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The Ubyssey Oct 7, 2013

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Array NOT JUST BURLAP   I WOMEN'S HOCKEY IS BACK
It's more than saving the environment -
Eco Fashion Week strives to set trends
After years of losing seasons and missed playoff opportunities,
the team is out for blood following their first big year in a decade
FOOTBALL HANGS IN P7 CHOCOLATE CHICKPEA COOKIES P9 NAMING THE NEW SUB P3
DISPOSABLE CAMERAS P8 CARL SAGAN IS BACK P9 WOMEN'S SOCCER WINS IN WINNIPEG P5 // Page 2
WHAT'S ON t    THIS WEEK, MAY WE:
MONDAY   7
DISSOLVE
6 P.M. -7:30 P.M. @ FREDDYWOOD
UBC alumna Meghan Gardiner
mixes humour and emotion in this
one-woman play about drug-facilitated sexual assault. RVSP
at Eventbrite.
Free
TUESDAY ' 8
FEEDING YOUR FAMILY
DELICIOUS FOOD
10A.M.-12P.M.@YOURCOMPUTER
The First Nations Health Authority
will teach you how to make tasty,
nutritious and kid-friendly food.
Great for parents or those with kidlike taste buds. Online registration
required forthis web seminar at
http://learningcircle.ubc.ca.
Free
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
WEDNESDAY'9
GLOBAL EXPERIENCE
FAIR
UA.M.-5P.M. ©IRVINGBARBER
LEARNING CENTRE
Want to study abroad? Come
to the Global Experience Fair.
Get firsthand accounts of what
university life is like in other countries from students who actually
went there.
Free
=HOTO ALVINTANG/THE UBYSSEY
Haylee Wanstall is part actor, part student and frequent patron of the Irving book stacks.
Wanstall taking the
alt approach to acting
THE
COVER
One of our news editors gets her
dance on in the Pit; some friendly Pit
staff assist with the lighting. Photo by
Geoff Lister.
Video content
Make sure to check out our coverage
of the AMS Build Broadway party bus
launch, airing now at ubyssey.ca/videos/.
^|THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
coordinating@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Print
Ming Wong
orinteditor@ubyssey.cs
Managing Editor, Web
CJ Pentland
webeditor@ubysseycs
News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
jews@ubysseycs
Senior News Writer
Brandon Chow
ochow@ubyssey.cs
Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
culture@ubysseycs
Senior Culture Writer
Aurora Tejeida
3tejeida@ubyssey.cs
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.cs
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heather! ngton@ubyssey.cs
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
Leatures@ubyssey.cs
Video Producers
Lu Zhang +
Nick Grossman
video@ubyssey.es
Copy Editor
Matt Meuse
copy@ubyssey.es
Photo Editor
Carter Brundage
shotos@ubysseycs
Illustrator
Indiana Joel
joel@ubysseycs
Graphic Designer
Nena Nyugen
nnyugen@ubysseycs
Webmaster
Tony Li
webmaster@ubyssey.es
Distribution Coordinator
Lily Cai
cai@ubysseycs
STAFF
Catherine Guan. NickAdams
Kanta Dihal
Write/shoot/contribute to The
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the bdsement sguirreied dwdy
in the bock, there. Yedh, we
know. You'llgetusedtoit
OCTOBER7.2013 | VOLUMEXCVI ISSUEX
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Harry Chiu
Contributor
Most people think of the film
industry as a different world,
but Haylee Wanstall has been a
part of it her whole life.
Wanstall has been acting
since she was three years old.
Despite the popular conception
of parents pushing their kids
toward stardom a la Toddlers
and Tiaras, Wanstall was the
one who took the initiative in
becoming in actor.
"My sister was a model when
she was young," said the fourth-
year political science major,
"and I was really jealous of all
the attention she was getting, so
I made my parents sign me up."
After taking workshops and
training with an acting coach
for a couple of years, Wanstall
made her debut in the popular
TV series Queer as Folk and
went on to be cast in movies
such as The Safety of Objects and
Sugar.
Wanstall prefers working in
smaller indie films due to the
emphasis placed on artistic
freedom, which is often not
found working in blockbusters. "I've never really been a
C W-mainstream kind of girl,"
she said. "I'm not a Scarlett
Johansson, and I'm OK with
that. If I could do indie films for
the rest of my life, I'd be a happy
camper."
Quite fittingly, the actors
Wanstall admires are also
relatively unconventional in
their career choices. She cites
Jennifer Lawrence, who despite
her success in The Hunger
Games "still refuses to be a size
zero just because the industry tells her to," and Daniel
Radcliffe, who took the theatre
route and starred in Equus right
after the Harry Potter franchise, and continues to play in
small-budget movies.
Looking to the future, Wanstall plans to continue pursuing
acting after graduation. This is
easier said than done, and Wanstall knows it.
If I could do indie
films for the rest
of my life, I'd be a
happy camper.
Haylee Wanstall
Fourth-year
political science major
"[Acting is the] toughest industry to make it in. Your chances are almost zero," she said.
Wanstall's parents, who are
both in the industry, know how
hard it can be, and advised her
to wait a couple of years and to
get a degree first so she could
have different career options.
Still determined to become a
successful actor, Wanstall does
not regret her decision to come
to UBC. She credits the time
that she has spent in university
with giving her the self-knowledge she needed to get in touch
with herself.
"I don't necessarily know
what I'm doing with the rest of
my life, but I'm OK with that.
Three years ago, that would've
really freaked me out." XI
■ CELEBRITY ENCOUNTERS
Johnny Depp:
"1 wouldn't say that
star-struck.... Ther
1 really get
e was an
exception, though
[my mom] follow Jc
Depp around Toro
— 1 made
)hnny
ito."
Daniel Radcliffe
"Sweetest and mo.
st inspira-
tionalguy inthewc
himwhile working
)rld.l met
as an extra
on a set."
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official studentnews-
aaper of the University of Rrmsh Cn-
umbia. It is publish^
andThursdaybyTheui
dons Society. We are ai i dutonomous,
democratically run student organization, and all students are encouragec
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Jbyssey staff. They are the expressec
opinion of the staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society. Stones, opinions, photographs anc
artwork contained herein cannot be re-
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Jbyssey Publications Society fails tc
aublish an advertisement or if an er-
'or in the ad occurs the liability of the
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aaid for the ad. The UPS shall not be
•esponsible for _, ■ ■ angesorty-
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I
Know someone at UBC who's done something interesting?
Think they deserve to be profiled in Our Campus?
Email all candidates to printeditor@ubyssey. // News
NIGHTLIFE »
)RS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
=ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Pit Night is usually jam-packed, but Wednesdays have been particularly quiet in recent weeks.
Pitiful turnout at Pit Nights
David Turko
Contributor
The Pit is dead.
Or at least dying, according to
recent reports. Turnout in recent
weeks has been low, sales are down
and student nights on Wednesdays
are facing direct off-campus competition.
According to AMS VP Finance
Joaquin Acevedo, business has
been lacking in recent weeks,
though he wasn't able to disclose
exact figures.
"The best way of seeing how
many people are coming in is by our
drink sales, and those are way down
from last year," said Acevedo.
However, this doesn't come as
a big surprise. "Overall, we were
expecting decreased revenues because of all the construction going
around," Acevedo said. This was
worked into the Pit's budget at the
beginning of the year, so the Pit is
actually ahead of budget in terms
NEWS BRIEFS
UBC to offer adult
education certificate
Starting next year, UBC will
offer a certificate program in
adult education.
The Graduate Certificate
in Adult Learning Education
(GCALE) is an interdisciplinary approach to adult learning focusing
on the principles, histories and
philosophies of adult learning and
education.
