which the President's Committee
on Housing and housing administration can make long range
plans," Munton said.
The survey should be mailed to students both on and off
campus by Nov. 1.
"We hope for 5,000 samples toy Dec. 1," Munton said.
Holy terror lose on campus
Yogurt!
By RICHARD BAER
And lo' a great commotion
did arise in the night, and religious warfare was conducted
with much rivalry.
Early Thursday, the cluster
of theological colleges in the
north-east corner of the campus became a core of intrigue.
Twenty students from St.
Mark's College raided Union
College, Anglican Theological
college and St. Andrews.
It all started Wednesday
when Union littered the halls
of St. Marks with hay.
Then Union students added
a cow which urinated in the
dorms.
Retaliating Marksmen early
Thursday crept through Union's kitchen window, liberating cutlery.
. From ATC they lifted bag
lunches and eggs, later to become ammunition when Anglicans attempted a charge.
Most Anglicans, when eggs
splattered their outside walls
and doors, decided to stay in
side the building.
But a few adventurers and
several Union students were
soon baptized by Catholic
buckets of water.
Several Marksmen were
caught and soaked in Anglican
showers before being turned
loose.
Finally, a band of Marksmen pealed out the scores of
battle on St. Andrew's bells.
Five geology professors
share $9,000 study grant
Five UBC professors in the department of geology
have won grants from the Geological Survey of Canada.
Professors W. R. Danner, H. J. Greenwood, W. G.
Libbey, W. H. Mathews, K. C. McTaggart, and J. W. Murray
each won a share of $9,110 to further their research
projects.
The grants, founded by the National Advisory Committee on Research in the Geological Sciences, have been
awarded for the past 16 years.
The Canadian total of $185,000, announced by Jean-Luc
Pepin, energy, mines and resources minister, was one-third
the amount applied for.
UBC ranked ninth out of 21 Canadian universities in
the amount awarded.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
Quite a chubby blorg lady said
this today: "I never seen the
like. It was horrible. It was
terrMe. It breathed fire and
water. Hoo boy! Wait till I
tell the delicatessan-owner.
What a yogurt! What a ceremony! I wouldn't trust one.
"Wow, what would have
happened if it hadn't — and if
it had! Oi vey. Never throw
a puce blorg at an ice cream
roll—or if you do, watch out."
THE
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BLOOD. MAKE ■
A DATE TODAY. T
ALMA MATER
SOCIETY CLINIC
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FOR INFORMATION & RESERVATIONS CALL MU 1-4010 Friday, September 29, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
NLF spokesmen brave
rowdy Montreal crowd
MONTREAL (CUP) — Three students representing the National Liberation Front of Vietnam
were roundly hissed and booed down as they
attempted to address a crowd of 900 rowdy students in Montreal Thursday.
Sponsored by the Union Generale des Etudiants du Quebec on a two-week speaking tour
of Quebec, the students made their first public
appearance before an overflow crowd at Sir
'George Williams University.
The crowd was antagonistic from the moment
the student speakers entered the hall.
After unsuccessfully trying to explain their
flew of the war the trio were forced to cancel
a scheduled question period.
At a press conference at Dorval Airport Wednesday Lyuan Sou, the group spokesman, said
• their primary purpose in coming to Quebec was
to explain the situation in Vietnam.
The Sir George crowd wouldn't listen.
Lyuan Sou said "We are a small country,
smaller than the state of Florida and no bigger
tnan Vancouver Island.
"For four thousand years we have been in
constant struggle. We have waged wars against
invaders to defend our rights to peace and freedom and happiness."
He explained in recent years the wars have
involved first the French, then the Americans,
and he offered a catalogue of the atrocities of
the war.
"We are just a small people who are being
killed by 'bombs, whose women are being violated, and whose homes are being destroyed. We
admire the American students who now bravely
pronounce themselves against this injustice",
Sou said.
"Long live the friendships of our people".
UGEQ President Pierre Lefrancois said Quebec students support the struggle of the NLF.
Sir George External Vice-president Jean Si-
cotte said of the disturbances created by the
students: "Freedom of speech is a basic right in
a democratic society. Students at Sir George have
denied that right in the name of democracy".
"I am ashamed", he said.
The other members of the group are Miss
Ngeum Ngok Eung,.and Le May. All three said
they were students before the war.
They are now Working in the student section
of the NLF, which is the political arm of the
Viet Cong.
Newspaper Georgia Straight
busted by city hall squares
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Vancouver's most recent
newspaper, Georgia Straight,
lost its business licence Thursday.
*h. Mayor Tom Campbell announced the decision Thursday morning after conferring
with city corporation counsel
Russell Baker and city licencing inspector Milt Harrell.
Campbell gave no specific
. reasons for the suspension in
a Ubyssey interview, but said
city hall has been flooded by
"hundreds of calls" about the
newspaper in the last three
*3ays.
He said the editors have the
right to appeal the decision before council within 10 days.
Many of the callers complained about the paper being
sold outside Vancouver
schools,  Campbell  said.
Lord Byng high school on
Sixteenth near UBC is an example.
> "We've been expecting some
kind of action since we started
the paper," assistant editor
Peter Hlookoff said Thursday.
"We're just surprised it
hasn't come sooner. Campbell's move seems to be based
on   hysteria  rather   than   any
legal action."
Inspector Harrell said the
section of the city charter
dealing with the "Power to
Suspend" was quoted in the
notice to Georgia Straight.
It reads:
"The chief license inspector shall have power at
any time summarily to
suspend for such periods
as he may determine any
license if the holder of
the license has, in the
opinion of the inspector,
been guilty of such gross
misconduct in or with respect to the licensed
premises as to warrant
the suspension of his license."
Lawyer John Laxton, representing Georgia Straight, said
there were no grounds for
suspension included in the
notice.
"It's incredible discrimination. It seems that any bureaucrat—a tax collector—can
close down a business," Lax-
ton said.
"It makes you wonder
what's happened to freedom of
the press."
Laxton said that the editors
haven't   yet   decided   whether
to appeal the suspension.
"Read the paper," said
Campbell when asked the reasons for suspension. "She's a
lulu.
"It was all right when they
were selling them just in hippie village," he said.
Campbell said Vancouver
police have been notified of
the suspension. He said it is
now illegal to sell copies of
Georgia Straight in Vancouver
but police were only warning
sellers on Thursday.
Georgia Straight, a bimonthly, sold for 15 cents and
has a claimed circulation of
70,000.
Its editors had difficulty
printing their second issue. AU
Vancouver printers they approached refused to print the
newspaper. It was last printed
in the Fraser Valley.
Six issues have been printed
since March. The seventh was
to appear next Monday.
"All of them are offensive,"
Campbell said of the issues.
"But the last was better than
the rest."
— kurt hilger photo
DOWN ON YOUR KNEES! Most watch as some get into the
spirit of the thing at noon sign paint-in Thursday in music
quad. Signs are to publicize fall symposium Oct. 2-8 sponsored by arts council.
Bookstore explains
text books delays
By MIKE FINLAY
UBC's bookstore, much maligned in the past for failing to
meet fall book needs, has gained some campus approval this year.
Representatives of several departments Thursday denied
reports that their courses had been held up due to a lack of
text books.
Bookstore head John Hunter indicated that problems that
do arise are not usually his fault.
"Very few professors get their orders in on time," he said.
To this, political science professor Paul Tennant replied
that the deadline of late May or early June was "absurdly early".
Hunter blamed the Canadian publishing system and the
printers for slow service.
In reply to charges that the bookstore makes an unreasonable
profit, Hunter said his store pays the publisher 80 per cent of the
retail price for books, while downtown shops pay only 50 to 60
per cent.
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/ THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The' Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242; editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-524.
SEPT. 29, 1967
Real obscenity
A letter-to-the-editor of this newspaper in 1920
declared: "The Ubyssey is a glorified gutter newspaper."
In 1956 a college professor at Assumption College
harrumphed for all Canada to hear: "The Ubyssey is a
vile rag."
The outbursts continue and we're proud of them.
When the prudish and pompous are offended, a paper
must be doing something right.
That's why we were a bit surprised Thursday when
city hall closed down The Georgia Straight which Mayor
Tom Campbell was quoted as calling "a filthy, perverted
paper."
The Georgia Straight must be better than we
thought it was. And the fact license inspector Milton
Harrell suspended the paper's licence on the grounds
of "obscenity" can only mean the rag we had considered a weak imitation of the U.S. underground press
must contain a spark of genius. For Harrell is the same
old-maid-brained character who banned the late philosopher Lenny Bruce some years ago from a downtown
nightclub.
It shouldn't be necessaty to point out that freedom
of the press includes freedom to offend an egregious
mayor and his petty bureaucrats.
And that it includes also the freedom to upset the
matrons who guard the testicle-shrivelling "morality"
of the lower middle class and whose wrath at the hippy
paper moved the terrified mayor to action.
It's disheartening that a licence inspector can still
claim "obscenity" consists of words on pieces of paper
— and be taken seriously.
Real obscenity consists of deeds and of conditions
within society. Anyone who doubts the obscenity of
this society need only watch its leaders in action any
Tuesday in city hall's council chambers.
The editors of The Georgia Straight last month
promised an investigation of this den of obscenity. We
urge them to push on with it.
Gherao, anyone?
Ubyssey News Service Thursday reported from New
Delhi, India, that authorities there are not pleased by
Indian students latest tactic. The tactic is called "gherao"
and consists of locking up university officials until
demands are met.
Students at Nagpur University, the report said,
confined their principal in his car for 45 minutes, preventing him from announcing a decision to increase
tuition fees.
The gherao was lifted only when he promised to
return home. The report said the tactic was spreading.
The news from India should make local authorities
realize how soft they've got it, with nothing but wordy
student council briefs, timid marches and half-hearted
strike threats to contend with.
Ghefrao, anyone?
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rlACLEAM'S
"It lied, distorted, was biased, and was indoctrinating
innocent children with an ethos they were too young to
question — no, not The Sun — The Georgia Straight!"
GUERRILLA GOVERNMENT
This
is news
By STAN PERSKY
In a lead editorial, the
Province (Sept. 25, 1967) calls
for scientific research on pot,
backing an argument advanced by UBC psychiatrist Conrad Schwarz, writing in the
monthly journal of the B.C.
Medical   Association.
While generally moderate
and sensible ("the drug will
not be stamped out merely by
more severe application of the
existing laws") the editorial
contains this kind of cryptic
ponderousness: "Marijuana, in
combination with the fatalistic
philosophies of the Orient, has
proved a handicap to economic
development in some parts
of the world." Huh?
Halfway down the page,
another editorial praises a
North Van high school principal who says: "We tell those
with long hair to get a haircut, those who haven't shaved
to shave, and those who
haven't washed to wash ... it
seems to work." The Province
comments that this was once
"the routine method bringing
the best out of developing
young rebels."
I find this to be typical
Province fodder, replete with
cornyness and self-satisfied
moralizing, which is sold as
concern with the youth problem. Anyone who has talked
with people attending high
school or university would
recognize how unrealistic this
approach is.
The same issue carries a
story by reporter Mike Bolton
in San Francisco saying that
hippies are talented people,
but that the Haight-Ashbury is
swamped with "plastics."
That's a lot of youth problem stuff for one issue. In
fact, it occupies more space in
the paper than any other topic.
One wonders if the Province
isn't merely trying to terrorise the hungover Monday
morning readership, while
they much their way through
burnt toast. But that isn't all.
We  also  have  a  report in
deathless purple prose that the
police are "ferreting" out the
mashers who turn hippie for
their own brand of young
love."
Simons also includes a pot-
leads-to-heroin warning, without which a newspaper hippie
story wouldn't be complete.
And the headline writer gets
his two-cents in, too: "Hippie
colony mood getting ugly" is
the title for Simons' story.
Most of this stuff is a nauseating defense of a world we
aren't interested in preserving.
Yet I suppose people riding
to work on the bus believe it
and feel a little more secure.
LETTER
Hoye a despot
Editor, The Ubyssey:
May I point out to the bureaucratic despot Mr. Hoye that
the past 20 years have seen
nothing in the way of arts
undergraduate council work.
It is only in the past few
months that any work of any
value at all has been done by
AUS. Need I enumerate for
you Mr. Hoye? Although Mr.
Hoye may not personally agree
with the programs of the new
arts council, he has no right
at all arbitrarily to decide on
the responsibility, or lack of
it, of the arts council. He, in
turn, is showing a lack of this
same responsibility, which is
all too prevalent in our bureaucratic organization.
PETER LAUCHILD
arts 2
M.W0.l.:W,M«iWft*.**»5
SIGHT FOR SORE EYES
DEPARTMENT: Readers will
doubtless be delighted to know
that not one of The Ubyssey
staffers who went to Expo
will mention the fact in prinfc"
AWK DEPT.: Yessiree, Leslie Rohringer, housing boss, is
human. That Lower Mall
police force is actually a;
"standards committee" — but
whatever it is, it's run by students, not housing.
Another concession to student self-government froj»
Rohringer, who is hereby
freed from the label "czar":
lots more visiting hours at
Totem Park.
Time was when Totemites
cuddled in the lounges, em-*
harassing visiting mommies
and daddies. Now they hold
hands twice a week in thejt
rooms instead of twice a
month.
NOSE FOR NEWS DEPART-.
MENT: Zoology prof. D. Hr
Chitty was puzzled by Ubys-^
sey staffer who knew about
and asked for the Zo. 400
course plan before any students had it. Sorry, sir, wes
never reveal our sources . . .
SENTIMENTAL ME: The
very rich Woodward that built
our biomedical library . also
paid to move a big statue of.
