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The Ubyssey Jan 24, 1984

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THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVI, No. 30
Vancouver. B.C. Tuesday, January 24,1984
.T,fa§ga,,i-t.48
228-2301
avid Thompson closure
estroys source of
unique education
c
tS.
Restraint obsessed government takes
educational, cultural and economic
centre away from Kootenay Valley
By ARNOLD
NELSON, B.C. (CUP) —
It's the final week of rehearsals
before Bertolt Brecht's play
The Good Person of Tze
Chuan opens at the David
Thompson' University Centre
here.
The centre's information office expects more interest than
usual for the play produced by
the theatre department and
featuring an original musical
score written and performed by
the composition class. It's likely
to be one of the last productions.
The provincial government announced Jan. 4 its decision to close
David Thompson in May permanent-
iy.
If the centre does close, it will be an
attack on the cultural community of
the Kootenay Valley and the final
curtain for 33 years of higher education in the region.
"The loss to community is enormous," says Tom O'Connor, a
philosophy instructor at the centre
which is jointly operated by Selkirk
College and the University of Victoria.
Nelson will lose about $3 million
annually in wages and money spent
on goods and services in the community. DTUC is the area's second
largest employer behind CP Rail.
About 100 people will be laid off.
DTUC's 500 full- and part-time
students will be forced to transfer to
other institutions to complete their
studies.
But more importantly, the social
fabric of this area will be severely impaired. The school's library, art
gallery and theatre will all close.
DTUC's faculty, active music instructors for 92 children in the com-
HEDSTROM
munity and members of the library
and hospital boards will leave.
Gone will be the province's only
program in rural education.
Students will no longer be able to
take the unique interdisciplinary programs offered here instead of having
to go to a metropolitan university.
O'Connor says Interior students
are being robbed of a chance to experience higher education in their
own community.
"What we have is a political decision to restrict access to university
unless you move to the coast. It's like
it was 15 years ago in this province."
In typical Socred style, the announcement came with no advance
warning or discussion. The centre's
director Richard Pearse had one hour
notice before the decision became
public.
Pearse says the government closed
DTUC because the centre is not cost
effective despite recent efforts to
move toward government funding
criteria.
At the root of DTUC's cost effective problem is an education ministry
funding formula which favors large
enrolment and programs with 25 to
30 students. The formula
discriminates against the centre's
liberal and fine arts programs with
studios, workshops, and elective
courses.
Selkirk College principal Leo Perra
says the cabinet's decision to close
DTUC was based on comparisons
with other institutes that offer similar
courses.
"The centre needs more students in
the programs that are there. Stacked
up against provincial norms it fares
badly," Perra says. The region's
small population base also limits
possible enrolment, he says.
"The government was looking for
dollars. They looked at DTUC with a
certain set of values, and with the cost
situation closed the centre.
"The training priorities of the province are geared to employment opportunities. That is the stated objective. The colleges will not offer visual
or performing arts," Perra says.
Ironically, an evaluation of the
centre's first four years by representatives of the two government
ministries and the two institutes
responsible for funding DTUC
recommended the centre continue,
based on its performance after it
replaced Notre Dame University in
1977.
A letter from education minister
Jack Heinrich and universities
minister Pat McGeer dated Sept. 21
indicated the centre would continue.
Pearse says the centre had just
completed a market survey which
outlined 31 recommendations to promote DTUC and was in the process of
reorganizing courses and programs to
fit the criteria.
"We feel we've been cheated in a
chance to become cost effective in the
view of those who fund us," O'Connor says. "We had every reason to
believe we would become cost effective."
The David Thompson University
Centre was a unique concept from the
start, born out of a three year battle
to keep a university facility in the
area. In 1975, NDP education
minister Eiileen Dailly decided to stop
all public funds for Notre Dame, a
private university.
According to education ministry
figures, the cost of educating students
at NDU was reportedly double that of
UBC. The ministry proposed to offer
courses from the three coastal universities on the campus as an alternative.
Before the NDP was defeated that
year, Dailly reversed her decision and
declared NDU would become the province's fourth university.
But the newly elected Social Credit
government scrapped the idea.
Following immense local political
pressure, it followed through on
plans to open a joint facility. They
passed the Notre Dame University
Act in 1977 which created DTUC.
Under the act Notre Dame assets
were transferred to the government.
The agreement was signed by the
NDU board of governors and the
province stipulated the site would be
used for future education. Today, the
government hasn't revealed plans for
X
\
'*.
the site according to O'Connor, but
rumors circulating in Nelson predict a
convention centre or a minimum
security prison will be set up.
Selkirk College took over the site's
maintenance and together with UVic
became responsible for funding and
offering programs there. This fiscal
year Selkirk provided $2.7 million
and UVic, $690,000 of the centre's
budget.
"If you read the way this place is
set up, it's a recipe for failure,"
O'Connor says. "What's needed is a
recipe that allows both partners
responsibilities and makes both worthy of merit. That's what's missing.
We have unequal and unwilling partners."
With UVic facing a six per cent
funding decrease next year, administration president Howard Petch
says UVic cannot fund DTUC out of
the operating budget. Selkirk faces
similar problems and according to
O'Connor, Perra is urging the Selkirk
board to ask the government to
transfer some of its programs offered
in Nelson back to the Castlegar campus.
The community of Nelson,
students and employees are mounting
a battle to save the centre in its current form.
Other options under study include
a plan to privatize the centre and
operate with private donations,
O'Connor says.
Some people hope for a miraculous
shift in policy, which will prompt the
government to realize the value of a
small arts university and give DTUC
the same potential for national
recognition as facilities like Alberta's
Banff Centre.
But despite $3,000 in student
money and an active strategy to
create public support, the centre will
likely close.
After the announcement, local
MLA Lome Nicholson charged that
the local Socred riding association
wants this controversy over long
before the next general election.
And as O'Connor points out, the
Socred policy on culture and education is clear.