Students in the program will
complete 12 credits of course
work, including classroom and
online learning. All courses will
take place in the evening. The
program will cost around $5,000
in course fees.
Shauna Butterwick, who
proposed the idea of the GCALE,
described the certificate program
as affordable and accessible.
"Adult education is not a regulated field," Butterwick said. "The
certificate will enhance people's
employment profile and increase
mobility for people who are already working."
Students who have completed
an undergraduate degree are
eligible for the program, and can
use the credits acguired through
the program towards a master's degree.
The program will emphasize the
importance of adult education to
society and how an educated adult
population contributes to the state
and other social institutions, xi
of revenue, Acevedo said.
Luke Gooding, a fourth-year
combined science major, said
he's noticed a change in the Pit's
popularity recently.
"[In] previous years, the line-up
definitely got going earlier. There
were a lot more people in there
before 11 p.m., and you had to get
there around 9 p.m. just to get in,"
said Gooding. "It's nowhere near
how it used to be."
Gooding thinks local competition could be partially to blame.
"It's not the cheapest bar anymore," he said. "It's decent, but it's
not a student's number-one option.
There's better places to go."
With dozens of bars just off
campus, one pub in particular —
the Bimini — is gearing up to become the Pit's biggest competitor.
On Sept. 25, the Bimini started running College Nights on
Wednesdays. With free buses from
UBC to the Bimini bookable for
NAMING »
New SUB name to
be decided Oct. 23
Tammy Kwan
Contributor
The top names being put forward for the new Student Union
Building (SUB) will be released on
Wednesday.
The AMS's New SUB committee
has been gathering student feedback
on the name since the beginning of
September through Facebook and
Twitter. They have been accepting
name suggestions online since Sept.
3, and since Sept. 10, students have
been able to write suggestions on
the glass walls of the New SUB
design team's office, located in the
old SUB behind Starbucks.
Derek Moore, head of the New
SUB committee, said that all the
names that will be released came
either from these student suggestions or committee suggestions,
with the majority coming from
students.
On Wednesday, the short list of
seven names will be posted on the
AMS New SUB Project Facebook account and the @mynewsub Twitter
account. This list will be narrowed
down by students to three names,
and the final name will be picked
from these three by the AMS Council. Moore said the name should be
decided at Council's Oct. 23 meeting.
Some of the names on the list
include the Bird's Nest, the Nest,
Pacific Student Pavilion and
SUBway.
student groups of 25 or more, the
bar offers a tempting alternative
to the Pit.
Chris Badyk, manager of the
Bimini and a UBC alum, said he
had the Greek system in mind
when he started running student
nights. As a Kappa Sigma member,
he noticed that the Pit often had
too long of a line for fraternity and
sorority members to get in after
their exchanges on Wednesday
nights.
"I just remember Wednesday
nights were the nights to go out
for college kids, so I thought we'd
be a good alternative to the Pit,
[because] they were so full back in
the day," Badyk said. "If [students]
want an alternative bar ... why not
Bimini's? It's nice and close."
"I'm hoping my marketing
team will reach out to all groups
from UBC," said Badyk. He listed
the Greek system, Thunderbird
athletics, the engineers and the Ski
and Snowboard Club as potential
target groups.
Badyk said that for the first two
College Nights, the bar was near
capacity with about 150 people. "I
would say it's been getting close to a
slow Friday," Badyk said.
"It's somewhere different," said
Dannika Rogowsky, a third-year
environment and sustainability
student. "The Pit's always the same
thing every Wednesday, with the
same crowd of people."
Competition may not be the only
contributor to the Pit's dwindling
numbers. When asked about the
turnout, staff at the Pit blame recent
changes such as the revocation of in-
and-out privileges to Pit-goers.
Pit bouncer Randy Zhou said that
the Pit no longer gives out stamps.
The new policy forces patrons to
line up a second time if they leave
the pub for any reason.
Without a cross breeze from
the open doors, the Pit has been
known to get uncomfortably warm.
"Before, we had four doors open and
had a smoking pit," Zhou said. "The
airflow was better and it was cooler
in there [before]."
Pit bartender David Weeks said
this trend has been a long time
coming. "It's been on the decline for
probably the last five or six years,"
said Weeks. "The student bar is just
not a place to be seen anymore."
"The demographics of UBC
are changing," said Weeks. "Our
clientele aren't necessarily seeking
quality, they're seeking cheap drinks
and a good time."
Weeks said the the Pit needs to
adapt to competition to survive,
but it is not as easy as swapping the
daily special.
Some are still optimistic. Charlie
Thorpe, a third-year Arts student,
said the fluctuations in popularity
are nothing new. "It depends on the
week, depends on the time of the
year," Thorpe said. "If it's in midterms, it's always less. Beginning of
the year and end of term are always
the most busy."
With only 30 Pit Nights left in the
old SUB, staff are hoping business
will pick up before the Pit closes its
doors for good. XI
MONDAY
FORESTRY»
The new SUB is set to open between Septmber 2014 and January 2015.
LD/THE UBYSSEY
"We put a lot of emphasis on the
Nest," said Michael Kingsmill, an
AMS designer currently working on
the New SUB project. "That's our
big multipurpose performance space
that's very dominant in the New
Student Union Building."
Although humorous, it is unlikely
that names such as the Quidditch
Palace and Hogwarts, garnered
from the design display, will be
used, according to Kingsmill.
Kingsmill said that the names of
a few distinguished UBC alumni
were suggested at the New SUB
committee meeting on Sept. 27. Such
individuals included Evelyn Lett, a
Canadian women's rights pioneer,
and Pierre Berton, a well-known
Canadian author, television personality and journalist (and former
Ubyssey editor).
It has also been suggested to
name the building after a donor,
but this option has been ruled out.
Moore said that doing so would
go against regulations listed in
development agreements.
"The building is meant for students," said Moore. "Students are
actually the biggest donors of the
buildings because of the New SUB
fee incorporated into tuition fees."
Moore said in June that the
New SUB committee was aiming
to have the names shortlisted by
the end of the summer. However,
the deadline was pushed back to
fall.
Madeline Rigg, a fourth-year
Arts student, thinks that the SUB
name should remain the same.
"It'll be too bad for other kids to
not be able to use that great acronym. So good, so short," said Rigg.
"Chances are, 'SUB' will still
continue to be a name here on
campus," said Moore, "But we'd
like to give it a name. We think it's
a great opportunity." XI
Pulp and Paper
Centre gets $2.7
million grant
M
=HOTOWILLMCDONALD/THE UBYSSEY
The UBC Pulp and Paper Centre will use
this money to cut power usage by 50 per
cent.
Natassia Or
Contributor
The UBC Pulp and Paper Centre
has received a $2.7 million grant.
The Natural Sciences and
Engineering Research Council
of Canada (NSERC) awarded
the grant to fund research on
reducing power consumption and
greenhouse gas emissions.
The UBC Pulp and Paper
Centre hopes to influence the
entire B.C. pulp and paper industry with its research. With the
industry consuming about eight
per cent of the power generated
by BC Hydro, energy efficiency is
a key goal.
"Reducing the energy used in
[the pulping] process would significantly improve the province's
ability to use and export clean
hydroelectric power," said James
Olson, director of the UBC Pulp
and Paper Centre.
"It also ensures that these
mills, located in rural B.C., are
efficient and prosperous for generations."
Olson said the centre has two
goals: modify the pulping process
with chemical pre-treatment so
that the wood fibres are more
easily made into pulp, and develop new, more energy-efficient
equipment.
Pamela Moss, acting
vice-president of NSERC's Research Partnerships Programs
Directorate, said the application
for the grant was a rigorous and
competitive process.
"This well-balanced mix of
fundamental science and highly
practical work promotes timely
implementation and encourages
the long-term sustainability of
one of British Columbia's most
important industries," said Moss.