King George VI over that-
away. To stay in the family's^
good books, librarians keep an
eye out for the signs of irreverent pigeons.
GET HIGH OR DIE: Hj»-
oracle Dan McLeod was serious when he said peyote is
a much better trip than LSD
because local acid is cut with
speed  and heroin.
Downtown pushers are indeed trying to move in oiv:
Fourth Avenue pushers.
A UBC student used to get
mad at being followed around
by cops — one night he was
stopped for no reason by ?
gendarme who happened to
know he'd moved—but thinks
differently since known hoods
beat up the hippies next door.
Some one on Fourth also got
an ice pick in the head . . .
Good old Hut B-6, home to*
half the Biology 101 labs, has
a hall stacked with specimen
boxes labeled "To be named".
Let's see now . . . "How about
Suzukius particolorus, DaveW
"Fine, Bob, and here's a
Paperworker scageli for you."
THE BLACK POT: If Mayor
Campbell is hurt over gleeful
ridicule in the downtown press
of his rat-catching incentive
program, he might check out
the mice-infested cafeteria in
the two-year-old Pacific Press
building. *
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City         Stuart Gray
News      __     Susan Gransby
Managing -     Murray  McMillan
Photo .    . _ Kurt  Hilger
Associate    Al   Birnie,   Kirsten   Emmott
Senior ..    .      Pat  Hrushowy
Sports           Mike Jessen
Wire   __       -    Charlotte   Haire
Page Friday       Judy Bing
Ass't.  City      Boni   !*•
Rambling in the rubble, the rambunctious rabble reported rapport.
Wouldn't it be rubbery, asked Irving
Fetish, braving a Brock brunch.
Lilting Elizabethan ballads hovered
in the foreground as Jane Kennon,
Mike Finlay, Steve Jackson, Scott
McCrae, Richard Baston and Davi^
Wallace braved clubbing attacks^
Jade Eden faced the muste, Richard
Baer looked cowed, and Perrln
Lewis didn't make cents. John
Lucky was, as were Hew Gwynee,
Paul   Knox,   and   Nigel   Thursfleld.
Airing his views in the darkroom
was Chris Blake, but George Hollo,
Lawrence Woodd (2 d's), Powell
Hargrave and Bob Brown were more
down to  earth. Friday, September 29, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
TWO SYSTEMS
SEES EAST ZONE
CUS at stake under
German  unity remote     Windsor referendum
By BILL GRAF
,-.     Today in Bonn the old fiction of a reunited
Germany is still publicly maintained. Privately
most officials concede  that  prospects are now
jmore remote than ever.
But two Germanies exist today, with only
a history and a language in common. And even
these are tenuous ties: history is interpreted
quite differently in both Germanies and as the
one language becomes Americanized the other
•acquires a Russian flavor.
West Germany is more similar to the USA
than to the (so-called) German democratic Republic.
«~. This fact is apparent entering East Germany
from the West. Instead of a hyper-fast, neon-
lit pace there is an amiable leisureness.
There is also rubble, much of it left from
♦ the war, alongside vast new housing complexes,
of monotonous  three-story buildings.
Unimproved cobblestones barely sustain a
meagre flow of traffic. Coffee, cigarettes and
stylish clothes from the West are in demand.
But in East Germany everybody who can,
$©rks; everyone who can't is cared for. There
are numerous kindergartens, old-people's homes
and low-cost housing projects.
And if these don't suffice, the East German
js sustained by slogans, everywhere — on
''fences, public buildings, town squares, buses
and store windows — urging cooperative effort for the progress of the socialist state or
suggesting that West German President Lubke
lg§s a concentration-camp builder.
Other than social-security and collectivism,
the East German government demonstrates a
different system of priorities than the West.
Books and records — to be sure in limited
selection — are about half the price in the East
Zone. I attended several excellent stage and
concert productions and never once paid more
rfchan $2.00 for a performance.
In East Germany 19 per cent of the youth
attend university or an advanced technical
school, of which 55 per cent are drawn from
the working class. In West Germany the corresponding percentages are 9 and 5.
While in the East Zone I discussed politics
with whomever was willing, and most were,
because few had even seen a North American
since the war. I talked to students, professional
men, housewives, academics.
Not once did I hear a criticism of commun-
,5sn_>   Most   of  the   complaints   were   economic:
not  enough  money,   too   many  working-hours;
but not: the system is wrong.
For most East-Germans, espscially the postwar generation, there is no other system.
mi In West Germany, on the other hand, precisely the same social, economic and political
system remains as in the Weimar Republic, that
is, till the advent of Hitler.
The makers of the Grundgeset?, the German
constitution, envisioned — and the majority of
the population agreed with them — a complete
transformation of the social structure, including
socialization of key industries, a stronger guarantee of individual rights and a more equitable
distribution of powers.
All this was vetoed by the American occupation authority and today West Germany's
social and political structure is indistinguishable
from that of the USA.
Consequently, 22 years after the war there
are two different Germanies. One out of three
East Germans who flee to th? West eventually
returns despite the prospect of recriminations
and even jail sentences. West Germans display
the same morbid fear of communism prevalent
in the Western World, especially in the USA.
The Ulbricht regime will never consent to
reunification, for the three-to-one numerical predominance of West to East Germans would
mean the end of its power.
The Great Powers, sensing a stalemate and
increasingly occupied with other conflicts in
other parts of the world, have effectively abandoned the "German Question".
The division of Germany nicely completes
the power balance between East and West. An
intact Germany would be the singly most powerful nation in Europe. Poland and Czechoslovakia on the one side and; France on the other
will resist German reunification.
If a re-united Germany means incorporation
of East into West, virtually every European
country would fear—not without justification
—a Germany in which the social, political and
economic structure is identical with that of th«
pre-Hitier era, in which the "Grand Coalition"
has virtually eliminated parliamentary opposition, in which an "Emergency Decree" similar
to Article 48 of the Weimar Constitution may
soon be passed and in which a neo-fascist party
is (until very recently) rapidly proliferating.
Moreover, the price of unity would certainly mean West Germany's official recognition
of the Oder-Neisse Line, that is, that the former
East Prussia as part of the Polish state. This
by a government who advocates a return of the
1937 boundaries!
That the question of reunification remains at
all is largely due to the desire of West German
politicians to make political mileage: 59 per cent
of West Germans are against recognition of the
Oder-Neisse Line as a basis of negotiations.
Germany will never be reunited. But two
Germanies, once and for all defined, would be
an integral step toward East-West rapprochement.
UBC psychologists survey
attitudes toward outcasts
If you are an ex-mental pa-
client, you'll probably have
more success if you deal with
a female personnel manager.
If you're a woman, your
chances of getting a job are
about the same as a hippie's.
These are two of many findings in a study being conducted
*by UBC psychology professor
Edro Signori and two graduate students. Signori, with a
$4,100 research grant from the
department of Manpower, is
studying the socially disadvantaged person and the attitudes that make him an outcast.
"We are interpreting the
word 'disadvantaged' in the
Widest possible way," Dr. Signori said.
"It includes the physically
and mentally handicapped,
school dropouts, ex-criminals,
older workers, ethnic minorities, and women."
During the summer, the re
search team examined over
400 books and articles to determine the structure of attitudes concerning types of disadvantaged people.
"On the top of the list are
the physically handicapped,
the ex-convict, and the ex-
mental patient."
On the -bottom is the person
who has little trouble but is
nonetheless disadvantaged —
such as the British immigrant.
The team also submitted
questionnaires to students in
order to discover possible differences in the attitudes of
first and fourth year students,
and male and female students.
The ultimate aim of the research, which will continue
for an undetermined period, is
to get jobs for more people.
Once the results are analyzed
it will be possible to destroy
unfounded attitudes and prejudices through education and
to help those who are perhaps
understandably   poorly   treated, Signori said.
He knows of no other program similar to his own. "The
research, once completed, will
have immense practical value."
Hoye vindictive
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Please relay my deep concern to treasurer Dave Hoye.
From His proposed budget i
would be led to believe that
this is the last time that He
will deal with the competency
of others. As i did not have a
hand in His election, why
should i suffer from His
judgment (?) which i deem
vindictive and prejudiced and
not in keeping with a mature
and human person.
ERIK  WAHLEN
arts 1
WINDSOR (CUP)—The student council at Windsor
University voted Tuesday for a referendum to decide on
their membership in the Canadian Union of Students.
The referendum will be held Oct. 13, with open debate
of the issue and complete discussions with students to be
held Oct. 11.
The question of CUS membership was brought up in
council Tuesday by Bob Somers, student minister for external affairs, who claims CUS is a leftist organization that
does not represent the majority of Canadian students.
Somers felt he had seven out of nine council votes in
favor of his motion to get out, but the tide turned when
CUS president Hugh Armstrong showed up at the council
meeting.
The vote to send the issue to the students came after
strong lobbying by the pro-CUS forces in council.
Commenting on the Windsor council decision in Ottawa
Thursday, Armstrong said, "I am glad their council decided
not to withdraw from consideration of the problems of
education.
He said the main problem in Windsor is misinformation
about CUS.
KOBAYASHI'S
KWAIDAN
OPENS THE
INTERNATIONAL    SERIES
OF
CINEMA 16's 7th SEASON
OCTOBER 2 - 8:00 p.m. AUDITORIUM
SERIES   PASSES  AVAILABLE   AT  THE   DOOR
For all ot your clothing requirements there's
only two places to shop and that's
mm iiiiin & parish ltd.
786 Granville
and THE COLLEGE SHOP LTD.
802 Granville
COME IN NOW AND CHOOSE FROM OUR COMPLETE FALL
SELECTION   OF   SPORTS JACKETS,   SLAX   AND  SWEATERS. Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, September 29,  1967
This  is the way
a
This is AMS treasurer Dave Hoye's proposed budget for   1967-68  (with comparative figures for 1966-67) to be put before student council Oct. 10 for approval.
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statement of Estimated Net Revenue and Expenditure
Year Ended May 31. 1968
(With comparative figures for 1967)
REVENUE:
Student fees 	
Profit from College Shop 	
Rentals  —   ~_	
Interest income 	
Sundries —   _.	
Total Revenue   	
ALLOCATION OF FEES COLLECTED:
Non-discretionary
Student Union Building 	
Men's Athletic Committee 	
Accident Benefit Fund 	
Brock Art Fund    	
Brock Management  Fund  -	
Canadian Union of Students —	
Women's Athletic Committee 	
Total Non-Discretionary  	
Discretionary
Students' Associations and
Undergraduate Societies, Schedule 2 ...
Academic Symposium	
B.C. Assembly of Students,
Radio Society	
World University Service Committee,
Intramural Fund —
Dr. J. B. Macdonald Scholarship Fund	
Office equipment reserve   -	
Provisions for loss on sale of inventory
Total Discretionary 	
EXPENDITURE:
Net cost of various major activities:
Campus activities and events,
Schedule 3 -    - —	
Publications,  Schedule 3 	
University Clubs Committee 	
Registration photographs  	
Administrative and general expenses,
Schedule 1	
Total Expenditure   	
MARGIN
Proposed
Allocation
Actual
1968
1967
$464,000
$470,403
2,000
5,206
2,400
2,199
5,200
5,453
5,300
4,280
$478,900
$487,541
$240,000
$239,895
67,200
67,171
1,600
1,599
1,500
1,500
8,000
7,997
10,400
10,395
12,800
12.794
$341,500
$341,351
8,655
11,638
400
400
—
25
300
—
5,390
10,490
2,800
2,500
—
2,500
—
7,500
—
3,500
18,545
17,955
15,400
5,000
4,800
53,500
$ 95,655
$ 23,200
$478,900
38,553
20,873
15,684
5,500
4,629
50,004
$ 96,690
$ 10,947
$487,541
.. the money goes
TO PAGE  15
Birth control programmers
free to distribute info
?
TORONTO (CUP) — University students distributing birth
control information will not be
prosecuted, Ontario's attorney
general said Tuesday.
"I have not thought of taking action in this matter," AG
Arthur Wishart said.
The University of Toronto
students' administrative council has endorsed a birth control education program by a
group of senior co-eds.
The group has distributed
contraceptive information to
anyone  asking for  it and re
ferred inquiries to the planned
parenthood association o r
Toronto doctors who have
agreed to  co-operate.
Council president Tom
Faulkner said he had doubted
charges would be laid.
"The planned parenthood
association has been doing this
sort of thing for seven years
and nobody has persecuted
them," he said.
Section 150 of the Criminal
Code makes it an offence to
sell or dispose of any instructions • "intended or represented
as a method of preventing conception."
Toronto is not the first to
have student birth control
clinics.
Carleton University's chaplain said Friday there was a
similar group on the Ottawa
campus last year and there
had been no trouble from
either the university authorities or the law.
High schools plan union voice
MONTREAL (CUP)—Montreal high school students may be
the first in Canada to form their own student union.
Rita Karakas, former Montreal high school grade 11 student
who had been council president and editor of the school paper,
made the announcement early in the summer.
"What we are hoping for would be comparable to UGEQ,
but we realize it could not be as strong or vociferous," she said.
Union General des Etudiants du Quebec (UGEQ) is a union
of students from universities and classical colleges in the province.
Its philsopohy of action is syndicalism, and it acts as the
negotiating body for its student members at all levels in the
province.
Miss Karakas feels that the union would "seek a voice in
the curriculum and other phases of school administration."
She states, however, that it would take some years to bring
the plan to realization.
Missing
someone
far away?
She's lonely like you
- phone her tonight!
B.C.TEL<&
t.