"The trend is to use public money
only for necessities. Humanities, including liberal arts and sciences and
fine arts, appear to be regarded as
luxury items."
hj£l Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 24,1984
B.B. belts out blues
By JACK TIELEMAN
A capacity crowd packed the
Plazzaz Showroom Jan. 16 for the
opening night of B.B. King's two-
week stand. The legendary blues
guitarist displayed his characteristic
guitar style and stage manner that
has delighted audiences for 30
years.
B.B. King
Playing at the Plazaaz
in the International Plaza Hotel
Until Jan. 28
King's polished band opened the
evening with an instrumental
number. Each musician took a turn
demonstrating their talents. But
when King came on stage, a new
dimension was added to their sound
and the crowd responded with
cheers.
Soon King was belting out classic
blues tunes such as Everyday I Have
The Blues and the Inflation Blues,
one of the highlights of the evening,
with King and his guitar Lucille at
their best.
The song captured not only
King's guitar style, but his stage
presence — focused on his facial expressions and singing style.
After the Inflation Blues King
played other notable tunes such as
When it All Comes Down and Its
just a Matter Of Time. The hour
and a quarter set ended with Kings
classic tune The Thrill is Gone, and
a standing ovation. King's ability as
a showman was prominent
throughout the show. He does more
than just play blues, he jokes and
reminisces.
His anecdotes are funny and his
punch lines are timed perfectly. But
these diversions last only for a few
minutes, and then its back to the
blues. The performance was
plagued by the shortness of the
set and lack of dancing room.
DR. KATHEM TALEBIAN
DENTIST
is pleased to announce
the opening of his dental practice
at
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(near UBC)
TELEPHONE: 224-8662
REC UBC
presents
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A scuba certification course including pool preparation
and open water dives with emphasis on skills, principles, equipment and techniques of diving.
Class starts Tues., Jan. 31st/84
REGISTER:
War Memorial Gym, Room 203
Tues. 24th to Mon. 30th, 9:00-11:30 a.m.
and 12:30-3:00 p.m.
EXPLORE B.C.'S BEAUTIFUL
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8t
FASHION
SHOW
When:
Where:
What:
Wednesday, January 25th at lunchtime,
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
At the UBC Bookstore, Sportswear
Department.
Great styles, great looks for spring. 25%
discount on team sales of 25 items or
more!
SKIING
BLACKCOMB SKI TRIP
January 29th, 1984
Register January 25th — WM Gym
Organizational Meeting January 26th
$35.00 Lift Ticket / Transportation
Smorgasbord / Bzzr / Ski Race
NOTICE OF REFERENDUM
Referendum to be held Wednesday, January 25th
to Friday, January 27th.
The question to be placed to all students is:
"That the A.M.S. request the U.B.C. administration to introduce
the following measures:
1) An unequivocal ban on campus research which is
directly applicable to conducting nuclear, biological,
chemical, or outer space warfare.
2) Full public disclosure of the sources of funding and the
nature of all research projects connected with the
University.
3) Establishment of an ethics committee to evaluate and
approve all research conducted at U.B.C. with the
potential mlitary aplications as an essential part of
the criteria for screening proposed research."
YES    □ NO    D
POLLS 10 A.M. - 4 P.M.
ANGUS
BUCHANAN
CEME
CPSC
HEBB THEATRE
LAW
MACLEOD
MACMILLAN
SCARFE
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
SUB
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Poll locations and times subject to the availability of Poll Clerks. Tuesday, January 24, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Students plan protests for B.C.
By PATTI FLATHER
Student protests in B.C. loom as
students plan to combat huge tuition fee hikes and other measures
prompted by the provincial government's proposed funding cut.
UBC students against the budget
will definitely plan protests at their
Thursday meeting, said SAB
member Kevin Annett.
"It's not over by any means."
Annett said SAB is coordinating
its efforts with Simon Fraser
University students. "We're going
to make more of an attempt to include high school students as well,"
he said.
And an upcoming Canadian
Federation of Students Pacific
region general meeting will coordinate province-wide protests, said
chair Stephen Learey.
The meeting, which will include
representatives from most student
unions in B.C., will examine student response to UBC's recent decision to raise fees by 33 per cent and
introduce differential fees.
"UBC will be looked at as a
precedent for what's going to happen," Learey said.
He predicted higher tution fees at
colleges in B.C. if the provincial,
government cuts post-secondary
funding by six per cent, and said
UBC's decision to raise tuition fees
was inevitable because of the
government's proposal. Learey
predicted that accessibility all over
B.C.  will begin to decrease
But universities minister Pat
McGeer denied that provincial
government policies prompted the
fee increase.
'We don't set the university's
budget. It sets its own," he said. He
claimed that UBC receives a "very
generous portion" of provincial
government funds.
And he said UBC's accessibility
will not be threatened by higher
fees.
"During the last couple of years,
the number of students has sharply
risen. It's not correct to say fewer
people are benefitting."
Learey said of McGeer's analysis:
"It's sort of interesting when
there's going to be 1,000 fewer
students going to university next
year." UBC first year enrolment
was recently reduced by 500 and 500
former David Thompson University
students are without a school in
their community as of May.
He added B.C. has the lowest
participation rate in Canada for
post-secondary education and that
fewer students from outside the
lower mainland will be able to afford higher education.
Although McGeer recently sent a
letter to all three B.C. universities
indicating the government's position on differential fees, he denied
that the government put pressure on
UBC to implement differential fees
for foreign students — another
measure to offset the anticipated
shortfall.
"We have not dictated what fees
should be," he said.
He also denied that differential
fees are racist because they
discriminate against students whose
nationality is not Canadian. "If differential fees are racist, there are an
awful lot of racists around."
UBC administration president
George Pedersen, who admitted
that the provincial government put
pressure on UBC to implement differential fees, said they will not
raise substantially higher revenues.
"There is an economic argument
for it. It's not one I agree with, but
I'm not the one making the deci-
Tuition hikes hit
other universities
mmmtm hvoous
mmimo $ &x ltd,
ENTALS
By VICTOR WONG
Following on the heels of UBC's
33 per cent tuition increase, Simon
Fraser University and the University
of Victoria are recommending
massive fee hikes for students next
year.