The research could have an
effect on BC Hydro.
"We're looking for energy
conservation goals with targets
to save energy ... and the means
of achieving targets is emerging technologies," said Markus
Zeller, who specializes in power-
smart technology and innovation
at BC Hydro.
If the Pulp and Paper Centre's
goal of reducing power usage
by 50 per cent could be implemented across the industry, it
would mean a reduction of 2,000
gigawatt hours per year.
"That would be the equivalent of a small civilized city,"
Zeller said. "If we could achieve
that target, it would be probably
equivalent to Kelowna."
Olson was optimistic about the
research the grant funds.
"The results we develop will
be initially deployed in the local
industry, but we anticipate that
it will be eventually deployed
throughout the global industry,
making what is already a sustainable industry more competitive
and energy efficient," said Olson. XI 4    I    NEWS    I    MONDAY, OCTOBER 7,2013
TEA»
UBC grad forms non-profit for Kenyan farmers
JusTea aims to help farmers like Davison, centre, pictured here with JusTea founder Paul Bain, right, and Ian Bain, left. Davison is a small-scale tea farmer and currently earns only $2 a day.
=HOTOCOUPTESYOFJUSTEA
Milica Palinic
Contributor
Fair trade coffee is a Vancouver
mainstay, but when was the last
time you thought about where
your tea came from?
JusTea is a Vancouver-based
non-profit organization that aims
to remove the middleman from the
process of tea farming in Kenya. In
doing so, JusTea hopes to increase
the earnings of Kenyan tea farmers by 20 per cent. Currently, they
earn about one per cent of the retail profit from the tea they grow.
"We want to bring justice to the
tea industry," said Isaiah Muuo,
the Kenyan partner of JusTea.
JusTea was founded by Paul
Bain, who graduated from UBC
with a political science degree last
year, with the help of his father
Grayson Bain. They founded the
organization after a visit to Kenya
in 2012, where they lived with
small-scale Kenyan tea farmers.
They are currently running
a 30-day fundraising campaign
through the local company
Fund Razr. Their goal is to raise
$20,000 to purchase equipment
for the two regions in which Jus-
Tea will be operating.
With the money, they aim
to bring in equipment to build
the first processing kitchens in
the two regions and to educate
their Kenyan partners on how to
process tea themselves. Bain said
they are bringing in a man from
India with decades of experience
in traditional hand processing
methods to do this.
About half of these funds will go
to purchasing the tea that people
who contribute to the campaign
will receive. Fundraising began on
Sept. 16 and with two weeks to go,
they have raised about $9,000,44
per cent of their goal.
"You're just buying tea like you
usually would," Bain said of the
fundraising process. "Everything
that you give you get something
for it.
"Everyone's a volunteer, so it
doesn't go to any of our pockets
at all."
Bain said they chose the
relatively humble goal of a 20 per
cent increase in salary in order to
avoid having negative attention
drawn to the farmers involved.
"If all of a sudden we double
their salaries ... it could almost
ostracize them in the community, so we've been working really
closely with our partners in
Kenya to learn how to pay them
more but not make it so it's all
of a sudden," Bain said. "Other
people will become suspicious of
what they're doing. They might
want to get in on it as well. We
might not be able to have the
resources to be able to take more
farmers in at the time."
Muuo said recent changes in
the Kenyan government give
JusTea the opportunity to purchase tea directly from farmers
rather than having to buy it
from the government, as was the
case previously.
He expressed the frustration
farmers have felt with the government-controlled system. "If
I produce the tea and I give it to
another person to sell it for me, I
have no control over that, and so
whatever [price] they give me, I
accept, because there's nothing I
can do."
Muuo said even farmers who
produce a lot of tea need to buy a
cow or goat to supplement their
earnings. He said JusTea should
increase the standard of living for
those involved, allowing them to
buy food or be able to send their
children to school.
In the future, Bain hopes that,
with the raise of profits and the
increasing tea demand, JusTea
will be able to install more processing kitchens in other regions
in Kenya that welcome this kind
of project. For now, they have two
co-ops in Kenya with a total often
farmers.
Bain said that the tea will be
sold online, with prices comparable to that of David's Tea and
Teavana.'a
TALKS»
Delis Palacios lectures on the ills of mining in Colombia
Joshua Gabert-Doyon
Contributor
A public lecture on campus last
week drew attention to the consequences of mining in Colombia.
The lecture at the Liu Institute
for Global Issues last Thursday,
entitled "Resource Extraction, Land
Ownership and Internal Displacement," featured Afro-Colombian
activist Delis Palacios and UBC
professor Phillipe Le Billon.
Palacios gave accounts of her
personal experience and work in
Choco, a region in the northwest
part of Colombia.
Palacios, who works with the
Asociacion de Desplazados Dos de
Mayo (ADOM), came to Canada to
escape threats of violence.
The detrimental effects of mining
in the Choco range from threats to
the riverbeds, skin diseases, internal
displacement and an increase in
prostitution. Palacios said the
infrastructure that accompanies
mining projects means an increase
in security forces and male workers
who often leave behind venereal
diseases, unwanted pregnancies and
scars of abuse.
ADOM works primarily with
displaced Colombians in an effort
to address problems related to the
marginalization of black Colombians as well as the forced displacement of those in mining regions.
"Development through foreign
investment is at odds with the Afro
and indigenous vision of development," said Palacios, who spoke
through a translator. She proposed
a restructuring of the Colombian
state and further consultation with
ethnic groups.
The event was put in the context
of Canadian Aboriginal struggles
related to resource extraction early
on in the talk. Afro-Colombians and
indigenous people in Colombia both
have collective land titles in Choco,
giving them legal protection. Many
of these communities are self-governing.
A question-and-answer period
that followed the talk brought forward questions related to artisanal
mining and the characteristics of
mechanized mining before turning
to a more conceptual debate.
"What right do Canadians have
to participate in the Colombian
people's dialogue around what they
do with and how they govern their
resources considering Canadian
companies' and Canadian diplomacy's track record of imposition
and abuses in others' countries?"
asked Sam Stime, who is doing
graduate work in civil engineering
at UBC.
Organizer Pilar Rianyo-Al-
cala, stressed the importance of
questioning Canada's place in the
mining sector.
Major concerns
Low taxation
Large environmental impacts
Poor labour standards
Lack of community consent
Economic displacement of artisanal/medium-
scale mining
Human rights abuses
- Forced displacement
- Extrajudicial killings
- Kidnappings
PHOTO WILLMCDONALD/THE UBYSSEY
The infrastructure that accompanies mining leads to an increase in venereal diseases and unwanted pregnancies, speakers said.
"[These kinds of events]
challenge students and faculty
to engage with real-life issues,"
Rianyo-Alcala said, "and to hear
direct testimonies [and] offer an
opportunity to critically look at
whether universities and aca-
demia are becoming instrumental
in supporting economic and trade
model that benefits Northern
economies and creates new forms
of displacement, oppression and
livelihood treats to indigenous
and Afro communities."
Palacios gave a lecture earlier
Thursday afternoon on her work
with human rights defenders and
survivors of armed conflict in
Uganda.
The lecture focused on
Palacios' experience as a survivor of the 2002 Bojaya massacre,
which claimed the lives of 79
Afro- Colombians. XI // Sports + Rec
EDITOR  NATALIESCADDEN
MONDAY
SOCCER»
Women's soccer shuts down Winnipeg
With just 1 goal allowed in 8 games, the undefeated squad has the best defence in the west
Nick Adams
StaffWriter
With the only blemish on their
record a single own goal against the
University of the Fraser Valley early
in September, the UBC women's
soccer team has the best defense in
Canada West, and remains undefeated in eight games this season.