*"" •>v.'%''
vy„v
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVARD
UNIVERSITY HILL UNITED
11:00 a.m. Sacrament of
Holy Communion
"World Wide Communion
Sunday"
Rev. Harold McKay
ST.   ANSELM'S   ANGLICAN
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion  >.
10:00 a.m. Holy Communion
and Sermon
Preacher: Rev. C. H. Powles
WELCOME TO U.B.C.
HAROLD MacKAY
JIM McKIBBON
au on smMH
STUDY GROUPS - 9:45 a.m.
SERVICES -   11   a.m.  &  7:30  p.m.
COLLEGE AND CAREER FELLOWSHIP - 8:45 p.m.
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12:30 & 8:00 P.M. - AUDITORIUM
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Attention-
GRADUATE STUDENTS
and those who will be
GRADUATING IN 1968
The  Government   of  Canada   offers   unlimited  scope
to   university graduates  to   achieve   job   satisfaction,
and recognition, and to perform a vital service
to the country.
Learn something about the challenges that the
government has set for new graduates.
Learn how the government is using advanced managerial techniques, and how these techniques have
opened wide career vistas.
Attend a seminar at BU 106, Monday, October 2, at
12:30 p.m. Representatives of the federal government will speak on administrative careers. The cuU/cfe ih
by Scott Lawrance
I have just come across some
very fitting words from William Burroughs, relating directly to what I, and presumably
the arts council, are trying to
do. Burroughs, a long time intimate with junk, sums up the
principles of our junk culture
as follows — "Never give anything for nothing. Never give
more than you have to give
(always catch the buyer hungry and always have him wait).
Always take everything back
if you possibly can."
This applies readily to many
situations facing the concerned
student today. The housing
shortage is a case in point. All
the governments involved,
from federal to university, are
typically unconcerned, at least
inactive concerning any solution to the problem.
It is no matter of lack of
money. The federal government is criminal in its subordination of human needs to
the military. All governments
are coercive and exist to consolidate their power. The authorities act in accordance
with the principles of junk
culture.
The university government
waits until students, even
whole families are screaming
, for a home, and then appoints
committees to deal with the
problem. Dean Walter G. remarks on how easy it is to
criticize. True, there is so
much to criticize, but I lay
the blame not with the administration, or even the totality
of society. Rather, it is the individual who must work out a
solution, giving him the great
est scope of freedom. Bypass
the authorities; ask not what
the housing administration can
do for you, but what you can
do for yourself.
In the case of the housing
shortage, I can offer a few
solutions, which have varying
degrees of practicality, dependent on the mental and spiritual, but not financial, resources of the student.
At least temporary accommodations can be created by
the student to meet his needs.
Permanent situations could
develop from these. The endowment lands are mainly
forests. Forests were long the
homes of Indians. It is a simple matter to erect tents and
shelters (the only requisite is
they be dry.) A sleeping bag
will keep you surprisingly
warm,  and  as  there  are  ade
quate bathroom and study
facilities elsewhere in the area,
there is no need for much else.
Also, there are many buildings around campus that are
used only occasionally, ranging in diversity from the army
huts to the gun towers. Brock
lounge is not open at night
tout could be. A pile of mattresses <or air mattresses) and
sleeping bags would take up
negligible space during the
day.
I am suggesting to you who
need a place to stay, and who
are fed up with paying ridiculous rentals that there is free
accommodation available in
many places, if only on a short
term basis.
Recognize the system as a
lie, and act in accordance.
Break down the junk culture
where you meet it.
NO IT'S NOT A STUDENT wishing he'd volunteered for
Arts 1; only one of the inmates at Charenton. Peter Brook's
film, with original cast, of Peter Weiss' Marat/Sade is
running at the Varsity for one week only. Don't miss it.
27
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE'
ACTORS   AUDITIONS   ACTORS
GET   INTO   THE    ACT
ROLES GALORE
EVERYTHING FROM STRUMPETS TO DUKES
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k.
by Wm. Shakespeare        directed by John Brockington
(Playing November 17-25)
ORGANIZATIONAL  MEETINGS
(to Arrange Individual Audition Times)
FREDRICK    WOOD    THEATRE
Monday,  Oct.   2  -   12:30   p.m.
Tuesday,  Oct.   3  -   12:30   p.m.
__—FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE-^^—.
4¥
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery,  handbags,  slippers,   rubbers  and
umbrellas.
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10%  discount.
Better Shoes for less
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A GO-GO sat oct 7
WILDEST DANCE OF THE YEAR
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UBC ARMOURIES ^^SX™
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Returning Officer
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of AMS Returning Officer. The successful applicant
will work with the interim returning officer during
the October 18th elections, after which he will assume
responsibility for running all referenda and AMS elections until the General Meeting in March. Applications
and questions should be addressed to Kim Campbell,
2nd Vice-President, AMS mailbox number 53, or
224-3242, Local 47. Appointment will be made at a
meeting of Student Council, Monday, October 2, 1967.
COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS
Applications are now being accepted for the following
committees:
Student Union Building
Constitutional Revisions
Student Housing
Student Union Building applications should be addressed to Kim Campbell, 2nd Vice-President, AMS mailbox number 53.
Constitutional Revisions Committee and Student Housing Committee applications should be addressed to Don
Munton, 1st Vice-President, AMS mailbox number 51.
STUDENT-ALUMNI COMMITTEE
Students interested in serving on this committee are
asked to contact Barbara Vitols, Program Director at
the Alumni Association,  Cecil Green Park, 228-3313.
(Bsucuuh^ Salon.
Complete    Beauty    Care
Refridgerated  for   Your  Comfort
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Slacks Narrowed
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UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
Friday, September  29,   1967 "Brothers and sisters
better come home"
The   following   is   from   a
-      speech  to  the  Negro students
of Morgan State College. Baltimore, Md., first printed in The
Movement.
By STOKELY CARMICHAEL
You are college students, you
should  think.   Now   then   we
want to talk finally about the
_.    responsibility of youth. That's
black students.
What is your responsibility
to your fellow black brothers?
Why are you here? So that you
can become a social worker
so that you can kick down a
door in the middle of the night
to look for a pair of shoes?
Is that what you come to
v college for? So that you can
keep the kid in the ghetto
school, so that you can ride
up in a big Bonneville with
AKA sign stuck on the back?
Is that your responsibility? Is
that your responsibility?
Is it so that you can just get
over? Do you forget that it is
your sweat that put you where
you are? Do you not know
that your black mothers scrubbed floors so that you can get
here, and the minute you get
out, you turn your back on
them? What is your- responsibility, black students? What
is it? Is it to become a teacher
so you can be programmed
into a ghetto school? So that
you can get up and say, "It's
a shame how our children are
culturally deprived?"
What do you know about
culturally deprived? What is
your definition of culture?
Isn't it anything man-made?
How the hell can I be culturally deprived? You deny my
very existence, to use that
term.
Do you question what they
tell you at school? Or do you
only accept, carry it back, get
over; and go out to further
"*■ stymie black people in the
ghetto?
I blame you for the rebellions across the country last
summer. And I will blame you
again when they increase more
this summer.
It is your obligation to be
back in the ghetto helping out
black people who are looking,
who are acting, begging and
thinking a way to solve their
problems. And you are running out of the ghetto as fast
as your sports cars and Mustangs can carry you?
What is your responsibility,
black students of Morgan? Do
you know about Du Bois? Have
you read Douglass? Do you
know Richards Wright? Can
you quote A. J. Rogers? Do
you know Claude McKay?
Can you understand, can
you understand LeRoi Jones?
J There is a young man with
me now. His name is Eldridge
Cleaver. He just spent eight
years in jail, he is writing
some of the most profound
writing that has come out in
the country from black men.
/' Why is it that you haven't
read his stuff? Is it that you
are spit-shining your shoes so
that you can become a lieutenant colonel to go to Viet
nam when you graduate? Why
is it that you haven't read his
stuff? Is it that you don't want
to read anything about being
black because you, too, are
ashamed of it and are running
from it?
So you want to run to your
debutante ball with your light-
skinned girlfriend to be white.
So you want to run to your
Kappa fraternity ball and forget all else.
When the ghettos rebel you
are going to toe the buffer, and
you are the ones who are going to be caught in the middle. The gate is swinging open.
Brothers and sisters, you had
better come home. You had
better come home early this
summer. You had better take
what knowledge you have and
derstand that. Do you have the
guts to stand up now and say
I will not follow law and
order, I will follow my own
conscience?
That's what they sent Eich-
man to jail for, you know, because he followed law and
order. And they said that there
is a higher law than the law
of government. There is the
law of each of us and they are
absolutely right. And that is
my law, and I will not go to
Vietnam, I will not serve in
the army. I will say hell no.
The choices are very clear.
They are crystal clear. You
either suffer or you inflict suffering. Either you go to Leavenworth or you become a
killer. I will choose to suffer.
I will go to jail. To hell with
"EITHER YOU GO TO Leavenworth or you become a killer.
I will choose to suffer. I will go to jail. To hell with this
country."
use it to benefit black people
in the ghetto.
You had better recognize
that individualism is a luxury
that black students can no
longer afford. You had better
understand that. You had better begin to see yourself as a
people, and as a group and,
therefore, you need to help to
advance that group.
Can you be aggressive? Can
you say that Baltimore is almost 52 per cent black and
black people should own, run
it, lock stock and barrel? They
do it every place else. Or, are
you afraid?
Can you go out and organize those people to take the
political power which they
have been denied? Can you
not help? Or are you too busy
trying to be a doctor a lawyer
so that you can get a big car
and a big house and talk about
your house in the suburbs and
I'm the only one out there.
When McNamara says he is
going to draft 30 per cent
black people out of the ghettos,
baby that is nothing but urban
removal, that's all it is. And
if you don't begin to understand that, you are going to
be the fellows leading the
charges of your 30 per cent
black   people.   You   don't  un-
this country.
Now the last statement that
I want to leave you with is by
John Donne. You know John
Donne is my favorite philosophical poet of the 17th century.
He said, "the death of any man
diminishes me because I am
involved in mankind."
Now what this generation
has allowed to happen is that
we are not involved in mankind. Now when we began to
crawl they sent six million
people to an. oven and we
blinked our eyes, And when
we walked they sent our uncles
to Korea. And we grew up in
a cold war to continue their
head-wrecking period so that
we are immune to humanity
and we, this generation, must
save the world. We must become involved in mankind.
We must not allow them to
stage the killing of everything
and anything that gets in their
way.
We must not become part of
that machinery. Now I want to
read my favorite quote:
"If I am not for myself, who
will be? If I am for myself
alone, who am I? If not now,
when? And if not you, who?"
I want to thank you.
Sav& on (BookA
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dyed-to-perfectly-match
all bright new Kitten sweater
colours.
S645/690
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Look for the
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Without this label    ^'/Huit.',^   it is not a genuine KITTEN
booklon
YOUR BOOKS* FROM
ANYTHING!...
PROTECTS
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AT DEPARTMENT, STATIONERY AND BOOK STORES OR WRITE:
Ben Sanders Company Limited 375 Midwest Road, Scarborough, Ont.
Friday, September 29, 1967 .^*..'.
A."
u-  w^^_*v^^i*-;.\ctsw_w^
Jailing Rap Brown
wont save America
What is Black Power?
By GABOR MATE
Ultimately the roots of Black Power spring
from the soil of Negro exploitation and oppression, but its direct political basis can be identified as: 1. the racial separatism of the Black
Muslims, and 2., the civil rights - integration
movement.
The Black Muslim contribution is the notion
that the Negroes must themselves be the instrument of their own liberation, that they cannot
expect white America to be the agents of Negro
freedom.
Black Power, however, rejects the Muslim
idea that the Negro must establish some sort of
a separate political entity somewhere in America
where segregation of races would be total. The
late Malcolm X himself wrote in his autobiography, completed shortly before his murder, that
he was beginning to realize Negroes and whites
must be brothers.
Black Power thus accepts the civil-rights-
integration view that the liberation of the Negro
must take place within the context of American
society as a whole. What it does reject is the
assumption made by Wilkins, King, and other
Negro liberals that the Negro can gain his freedom within the existing structure of American
society. That is, Black Power says Negroes
cannot be liberated so long as they depend on
the good-will of the existing power structure,
and its legislative representatives.
For, say Stokely Carmichael and Rap Brown,
it is this very power structure which keeps the
Negro in his second-class status.
Black Power, as enunciated by Carmichael
and Brown, sees as its enemies the same people
who profit by oppression in Latin America and
who find it necessary to wreak destruction in
Vietnam — American imperialism. Black Power
is a call for action against imperialism on its
home base, America. In short, Black Power
sounds the clarion call social revolution in
America. Necessarily this would imply cooperation with white revolutionaries, but the
organization and leadership of the Negroes must
come from within the black community. This,
then, is the meaning of Black Power.
Rap Brown's statement
of August 20, 1967, released in response to his
continued imprisonment:
In the course of any
movement that seeks to
promote change be it religious, social or revolutionary, individuals because of their beliefs are
unjustly made to suffer.
For Blacks, the historical
alternatives for political
dissent in America have
been death, exile or imprisonment. I am no exception,
I am being held as a
political prisoner. However, my confinement will
not rebuild Detroit nor
will it save America from
its due fate. For as America has bestowed upon me
in my 23 years her extreme disfavor, she has
also through her inhumanity, racism, oppression and
exploitation of both black
and while, domestic and
foreign, made herself an
enemy of mankind. I am
told that people across the
country    have    recognized
my imprisonment to be a
sounding board which may
in some way reveal their
own  fate.