SFU academic vice-president
Jock Munro said a proposal for a
23 per cent increase would be presented to the board of governors
Tuesday. Approval of the increase
would make SFU's fees comparable
to UBC's, he said.
"This (possibility) was known by
everyone formally for several
months," Munro said. "We are
making the formal announcement
on Tuesday. No one likes fee increases and we don't either, but we
have no choice."
The student society has not yet issued a statement about the proposed increase, Munro said.
"They did not receive formal
notice until recently," he said.
UVic administration president
Howard Petch said he is recommending a 25 per cent increase to
UVic's board of governors.
"I'm not sure how much the final
total will be exactly, but I'm recommending something on the order of
25 per cent," he said.
But UVic students are strongly
objecting to the proposed increase,
led by student society president
Brian Stevenson. Stevenson made a
presentation Monday to the president's office which Petch said was
"obviously well thought out and
well written."
"The students here are obviously
very concerned, particularly about
the student aid program," Petch
said, referring to a recent disclosure
by student leaders that the B.C.
government intends to introduce
drastic changes to the aid program,
including the abolition of grants.
UVic's student society sent letters
of protest to both federal and provincial governments and arranged
for several students from rural areas
to see provincial cabinet ministers.
"They're trying to develop an
awareness among the students."
UVic's graduate student society is
planning similar strategies to inform the public about the issue, he
said.
— sua mcllroy photo
THE PARTY'S OVER . . . commander-in-chief's campus palace, recently renovated at paltry cost of a half
million dollars, has now undergone a twenty dollar facelift and is available for Party functions on a lease basis. It
is the C.O.'s latest attempt to generate cash for B.C.'s dying university system, which sustained yet another
severe blow after Party duped CO. into proposing monster fee hikes. Pedersen family has taken up residence in
the Buchanan building now that Arts is to be phased out.
Students to vote on research ban
UBC students will decide this
week if they want chemical,
biological and space warfare
research to be conducted on campus.
Referendum questions on this
week's Alma Mater Society election
ballot calls for a ban on research for
weapons of mass destruction, full
disclosure of funding and research
Employee must walk on water
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
The university is searching for a
multi-talented individual to beef up
its contact with the outside world.
Advertising for UBC's new position of vice-president of development and community relations has
appeared in the Sun, University Affairs, and the Globe and Mail. The
administration has received about
10 applications for the job so far.
"We really need someone who
walks on water in a variety of
ways," said administration president George Pedersen.
The person hired will be responsible for building financial as well as
moral support for the university.
He or she will develop closer con
tacts with influential people in the
business community and in government, but must have a substantial
knowledge of university affairs.
Pedersen said the fourth vice-
president will act as an effective
communicator by informing and
bringing UBC closer to the general
public. "Universities generally
don't make effective use of the
media, and people don't understand the importance of research and
its application," he said.
And the chosen one will encourage more private donations
from UBC alumni, Pedersen said.
American universities currently
have closer ties to the private sector
and   their   graduates   than   their
Prices hit witless levels
Inflation and large markups may be a fact of life, but sometimes
things can go a little bit too far.
The UBC bookstore was discovered to be not going by the book
recently when a student noticed a strange price tag on Canadian
Wood Frame Construction. Vera Pronker showed the $59 book
to a clerk and told him it wasn't worth it.
Sure enough it wasn't, and the book was sent back to the shelf
with its correct $3 price tag.
"He told me it must have been some awful mistake," said Pronker. "But what about the price of other books?"
What indeed. Bookstore management attributed the over pricing
episode to human error.
"It stood out a mile — the book wasn't worth $59," said store
manager John Hedgecock. "Mind you, it's interesting that when a
$50 book gets sold at five nobody says anything. When it's the
other way around, we're left to our wits."
But this time the bookstore was found to be witless.
Canadian counterparts, he added.
"Positions like this are common
in the U.S. It's a career pattern
there," he said.
The salary awarded to the new
vice-president will be negotiable to
ensure the person will not suffer a
cut in pay upon appointment, said
administration information officer
Jim Banham.
Pedersen said he expects the person to generate more money than he
or she receives in salary. And
although all three of UBC's vice-
president are men, Pedersen said
the position is equally open to
women.
"I would be delighted if we could
get a woman for the position," he
said.
Both Pedersen and Banham said
they had no idea how much the
university is spending in advertising and approximately how much
the salary would be. Pedersen said
he hopes the position of fund-raiser
will be filled within the next three or
four months.
"We're moving slowly because
we want to get someone who is really qualified. It's going to be increasingly important for the university to
build in this dimension," he said,
adding the university cannot continue to rely on government funding.
Positions similar to the one being
advertised exist at Simon Fraser
University, the Universities of Victoria, Waterloo and Toronto, and
McGill University.
at UBC and the establishment of an
ethics committee to evaluate all research.
More than 3,500 students signed
a petition endorsing the ban, and
organizers are hoping they will receive the 2,800 yes votes needed to
reach quorum.
"The purpose of the referendum
is to stop the current trend in North
America towards research on weapons of mass destruction," said
Cachy Garneau, an organizer for
the campaign against military research on campus.
According to research services director Rick Spratly, UEIC accepts
only unclassified research. But Garneau said "similar groups to
CAMROC in the U.S. have found
that dangerous research is not
necessarily done as classified research."
Garneau said she doubts a ban
would affect current research at
UBC. "UBC is fairly clean now.
We just want to make sure it stays
that way," she said.
Meanwhile in Montreal, students
and citizens are campaigning for a
nuclear free city and are organizing
referenda on the nuclear industry
and research.
Referenda are being organized at
the Vanier Snowdon colleges,
Universite de Laval and Concordia
University.
At McGill, Project Ploughshares
plans a referendum but with no
definite date or format yet.
Organizers say the Concordia
referendum, planned for early
March, may affect research at the
university.