This style of play shows a clear
evolution in the Thunderbirds' game
plan — one that is no doubt reflective of new head coach Andrea Neil.
A different system is being
enacted than that of last year's
lOth-placed squad, and it seems to
be working. The 'Birds are in fourth
place, with a good shot at a Canada
West championship.
This new game plan is manifested in players like Janine Frazao,
who scored 13 goals last year — the
second most in the Canada West.
This year, Frazao has only four
goals, but the difference lies in her
assists. Last year, Frazao tallied just
four, and with five already, she's on
pace for quite a bit more this year.
Instead of a singular, individual
attack unit, skill and talent is being
used to work together as a team.
The mentality of this system
is clear: defence wins championships. Building a defensively strong
team has been working well for the
T-Birds, and Saturday night's 8-0
win was no exception.
With only one win and seven losses, llth-placed Winnipeg
seemed to be in a losing mindset
from the start. Just six minutes in,
Frazao broke down the left side past
the last defender, then cut right and
curled a shot into the top corner to
start off the scoring spree.
By the 12th minute, it was 3-0
UBC with tallies from Frazao and
Nicole Sydor. UBC showed no sign
of slowing against a disheartened
Winnipeg team. As the half pressed
on, so did they. Only twice did
Winnipeg show any real sign of life
and break out of the neutral third.
But with one of their two shots off
target, UBC keeper Emily Wilson
only had to bail out her defense once
to claim the clean sheet.
Five more UBC goals — from
Kym van Duynhoven, Jasmin
Dhanda (two) and Madison Guy
(two) — put the nail in Winnipeg's coffin.
Although the game was an
unquestionable blowout, Neil saw
aspects of her team's play that
need work. "Overall, I still wasn't
satisfied with certain points of the
match," she said, pointing to overall
possession, ball retention and
rhythm as areas to be improved.
Creating a solid defensive core
has been the focus — and the
outcome — of the team's endeavors.
But once you realize that the coach
still isn't completely satisfied after
an 8-0 win, the reason the team sits
six spots higher this year becomes
much clearer.
"I think that it's important to get
the result. It's important to score
goals, but I would say the performance of the team still has a lot more
to grow," Neil said.
The work the team does in practice is clearly translating. "There's
the phase without the soccer ball,
which is the 11 players, and that's
important not just for the back line,
but to get everything right from the
front backwards," Neil said.
After they do that, the important part is [to] get the whole
team forward and attack as a unit.
Again, with an 8-0 win, it's clear
that they've been able to apply this
system effectively.
Next weekend, the T-Birds go
to Alberta to battle 12th-placed
Lethbridge on Saturday and third-
placed Calgary on Sunday. If all
goes according to plan, UBC could
be sitting in the second place spot
after the weekend. As long as they
continue to employ and execute
their system, there's no reason that
shouldn't be the case. XI
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE/THE UBYSSEY
Nicole Sydor scored her first goal of the season in Saturday's shutout against Winnipeg.
Scott Secord of men's golf
was a huge factor in UBC's
victory atthe 42nd Annual
Western Washington Viking
Men's Gold Invitational Tournament last week. Carding
afinalround4under68,the
Calgary native tied forfourth
place individually. His overall
score was2 under214. The
win was the third title at the
WWU event for the Thunderbirds, the most recent being
in 2007. The men's golf team
will be back in action on Oct.
21st at the Otter Invitational,
hosted by California State
University-Monterey Bay in
Seaside, Calif.
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE/THE UBYSSEY
Janine Frazao scored the game-winner against Winnipeg just six minutes into the match. It was her 50th goal as a Thunderbird.
Checkout more sports
articles at ubyssey.ca
RUGBY»
Victory in Victoria
Jenny Tang
Contributor
After what seemed like a plague
of losses for the women's rugby
team, things finally changed for
the Thunderbirds as they won
63-17 against the Victoria Vikes
on Saturday afternoon. This
46-point margin easily cinches
the minimum seven-point lead
needed to make it to the Canada
West playoffs.
Playing away from home for
the first time this season, the
Thunderbirds started strong with
an opening try by fullback Annie
Arnott. They made it look easy and
gained a couple more tries to end
the first half with a score of 27-5.
The Vikes managed to fight back
with a single try by Tiffany Pick-
etts, but it was clear that UBC was
in control of the game by then.
UBC has led at halftime once
before this season and fallen flat
in the second half. But this time,
the tries did not stop there. UBC
was relentless in the second half,
with tries being scored left right
and center by Jen Blume, Gabrielle
Hindley, Cassidy Gale (two tries),
Ciara Malone (three), and Catherine Ohler (two tries, five conversions and one penalty).
While the victory is a satisfying
end to the Thunderbird's season,
the team isn't off the hook yet —
playoffs start on Oct. 18. They'll
have Thanksgiving weekend off,
but they are planning to use it
for extra training, conditioning
and preparation for their playoff
match. XI
UBC powered past Victoria on Saturday afternoon to earn themselves a spot in Canada West playoffs, photo courtesy armandotura/uvic vikes SPORTS + REC    I    MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013
HOCKEY»
T-Birds on
a mission
Natalie Scadden
Sports + Rec Editor
"We want to win the national championship. That's it."
Clearly, the expectations for the
UBC women's hockey team have
changed drastically since Graham
Thomas took over head coaching
duties a year ago.
The Thunderbirds lost all but
one game in 2011-12, and had made
the playoffs just twice since 2000.
Frankly, they were terrible, and
having never won more than eight
of 28 games in a season, they always
had been.
However, when Thomas stepped
in, all that changed. The former University of Syracuse assistant coach
recognized his team's potential from
the get-go, and orchestrated the
greatest turnaround in Canadian
Interuniversity Sport (CIS) history.
The rest of the country was
caught off-guard as UBC put
together a 17-7-4 regular season
record, setting all sorts of team
records en route to toppling a Calgary Dinos team led by Team Canada captain Hayley Wickenheiser
to take home the Canada West
championship. This booked them
their first trip to nationals, where
they suffered two close defeats
before winning their final game to
finish fifth in the country.
But you can only catch teams
sleeping once. Now, the Thunderbirds have a giant target on
their backs.
"We're going to get everybody's
best game now, let's put it that way,"
said Thomas. "We want to prove
that we belong as one of the top
programs in our country and in our
league, and that it wasn't just a one-
off year. It's a completely different
coaching challenge this year."
It shouldn't be too hard for the
'Birds to carry over last year's
momentum. The cornerstones of
UBC's roster remain largely in
place, and with six impact rookies
joining the mix, there's more
depth to this year's lineup.
"All four lines are able to contribute and compete. That'll help us in
our long run," Thomas said.
While the skaters are certainly no slouches, goaltending
should once again be one of UBC's
strengths. Thomas is both blessed
and cursed by the fact that he has
three excellent goalies in Danielle
Dube, Samantha Langford and
Danielle Lemon. While he said
that it's good because they all
push each other and get along,
they obviously all want to play,
which forces Thomas to make
some tough decisions.
"I lose sleep on that one. These
three darn goalies are goingto be
the end of me," said Thomas. "It's
definitely a good problem to have,
but at the same time, when you're
having to manage it and make sure
that everybody's prepared and
getting what they need and they're
ready and given opportunities, it
becomes a bit of a juggling act."
Dube led the conference with a
0.943 save percentage in over 1,000
minutes in net last year. Langford
was trusty backup, posting a 0.924
save percentage in over 600 minutes
over the regular season in addition to playing superbly all three
games in the CIS tournament while
Dube was sidelined with an illness.
Lemon is back for her second year as
well, and although she didn't receive
as much playing time, she is another
talent Thomas can rely on.