To all the Black brothers and sisters across
America who are caught
behind enemy lines, I say
RAP BROWN
the fight has not yet matured. Arm yourselves, for
our freedom is yet to come.
Yours in rebellion.
Rap Brown
-i'       **■#-«!(
TODAY!
VAlWulsUi
MAW
AMXINfllQti 9FM JZAll'hM,
ofwmuMtfmcHmm uhm
r.;/#»lv^.Z'/:i'.__r/7/3
THE ROYAL SHAKESPEARE
COMPANY
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WEDNESDAY
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224-3730 V
4375 W. 10»h
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7:30 & 9:30
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CONTINENTAL  ELEGANCE
SPECIALLY STYLED  FOR  THE  YOUNG  CROWD
IMPORTED  FROM
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Near the Downtown Theatre
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K W A I D A N
OPENS THE
INTERNATIONAL    SERIES
OF
CINEMA 16's 7th SEASON
OCTOBER 2 - 8:00 p.m. AUDITORIUM
SERIES   PASSES   AVAILABLE   AT   THE   DOOR
548 Granville, Vancouver 2
MU. 2-1022
Friday, September  29,   1967 Warfare is non-violent
at UBC free college
';      .'  *
The proposal to found an
experimental college was the
answer of some interested UBC
students to the growing wave
of such colleges in the U.S. and
Canada. This summer, under
the direction of Jerry Cannon, the UBC college project,
a seminar on education, was
started. The response, especially from faculty, was encouraging. Besides the seminar,
courses of short duration were
given on Greek, and nonviolent guerilla warfare, with
Bill Wilmott of the Asian
Studies Department giving a
series of lectures on the Vietnam war.
Our experimental college
can function in interesting
ways. Since it is a completely
unofficial body — there is no
chance of university credit for
any of the courses taken—the
college can liberate itself from
the bureaucracy which seems
to prevail in large institutions.
This fall the college will
start off with three courses.
Fred Stockholder of English
and Arts 1 will give a course
called Literature and Imperialism— lectures and discussions
on Yeats, Eliot, Lawrence, Con
rad and two African writers,
Achebi and Toutuola. Karl
Burau will give courses on:
(1) What is Wrong with Canada and What to Do About It,
and (2) The True Human Nature and Problems of Education. Arthur Dolsen will give
a course in conversational
Greek.
All students and faculty
interested are invited to come
to a meeting Tuesday, October
3rd, at noon in Bu. 217, or to
contact Arthur Dolsen ,738-
6945, Jerry Cannon, 224-3242,
or come to the Special Events
office.
DANCE TONIGHT
AT
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
8:30 p.m.
FOR CANADIAN AND FOREIGN STUDENTS
LIVE   BAND
Sponsored   by   I.   HOUSE   AND   PHRATERES
HAVE A
AT McKEE'S
IN
McKee's
KINGSWAY at KNIGHT
2550 E. HASTINGS
FRASER at 47th
CANADA'S LARGEST SUPPLIERS OF LEVI'S
letter
CHECK-MATE?
GOLDMAN
Editor, Page Friday:
I have under my eyes the second instalment
of Gabor Mate's propagandists tirade against
Israel, which selects and distorts the facts to the
point of ignoring altogether the very well publicized threats made over twenty years by the
Arab leaders to "drive Israel into the sea", as
well as the "Holy War" atmosphere whipped up
in Egypt at the eve of the June war.
It is, for the least, odd to see Gabor Mate
using, to support his case against Israel, such
sources like Time, the New York Times, and the
Vancouver Sun; if these are unreliable in their reporting on
China and Vietnam, why
should they, in his eyes, become reliable in their reporting on Israel?
Mr. Mate regards Israel,
with her 2,000,000 inhabitants,
as a threat to 100,000,000
Arabs. Small numbers of Europeans were able to manipulate masses of Asians in the nineteenth century, when the latter were defenceless against
modern weapons and lacked national consciousness. For one thing, the Israelis do not constitute
an artificial European enclave in the Middle
East: more than one half of Israel's citizens are
Arab Jews, culturally and racially akin to the
Arabs. Further, the intensely nationalistic Arab
states of today are brimming to the teeth with
vast quantities of the most up-to-date weapons,
in quantities very superior to what Israel had at
its disposition, and supplied to them, not only
by their Soviet protectors, but by mercantile
western nations as well. Jordan's armaments
came entirely from Britain and the U.S. Egypt,
besides being recipient of billions of dollars of
Soviet aid, also received one billion dollars in
loans from the U.S.A., not counting American
supplies of wheat (my source for this is a study
appearing in the highly respected Parisian daily,
Le Monde, of June 18-19). So much for foreign
aid, Gabor. Even if Israel, as Mr. Mate claims,
was the largest recipient of foreign aid in the
world—which is doubtful—money alone cannot
transform deserts into orchards.
No Arabs were displaced from their lands until
several hundred thousands of them were instigated to flee by the leaders of invading Arab
countries in 1948-49, who promised to bring
them back affer victory over Israel. The 300,000
Arabs who have remained in Israel after 1949,
suffered from restrictions unfortunately imposed
upon them because of considerations of national
security. But Gabor Mate's statement that they
earn only one-quarter or one-fifth of wages received by Jews is simply untrue. The Arab
citizens of Israel enjoy higher standards of living
than in any Arab country; some of the wealthiest
men in Israel are Arabs. To expect Israel to
accept the Arab refugees back on its territory,
as long as the Arab countries refuse to conclude
peace with her, is to ask Israel to commit suicide.
Arab propagandists always conveniently forget that a number of Jews at least as large as
the number of Palestinian refugees were driven
out of Egypt, Iraq, Morocco, etc., where they also
had lived for many generations and that they
too lost their lands and belongings. Israel has
resettled those people on its tiny territory.   The
foreign aid Israel received was used to settle an
influx of immigrants three times as large as its
original population. Even a large and rich country like Canada could not have accomplished
such a feat in a few years without outside assistance, and this coming on top of having to maintain a costly military establishment! Therefore,
this proves nothing about the viability of Israel's
economy. Would the economy of Hussein's
kingdom have been viable if he had not annexed
the Arab state carved out of Palestine by the
U.N. resolution of 1947 and without American
and British aid? Could Israel be the cause of
Egypt's economic stagnation?
Millions of refugees have been resettled In
various parts of the world after World War II.
Israel's resettlement of the Arab Jews is one
case. France has resettled one million Algerian
"Pieds-noirs". West Germany has resettled
fifteen million refugees from the East. The Arabs
alone, in spite of their vast territories stretching
from the Atlantic to the Persian Gulf, of the
fabulous wealth of their oil sheikhs, of the billions of dollars of foreign aid, have failed to do
so: they have, in cold calculation, confined their
Palestinian compatriots to camps, in order to
artificially, perpetuate on the borders of Israel
festering nests of hatred. When, a few years
ago, Iraq, direly in shortage of manpower wanted
to resettle some of those refugees in Mesopotamia, Egypt refused.
There are other ways to commit aggression
than by shooting. Only a few years ago, the
Soviet Union sponsored in the U.N. a resolution
declaring the naval blockade of a country to be
an act of aggression. The blockade of the Gulf
of Akaba, cutting off Israel's trade with Asia
and Africa, by Nasser, was the act of aggression
which sparked the June war. In 1956 Israel
obtained rights of shipping in the Gulf of Akaba
in compensation for the Suez Canal, then closed
to her by Nasser. Nasser's rash action of last
May crowned a mounting campaign of terrorism
carried out by infiltrators coming from Syria.
Why doesn't Gabor Mate also absolve the Syrian
government from responsibility for the indiscriminate shelling of Israeli villages by the Syrian
artillery entrenched on the Golan Heights?
In spite of what Gabor Mate might think,
I am not a Zionist. I never believed that all
Jews should return to their ancient homeland.
To this day I hold reservations as to whether it
was wise to recreate the Jewish state, even
though the disgraceful record of the so-called
Christian states left the Jews with virtually no
other alternative. Today, however, Israel is a
reality. Several generations of Jews have been
born there and are deeply rooted in the country.
It is a young, progressive, dynamic nation, justly
proud of its achievements. Gabor Mate's argumentation puzzles me: what is he aiming at?
It is obvious that for Israel the alternative to
victory was not defeat but extinction as a nation.
Mr. Mate, what solutions do you have to
offer for the Middle Eastern crisis? It is hard to
believe that you are not aware of the fact that
the Arab line you support so uncritically provided
for a "final solution"—Eichmann style.
Yours sincerely,
RENE GOLDMAN
Assistant Professor.
Dept. of Asian Studies.
CUSO
Director of  Research
FRANK BOGDASAVAGE
'tywsrfopjuu^ yiatiofiA*"
BROCK LOUNGE • 12:30 FRIDAY, SEPT. 29 • 10c
Friday, September 29, 1967 theater
The black fox
By  KERRY   WHITE
Ben J o n s o n ' s monstrous
black comedy, Volpone, opens
tonight at the Frederic Wood
Theatre. Set in Renaissance
Venice, which epitomized the
decadent life to the Elizabethans, Volpone bursts with sensual imagery, grotesque
characters and theatrical trickery.
•
The plot is easy to follow,
being concerned with the frantic efforts of three conniving
citizens to obtain Volpone's
favor and money by out-bribing each other, while Volpone
in turn tnatalizes them by pretending to be near death and
promising his will to the highest bidder. The middle-man in
this game of one-upmanship is
Volpone's parasitical servant,
Mosca, who decides to cheat
them all by discrediting the
legacy hunters and hoisting
Volpone with his own petard.
•
The subject of the play is
thus a struggle of wit applied
to chicanery, with a focus on
the corrupting power of greed,
for from the villainous Fox
himself, his rascally servant
Mosca (the fly), Voltore (the
vulture), Corbaccio and Cor-
vino (the big and little raven),
to the judges of the court
where Volpone is tried, there
is scarcely a virtuous character in the play.
Volpone's world is a complete inversion of Elizabethan
cosmology, with geld placed
at the top ai the hierarchy as
the unmoved mover and virtue at the bottom. The abundance of animal and sexual imagery thus results in a gallery
of monsters surrounded by the
sound of grunting pigs and
howling dogs, and the stench
of Venetian sewers.
Reality itself is threatened
by a bewildering succession of
theatrical    impostures.     Gold
and jewels are treated as wine,
and wine as blood; men literally become animals of prey,
both physically and morally—
even the virtuous are tarnished
as the virtues of justice and
love become corrupted.
•
Question has been raised as
to whether a story so forbidding can be considered a comedy, for although the plot ends
in the discomfiture and imprisonment of the most vicious, it involves no mortal
catastrophe. But Jonson was
on sound historical ground, for
Volpone is conceived far more
logically on the lines of the
classical theory of comedy
than was the romantic comedy
of Shakespeare, however repulsive we may find a philosophy of life that facilely divides the world into the rogues
and their dupes, and, identifying brains with roguery and
innocence with folly, admires
the former while inconsistently punishing them.
Almost in spite of all the
antics of the predators as they
fall over each other in their
greed are hilarious. We are
delighted to see the most stupid and ugly of the characters
get what they most thoroughly
deserve at the hands of the
clever Volpone and his servant,
and we are equally delighted
to see those two battle each
other until neither wins. But
who gets all the money in the
end? The virtuous?
•
The parallel with our own
decadent times, with our losr
of value standards, our slavery
to material goods and technology and our fascination
with the grotesque and physical side of man, is finally the
ultimate interest this play
holds for us, and for this reason the Frederic Wood production, directed by Dr. Donald
Soule, emphasizes this parallel.
X
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Pinter pares dialogue
shows bones of truth
and perverted loving
By  KEITH  FRASER
Harold Pinter doesn't clothe
characters with a dictionary;
instead he pares their dialogue
until the bones show, and rolls
it naked about our ears like
verbal dice. Their lives become a game, but one balanced
and ritualistic, calculated to
conceal inner chaos. In The
Lover, one of two Pinter plays
at the Arts Club, Richard asks
his wife, 'Is your lover coming today?/Will he be staying
long?' He is not interested in
provocation, only in arriving
home at a not inappropriate
hour.
In this play love is perverted and compounded until we
realize it isn't love these people
finally achieve, but the opium
of illicit pleasure. The action
is cleverly brought full circle
by Doris Chilcott and Peter
Brockington.
In The Collection a loss of
ritual threatens to expose the
chaos in illicit relationship. A
church bell distresses one of
two men who live together,
by ringing deliberately against
the foreground of their sterile
breakfast banter. The vacant
ritual it tolls is slow and dying
like the rhythm of the play.
A wife twists the account of
her meeting another man, and
reality loses focus for her husband. But discerning the truth
from a collection of lies is not
so important, we see, as examining why these characters
are involved with perverted
truth in the first place.
Until Oct. 5 for a fine production of these very contemporary plays.
\e
THE YEARS BEST TRIP
VOLPONE
(THE FOX)
by Ben Jonson
with Derek Ralston and Lee Taylor
directed by Donald Soule
designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
Sept. 29-Oct. 7
Student Tickets 75 cents
(available for all performances)
Special Student Performanees-Mon., Oct. 2, 7:30 p.m., Thurs., Oct. 5, 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre — Room 207 or 228-2678
SAVAGE     •     GROTESQUE     •      HILARIOUS
THE FIRST AND GREATEST BLACK COMEDY
SUPPORT  YOUR  CAMPUS THEATRE
*\
.FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE.
4?