"One department at Concordia
carried out $170,000 worth .of
military research in 1981-82," said
John Kinloch of the coalition des
etudiante-es Quebecois-es pour le
desarmament. He said even more
research is conducted at McGill.
Meanwhile, the municipal opposition party, the Montreal Civic
Movement is lobbying for a city
wide referendum to make greater
Montreal a nuclear free zone,
despite the protests of Mayor Jean
Drapeau's civic party, which claims
the matter is outside municipal
jurisdiction.
A referendum on declaring
Outremont, a district of Montreal,
a nuclear free zone was endorsed by
an 80 per cent vote last November.
According to the terms of the
referendum, nuclear devices may
not be located in Outremont, and
the community may prohibit the
transportation of hazardous
materials across Outremont city
limits.
Fast to end soon
Andre Sobolewski is nearing the
end of his 40-day fast for human
rights in B.C. but he has yet to hear
from government officials on their
plans to guarantee human rights
protection in B.C.
Repeated attempts to contact
government officials on human
rights have proved unsuccessful, he
said. "I feel bad because I made it
clear that it was in their power to
end my fast," said Sobolewski, who
is on day 38 of his fast.
"The main purpose of the fast
has been to find out the true intentions of the B.C. government on
human rights. It was not to make
any demands on the government,"
Sobolewski said.
Sobolewski tried to arrange
meetings with Garde Gardom
(MLA-Point Grey) and labor
minister Bob McClelland, who indicated he would visit Sobolewski
last week but never showed up.
The government's failure to respond to the fast reflects poorly on
their interest in human rights protection, he said.
But Sobolewski said he is in good
spirits and has no regrets about
choosing fasting as a form of protest. Sobolewski added he is physically very weak. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 24, 1984
Hot McGill scandal goes to courts
MONTREAL (CUP) — An invention that may be worth millions
of dollars has blown up a major
scandal at McGill University.
And the university faces public
humiliation this week as the scan
dal, which involves the new
chancellor, the chair of the microbiology department and two other
professors, goes before the courts.
The complex controversy started
quietly   one   year   ago,    when
Oops
•imcviimcvijiit
IN a Jan. 17 story Government
may kill program, we erroneously
stated SFU student society member
Kevin Russell had attended a
meeting with provincial finance
minister Hugh Curtis in Victoria.
Sorry. It was CFS — pacific
region chair Stephen Learey who
did the dirty work.
The reporter responsible was
forced to steal a sandwich and was
subsequently executed.
The Ubyssey would like to apologize for the following mistakes in
the story, (Thefts may raise SUBway prices, Jan. 13). The word executed" should have read "prosecuted." The SUBway management
has not hired three people to watch
for theft during lunch hour, it merely assigned three people.
SUBway will not switch to using
plastic utensils if thefts increase, instead it will use more. We would
like to add that three to four people
walk into the cafeteria per day with
the intention to steal, not three to
four per week as was reported.
The Ubyssey would like to correct certain factual errors which ap
peared in Friday's analysis piece,
(Money man seeks record fourth
term, Jan. 20). We would like to acknowledge the following: (1) James
Hollis has never given "allocations" to either the video club or
the Aquatic Society. The money the
Alma Mater Society lends to clubs
is not called "allocations." (2)
Hollis has never been treasurer of
the Aqua Soc. In fact, he has held
the positions of president, vice-
president and newsletter editor. (3)
The purchase of the word processor
and the satellite receiving system
were taken with student council's
full knowledge. (4) Prior to the
meeting in which The Ubyssey's
budget was restructured, discussions did occur between Hollis and
the paper.
Finally, The Ubyssey staff collectively made the decision to respect the author's wishes and withhold the byline, with a full awareness of the problems in doing so.
We fully anticipated the type of
criticism we received. We can only
emphasize the decision was not
made lightly and that the criticism is
fair. We apologize to Hollis for any
embarrassment we have caused.
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microbiology department chair Irving DeVoe and associate professor
Bruce Holbein rented private
laboratory space from McGill so
they could research market uses of
an invention that can apparently
recover radioactive material from
nuclear waste.
Their quiet world was shattered
suddenly in late October, when the
Montreal Gazette ran an article
claiming the professors were using
government research grants for
private purposes.
The article said DeVoe neglected
his duties as department chair to
spend time in Europe handling interests of the company DeVoe-
Holbein, Inc., while Holbein
neglected his graduate and
undergraduate students to work in
the laboratory.
The controversy soon expanded
when the student newspaper, the
McGill Daily, started a deeper investigation into DeVoe-Holbein.
The first issue that carried a story
on the scandal was promptly slapped with a court injunction sought
by the two irate professors.
The injunction also applied to
chemist Chun Fai Yam, a former
employee of the two professors who
claims he is the real inventor.
DeVoe and Holbein took the
issue to court Jan. 23 to extend the
injunction to six months. Should
they win, all information on the invention will be muzzled.
Both Yam and the Daily are appealing.
William Miller, Yam's lawyer,
says the real motive of the injunction is to seize Yam's documents on
the invention.
IN SUB
Basement
for a variety
of sandwiches
coffee and snacks
Open daily 7 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Fridays till 6:00 p.m.
NO RETURNS
OF TEXTBOOKS
AFTER JAN 31
The Bookstore regrets that,
due to the need to negotiate
and arrange for the return of
overstock to publishers in
specific quantities and by a
deadline, NO RETURNS OF
WINTER SESSION
TEXTBOOKS will be accepted
alter
JANUARY 31st 1984
The last dav for changes ot
classes is |an 13th.  1L)84 so the
nerds ot students changing
classes will be accommodated.
Because of the 10-day rule
TEXTBOOKS BOUGHT
AFTERJAN 21st 1984 WILL
BE NON-RETURNABLE.
MlliBOOKSTQ
"If my people, who are called by my Name, will humble themselves
and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I
will hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and will heal their
land."