Recognizing the importance of
development, Thomas's strategy
early on will be to give each of them
playing time. But now that the
Thunderbirds have a title to defend,
performance becomes ever more
important. "We've got a lot of expectations onus. [We need] to make
sure that we're giving ourselves the
best chance to win every night."
Offensively, seven of UBC's top
eight scorers will be returning, including Tatiana Rafter and Rebecca
Unrau, who combined to score 24 of
the 72 regular season goals by the
Thunderbirds. Stephanie Schaup-
meyer stormed onto the scene as a
rookie last year to chip in five goals
and eight assists, and was rewarded
by being named one of this year's
assistance captains.
On the defensive side, UBC will
be anchored by a familiar leader in
fifth-year Christi Capozzi, who will
wear the lone "C" this year. She has
played over 100 regular season and
playoff games as a T-Bird, and was
recognized as a Canada West second
team all-star last season following
a three-goal, 10-assist campaign.
She'll be aided on the blue line by
assistant captains Sarah Casorso
and Cailey Hay.
A national championship may be
the ultimate goal, but a consistent
effort throughout all 28 regular
season games will be crucial. After
finishing third in the conference
last year, UBC was the underdog
when they took down Regina to
book a trip to nationals, and more
so against Dinos in the Canada
West championships. They had to
play the bulk of their playoff games
on the road — although they did
host their first ever playoff game
in the first round — and every road
series went the full three games,
which meant several weeks of
travelling. Not only would finishing
first in the regular season this year
be another historic achievement for
this group, but it would also earn
them the right to host more playoff
games, meaning an easier path
to nationals.
Thomas said the team is ready to
go, despite a 1-5 preseason record
that looks all too similar to their
overall record just two seasons ago.
"We could be hitting a panic button
or I could be losing my mind, even
though our last four games we were
playing a high level competition."
Indeed, it was a preseason
designed to challenge the Thunderbirds. Last weekend, they took a trip
to Minnesota, the "state of hockey,"
for the opportunity to play against
high-calibre teams four nights in
a row. This included playing the
Japanese Olympic team and the
University of Minnesota Gophers,
the defending NCAA Div. 1 champions who haven't lost in 50 games.
We're going to get everybody's best
game now, let s put it that way.
Graham Thomas
Head coach, UBC women's hockey team
"[The Gophers] are the pinnacle
of women's hockey, the best college
team in the world. It was very
eye-opening," Thomas said.
"We've learned a lot of lessons
in preseason. We're definitely
coming out of [that] weekend
stronger. I think this trip's going to
pay dividends on how we play this
year and how we come out of the
gate for the first games."
Last year, they defied the odds
and made it further than anyone — except they themselves —
expected them to go. But now that
they've come so close to winning
it all, they're hungrier than ever
to win that national championship. XI
UBC opened their regular season
with two away games against
the Lethbridge Pronghorns this
weekend. On Friday night, UBC
stormed back from a 4-1 deficit in
the third period and won the game
in a shootout. The Pronghorns
would be the ones to rally on Saturday evening, coming back from
two early goals by UBC's Nikola
Brown-John to take the game 3-2.
UBC will return to Thunderbird
Arena over Thanksgiving weekend
to face off against Calgary, who
will be without Wickenheiser this
year. Puck drop is at 7p.m. on Friday and 2 p.m. on Saturday.
Above: captain Christi Capozzi, centre, is looking to lead the Thunderbirds to their first national title t
Below: a true playmaker, assistant captain Sarah Casorso had 20 assists last season, along with six c
i MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013    |   SPORTS + REC
his season; the 'Birds won't be the lovable underdogs this time around, though.
joals.
=HOTO JOSH CURRAN/THE UBYSSEY
i
WOMEN'S HOCKEY
BY THE NUMBERS
previous best wins in a season
U««s 40 per cent regular season save rate for
Danielle Dube — best in the conference
U* «7^4 per cent regular season save rate for
Samantha Langford
cored bvTatiana Rafter
■LXU games played as a Thunderbird by captain
Christi Capozzi
=HOTO JOSH CURRAN/THE UBYSSEY
FOOTBALL»
UBC finally topples
a ranked opponent
CJ Pentland
Managing Editor, Web
When UBC football head coach
Shawn Olson said last week that
it's been a tale of two fourth quarters for his team, he really wasn't
exaggerating.
Taking an 18-3 lead into
halftime of Saturday's contest
against the Manitoba Bisons in
Winnipeg, the 'Birds were in
the midst of playing their most
complete game of the year — even
without running back Brandon
Deschamps, who most of the
time is the team's offence. But
when Bisons quarterback Jordan
Yantz threw a five-yard touchdown to Anthony Coombs near
the start of the fourth quarter,
UBC suddenly found themselves
down 24-21 and at risk of blowing
a large lead to Manitoba for the
second time this year.
UBC responded right away, with
Carson Williams leading a drive resulting in a 15 -yard touchdown pass
from him to Micha Theil. But the
game was far from over, especially
when Coombs appeared to haul in
a pass in the end zone on third and
12 with just 33 seconds left that
would have given his team the lead.
It appeared that another fantastic
effort from the 'Birds would end in
a crushing defeat caused by fourth
quarter lapses, ones that typically
happen at home.
But in a moment of desperation,
Riley Jones, having let Coombs
get open, swiped his hand in
hopes of making something —
anything — happen, and he got
lucky. It wasn't even a vicious
swing of the arm, but his hand
struck gold, as the ball helplessly
fell out of Coombs's hands before
he had complete possession.
That gave UBC the ball back and
allowed Williams to simply take
a knee and run out the clock for a
28-24 victory.
It's easy to make a case for
week four's win over Regina being
UBC's biggest win of the year, in
that it separated them from the
Rams in the chase for the final
playoff berth. But it's even easier
to make the case for this game
being bigger.
Yes, the 'Birds did win their
previous two road games this
year, but those came against the
bottom two teams in the conference. This game was against a
Bisons team ranked 10th in the
nation, and was being played in
a brand new 33,422 seat stadium
(although only 1,457 people
showed up). To add to that,
UBC was without an injured
Deschamps, who is leading the
conference with an average 152.8
rushing yards per game.
The case could also be made
that Deschamps not playing
actually helped the 'Birds. Williams, who all season has looked
tentative leading the offence,
understood that his team couldn't
win just by running, and played
with a confidence that hasn't been
seen all year.
He let loose, rearing back and
zipping tight spirals downfield
that hit receivers in stride. The
exact stats aren't available, but
this reporter is fairly sure he
made more throws that travelled more than 10 yards in this
game than he had in the previous five games combined. He
knew his team needed him and
he delivered, throwing for 348
yards, two touchdowns and no
interceptions. David Scott was
the main beneficiary, hauling in
seven passes for 170 yards and
one touchdown.
Williams deserves the praise
on the offensive side of the ball,
but the defence also stepped up to
play their most complete performance of the year. Jones' strip
in the end zone will go down as
being what saved the game in the
minds of many, but overall, the
T-Bird defence gave up just 353
total yards to a team that torched
them for 467 yards three weeks
ago. The guys up front sacked
Yantz five times and forced one
fumble, while the downfield
defence did their part by limiting
him to just 14 completed passes on
30 attempts.
In a season where UBC has
played extremely well in games
but found ways to turn them into
crushing defeats, the Thunderbirds got a little bit of luck in the
end to finally take down a legitimate contender in the Canada West.
They now currently sit at 3-3 and
are tied for third with Manitoba
in the conference, solidifying their
playoff chances with two regular
season games to go.