ONLY ON GRANVILLE
U.B.C. Students Receive Personal attention from our 'Courteous'
Salesman from CAMPUS casual wear to SUITS tor
after hours; our selection is most unique and complete
of course say "Charge it"    ....    Murray
Murrag Goldman
774WGranvillfi
"up  half a  block from  BIRK'S clock"
Friday, September 29,  1967 How I learned to stop
worrying and love the war
FV
The writer has a B.A. in psychology
from Adelphi university in New York
state, class of '65. For the past two
years he was a third class petty officer.
Commander Seventh Fleet, on the USS
Providence.
By PAUL VAN NIEWERBURGH
The bars and the whorehouses of Eastern Asia have never before enjoyed such
prosperity, for a soldier has his choice of
any of a dozen cities in which to spend
his one week's rest and relaxation period
every six months.
The Americans are spending more now
too, for if they don't get their loving in
now, there might not ever be another
chance. But it's never what you think
, it will be, for no matter how much money
you spend, you just can't buy love, especially in a week. The whores and bar girls
are just too busy and too tired to bother
^■with you. And even if they did bother,
they'd lose, for you would be gone in a
week or so, and another guy would take
your place. But they certainly do know a lot of
positions, and sex is still
pretty nice (certainly
beats hanging around
the ship). Between sex
and booze you can certainly put a lot out of
your mind, if only for a
little while.
Today is the day of
the big missile shot. A light guided missile cruiser carries a twin mount missile
system in place of its rear guns for anti-
- aircraft purposes, and today the ship is
going to test theirs.
Gunnery officer comes on the PA system to announce a short delay in the fes-
,-a.tivities, as something has gone wrong in
the missile house.
NIEWERBURGH
Five hours later, man comes on again
to announce they are going to do it now.
Then comes the word from the drone
control that they are experiencing some
difficulty with the launch.
One hour later everything is set, and
the shot goes off without a hitch. However, the second missile can't be tested,
as the second drone refuses to operate.
Results: theoretical launch time — three
seconds; actual launch time — six hours.
Not only are you an American ambassador when in foreign waters, but a Navy
ambassador as well, and you must conduct yourself in a manner that not only
brings credit on the United States, but
on the Naval Service as well.
So, after a month at sea, if you want
to go on the beach, you first must take a
haircut and shave, and shine up your
shoes and see to it that your uniform is
pressed and clean. In this way, you will
be protecting high image of the military
forces and "Ready Power for Peace" when
you come reeling out of a bar with a
whore on your arm.
All military activitta. have a chaplain,
whose job it is to promote and protect the
welfare of the men against the often times'
forgetful establishment, as well as to provide for the spiritual welfare and comfort
of the men. One of the favorite methods
our Chaplain used in reaching the crew
with daily spiritual comfort was the evening prayer, administered five minutes before taps.
On this particular night the ship was
participating in Operation Sea Dragon,
and was engaging in the shelling of NVN
coastal positions.
Time came for the Chaplain to administer his spiritual comfort to the assembled
faithful, and his appeal was to brotherhood and harmonious conduct. Unfortunately, just as he warmed up to the topic,
the ship let go a broadside, completely
drowning him out, and causing him to
emit a most unpriestly squeal of fright.
But, as it is often pointed out in Chaplain
school, the Christian ministry in the military is in many ways a unique and trying
experience.
We had this Chief Petty Officer, who
was also the senior enlisted man in our
place of work on the ship. He was not a
very nice person, as he had this peculiar
trait of taking delight in messing over
anybody under him that he could. This
trait was unfortunately coupled with a
knack of deluding the officers into thinking that quite the opposite was the case.
Occasionally his enthusiasm would become
quite unbearable, and during one of his
sprees, a discussion group came together
to see what could be done with him.
After several ideas were batted about,
the most humane and logical thing to do
seemed to be to kill him. The traditional
method of executing a decision of this sort
in the Navy is to throw the subject over
the side at night, but this was highly impractical owing not only to the size of
the ship, but to the fact that this chief
was not given to wandering about at night.
The most expeditious method seemed to
take Up a collection and hire a group of
enthusiastic lads in the Philippines to
completely eliminate him. In this way
not only would we solve our problem, but
enhance the Philippine economy as well,
a worthy American tradition.
The collection was duly taken, and
everything was set, but unfortunately the
object was seized with a desire to take
leave in Hong Kong, and so miss the trip
to the Philippines. When he returned he
was much calmer, and so the project was
dropped for the time being, as we could
all think of better things to do with five
dollars.
W^M^M%%^ffiM%^^W$$$WM^$&%@%Z@:W%0j.
architecture
5^,!^w,^     ^^j,^
Multi-purpose people plaza pleases
By ALAN BELL
A noteworthy new piece of
* architecture has made its debut at UBC.
Not the Thunderbird Stadium, nor the Music Building;
not even the John Barfoot
MacDonald Dentistry Building,  or  the H. R. MacMillan
v Building for Forestry and
Agriculture. Instead of all
these major new structures,
whose relative merits could be
debated ad nauseam, take the
** unassuming new music building plaza.
Here, the architects (Gardiner, Thornton, Gathe, Davidson, Garrett, Masson and Associates) have refrained from
leaving a monument to them-
>_. selves. And wisely, too, for
individualistic expression by
any but an extraordinarily
sensitive and intelligent designer is fraught with dangers
"** in the social art of architecture.
Many buildings on this
campus testify to the pitfalls
of strong, but ill-considered
design, which these architects
pf 3hree
have managed to avoid. There
are innumerable instances at
UBC where activities (both
academic and social) are rendered inconvenient, if not impossible, by architects' designs
based on short-sighted predictions of needs and preconceived external appearances.
In the case of the music
building forecourt, a strong
stylistic statement would almost inevitably prove very
limiting in terms of the activities which might occur
there. However, the plaza
which has been realized is
"designed" to the extent that
it is a pleasant space, but sufficiently '•'undesigned" to encourage a lively variety in
social life.
Architects alone cannot create a vital and exciting place.
The physical aspect of environment must be complemented by social components. To
become successful, a public
open space needs sufficient
people, either present in the
neighboring buildings, or passing through it en route to
other destinations. Each situation will result in a different
type of space, static in the
former case and dynamic in
the latter.
Here, in front of the Music
Building, both social conditions for success are satisfied
and a great variety of activities — ceremonial and casual,
planned and spontaneous —
are likely to occur. In addition to sitting in the sun,
meeting one's friends, and
moving from building to building, the designers have facilitated events as diverse as rock
concerts, theater performances
(on the raised area) and soapbox orations. Generations of
students    will    invent    many
others, and the space will continue to be alive.
Perhaps the greatest virtue
of the new plaza is that it relegates the confused new Music
Building to the role of background architecture.
Go and enjoy this place newly resurrected for human use.
By your presence you will
demonstrate that more of
UBC's dead sea of blacktop
should yield to urban pleasures
such as this.
JOHN WEISS
| LADIES &  GENTS  TAILOI
2934 West Broadway
RE 3-6711
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coats,   vests,    shirts,   slacks.
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Cow,   sheep,  wolf  skin  vests.
Wedding    dresses,   dresses.
Blouses,   bathing    suits   and
jumping   suits,
All  garments  tailored  for
self  measurements.
MEHMET'S TAILORS
540 Granville St. - 684-0811
In Arnold & Quigley's Shop
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
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FRIDAY?
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Admission 50c
Ph. 876-4342 for information
HEAR BOS DELREMPLE
* THE MASTBtTONES
Courtesy bus leaves Brock
Hall  at  7:00  p.rhT-return
Tenth Avenue
Alliance
Church
10th Avenue and Ontario Street
Vancouver  10,  B.C.
Largest Selection of
Classical
Jazz
Folk & Popular
Records
LOWEST PRICES
WARD MUSIC
412 W. Hastings - 682-5288
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Friday, September 29,   1967 pf
SEPTEMBER 29, 1967
On the cover:
Arts 1 fantasia by
Pidler Saba studios
girls friday:
judy bing
rae moster
boys friday:
Stephen scobie
bert hill
roy starrs
kurt hilger
dave welsh
lawrence woodd
Lectures are
Glad to have you with
us again.
This week it's all about
the radical new arts program on pages one and
two.
The encounter of two
fierce Scotsmen: pf's
Stephen Scobie lunged
with the bright sword
of his microphone but
Arts l's stalward defendent
Ian Ross parried with the
shield of his eloquence.
On the next page, Paul
Van Niewerburgh talks
about his two years before
the mast in the TJ.Z. navy.
He '-sr currently in Vancouver having completed his
period of service aboard
the flagship USS Providence in the Gulf of Tonkin, keeping the world safe
for American investments,
and oh yes, democracy. So
go contemplate his naval.
Pf now has an architecture reviewer in the shape
of third year architecture
student Alan Bell. We feel
the buildings around the
campus and around Vancouver are as worthy of
critical review as any
other art form. That too is
on page three.
Gabor Mate's article
about the Arab-Israeli war
has made nothing but
waves since its publication
last week. One of the many
letters pf has received
about it appears on the
fourth page.
Next to that, some comments on the free college
at UBC.
Theater buffs should
turn to page five to find
out about current productions at the Arts Club and
at Freddy Wood.
Pages six and seven are
given over to articles dealing with the nature and
significance of the Black
Power movement in the
U.S.
Scott Lawrance's weekly column winds up the
show.
Fin.
pf 2 wo
are
"happenings",
grades
not important
in  new arts
Continued from cover
late individuals who finally commit themselves to it. If they feel their education
is ever-narrowing, what will be the common ground for basing any discussion
with their fellow-specialists or the specialists in other areas on? If the political scientist is refining his techniques for
determining through polls what the state
of political opinion is, and yet losing
track of the history of political parties,
and having no awareness of how literature has tried out political situations, it
seems that he's cut off from so much in
our society and so much in our inheritance.
pf: For someone who is going to be
specializing later on, how far does Arts 1
leave him at a disadvantage compared
to someone who's taken a normal first
year?
Ross: I myself don't believe he would
be at a disadvantage. It's true that he
wouldn't have, say, English 100, and that
means he wouldn't have the experience
of reading any particular short stories
and plays and poems and novels read in
that course.
pf: But take something like Psychology. How far will someone succeed in
Psych 200 without Psych 100?
Ross: Well, he couldn't, because such
are the ground rul«?s created by the psycho!-gists, who are very professionally
oriented. In fact, our students couldn't
go from Arts 1 to Psych 200, and they're
advised, as things stand at the present,
not to be out of step with Psychology as
a major: they would need to take Psych
100. But I defy anyone to say that the
experience of looking into human motivation, looking into the patterns of human behaviour that emerge in history or
a work of literature, has nothing to do
with what the psychologist may do when
he studies som. psychological situation
in a particular and professional way. I
think that the real mastery of a discipline often comes after a satisfactory
general education, and the choice of the
specialization is presumably rational and
thought out. Also, the specialization can
come when the student is mature enough
to cope with the demands.
pf: Insofar as you have a timetable of
lectures, are there fairly rigid divisions
when you progress from one theme to
another?
Ross: The lectures aren't rigid, we
don't structure the program according to
the lectures. The lectures are opportunities for the presenting of different points
of view arising from the different disciplines of the lecturers, so that people who
are being taught primarily by someone
in philosophy or English will have the
opportunity to hear a historian or an anthropologist speak; in other words, to
meet points of view that they don't normally encounter in their seminars. Also,
the lectures are "happenings"; they're
meant to be foci of intellectual excitement over some aspect of the theme that
we're studying.
pf: What kind of students have been
attracted to this program?
Ross: I think in the first place they're
venturesome, they've decided to come in
because they're not afraid of the idea of
an experiment. It does seem from a
rather cursory examination of the application forms that a good number of
them have been in the upper half of
their class, thongh we have some who
are not. We made no attempt to gather
an elite; in fact, we definitely played that
idea down. We did suggest to any student
that came for an interview, and we si»g
suggested to the student counsellors,
that this wasn't a snap program, that
quite a bit of work would be involved,
but it's not keyed to an elite group in
any sense. We are, though, seeking to
catch the motivated student.
pf: What has been the reaction so far?
Ross: I think the students are very enthusiastic and amazingly nice to be with.
For one thing, I think they have a feeling that they have decided to do something, they've chosen something, and that
puts them in a position of wanting to
make something of the program. And
the pressures that exist in the other program don't seem to be present, I don't
find the antagonisms that seem to exist in
the other program — arising, I think,
largely from the students feeling that
they are pushed into a set of courses that
they don't necessarily want to take.
pf: Do you find them capable of carrying on discussions at the seminar level?
Ross: It's early days yet, of course, to
know exactly what to say about that. I
thoroughly enjoyed my first seminar; I
think the students were very articulate,
and it was noticeable that they wanted
to go on talking after it was time to stop.
I noticed in the meetings of other seminar groups that the students have stayed
on to discuss, and some have gone into
groups themselves to carry on discussions, which is exactly what we want to
happen. Maybe one test will be when
we've exhausted the obvious things about
the themes we've studied, and seek to
probe a little deeper, and maybe when
the students get into more unfamiliar
material, when we come into contact
with things that they haven't known
about, then we'll have to see how discussions go on that basis.
pf: How are they graded? How is a
mark arrived at for the year?
Roes: Well, this is what we have said
to the students: at the very end of the
program, we're going to allott to them
a standing in the program, an A or a B
or a C, and if they haven't been doing any
work they'll get a fail. This A or B or C
will depend upon the calibre of the
essays they've written, the work they've
put into projects. But they're not going
to be graded on the work that they turn
in as they turn it in through the session.
In other words, we're trying to avoid
any attempt to motivate them on the
basis of competing for grades. One student asked me about this, and I explained
what I was to do, that I would keep a
record, a file of the student's work. I
would tell the students what in my judgment was wrong with an essay, what
could be done to improve it, but I would
group of students will look at  the file
of work.
pf: You have this program set up on an
experimental basis for three years, and
then some decision will be made on the
future of it. On what kind of standards
are you going to be able to judge th^
success or failure of the experiment?