IIChron.7:14
A CALL
TO PRAYER
For the entire campus community. All students, staff faculty and administration are inyiled to pray. Friday's at 12:30-1:15 p.m. St. Andrew's
Chapel (just east of Law Faculty)
Inter Varsity Christian Fellowship
GRADUATING
THIS YEAR?
Your   vote   is   necessary   to
decide on a GRAD present.
DATE: THURS., JAN. 26th
TIME: 1:30 p.m.
PLACE: HEBB THEATRE
The decision can't be made
without you!
1984 GRAD COMMITTEE COUNCIL Tuesday, January 24, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Youth ministry to restore hope
OTTAWA (CUP) — A confidential report presented to the federal
cabinet last July says the newly-
created youth ministry is largely a
public relations gesture.
The report, prepared by influential Liberal Senator Jaques Hebert,
recommends establishing a youth
ministry to "restore hope" to
young Canadians.
But Hebert admits "in spite of all
its efforts the Canadian government
cannot solve the youth unemployment problem." He promotes the
creation of the youth ministry as "a
simple and inexpensive way" of
restoring hope to young Canadians.
The report calls youth unemployment "a serious social problem"
but concentrates on the political
consequences of such a large group
of disaffected voters. A major function of the youth ministry is to
"make public opinion aware of the
problems of youth," Hebert writes.
Youth minister Celine Hervieux-
Payette, appointed Jan. 10, denied
her ministry is an exercise in public
relations.
"These are Senator Hebert's
views, my view is that I have the
portfolio," she said.
"If we were pessimistic enough to
say we were just created to appease
youth, I'm not sure I would have
taken the job," she said. "I have a
leadership role to play."
"I intend to do something else
than just PR," she said. She did not
elaborate on what new programs
her ministry would be sponsoring.
"I don't think the prime minister
would have created a ministry just
for the pleasure of having one," she
said.
The report said the ministry's
primary function is to coordinate
the "many generous and often effective" job creation programs offered by the federal government.
No new job creation funding will be
made   available   through   the
ministry.
"I will do more than just coordinate the effort of the
government," said Payette,
although such coordination was a
good place to start in addressing
youth problems.
Student loan plan
AMS credit union
idea has problems
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
The manager of UBC's Bank of
Montreal says a student owned and
operated credit union is a gamble he
wouldn't want to place a bet on.
"It's a multi-million dollar proposition," said campus branch
manager Stuart Clark. "There are
very substantial losses that could be
incurred if there is a change in interest rates."
Clark said an Alma Mater Society credit union, proposed at council's last meeting, would probably
not be successful even with a federal
government repayment guarantee.
The AMS would be required to
fill out detailed forms for each
loan, demonstrate economic viability, and would encounter difficulty
in obtaining government approval
for such a guarantee, Clark said.
"The documentation has to be
correct," he added.
While he declined to say whether
or not the management of the Bank
of Montreal would object to council
processing student loans, Clark said
the UBC branch has exclusive banking rights on campus.
But AMS finance director James
Hollis said council would be providing a service currently not offered by the Bank of Montreal, and
that the latter is violating its contract by refusing to process student
loans here.
"If they're not processing student loans on campus, then that's
surely in violation of their contract
(which   gives   them    exclusive
rights)," said Hollis.
He also disagreed with Clark's
assertions that the AMS would encounter difficulty with the federal
government. Council would only
have to provide administrative costs
and space when setting up a credit
union, he said.
"The loans are completely
guaranteed by the government," he
added.
The idea of a student run credit
union is still tentative, Hollis said.
It would only be implemented if
council can increase the number of
student services being provided, he
said.
"If anything we wouldn't be set
up probably until September and
that's only if we jump over all the
hurdles."
AMS external affairs Lisa Hebert
said the campus branch of Bank of
Montreal provides "atrocious" services to students.
"They came down with their
decision (to move the loan office
downtown) last year and a lot of
students are very upset," she said.
Clark said the consolidation of
student loan processing in one
downtown bank in 1981 was a cost
saving measure and allowed clerks
skilled in processing loans to avoid
duplication of effort.
He claimed only 20 to 30 per cent
of UBC students have student loans,
and that the AMS couldn't serve
all students requiring assistance.
"I think they should look what
they're getting into," he said.
Boycottincj MuttlncfHoitCH lNrorics
Multinationals proliferate in developing countries to increase their
profits, not to satisfy natives' needs or wants, say overseas university
workers.
"Multinationals are part of our way of life, but there are social responsibilities that they must meet," Bill Raikes, a member of Canadian University Services Overseas, told 80 people in International
House Thursday.
CUSO worker Carl Grigoruk said consumers can illustrate their
opposition to multinationals' money making practises by boycotting
their products. Boycotts often result in a substantial loss of profits,
he said.
"It is one solution that all people can use. They only care about
profits and if they lose them they will have to back off," he said.
But he added that companies aware of consumer boycotts retaliate
by changing the name which appears on the product in question.
"They use a subsidiary name on the product to conceal the parent
corporation's name," he said. "It makes it hard to boycott these
products when they do this."
Raikes cited the example of the N. stle's consumer boycott to illustrate how powerful this tactic can be. "The infant formula action
committee has had good success in their boycott of Nestle's products. It worked becaue a large number of people were made aware of
the problem and took action."
V.
"I have the dollars in existing
programs and I intend to make the
best use of them," she said.
Payette said more job creation by
the youth ministry was unlikely
because "if I enlarge the budget for
job creation or youth unemploy
ment, I'm taking it from somebody
else's pocket."
She said the $170 million in existing job programs under her
jurisdiction is "a good start."
"The problem is huge," she said,
but "I think we can do something."
— neil lucente photo
RARE EARTH TREMOR causes Chinese premier Zhao Ziyang to tumble out of limosine and into fountain outside UBC president George Pedersen's house (main entrance shown in background). Officials said tremor was
caused by collective fainting of student body upon hearing of tuition fee increases. Others speculated tremor
was work of anticommunist engineers, but would not comment further.