Maybe it's being on the road;
maybe it's a bit of luck; maybe it
is finally realizing what it takes
to be a contender. But whatever
it is, UBC showed resilience on
Saturday afternoon, and because
of it, they can now be considered
among the top teams in the Canada West conference. 31
PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Quarterback Carson Williams played his best game yet to lead UBC against Manitoba. II Culture
RHYS EDWARDS
MONDAY
FASHION »
Old material, new style
Eco Fashion Week showcases smart, sexy, and sustainable couture
Reyhana Heatherington
Senior Lifestyle Writer
What began as a joke for one UBC
Law student has become reality.
"My friends used to asked me,
'What's your dream job?' and
I would always say, Tn-house
counsel at Gucci!' And then we
would all laugh. Earlier this year,
it dawned on me that many people
actually are in-house counsel at
Gucci, so it doesn't necessarily
have to be a pipe dream."
Rachel Ricketts graduated from
UBC Law in 2010 and now works
on legal contracts and wrangling
panel speakers for Eco Fashion
Week, happening this week at
Robson Square downtown. Her
interest in fashion can be traced
back to when she used to draw
fashion collections as a 13-year-
old.
"I think [fashion is] one of the
most efficient and meaningful
ways to personally express yourself on a daily basis," Ricketts said.
"If you walk into work wearing
sweatpants, people are going to
know something is going on. So I
wanted to merge something that I
thought was really near and dear
to my heart and something I have
a passion for, with all my years of
legal and analytical training."
The seventh edition of Eco
Fashion Week began Sunday with
a series of free educational seminars on the topic of sustainable
fashion practices. Ricketts hopes
to work with Eco Fashion Week
president and founder Myriam
Laroche to create internationally
recognized rules for sustainability
in fashion.
"There's a movement globally
to have internationally-renowned
and recognized regulations set in
place. We sort of like to think of it
as an analogy to Vancouver Aquarium's Ocean Wise. When you go
to a restaurant, you sit down and
see that little symbol next to the
ART»
food name [and] you go, "Oh, OK,
I know I can eat this sablefish and
feel good about it because some
independent third party looked
at it."
In an industry where sustainability, human rights and labour
issues are commonly critiqued,
Eco Fashion Week aims to create a
larger dialogue around standards
in fashion.
"Awareness is always the number-one takeaway," Ricketts said.
"We have really beautiful pieces
and really amazing designers who
just also happen to create fashion
that's made out of sustainable
fabrics or is locally-sourced. But
the first focus for [the designers] is
to make beautiful clothes."
Sonja Henrickson, Eco Fashion
Week's fashion manager, acts as
a liaison between the event team
and the designers. She is most
excited about surprising audiences
with beautiful clothes and, like
Ricketts, maintains that sustainability is an added bonus.
"When [people] hear the word
'eco-fashion,' they think that it's
going to be extremely granola
and a lot of old, recycled beige
and oatmeal tones like a burlap
sack that we've ransacked into
some sort of couture piece, and it's
really not that at all," Henrickson
said. "It doesn't necessarily even
have to look like something that's
eco-friendly or socially responsible.
That's just a wonderful side effect."
Henrickson is particularly
looking forward to Hungarian
designer Matild Janosi's TildArt
collection, which includes items
made from bike parts and movie
projector pieces.
"It truly to me denotes what
runway is about, because it's exciting. It's basically walking art and
[Janosi] totally exemplifies that it
every way," Henrickson said.
Janosi's goal is "breathing new
life" into discarded materials; the
Far from being a niche design field, eco fashion is fast becoming an industry staple.
designer even saw a fashion collection waiting to happen while in a
pedicab garage in London.
"The first thing I observed was
the selective waste containers
with bicycle accessories," she
wrote in an email. "At this one
base, there are over two hundred
rickshaws. Seeing the bicycle
inner tubes waste bins, I saw the
clothes."
The 68-Pound Challenge is
always a highlight of Eco Fash
ion Week; one designer creates
an entire line from 68 pounds of
Value Village clothes, based on the
statistic that the average North
American throws out 68 pounds of
clothing per year.
For students who don't have
the disposable income to purchase new styles each season,
there are a myriad of ways to
renew your wardrobe, including
vintage shopping and clothing
exchanges. Ricketts recently
LLUSTRATION BY INDIANA JOEL/THE UBYSSEY
helped a friend with an aptly
titled "Five-Dolla-Holla Sale,"
where they sold their own clothing items for $5.
"Some of it was a friendly
clothing swap, but a lot of it was
just cleaning out your clothing,"
Ricketts said. "And donating is
great, but if you need some cash,
it's a great way to make cash." tl
Eco Fashion Week runs from Oct.
6-10 at Robson Square.
Disposable Camera Project democratizes art
=HOTO COURTESY DISPOSABLECAMERAPROJECT
Disposable cameras are cheap, but when you start using dozens of them to launch an
international art project, it can start to add up.
Kari Lindberg
Contributor
Have you seen a poster for the
Disposable Camera Project? In all
likeliness, you have.
Vancouverites Nick Hill and
Paul Nuestro, who co-founded
the project with Torontonian
counterparts Mark Serrano and
Michaelangelo Yambao, spent the
entirety of the Thursday before
last putting up 400 posters across
campus — but not without multiple run-ins with UBC security.
"I think at some point... the
security guards recognized what
we were wearing and just [started] chasing us, yelling that we
weren't allowed to put posters on
benches," said Hill. "That didn't
stop us, though — we just ran to
the next location."
The project itself is quite
straightforward: a disposable
camera in a plastic bag is left in a
public space with instructions on
how to use it. Anyone who comes
upon the camera can take a picture
or two of anything they want, and
then return the camera to the bag.
After the camera has taken all of
its exposures, one of the project's
co-founders will collect the camera, develop the film and upload
scans to the project website.
In addition to Toronto and
Vancouver, the project has visited
Montreal, Los Angeles, New
York, Auckland and Amsterdam.
The Disposable Camera Project
founder's vision is to continually expand the project. To them,
having an international audience
would allow anyone from any part
of the globe to see with their own
eyes how a person halfway across
the world lives and represents
themselves.
Hill and Nuestro's adventures
at UBC reflect their passion and
dedication to the project. Their
dreams are so big that they're
already starting to outstrip their
cumulative monetary capital; all
four co-founders have financed
the project entirely out of pocket,
paying not only for the disposable
cameras, but also the development of the film.
"Our ability to get financial
funding will very soon either
make or break this project,"
said Nuestro.
To the co-founders, the project
signifies the merging of two
different media — it's both an ode
to traditional photography, where
every exposure counts, and an
embrace of the digital world that
the 21st century has propelled us
all into.
Hill, Nuestro, Serrano and
Yambao envision a world where
an ordinary, everyday person can
take the production of art into
their own hands. Captured inside
a framed shot is a single moment
in time, where a person native to
that location is able to showcase
a representation of themselves
and how they interact with the
environment that they live in.
And, since individuals who find
the camera can't just take 10 shots
and pick the best of the bunch,
their photographs are a more
accurate reflection of that single
moment.
Both Hill and Nuestro agreed:
"There is truth and honesty in the
ability to take a photo and not be
able to take that shot back." tJ MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013    |    CULTURE
LIFE, THE UNIVERSE AND EVERYTHING »
Crossing the arts-science continuum
Carl Sagan Club to promote interdisciplinary conversation outside academia
"*^4i^v .v .. ■
CARTER BRUNDAGE/THE UBYSSEY
Jason Fernando, left, and Jordan Buffie hope the club will unite students in the love of
science and the arts, regardless of their major.
Marlee Laval
Contributor
As world-famous American
astronomer Carl Sagan once said,
"If you wish to make an apple pie
from scratch, you must first invent
the universe."
While a new universe has yet
to be invented by UBC, a group
of students has created their own
little universe dedicated to Sagan
himself. Founded in June of this
year, the Carl Sagan Association for the Communication of
Science (shortened to the CSA) is
one of the newest AMS clubs on
campus, with a goal of combining the arts and sciences in a
way that any student can access
and understand.