Ross: Well, one thing will be the reaction of the students, what they made
of it, what the three succeeding classes.,
made of it — if it lasts that long and
there's not some frightful catastrophe—
whether they think it's worthwhile to
be in this kind of thing in the first year*
Presumably we'll be able to keep in
touch with the students as they go from
Arts 1 into the regular program in the
second year. So the student reaction will -
be one thing. The faculty teaching the.
program—their reaction will be another,
whether they find it satisfactory. It's
great fun—at least, this is an initial experience, I think, for most of us—but it
takes up a great deal of time, and well
have to assess whether this can be coped
with, whether the demands on the indi-
W^S^5SswM3S5:^??^?55r¥i?i;:
not be setting a grade to that essay. I'm
just going to drop that out of sight until
the very end of the year. And then I'll
tell the students individually what the
standing is that I've allotted to them, and
if they want to challenge me they can
appeal, and the six of us teaching the
vidual teacher can be met. And then
further, there's an independent faculty
committee of evaluators, and it will be
their job to run such tests as they see fit
to see if they can compare the perform-
, ance of students in Arts I with the performance of students outside Arts l.*&-
myseif don't have too much faith in these
things, I'm glad I don't have to do it myself, and I'll quite cheerfully leave it to
the evaluators to do it. But there are
people who claim that expectation arid
attitude tests can be very revealing about
the quality of experience in education>
and there are tests that have been set up
and presumably these can be applied. But
I don't really want the students in Arts 1
to think of themselves as guinea pigs, I
don't really want students in the univera-.
ity to think of them as guinea pigs rushing through the mazes just for the delight
of the manipulators of the educational
process. I hope that we'll pile up a body
of evidence from people within the program, and observers, sufficient to judge
it, what it is and what it has achieved.
pf: And if it succeeds, do you hope to
see it greatly expanded?
Ross: Yes. I would like to see more
students given the opportunity to choose
between the normal program — the ve*y
heavily structured, subject-oriented one.
which I think always ought to exist because very likely some people can operate best within such a structure — and
something much more free and explora
tory. I'd like to see it possible for students to do a science one in which they
do some sort of core program in science.
I believe there is such a program at the
University of Colorado, and a good friend
of mine, James Miller, who is a geneticist now in Japan, at the University #t*
Kyoto, has talked to me about it, and
the idea of possibly having a life sciences
one for the first year. This would have
a core program in genetics, which does
seem to be a crucial subject for understanding the life sciences now, and the
program would be exploratory, sort o*
open ended, and this would be a good
experience, he thinks, for people before
they go on to specialize in one of the life
sciences.
Friday, September  29,   1967 arts 1
Ian Ross
meets pf
Stephen Scobie talks to Dr. Ian Roes
for pf. Ross, together with Father
McGuigan, heads the new Arts 1 program.
pf: What dissatisfactions with more
conventional teaching methods lie behind
the eoncept of Arts 1?
Ross; One dissatisfaction in teaching is
that students are so caught up in a program of a number of courses that when
one topic is being pursued, it can't be
pursued in any depth; and furthermore
that the students can't give a span of attention to a subject to give them satisfaction. This means that the interaction between teacher and student is not very
fruitful. It's a case of the teacher often
feeling he's racing against time and the
student feeling something has to be grabbed. , I myself believe that the first year
at University should be a year of exploration and not the cramming of
material into the mind concaved as a
carpet bag.
pf: How similar is the UBC program
to programs elsewhere in America?      *
Ross: The nearest thing, probably, fa
jStates  would be the  Experimental
the   committee   which
advise the Dean on cur-
ts very much stimu-
yisit to the cam-
,of the Uni-
And he in turn wai'«i_lH.
man called Alexander
political scientist, who in
at Wisconsin, created an es
college. When we heard Tussmsgr
wasn't so much the content of his curriculum that impressed us? it was the
vision of students having the time to devote to what was believed to be worthwhile, and doing so in the context of
good discussions, with a good ratio between teachers and students, making use
Of lectures where necessary and having
the students do quite a bit of writing,
involving them in the process of learning. So when we came to plan something
in our committee, last year, when two
small groups got together to prepare a
program for an experimental first year
in Arts at UBC, we settled on the idea
of making the curriculum a sequence of
themes — thom^s that would allow for
an inter-relation of subjects. The present
program at UBC. Ihr normal orthodox
one, has five subjects that the student
studies; unless he's very agile, he doesn't
make connections between the subjects.
In Philosophy he goes back to the Greeks
and Spends a lot of his time dealing with
Plato, and apparently they now go forward and deal a bit with. Russell; in History, he's dealing with the history of
Europe from the Renaissance period; in
English 100 he's dealing with modern
literature; then on top of that he's probably doing » language, basically grammar
study, and then possibly a science, and
"Things fall apart, the . centre doesn't
hold." Whereas our idea was to take some
broad theme of human concern and turn
to history where that was appropriate to
open up a question under a thenie, or
turn to a work of literature where the
theme received a treatment; and work
in arras of knowledge.
pf: In an age where everything in university education tends towards specialization, you seem to be going in an opposite direction.
Ross: Yes, and my view is that this is
necessary if the specialization isn't to iso-
Continued on pf 2
■vwrw* •"*.v* 4. ■ ■*. - -.v
**/.-«t rswawywsv.
Friday, September 29, 1967 Friday, September 29, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 15
i $&**!,    S^.'V ■
Allocation
Budget
Actual
19M
1947
1967
$38,800
$36,000
$34,204
800
1,300
1,162
700
800
714
400
500
490
1,300
1,350
1,291
100
175
28
1,200
1,300
1,287
1,100
1,150
1,145
1,500
1,500
1,478
460
465
430
4,300
4,300
4,311
300
300
252
1,200
1,100
1,100
380
475
328
690
687
687
300
380
374
—
750
$52,532
723
$53,500
$50,004
.. more AMS budget
FROM PAGE 6
Schedule 1
Statement of Proposed Administrative  and General Expenses
Year Ended May 31, 1968
(With comparative figures for 1967)
Proposed
Office salaries ...: 	
Student government expenses:
Dinner meetings   	
Entertaining	
Travel	
Elections and general meetings .
Council committees 	
Other expenses	
Stationery and office expenses 	
Honoraria, gifts and donations 	
Insurance  ...< ~	
Telephone and telegrams  ...	
Postage	
Audit and legal	
Public relations expense 	
Depreciation expense  ...
Repairs and maintenance 	
Housing co-ordinator's expense	
Schedule 2
Statement of Proposed Discretionary Allocations
Year Ended May 31, 1968
(With comparative figures for 1967)
Students' associations and                           .p,.opo..ed _ .   , *B__l,n5.
.._j,.-..--,~j,.-.*,.  -„_:_.*;_.-.                                  Allocation Actual May 31
undergraduate societies:                                     1968 1967 m7
Agriculture .. $ 100 $ 400 $1,926
Architecture       190 300 (22)
Arts                            ........                                      30
B. Comm.—C.A. studentsZ~ZZZ.Z.Z.ZZ~.Z"<      50 120 (27 )
Commerce  - _ ...      900 835 (828)
Education      700 880 (224)
Engineering    1,200 1,698 1,573
Forestry       400 300 1,475
Graduate Students' Association ...       300 650 2,117
Home Economics         150 270 300
Law Students' Association       600 755 93
Library School Students'  Assn.       100 150 4
Medical & Dental       450 495 35
Music -       270 300 (271)
Nursing                       150 200 155
Pharmacy ~      300 365 (228)
Physical Education       110 235 (91)
Rehabilitation  Medicine       100 100 67
Science  ....      800 900 <523)
Social Work Students' Assn      200 200 (94)
Undergraduate Societies' Committee ....        — 2,000 2,641
Margin .  >. —      585 — —
7,655 11,153 9,818
Students' associations and undergraduate
societies publications:
Agriculture Yearbook   —           — — (176)
U.B.C. Business Review           — — (1,480)
Slipstick   _.. -        — 235 (314)
U.B.C. Engineer  ~~         — 250 (326)
Forest Annual _         — — (331)
Home Economics Yearbook _...         — — 215
Law Review  _         — — 79
U.B.C. Medical Journal         — — (115)
Music Yearbook           — — (15)
Pharmacy Annual  _ —          — — 28
Physical Education Yearbook  -       .— — <100)
Rehabilitation Medicine Yearbook          — — 123
Science Yearbook  _          — — (59)
Allocation for subsidiary publications $1,000    $ 485 $(2,471)
$8,655 $11,638
♦Bracketed amounts are deficits
Schedule 3
Proposed Expenditure — Campus Activities
and Events and Publications
Year Ended May 31. 1968
(With comparative figures for 1967)
Proposed
Allocation Budget
Campus activities and events:                      ,'68 ™iJ
Academic activities  _ _.$ 1,925 $ 1.500
Canadian Union of Students        130 336
Canadian University Students Overs    1,100 1<002.
Conferences      6,000 8,500
Debating Union ~        250 270
Education Action Week            — °«0
Festival of Contemporary Arts         500 300
Frosh Orientation  —      (500) —
Frosh Retreat —        750 400
Higher Education Promotion           — 25°
Homecoming  __       (400) —
Housing Action Programme —          — 250
Leadership Conference  ~         — "0°
Mamooks  -      (300) —
Open House '..    1,000 2,000
Special Events       5,000 5,500
Fall Conference    1,500 —
Subsidiary  Symposiums        LOOP —
Total Campus Activities  $17,955 $21,606
Publications:
Student  directory  (1,600) (2,200)
Sundry publications          250 200
Totem _..  --           — —
Tuum Est        550 1,400
Ubyssey  16,200 17,500
Total Publications  $15,400 $16,900
Actual
1967
1,619
392
988
8,496
174
559
300
(165)
680
367
(549)
271
668
(427)
2,000
5,500
$20,873
(1,589)
302
(565)
1,620
15,916
$15,684
KOBAYASHI'S
KWAIDAN
OPENS THE
INTERNATIONAL    SERIES
OF
CINEMA 16's 7th SEASON
OCTOBER 2 - 8:00 p.m. AUDITORIUM
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FALL SALE OF FULLY RECONDITIONED
TYPEWRITERS
Electrics of all makes           from  129.50
Standard Typewriters of all makes     __from    27.50
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New Portables of all makes          ■ __ from      57.50
. . . OUR   BEST   BUY ...
Near New  Smith  Corona-Standard  Typewriters
Reg. $149.50—Student Price               $89.50
YOU SAVE $60.00 . . . ONLY 47 LEFT
Over 250 fully guaranteed machines to choose from
Top Prices For Trade-ins
P0LS0N TYPEWRITERS
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with the diamond held high in four prongs to
accentuate the positive. A classic setting
since before the turn of the century, when the
fashion of the single diamond came into being.
Rings illustrated are exclusive Grassie designs,
and must be handcrafted
BUDGET TERMS—10%   DOWN
Preferential Discount to UBC Students
Diamond Specialists Since~1886
566 Seymour 685-2271
Open 5 days a week — Fridays unttil 9 p.m. — Closed Wednesdays. Page 16
THE     U BYS3EY
Friday, September 29,   1967
CLUBS PARADE GOODS Hebraic lore to library;
Babylonian Talmud gift
By JADE EDEN
The armory was an apex
of action noon Thursday.
Attracted by colorful costumes and eye-snarling displays, an estimated 8,000 students flocked to Club's Day
exhibitions to consider the
wide range of activities available to them on campus.
Most clubs made imaginative use of their booth space.
Highlights included the Sailing Club's Flying Junior sailboat, and the Sports Car Club's
two full-scale sports cars.
Varsity Outdoor Club members climbed the wall at the
entrance to the armory in a
demonstration for would-be
mountain  climbers.
Circle K dosy-doed and the
Dance Club tripped gaily in
and out the crowd of spectators.
Singing by the Folk-Song
Society attracted many onlookers. Film Soc flicked cartoons and travelogues and sold
passes to the Cinema 16 series.
Ebbing from the Radio Society booth, popular music
tried valiantly to become a
background, though barely
audible in most parts of the
building because of the rumble
of the milling crowd.
A feeling of excited expectancy hung in the air as students discovered hidden aspects of university life. And a
sense of indecision, caused by
NOTICE
Students entitled
to  Prov.   Govt.
BURSARY AWARDS
CHEQUES
CALL AT ADMINISTRATION
OFFICE
Oct. 3rd to Oct. 6th
How You Can Be
A Happier Person
An interview with a well-known
psychologist reveals 5 New Discoveries that show why certain
people are happier than others.
You can read all about this new
light on the subject of happiness in the October Reader's
Digest. Read why the psychologist called the happy people
he studied "self-actualizers".
What do they have that we
have, but don't use? How do
they act in the face of misfortune? Why do they grow old
more gracefully? Get the October Digest now, and discover
why you don't have to be a
genius with inexplicable gifts
to be a happier person.
SALE -
RAINCOATS
CROYDON
$1995
Regularly to $29,95
Manufacturers Clearance
UNITED TAILORS
BRITISH  WOOLENS
549 Granville MU   1-4649
Open  Fri. til 9
58 varieties of eager club
members, all vying for signatures on applications.
Meanwhile, on the Music
Quad, the free arts store booth
became a sidewalk cafe for
the distribution of free food
and ample conversation.
Club's Day, an annual event
held by the University Clubs
Committee, boasts prizes to
the booths judged best by a
committee of faculty and UCC
members.