Intimacy makes life worthwhile
Intimacy is the most important
value for human beings, according
to a California philosophy professor.
Humans have no meaningful
sense of being except in relationships, Peter Koestenbaum told 300
people Friday in the Woodward
building.
"To be is to be with — to be
human is demand contact."
Koestenbaum attributed the lecture's high turnout to the alienation
created by the nuclear age, which
has made humans desperate for
contact. This feeling occurs "when
you perceive the inwardness of
another human being and when, at
the same time, you know that the
other human being's inwardness is
perceiving your own," he said.
Three fundamental paradoxes of
human nature keep us from embracing intimacy more fully, he
said. The first is our need to
preserve individual identity while
attempting to attain the "total surrender" required to fuse with
another human being.
The second results from the tension between the realistic and
mystical parts of human nature.
"There is the part of you that is
realistic, hard nosed, practical, that
got you a job and a home — and
then there is the part that is
mystical,   artistic,   philosophical,
that craves a solution to the problem of existence. And that is, of
course, what the ultimate in love is
going to offer you."
The third paradox is between our
infinite yearning for love and total
acceptance, while recognizing we
must  learn  to  give  up  cherished
things, even love itself, he said.
Intimacy cannot be achieved in
this lifetime, Koestenbaum said.
But humans must continually strive
for it, he added.
"Intimacy with other human beings — that, more than anything
else, makes life worth living."
Educational campaigns
halt Chinese assimilation
Chinese in South East Asia have
been protected from assimilation by
massive educational campaigns, a
visiting professor said Friday.
"Dramatic intervention in the
educational field helped to restore
Chineseness in South East Asia,"
Wang Gungwu told 30 people in the
Asian Centre.
Chinese schools were started for
the first time by Qing rationalists
and local leaders in countries such
as the Philippines, Singapore and
Viet Nam, said Gungwu. Teachers
were trained in Qing dynasty
China, he said.
"The schools were used
specifically for the promotion of
Chinese consciousness. An urgent
need was felt to prevent further de-
tribalization of Chinese in South
East Asia."
Confucian   role   models   were
originally used to install Chinese
values in schools but role models
more appropriate to South East
Asians later emerged, said Gungwu.
The local population was originally
"not so concerned with being purely Chinese, but rather with being
Chinese in South East Asian
terms," he said.
An example of the new role
models was the synthesis of the
Chinese value of male dominance
with the more assertive attitudes of
South East Asian women, he said.
While Chinese schools offered a
sense of identity and an elite role
model to emulate, the West also
had a role model, Gungwu said.
"The West offered a new kind of
elite, that of the modern professional," he said. Doctors, lawyers
and engineers were included in this,
he said. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 24, 1984
W^- v&ssey
Stop nukes in our very own back yard
This Wednesday to Friday, UBC
students will have a unique opportunity to make a statement against
the arms race and the threat of
nuclear war. We will have this opportunity during the AMS referendum on military research on campus.
This referendum does not demand a radical statement from
students. Its demands appeal to
common sense: a ban on research
directly applicable to nuclear,
chemical, biological or outer-space
weapons, open disclosure of the
sources of funding and the nature
of UBC research, and the establishment of an ethics committee to
evaluate all UBC research.
The aim is not to inhibit research.
Strict ethics committee criterion
would ensure valid research is not
banned. The intent is to stop the
development of weapons of mass
destruction before it starts, at the
research stage.
By the time we hear about the
development of a new weapon like
the   cruise   missile,   there   are   so
many vested interests established
that scrapping these systems is extremely difficult. UBC students can
take action at the research stage by
supporting this referendum.
Consider a few facts:
• more than 40 per cent of the
world's scientists are involved in
military research.
• the U.S. government research
budget is devoted almost entirely to
military research.
• many U.S. universities such as
Berkley in California have substantial military research grants.
• UBC has received more than
$600,000 in the last two years from
the Canadian defence department.
Military research at UBC right
now may not be significant. UBC
researchers are not permitted by
university policy to do classified
research, but this does not mean
the research is harmless.
There is evidence some UBC
faculty would like a share of the
lucrative military-research pie. A
few UBC professors attended last
year's defence industry seminar at
Robson Square sponsored by the
Pentagon. One UBC professor, vying for one of the lucrative research
grants who was attending said "My
research interests overlap with the
U.S. department of defense."
It  figures  that  in  tough  times
when research grants are scarcer,
military research is tempting. As
one of the seminar organizers said,
"The U.S. military is one sector of
the economy that is not going
through a recession."
Students should be very wary of
research at a time when the military
industry is growing. If there isn't
any of this research going on now,
that's a good sign. But UBC needs
a firm policy that will keep this
research out.
Vote once, vote often.
Letters
Analysis is filled with libel
Letters
Board members are just
'flunkies' of the Socreds
Now that our worst fears have
been confirmed and the administration has raised our fees by a third, it
would be easy to become despondent. For, quite clearly, administration president George Pedersen and
company are not listening to us and
will never listen to us. They
wouldn't heed our opinions even
when a quarter of all UBC students
signed  a petition  against  the  in-
-,*   -   ; **i,
'„ '  - t
The Ubyssey welcomes all comments and criticisms concerning
stories and letters in this edition, as
well as past ones. Letters should be
typed on a 70-space line, and triple-
spaced, as this makes proofreading
easier and helps us figure out how
much space the letter will take up.
Letters of a racist, sexist, or otherwise offensive nature will not be
printed. Please do not address letters to the editor or Sir, as the odds
are 2 to 1 that the editor will be a
woman. Get the picture?
crease, nor when 300 of us publicly
protested.
On the other hand, Pedersen and
the other board of governors members are just flunkies of the provincial government and its policies.
The instigator of our higher fees
next year is that government. Our
protests must be aimed at it if we
hope to really stop the attacks on
our education system.
I'm proud of the students who
turned out for the protest last
Thursday, for we collectively put to
rest the old cliche that UBC students are inherently apathetic. Our
fight will continue. I hope you will
all come to the next students against
the budget meeting, this Thursday
at 12:30 p.m. at the Lutheran Campus Centre (across from the general
service administration building) —
we need your ideas and energy.