"I think that clubs like the CSA
are important because they can
open up a space for a community
of people, scientists or otherwise, who can work together to
spread and build knowledge,"
said CSA treasurer Nick Short,
a fifth-year psychology and
philosophy student.
"I was someone who, in high
school, was very interested in
both the arts and sciences," said
CSA president and founder Jason
Fernando, a third-year student
studying the history of science.
"Going into UBC and choosing one
faculty over the other, I felt that
choosing Arts was the more logical
thing, but there was always that
part missing where I wished I'd be
able to be more involved in the science community to pursue those
interests, even if it's not my major.
"That's basically the premise of
the club — it's to try to create that
space for other students in that
position," he added.
"Anyone who is passionate
about science can join it and feel
welcome," said VP Marketing Mi-
chaela Baer, who studies photography at Emily Carr University. "I
think that the multifaceted, multi-
disciplinary aspect of the club is a
perfect recipe for innovation."
The club can also provide
different purposes for each of its
members. "I'm not that interested
in the science part of this club, but
I like the communication part,"
said fellow VP Marketing Emily Larson, a third-year English
honours student at UBC. "Es
pecially with my major ... you're
with a close-knit group of people
and you're talking about the same
ideas all the time, but I like having
a different context where it's still
communication, but in a different
field."
Indeed, the CSA is interested
in combining multiple fields of
interest, and they believe that
using Sagan's messages will help
engage students from everywhere
on campus.
"The use of Carl Sagan isn't so
much to make use of a charisma,"
said VP External Jordan Buffie,
a third-year political science and
English honours student. "It's the
idea of communicating science and
making something that everyone can feel like they can engage
with."
"As a totally different generation, we're still inspired by his
message," Fernando said. "His
main message is that the scientific community is academic and
professional, but at the same time,
it should be broadened to include
as much of society as possible.
There's no reason why you and I,
as non-scientists, shouldn't feel
comfortable and be involved."
The CSA has been working to
build their community of scientists
and non-scientists alike, recently
with their recruitment at Clubs
Days — which went "shockingly
well," according to Buffie —
bringing in a variety of interested
members from all ages, faculties
and backgrounds.
"It was very surprising," said
Larson, who notes that the club
received over 100 email addresses
for their mailing list. "I was not
expecting to see that many people,
and they were engaging, too."
With established interest in
their club, the CSA is now gearing
up for various events, including
bi-monthly screenings of Cosmos,
the series that helped make Sagan
a household name, at the Norm
Theatre. Non-club members can
attend for only $2 per screening,
while a $4 membership allows one
to attend screenings throughout
the year for free.
"We're hoping that our Cosmos
screenings will attract a fairly
diverse crowd," Baer said. "I'm
hoping that these screenings will
become somewhat of a social event
and forum."
Aside from their Cosmos screenings, the club is hosting events
such as an art collaboration with
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre
called "An Inescapable Perspective: Conversations in Science,"
from November 3-25. Along with
strong support from Clubs Days
visitors, the group is sponsored
by campus radio station CiTR and
The Planetary Society, which was
co-founded by Sagan in 1980.
"We want to reach out to
campus, and beyond, by hopefully
showing people something they
might not have thought they would
be interested in," Short said.
And with the goal of creating a
fun, mind-opening community for
all students, the CSA is just getting
started. U
For more information about the
club, visit ubcsagan.org or find it on
Facebook or Twitter.
FOOD»
UBYSSEY FEATURES
HUMBLE SQUIRES IN
SERVICE OF TRUTH
SEMBLE WEEKLY, MONDAYS AT ONE THIRTY P.M.
:ATURES AT UBYSSEY DOT
Student Cooking: chocolate chickpea cookies
Becca Williams
Contributor
That's right, chocolate chickpea
cookies: the most unconventional
yet delicious chocolate chip cookie
recipe around.
Made from a base of chickpeas
and almond butter, these little protein-packed treats serve a much
bigger purpose than sweet-tooth
satisfaction. Unlike ordinary, run-
of-the-mill chocolate chip cookies,
these bad boys can provide fuel for
the day, keep you focused during
long lectures and even power you
through your late-night midterm
study cramming, all while satisfying your cravings.
To keep things as quick and
easy as possible, this recipe requires only a blender and measuring cups or spoons for preparation.
Cost-wise, it's student-friendly,
considering the amount of time
BECCA WILLIAMS/THE UBYSSEY
it takes to make, its deliciousness
and its nutritional content.
Who says chocolate and chickpeas don't mix? After trying these
little bites of paradise, no one will.
Vegan and gluten-free Chocolate
Chickpea Cookies
Ingredients (makes 15-20
cookies)
1 Vi cups cooked chickpeas (if
using canned, drain and rinse)
Vi cup natural almond butter
Vi cup maple syrup or
agave nectar
Vi cup mini vegan chocolate chips
(I recommend Enjoy Life)
1 tsp baking powder
2 tsp cinnamon
2 tsp vanilla extract
1 tsp sea salt (if using unsalted
almond butter)
Equipment
Measuring cups (Vi)
Measuring spoons (tsp and tbsp)
Blender/ Food Processor
Cookie Sheet
Parchment Paper
Convection Oven
Instructions
1. Preheat the oven to 350 F (175
C) and line a cookie sheet with
parchment paper.
2. Throw everything but the
chocolate chips into a food processor or blender (in no particular
order).
3. Blend/pulse the ingredients on
medium-high until smooth.
4. Lightly stir/pulse in the
chocolate chips.
5. Once oven has reached 350 F,
begin forming dough balls. To do
so, consecutively spoon out two
tbsp of dough three centimetres
apart onto parchment paper (the
cookies will not expand or rise).
6. Place the cookies in the oven
on the top rack.
7. Bake for 12 minutes, or until
the dough balls become crackly
and golden on top (the cookies
should be very soft).
8. Remove the cookies from oven
and let them cool for 10 minutes
(of complete torment) before
digging in.
Notes: To store, place the
cookies in an airtight container
at room temperature or in the
fridge for up to one week. Freeze
the cookie dough and thaw it to
make a batch in the future. The
dough can also be frozen and
eaten as is. U II Opinions
If the AMS wants to get Pit Night back on its feet, they're going to have to get drastic.
LLUSTRATIONJETHROAU/THE UBYSSEY
LAST WORDS//
PHOTOSOC STRUGGLING
Last year, the AMS informed
UBC's photo society — Photosoc,
for short — that their space would
be removed for renovations two
years before it would be able to
move into its new rooms in the
New SUB. The renovations would
start in the summer of 2013. And
so, instead of trying to salvage it,
the society's directors decided to
disband the club until they had
space again. They sent a notice to
some members of the society, and
disappeared. Needless to say, more
than a few members were upset
with the decision.
The society nearly died, and for
once it's not the AMS's fault.
All around campus, our university suffers from a genetic disease
called decentralization. This disease means that sometimes things
can happen at UBC and no one
actually knows about it. It means
that projects can flourish before
being stamped out by administrators with "vision." And it means
that services can disappear into the
ether, especially when those services change hands and institutional
knowledge turns out to be the
knowledge of the person who just
walked out the door.
The Photo Society didn't die
because the AMS left it alone — it
died because the wrong people were
handed the keys. While members of
the club pay for and use the service
on a regular basis, there is no underlying social fabric to the society.
Like many parts of UBC, decisions
were made by its administrators
that did not represent the opinion or
desires of those it would affect.
The club is struggling back to its
feet and now that it has a dedicated
space, partial service will carry
the club until it moves into its new
space in 2015. But it highlights how
many things on campus rise and
fall in any year and how important
leadership is on campus. A few
people can make a big difference on
a campus that is so decentralized,
for better or worse.