First prize this year in the
large booth category went to
the Musical Society for its
booth illustrating the various
facets involved in making a
musical.
The exuberant reaction of
the jostling, chattering, name-
signing crowd to the far-reaching, smooth-talking, name-taking booth builders suggests
that Club's Day was, perhaps,
succesful.
The Progressive Conservative Club made a haul at Club's
Day.
100 new members were added to its ranks as compared to
60 for the Liberals.
As a result of this feat the
PC's won a generous donation
of $5 from the Liberal Club,
eral Club.
Oscar Johrikas, past president of the PC club, explained
his club's success.
"The tremendous showing is
attributed to the hard work
of the PC executive, the strong
student support and interest in
the new PC party leader,
Robert Stanfield," he said.
Kent Pearson, UBC Liberal
president, merely smirked,
"Oh yes, very, very good."
Registrar - General John
Turner was chosen as the Liberal party's next national
leader in a poll conducted at
the Liberal club's booth.
Finance minister Mitchell
Sharp and External Affairs
minister Paul Martin came
second and third in the poll.
UNRULY HAIR?
Best Men's Hairstyling Service
at the
Upper Tenth  Barber
4574 W.  10th Ave.
1  block from gates
The campus libraory will soon receive another treasure
this time the complete Babylonian Talmud.
It will be presented  to  the   ~^^~^~^~^^~~^^~~~
library  next  Monday  by   the
Vancouver   Council  of Hadas-
sah-WIZO of Canada.
The Talmud or "teaching",
is Jewish laws, ethics, Biblical
interpretation and legend.
The translation makes available for the first time to English-speaking people the complete text of Hebraic lore.
The presentation also celebrates the golden jubilee of
Canadian Hadassah, a non-
political organization which
raises money for social and
rehabilitation work among
women and children in Israel.
Mrs. Sam Rittberg, president
of Hadassah-WIZO Council of
"Vancouver, will make the presentation to UBC chancellor
John Buchanan.
Emancipation
MOOSEHIDE, Y.T. (YPS)—
Chief Charlie Joe of the Moose-
hide Indian tribe today intiat-
ed talks with representatives
of the National Liberation
Front to formulate plans for
the emancipation of the North
American- Indian.
Talks broke down shortly
after they began when Lin Lon
Lou discovered that Charlie
Joe was receiving money from
the Canadian government.
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at Similar Savings
A«B SOUND
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Open Friday Until 9 pjm.
571  Granville (at Dunsmuir)
MU 2-4846
Why
don't you ever hear
nostalgic stories   ..„
about
"the good old days"
before
Tampax tampons?
Just think what women had to
go through every month before  _«
there were Tampax tampons.
Actually, every feature of
Tampax tampons was designed
to eliminate at least one drawback of the pin-pad-belt contraptions women once had to
use:
• Tampax tampons don't show
when they're properly in place,
so women now can wear their
most attractive clothing any
time.
• Odor can't form when you
use Tampax tampons.
• Tampax tampons can't chafe.
• Your hands never have to
touch the tampon.
• Do away with disposal problems. The tampons and their
applicators flush away discreetly.
• Tampax tampons are so small
they can be tucked away inconspicuously in purse or drawer.
• No wonder iaiHics of women, married and unmarried,
say three cheers for the good    ^
new years Tampax tampons
have brought to them.
TAMPAX
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SANITARY PROTECTION WORN INTERNALLY
MADE ONLY BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD.. BARRIE, 0NT. Friday, September 29, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 17 Page 18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 29,  1967
Net proceeds benefit
John Owen bursary
The Seattle Supersonics will play the St. Louis Hawks in a
National Basketball Association pre-season game in Memorial
Gym on Oct. 7.
Net proceeds from the exhibition will be turned over to
the John Owen Memorial Bursary Fund, established in memory
of the late UBC athletic trainer.
The game, which begins at 8 p.m., comes less than a week
before the Sonics open their first NBA season.
The Sonics, who open their regular season schedule Oct. 13
in San Francisco, have also scheduled two league games for
Vancouver this season.
They meet the legendary Boston Celtics in Vancouver's new
coliseum at the PNE Feb. 24 and will play another game later
in the season subject to the availability of a coliseum date.
Tickets can be purchased at the UBC athletic office.
Great grid
game news
The UBC football Thunderbirds will play the SFU
Clansmen in Empire Stadium on Oct. 16 but students will not toe able to
get $1 tickets after Oct. 6.
Faculties are encouraged
to buy a block of tickets
and help promote inter-
faculty rooting competitions at the game.
Tickets may be picked
up at the athletic office in
Memorial Gym until Oct. 6.
Think you can manage?
Athletically minded people, willing to manage or play, are
needed to fill many positions in campus sport.
If you're after an administrative position, then volunteer
for the managership of one of the teams.
Other Thunderbird teams, including football, rugby, field
hockey, swimming, wrestling and soccer are in need of persons
wishing to become trained athletes.
The Junior Varsity basketball Thunderbirds will begin practicing at 4:30 on Oct. 2 in Memorial Gym.
introducing
Customer
Convenience
Banking Hours!
There's a new "open door" policy
in effect at the Bank of Montreal.
Now you can bank at a time more
convenient to you.
BANK  OF  MONTREAL
University Campus Branch
University ot British Columbia
NOW    OPEN
9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
FRIDAY
9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday to Thursday
Bank of Montreal
Canada's First Bank
GEORGE F. PEIRSON, Campus Br. Manager Friday, September 29, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  19
— kurt hilger photo
THE NEW THUNDERBIRD STADIUM is shown nestled in the bushland at the south end of the
campus in this aerial view. Although some work  is  still  continuing  on   the  structure,   it  is
scheduled to open on Oct, 7. A rugby game between the B.C. All Stars and  UBC  Past and
Present will be the first event played on the stadium turf.
MAC budget thrown out
By NORMAN GIDNEY
The proposed men's athletic
committee budget has been rearranged by council.
The athletic committee, or
MAC, presented its 1967-68
budget for approval Monday.
Council has since re-arranged allocation of its finances to
different sports.
The budget, drawn up by
MAC, in March, totals $118,-
707 — including the AMS
grant of $68,000 and a $32,500
grant from the administration.
A motion by AMS first vice-
president Don Munton recommended that $2,000 out of the
MAC budget be given to intramural sports. Intramurals
presently receive $2,800 annually from the AMS budget.
It also recommended that
athletes     benefitting     from
Women athletes
where are you?
The University of British
Columbia has the most extensive women's athletic program
of any university in North
America.
The opportunity of participt-
in this program, whether trying out for a team or doing
administrative work, is great.
Many new coeds who have
been active in high school
sports drop out of athletics
when they come to university
mainly because they feel the
calibre of competition is too
high.
As a result they are missing
out on a great deal of what
they have  been enjoying.
Anyone who is interested
about any aspect of this program is encouraged to drop
into the Women's Gym and
enquire.
Intercollegiate team sports
are getting underway now.
For practice times check the
'Tween Classes column in The
Ubyssey.
If you're more interested in
having fun and meeting people, there is an intramural
program. You can find out details by contacting Jeannette
Heyman at the Women's Gym
or signing up with your faculty, sorority or residence.
travel grants pay 10 per cent
of the travel costs and the
money re-allocated to minor
sports with budgets less than
$2,500.
Chairman of the MAC bug-
get committee, Dr. Peter
budget has been spent or is
already committed.
"Our  contract arrangements
most of the money in the
Lusztig said Thursday that
for home and away games run
from one to two years ahead,"
he said.
Lusztig said he's received no
formal notice from the AMS.
The MAC budget will now
have to go to its budget committee for re-consideration.
KOBAYASHFS
KWAIDAN
OPENS THE
INTERNATIONAL    SERIES
OF
CINEMA 16's 7th SEASON
OCTOBER 2 - 8:00 p.m. AUDITORIUM
SERIES   PASSES   AVAILABLE   AT   THE   DOOR
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
**»>.$.
OPTICAL DEPT.
LONDON V DRUGS
f
Limited
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS ONLY
Voncoirvar       ^_^■*■_■■■_■_■«■■■] U ,"97S1
677 Granvill*    | iTlAYTJ 1 __ _flAf Tl ^1  NeW *'•*"*"*•'
675 Colombia
Opp. Army A Navy
Opp. THE BAY
681-6174
DOWNTOWN
WeekendApcrU
Other than practice games, the UBC football Jayvees
are the only Birds team seeing action this weekend at
home.
The Jayvees will face tough competitors in the Seattle
Cavaliers, whom they play at 2 p.m.. on Sunday at Wolfson
Field next to the Winter Sports Center.
The Varsity football squad will also play this weekend.
They go to Salem, Oregon, on Saturday for a game with
the  Willamette University Bearcats.
Two international field hockey matches are scheduled
for this weekend when British Columbia is pitted against
New Zealand.
At 5 p.m. tonight the B.C. second team meets the Kiwis
at Lower Brockton Point (in Stanley Park) and on Saturday
the B.C. firsts play the visitors at 11 a.m. at the same place.
New Zealand, ranked in the top ten internationally,
rarely make a visit to this part of the world.
What makes our
Soft Shoulder tailoring
different from others?
Authenticity mostly, our suits are tailored by
Cambridge in the true tradition of natural
shoulder styling.
What is more, our suits are hand cut with
scissors, hand basted, and hand fitted. In the
total process of tailoring, various components
will be pressed as many as 26 times to shape
and mould each part to individual body proportions.
To a leading shop like ours, 'Tailored by
Cambridge" is no idle slogan, it is our promise
of complete tailoring satisfaction... a promise
based on the knowledge that our suits are
tailored in the finest fabrics, by the best combination of modern equipment and hand
crafting.
The Woolmark on the Cambridge label assures
you it is a quality tested product made of the
world's best... Pure Virgin WooL
Cambridge
Traditionally fine clothes.
L.TO
CRS-MTH
2174 W. 41st in KERRISDALE
AM 1-2750 Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, September 29,  1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Czechs aid net benders
THUNDERBIRD
VOLLEYBALL
Czech volleyball clinic Saturday, 10 a.m., Marpole Community Centre. Czechs are
rated first in the world and a
coach will be present to instruct in technique. All competitive players are advised to
attend.
LOWER MALL
RESIDENCE
Dance to the Shockers, tonight, beginning at 9:30 in
Lower Mall lounge. Admission
75 cents.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting today, noon, Bu. 203.
Slides of Germany will be
shown.
PHRATERES
All-phi and pledge meeting
today, noon, Bu. 104.
VIETNAM COMMITTEE
Film  the  Threatening   Sky,
today, noon, Bu.  102. Admission 15 cents.
COMMERCE  US
Help   choose the  commerce
queen today, noon, Ang. 104.
HELLENIC CLUB
Meeting today, noon, upper
lounge, IH. Programs for this
year will be discussed.
SCIENCE US
Science mixer tonight,  8:30,
Brock lounge.
COMPUTER CLUB
Organizational   meeting   today,  noon, chem.   250.
IH
Foreign   and   Canadian   students' dance, tonight, 8:30, IH.
Live band.
BOOSTER CLUB
Any girls wishing to try out
for  cheerleading,   visit   Brock
155, anytime during the day.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Seven plays and lectures for
$10 — special student night
with   the   Playhouse   Theater
Company. For information call
684-5361.
SCM
Discussion of Ferment in
Contemporary Religion, Saturday, 4:30 p.m. Supper served,
$1.25.
SYNCHRONIZED
SWIMMING
Practice  Sunday, noon to 2
p.m., Crystal pool.
IH
Fall tea and flag pinning
ceremony,  Sunday,  2:30  p.m.,
IH.
LSM
Forum on the role of the
student, Monday, noon, library
lawn. Shaun Sullivan, Stan
Persky and Peter Uitdenbosch
will speak.
GOLDEN E
Meeting Monday, 7:30 p.m.,
2019 West Thirtieth.
STUDENT ZIONISTS
Meeting Monday, noon, Bu.
234.
WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS
Badminton and swimming
entries due today. Manager's
meeting Monday noon.
UKRANIAN VARSITY CLUB
Meeting Monday, noon, Bu.
323.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
First meeting Monday, noon,
Bu. 203.   .
AQUA SOC
Meeting Tuesday, noon, Bu.
2233.
BADMINTON TEAM
First practice Tuesday, 8:30
p.m., memorial gym.
SAILING  CLUB
Meeting Tuesday, noon, Bu.
100.
GEOGRAPHY LECTURE
Discussion of the climate of
history, Tuesday, noon, geog.
100.
News media expert Calder
coming to hold seminar
An internationally-known journalist, author and broadcaster
will lecture at UBC next week.
Lord Ritchie Calder, professor of international relations at the
University of Edinburgh, will take part in a seminar and give
two lectures during his visit Oct. 2-7.
The seminar on Science in the News Media will take place
2 pjn. Tuesday in Woodward Library.
Calder will lecture on the Promotion of Common Understanding of Science Wednesday at noon in Freddy Wood and
the Tyranny of the Expert 8:15 Thursday in Hebb Theatre.
In I960, he received the Kalinga International Award for
science writing.
He was appointed to Edinburgh University in 1961.
Elected to the council of the British Association for the
Advancement of Science, he was founder and chairman of its
division of social and international relations set up to deal with
the impact of scientific discovery on human affairs.
Deadline extended for
weekend frosh retreat
Fun-lovers who missed the Tuesday deadline date for Frosh
Retreat are in luck.
Alma Mater Society officials said there is still room for 20
more people at the Rosario Beach, Washington resort this
weekend.
But leaves today at 6 p.m. outside Brock and returns Sunday
at 5 p.m.