Kevin Annett
law 1
students against the
budget
Your "analysis" in Friday's
Ubyssey (Money man seeks record
fourth term, Jan. 20) is absolutely
erroneous and full of malicious libel. It is the confused ramblings of
someone who cares less about truth
and accuracy than his own obsessive vendetta against myself. Most of
the points are not open to any form
of interpretation. They are blatantly false.
Your "anonymous" writer has
stated that my favorite groups that I
was personally involved with were
given "hefty allocations" from the
Alma Mater Society budget and included the video club (which I have
never had anything to do with) and
Aqua Society. This is complete nonsense. Neither club has received a
single penny in budget allocation
from the AMS. Not a cent. Ever.
Clubs are constitutionally ineligible
for direct allocations from the AMS
budget. Other than the direct areas
of council and the student administrative commission, the only groups
which quality for direct funding are
the service organizations. These include The Ubyssey, CITR, Speakeasy, the AMS women's centre, the
ombudsoffice and volunteer connections. I am strained to believe
that your anonymous writer, as a
former AMS executive who specifically coordinated clubs, did not
know this.
Contrary to the story's statement, I have never been the treasurer of Aqua Society or any other
AMS club while serving as director
of finance. Never.
The story continues that major
purchases were made without council input. Absolutely false. The
word processor is a case in point.
The search for an appropriate word
processor began in May, 1983. Between May and August, when the
order was finally placed, council
was given updates at every meeting.
The written council reports are
on file and open to anyone wanting
to see them. Obviously your writer
didn't. In addition to inviting input
at each meeting, funding had to be
approved first by a two-thirds ratification of the AMS budget committee and then finally by a two-thirds
ratification of council itself. Also,
council was fully aware of the satellite receiving system that was purchased on request of the Pit management well in advance of placing
the order.
Allegations of "railroading" a
SUBfilms increase and The Ubyssey
budget revision are completely unfounded. Full and lengthy discussions were held with both groups
far in advance of final ratifications
of budget committee and council. It
should be noted that The Ubyssey's
budget "massive restructuring"
(the only noteworthy change was a
requirement for The Ubyssey to
start containing a slightly higher advertising content) was necessary
while   your   "anonymous"   writer
was The Ubyssey's business manager and was running the paper
thousands of dollars over budget.
Contrary to statements, the increase in SUBfilms price was made
entirely by Filmsoc itself, not the
AMS or myself.
I take particular exception to the
contents made about my attitude
towards campus unions. While not
a diehard supporter, I fully respect
the rights and especially the legality
of unions. I am unable to comment
on the story's allegations other than
stating that I have no idea what the
writer is talking about. Obviously,
neither does he.
The writer of this story has done
a disservice to The Ubyssey and has
misled its readers. "Anonymity"
should not protect someone who
publicly makes false and derogatory
statements. Also, suspicion is cast
upon the integrity of all the people
who fit the "anonymous" writer's
description.
James B. Hollis
director of finance
THE UBYSSEY
January 24, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"Uh, folks," announced Sarah Cox, "we just snafued. That analyst we hired turned out to be a dud."
"Hoo boy," muttered Muriel Draaisma as Chris Wong fainted and started to wait in his delirium. Pani
Flather sent Gordon Clark out to find a straitjacket, while Sarah.Millin phoned Riverview Memorial to
pick Chris up. Meanwhile, Victor Wong was trying to locate Stephen Wisenthal's lawyer, to cram up
on the libel laws, and Peter Berlin arranged for himself and Monte Stewart to flee to England. Doug
Schmidt and Neil Lucente decided to hide in the darkroom, while Jack Tieleman told Mike Tracey to
stay home that day. Debbie Lo and Kurt Preinsperger jumped out the window, and Harry Hertscheg
and Bruce Campbell locked both doors. "Well here's another fine mess you've gotten us into!"
shouted Robby Robertson to the unfortunate analyst. Sue Mcllroy looked on in utter and complete
disgust.
) Tuesday, January 24, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Letters
Haves and have-nots have right to post-secondary education
A number of misconceptions
seem to have arisen from the letter
which I wrote on behalf of students
against the budget to The Ubyssey
(UBC education to be buried, Jan.
13), and if I may be permitted the
space I would like to clarify some of
these rather serious misunderstandings. I speak, of course, to Sandra
Chamberlain's retort, (Education
'not a right,' Jan. 17).
Firstly, let me say the letter which
appeared in The Ubyssey bearing
my name was not the same letter as
that which I had originally drafted.
It had been edited and embellished
by another member of SAB, apparently for stylistic considerations. Be
that as it may, I wish to respond to
Sandra because the letter which ran
did express my general beliefs regarding education.
Secondly, Ros is an abbreviated
form of Rosalind and yes, SHE
feels that accessibility to post-secondary education is being unjustly
restricted.
Now, I would like to address the
confusion as to the definition of
right. Any college dictionary states
that a right is that which is "in accordance with what is good, proper,
or just" or "that which is due to
anyone by just claim, legal guarantees, moral principles etc." Sandra
herself states that the choice to obtain an education past the secondary level is guaranteed "by the
grace of our constitution." To possess such a right does not imply, as
Ms. Chamberlain seems to think,
that anyone is obligated to exercise
it; it merely refers to the fact that all
of us (at least theoretically) have
equal opportunity to pursue higher
education if such is our desire and
provided, of course, that we possess
the relevant qualifications.
The problem, as I stated in my
original letter to The Ubyssey, is
that cutbacks in funding the post-
secondary education system and the
subsequent tuition fee increases
make universities and colleges accessible to only a small wealthy
elite. (This is to say nothing of the
abhorrent trend which sees B.C.'s
universities being redefined as mere
technical training schools, answerable only to the supply and demand
of a consumer economy.)