The AMS's Pit Pub, located in the
basement of the of SUB, has been
struggling as off-campus establishments siphon off sober UBC
students looking to get wasted on
weeknights.
We aren't here to bash capitalism — and if students can find more
fun for less money off campus, more
power to them. The Pit's hands
are tied by B.C. liquor laws and the
RCMP, whose regulations make it
difficult for them to lower prices for
drinks to compete with the off-campus bars and clubs.
Due to their opposition to beer
gardens on campus, we're no big
fans of the RCMP's stance on liquor
to begin with. But allowing the Pit
to die a slow death because they
can't offer good deals on drinks will
deal a serious blow to the campus
community in Point Grey, such that
it is.
This Wednesday, we hope you'll
head to the SUB basement to toast
the Pit for being a colourful gathering place for students.
A TEAM WE CAN BE
PROUD OF
Last year, the women's hockey team
took their fans on a magic carpet
ride that brought them from the
cellar of university hockey to the
rooftop patio. They hosted a playoff
game for the first time in team
history, and with the game being
played at the much smaller Father
Bauer Arena due to the Doug
Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre being booked, the atmosphere
was electric. Air horns blew after
every goal (and there were a ton of
them), sirens wailed and players
hugged. Hockey, never a huge sport
at UBC, had become something
worth caring about.
This year, the team can't sneak
up on people, but that shouldn't be
a problem. Head coach Graham
Thomas is back to work his magic
behind the bench, and a significant portion of last year's team is
returning. In the preseason coaches
poll, the T-Birds were tied for first
— meaning that everyone will be
gunning for them, something that
the team has never had to deal with
before. They are a legitimate contender in not only the conference,
but also the country.
It's easy to see UBC as the
loveable underdog who happened
to win a bunch of hockey games,
but in reality, they're much more
than that. They're an extremely
talented hockey team that, along
with the men's team, plays a brand
of hockey here on campus that is
some of the most entertaining in
the province. XI
LETTER
Salmon Confidential
flawed, important
Salmon Confidential was originally
released in March 2013 to mixed
reviews. Alexandra Morton, the
director, received strong support
from salmon activists, furthering
the anti-salmon farming movement. Unfortunately, many
objective scientists and salmon
farming supporters have outlined
numerous research flaws and
incorrect assumptions Morton
makes throughout the movie.
However, Salmon Confidential,
while lacking in accepted evidence and in some cases found to
blatantly disregard inconvenient
facts, does contribute an important
perspective from the anti-farming community. Environmental
groups and industry professionals are increasingly influencing
policy makers throughout the B.C.
government. Alexandra Morton
and associated individuals having
a strong, albeit often stubborn,
opposition to salmon farming and
can present a constructive dialogue
with public interests in mind. What
is required is participation from all
stakeholder groups with a basis in
scientific evidence. Salmon Confidential shows that this particular
environmental group isn't ready for
such discussions.
I encourage everyone to view
this movie and form your own
opinion, keeping in mind the greater motives the director may have.
-Fraser Larock
Forestry IV
Classroom crushes,
Kama Sutra come-ons
and a pizza faux-pas
The Ubyssey's etiquette guru will
now take your questions
EAT BEFORE AND BE
AWKWARD NO MORE
Dear Konrad,
I was at my friend's pizza party last
night, but I was still pretty hungry
when we got to the last slice. I know
it's more polite to leave it, but I
hadn't eaten all day, so I had to have
it. I ended up grabbing it just as my
crush was reaching for it. I think it
was her first slice. It was very awkward. How might one politely take
the last slice of pizza?
Sincerely,
Hungry
This entire conundrum could
have been avoided had you not
been so Hungry! Any social event
— be it a meeting with food, a
party, or even a dinner date — is
not mainly about eating. Having
a snack beforehand allows you to
focus on more important things,
like making a good impression on
your crush.
Before you've
heard him speak,
how can you tell
if a guy is as cool
as his hair?
If you do feel like having the
last slice, however, the most polite
thing to do is to ask those around
whether they would mind you
taking it. This works most of the
time, but if someone else wants it
too, it may be time for a game of
rock-paper-scissors. Should things
get serious, whoever bought the
pizza has the last word.
IF ALL YOU EVER DO IS
STARE, YOU'LL LOSE THE
BOY WITH SPIKY HAIR
Dear Konrad,
The boy of my dreams is in my biology lecture. He sits two rows down
from me and one over and I find
I spend most of the class looking
at the pink points of his spiky hair.
Konrad, I don't think he even knows
my name. How do I go about asking
him out?
Help!
One More Lonely Girl
While you have the impression he
is the boy of your dreams, everyone has flaws — your crush is no
closer to perfect than you are!
Before you've heard him speak,
how can you tell if the guy is as
cool as his hair? That's why you
shouldn't be afraid to approach
him and see if he really is worth
obsessing over.
Just like biology, approaching
your crush has to do with being
natural. Just happen to find a seat
PHOTO COURTESY OFBUBBLEWS
What to do when somoene hands you a
copy of the Kama Sutra in biology class?
beside him, or run into him one
day. Say hello, smile, and then
break the ice by talking about
whatever you have in common —
in this case, biology class. Make
a comment about the professor,
or ask for homework advice.
Before you ask him out, however,
he should be approaching you.
The next time, instead of sitting
beside him, wait for him to sit
beside you.
KAMA SUTRA, HE DON'T
SUITYA!
Dear Konrad,
This afternoon in my calculus
lecture, a boy sat down next to me
and handed me a copy of the Kama
Sutra. Then he just stared. Unfortunately, I was sitting in the middle
of a jam-packed row and could not
get up to leave, so I did my best to
ignore him for the entire 80-minute
lecture. What the hell do I do if this
happens again?
Sincerely,
Creeped Out
This guy most likely got lost on
his way to a different department. With all the construction on campus, who could
blame him?
If this did in fact happen, ridiculous acts deserve a ridiculous
response. If you feel comfortable
enough, diffuse such situations
with humour. As you felt creeped
out, you did the right thing by
ignoring him. People who do
such things are seeking out a
reaction. He may have thought
you dropped it, or perhaps he was
fishing for material to post on
UBC Confessions.
If you are afraid you'll run into
him again, try to walk into the
class with a friend or approach
someone at the start of class and
strike up a conversation. This will
take your mind off the situation
and make it harder for him to
approach you. 31
Got an etiquette question for
Konrad? Send them to etiquette®
ubyssey.ca to see them answered in
the paper. II Scene
COMIC »
99 problems
byTubey
toons.com
CATCULTY
SCIENCE
LLUSTRATION LUELLASUNATHE UBYSSEY
CHART»
THE ALL-NIGHTER
IT'S 12 —BETTER
GET STARTED
EHH, TOO EARLY
3    4    5
7    8
WELP, LOOKS LIKE
THIS IS GOING TO BE
AN ALL-NIGHTER
DRINKARED
BULL.WHOO,
SECOND
WIND!
AHH, ONLY TWO HOURS LEFT.
MUST... TRY ...HARDER...
MUST... CLOSE ... TUMBLR...
SO TIRED. WRITING OVERLY
VERBOSE AND FLOWERY
SENTENCES TO FILL WORD
COUNT
GRAHH. PAPER DONE.
WHAT IS PROOFREADING.
,      SNOOZE ON THE BUS
MEETING
TIMES
Come to our meetings to
get involved with UBC's
student newspaper!
NEWS
Mondays @ 3pm
FEATURES
Mondays @ 1:30pm
VIDEO + PHOTO
GENERAL STAFF
Tuesdays @ lpm
Fridays @ 3:30pm
SPORTS + REC
CULTURE
"—
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SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS 5
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