Interested students can get application forms at the AMS
or AAC offices.
The $8 cost includes accommodation and meals.
PRE LAW SOC
Organizational meeting Tuesday, noon, Ang. 410.
Appeal blitz cops $1,300
UBC students raised $1,300 in the United Appeal blitz
Wednesday.
Ron Hawkes, speaking for Red Feather appeal workers,
said they were pleased with the university's effort.
"This year's total and last year's are almost identical, but
some undergraduate societies contributed four times their previous
amounts," he said.
-i.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances         11
CATCH THE LATEST IN "NOW"
music, Friday, September 29 in
Brock. Turn on with Papa Bear's
Medicine Show. From 8:30 til Midnight. Guys 75c girls 50c. Everyone
welcome.
HANK AND THE HOBBOS AT THE
P.N.E. Showmart Building, Friday,
Oct.   13th.   Hard   Times.
CANADIANS AND FOREIGN STU-
dents meet Friday at 8:30 p.m. at
I.   House.   Dance   to  live_ music.
SEE THE 1?§YCHEDELIC~SCIENCE-
raen turn on Friday, Sept. 29. Brock
Hall.  Everyone welcome.
SIPREMES — TEMPTATIONS —
Beatles—All at the Nisei Varsity
Club Frosh Mixer on Friday, Sept.
29 at 8:30. Brock Extension. Frosh
and all girls—Free. Members 35c.
Non-members 50c. Everyone welcome.
UNDERGROUND ROCK BANDS ARE
where it's at. For your next dSnce
Phone  Magic  Theatre.   685-1711.
GEOLOGY HAS A BACK FROM THE
Bush BASH Friday, Oct. 13. 8:30-
1:00. Hallmark Hall, 5550 Fraser
Street. Tickets $3.00 per couple.
Room 112.  G & G.
ARE BANDS ALONE ENOUGH?
Why not add Light-Shows, Strobes,
People, Fun to your weekend
Thing? Kits Theatre Fri. & Sat.
Two top hip bands. Every nite. etc.,
etc., etc.
NEWMAN MIXER. FRIDAY 8:00
p.m. Lounge, Saint Mark's College.
50c person. Music by The Undertakers.
Greetings
12
CONGRATULATIONS
AL and  HARLEY
Lost & Found
   13
LOST: CHANGE PURSE CONTAIN-
ing $3Q plus change. Finder leave
at Publications office, Brock Hall,
reward. ^	
LOST MEN'S WATCH FIELD
House. $10 reward offered. Contact
Publications   Office;   Brock   Hall.
LOST BLACK SHOULDER STRAP
Purse. Finder phone 434-4159 ask
for   Sharon.   Reward   offered.
Rides & Car Pools 14
CARPOOL NEEDED. BETWEEN
Granville and Arbutus on 25th Ave.
Phone 733-7963.
TWO RIDES WANTED FROM
Richmond for 8:30 Mon. to Fri. vicinity No. 2 Rd., Railman Ave.
Phone Bob 266-6402.
RIDE WANTED FROM 14th & ALMA
8:30  classes phone Shirley 224-3692.
WANTED: SEXY CHICKS FOR
Swinging North Van. Car Pool.
Phone  987-1932  after  7  p.m.
RIDE WANTED FROM WHITE
Rock. Phone 874-8394. Ask For
Grace.
RIDERS WANTED FOR CARPOOL
travelling along 16th Ave. from
MacDonald.   Call   Diane  after   6:00
733-0745.
RIDE WANTED FROM RICHMOND,
Bennett   and   Three   Road.    Phone
273-3529.
DESPERATE: RIDE WANTED FOR
8:30's or 9:30's returning 4:30. Please
call Jill 261-6183 after 6 p.m., vio-
cinity 47th Granville.      	
DRIVING SHAREDrNEW^WESTIt
Car Pool with three drivers wants
one more. Call Gene 522-0994.
RIDE "WANTED VICINITY OF ONE
Road and Westmn. Hwy. Richmond,
Phone_Lorraine, j!77-8576.
RIDE N E E D E D DESPERATELY
from vicinity of top of Port Moody
Hill. Phone WE 6-1765.            _
RIDE NEEDED M.T."W\F. FROM 37th
and   Laburnum.   Phone   Kathie   AM
6-4325.
Special Notices
15
('.B.C. BEAUTY SALON ON CAMPUS. Ladies' haircutting—no appointment necessary. 5736 University
Blvd.  228-8942.	
SICK OF HAIRCUTS? GET YOUR
hair styled at the Upper Tenth Barber, 4574 W 10th Ave. 1 block from
gates.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP open 8 a.m.
to 6 p.m., Sat. 8:30 to 5:30 p.m.,
S736 University Blvd.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   298-5966. _
INTERNATIONAL FALL TEA SUN-
day, Oct. 1st at I. House, 2:30 p.m.
Everybody   welcome.
GOLDEN "E" MEETING, MON.,
Oct. 2nd, 7:30, 2019 West 30th. All
members invited. AM 3-6634 You
Too Mark Alexander.	
GEOLOGY PRESENTS THE BASH
Friday, Oct. 13, 8:30-1:00. Hard
Ties. Everyone welcome. Hallmark
Hall,   5550 Fraser.
WHITE     RABBIT     MULTI     MEDIA
dances   cost   about   the   same   as a
six-pack of beer and you don't have
lo  drink to  enjoy  them!?!  Fri.  and
. Sat.  nites. Kits Theatre.
DON'T THROW AWAY YOUR OLD
clothes — wear them to The Undercut.
THE    GREEK   FOUR    TIMES    OCT.
5.  Aud. 50c.
POINT     GREY     FELLOWSHIP
meets  Sunday 11  a.m. jit  Alma  Y.
Travel Opportunities
16
EASTERN CHRISTMAS CHARTER;
going home for Christmas? Fly inexpensively by delux Turbo Jet,
limited capacity. Information 224-
9841, 4-6 p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1961 VOLVO FOR SALE. EXCEL-
lent condition. Phone 596-2?60, after
6 p.m.
1962 DELUXE VW REBUILT
motor, radio, w.w. tires, call 224-
9845,   Rm.   6  after^ six.	
EXCELLENT VALUE 1962 ALPINE
completely rebuilt recently only
$800.   987-2059,   private.
1956 PONTIAC, AUTO., RADIO, NEW
tires,  $125.  263-8403 after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1958 VW. GOOD SHAPE,
runs well, $350. Contact Frank,
684-0705  evenings.
1962 VAUXHALL, NEW PAINT JOB,
20,000 mile, rear end in good condition. Over load springs, heavy duty
shocks, portable radio. Low, low
price. Phone 921-7041; ask for Chris.
CLASSIC 1953 MGTD. GOOD CON-
dition. New top. 5365' Main St. 325-
3382.
NEED A HOME? BUY THIS 1948
Buick Hearse. Body and inside excellent. Has mattress, needs water
pump.   No  reverse.   Ph.   939-0648.
m CORVAIR MONZA, AUTOMATIC,
radio, bucket seats, headrests. 263-
4353. Jerry.	
1960 VAUXHALL VICTOR SUPER,
fully equipped, excellent condition,
$549.50.   Phone  266-2772. 	
Automobile Parts
23
Motorcycles
 26
'65 DUCATI STREET SCRAMBLER.
Very fast, reliable, excel, cond.,
$480 or best offer.  224-0835 after 6.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
HONDA-FLAT
Motorcycles  -  Cars
Generators  -  Utility Units
New  and Used
SPORT CARS
N Motors T
O S
R E
T       W
145 Robson H 688-1284
UNPAINTED FURNITURE. SELEC-
tion of desks, drawers and bookcases. Bunk beds, complete with
mattresses, $49.50. Broadway Paints
Ltd.,   548  W.   Broadway,   874-5424.
WHOLESALE PRICES TO ALL UBC
students on trans, radios, tape recorders, record players, watches,
jewelery, etc., at THE DISCOUNT
HOUSE, 3235 West Broadway, Tel.
732-6811.
Rentals ■ Misc.  36
DUNBAR COSTUME RENTALS
Costumes    for   all    occasions,    5620
Dunbar   St.   Phone   263-9011.
Scandals 37
bOR A CERTIFIED SCUBA DIVING
course less than $10.00 inquire at
Aqua Soc behind Brock under the
Diving Flag.
WE CAN SAVE YOUR HAIR AT
the Campus Barber Shop, 153 Brock
Hall ext.  Just bring a bag.
SEE THE PSYCHEDELIC SCIENCE-
men turn on Friday, Sept. 29, Brock
Hall.  Everyone welcome.
HAVE    A
BALL
AT
THE
BASH
Friday,
Oct. 13,
8:30 -
1:00.
Tickets
$3.00   a
couple.
Room
112,
Geology
building.
KORT  CAMP  VOTE—MAKE  SANDY
Edwards your  Queen.
CAMPUS A-GO-GO WANTS TOPLESS G-GO DANCERS for Sat.,
Oct.   7.   Phone   926-1049.
PARTIALLY BLIND GRAD. STU-
dent would like volunteer readers
in German Lit. Call Paul Thiele,
224-0900 after 6.
THE  BIG BAD  PLANK IS   COMING
next  week — Watch for it.
XORBA   ARRIVEST    OCT.     5.    AUD.
12:30,  3:30,  6:00,  8:30.
Sewing - Alterations
38
SEWING,     -^ALTERATIONS,       EB-
pairs.   Reasonable   rates.   224-7141.
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   ELEC-
tric.   Phone   228-8384   or  224-6129.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable rates TR 4-9253
WILL  TYPE   TERM ESSAYS
RE  1-2664 — MRS.  SHARP
EMPLOYMENT	
Help Wanted—Female SI
Help Wanted—Male 52
LEAD GUITARIST REQUIRED ON^
campus group. Also any bands
wishing to join syndicate. Phone
Rob,   224-0088.
Male or Female 53
MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCES
tutors required. Fourth year or
graduate, 736-6923, 4:30-6:30 p.m.,
except  Tuesday.
HELP! STUDENT IN DESPERATE
need of a first-year chemistry
tutor. Phone 277-9611 after 4 p.m.
Ask  for  Steve.
Work Wanted 54
BABYSITTER NEEDED? LATE
afternoons, evenings, weekends. Reliable. Phone after 4 p.m., Chris,
738-8069.	
RETIRED NURSE—GIVE ALL DAY
care my home, 5 days week. Small
babies especially, UBC area. 224-
7141.
 INSTRUCTION
Music 62
ORGANIST AVAILABLE WITH
equipment for dance group. Ph.
John  224-3112.  Rm.   241.
Special Classes 63
CREATIVE  ART   CLASSES   FOR
CHILDREN
Ages 5-8   yrs.: Tues.  3:30-5:00 p.m.
5-8 yrs.:  Fri.   3:30-5:00 p.m.
9-12 yrs. Wed.   3:45 - 5:15 p.m.
9-12 yrs. :Thurs.   3:45-5:15 p.m.
9-12 yrs.: Fri.   3:45-5:15 p.m.
Fees:   $8.00 per class for the full session.   All materials   supplied.   For  Information     and     registration     phone
228-2141,   local  118.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE 71
THE FINEST MEN'S HAIRSTYLINO
at the Upper Tenth Barber. 4574 W.
10 th   Avenue.   1   block  from   gates.
THE BEST SELECTION OF CLEAN7
rebuilt:
washers
dryers
fridges
freezers
ranges
dishwashers
Mclver Appliances
Sales & Services
3215  W.   Broadway,   738-0081.	
REMINGTON      RAND      STANDARD
typewriter,   $75.  Phone  RE   8-8725. ■
PHILIPS   300   TAPE   RECORDER,-T-
track   stereo playback,  $169. Phone
Doug at 224-9946 after 8.	
100 - WATT TUNER AMPLIFIER,
solid state, AM-FMX, $198.00, terms.
736-6910. 	
GOOD USED FURNITURE
AT   LOWEST   PRICES
Good   used   washers,   from $19.50
Also, new 252 coil Hollywood
beds,  each ._ _ 45.60
Unpainted,   3-drawer chest. _ 12.95
Unpainted  students'   desks,
from          15.95
We carry a full line of preoislon-out
unpainted  furniture.
KLASSEN'S USED FURNITURE
MART
3207 W. Broadway RE 6-071*
Beer Bottle Drive-ln at rear of store.
FOR SALE
Hurry Girls to
"THE CAMPUS SHOPPE"
Retirement Sale, 5732 University Blvd.
(in   the  Village).   Prices   slashed   on
everything. Do your  Christmas shop-
ping now.	
DE-SCENTED BABY SKUNK FOR
Sale, $45.00 or best offer. Phone
David  after  6 p.m.  733-2126.
"rentals ft realHstate
Rooms 81
BASEMENT ROOM FOR TWO. Ker-
risdale,   near bus.   Single beds and
 study facility.  263-4504.	
GIRL   HONOR  STUDENT  WANTED .
to   exchange   light   duties  for   room
and   salary.   Professor's   home.   733-
6556.	
FOR RENT — 1 ROOM — MALE OR
female. Hot plate, refrigerator. 2970
W.  5th Ave.  Phone  731-2880.	
ROOMS, ON CAMPUS CLOSE TO
meal services. 2250 Wesbrook. Ph.
224-9662. 	
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED.
Must be 21. Will have own bedroom
furnished. Call Barb at 684-1808,
evenings.	
MALE STUDENT SHARE ROOM
near  UBC.   All  facilities,   224-4788.
Room & Board 82
BOARD AND ROOM FOR MALE
student. Sharing large view room.
Phone  732-5980.

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