Thus, those individuals who find
themselves in economically disadvantaged positions are being denied
access to post-secondary education
and will be unable to obtain the
knowledge   which   might    permit
Research controls have precedent
Over the past three weeks UBC's
peace groups have focused their attention on a campaign to curtail
military research on campus. This
drive began with a petition which
asked students to support three major objectives: (1) full public disclosure of the amount and purpose
of military funds allocated to UBC,
(2) the establishment of an ethics
committee to oversee military research, (3) a ban on all research on
campus specifically intended to develop new weapons of mass destruction.
The type of controls envisioned
for military research at UBC are
similar to the successful guidelines
established for recombinant DNA
research in the U.S. It was a group
of molecular biologists who originated an open discussion about the
regulation of recombinant DNA research because they believed some
of the research might result in harm
to the public.
The original guidelines required
periodic revision, following public
hearings, so that they could be adjusted to new scientific data and to
changing estimates of the risks of
the research. New data have indeed
permitted a more adequate assessment of risks, and allowed significant modifications of the guidelines. This experience has shown
that scientists and the public can cooperate in resolving conflicts between the right to the freedom of inquiry and other values that are essential to a humane society.
It is paramount this same cooperative responsibility be exercised
over military research because there
is no greater risk to society than the
development of new weapons of
mass destruction. The nature of
each new generation of these weapons is such that the likelihood of
nuclear war is increased.
The plebiscite offers UBC students an opportunity to ensure that
research done on this campus does
not contribute to this dangerous
trend. It gives them a voice with
which to state that they want their
university to make a constructive
contribution to society. By voting
yes, they will be acting on an issue
that affects them more profoundly
than any other, making their own
lives more secure, and helping to
build a safer future.
J. D. Firth
grad studies
Cooperative Christian
Campus Ministry
(Anglican-United Student Christian Movement)
"How to Read the Bible as if it really Mattered" — Led by George Hermanson.
To sign up, either phone 224-3722 or come to Lutheran Campus Centre, Wed.,
Jan 25 — 12:30 p.m. Possible times Mon., 12:30 p.m. or Tues., 12:30 p.m. or
4:30 p.m.
Wed. Night Pot Lucks, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre
Program: Baptism & Eucharist — World Council Study
The Campus Centre has room for you to eat your lunch — study — just be out of
the rain. You don't have to take part in any activity or be part of any group to
use the Centre.
Thurs., Jan. 26 — 4:30 p.m.
A gathering with Andre on the last day of his fast.
them to succeed in an increasingly
specialized job market. Instead they
are relegated to insecurity and dependency. Decreasing funding to
education can only further entrench
an already unacceptable disparity in
wealth and opportunity.
When I say that education should
be a right, I mean (and rightly so)
that all members of our society
should be given equal opportunity
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to choose an education and that the
criterion for relevant qualifications
should not be based upon wealth.
"In accordance with what is
good, proper, (and) just," post-secondary education must be made accessible to both the haves and the
have-nots, — left and . . . right.
Right? Right!
Rosalind Morris
students against the budget
Tiiedine.*1
Serving U.B.C. and West Point Grey
for the last 24 years.
We put our Sole in your
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For the early ones,   kve start serving
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CHRIS
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Having your hair
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 24, 1984
y/.Y////////,Y//.'//,'//S//A
SWAP
Copping comments on comic coverage
At the risk of seeming to make
impossibly fine distinctions, I
would like to correct the statements
attributed to me by The Ubyssey on
the subject of tuition fees, accessibility, and quality of education.
I would never try to justify the
high tuition fees we are experiencing. I was explaining to your reporter that tuition fees are necessary in terms of the budget constraints imposed on the university
by the provincial budget. Necessity
is a practical consideration; justification an ethical one. I also told
your reporter with great emphasis I
thought the decision was a very,
very bad thing — which doesn't
sound like justification to me, and
which was edited out.
Nor did I ever claim accessibility
had to be limited to preserve the
quality of education. I couldn't
possibly claim such a thing; I have
been arguing against that very point
of view for years, in every forum
available to me. I did say the $18
million shortfall isn't going to be
covered by the tuition increase, and
the remaining cuts will be in areas
associated with quality of education; programs, class sizes, and the
most radical possibility, "letting
go" of tenured faculty. Cutting $18
million from UBC's budget will inevitably affect both accessibility
and quality; there are no easy decisions left to make.
Well, but on to lighter matters.
It's encouraging to see you're groping towards a sense of humor, but
it's too bad the first clumsy attempts are aimed at people whose
only crime so far is running for
Alma Mater Society positions. That
crack about Glenna Chestnutt
wasn't especially funny, though,
and I would have thought there was
a limited amount of humor in descriptions of Peter Roosen and
Duncan Stewart eating. You must
have started getting tired around
the time you wrote Doug Dosdall
bit; the sarcasm is very weak; and 1
see you didn't have enough energy
to do more than a few lines on Nancy Bradshaw.
*£o^
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BE
A
VOLUNTEER
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To find an interesting and challenging volunteer
job, call VOLUNTEER CONNECTIONS at
228-3811 for an appointment or drop by THE STUDENT COUNSELLING AND RESOURCES
CENTRE, BROCK HALL 200.
SEE US IN SUB ON JAN. 25th
ON VOLUNTEER AWARENESS DAY
EVOLUTION
AND
CREATION
ALTERNATIVE THEORIES
IN THE STUDY OF LIFE
SPEAKING FOR
EVOLUTION
Mr. Fred Edwords
National Administrator
American Humanist Association
Member Board ot Directors   National Centre for Science Education  (Committees  of Correspondence Against Creation)
Editor and Author
SPEAKING FOR
CREATION
Dr. Earl
Hallonquist
Nationa1    Director   Creation   Science Association of Canada
B.A and M A (University of British
Columbia)   PhD   (McGill) in cellulose chemistry
Formerly Director of Wood Products Research. MacMillan Bloedel
Ltd
There will be a time for questions from the audience.
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, Auditorium No. 2
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25,1984, 7:00 P.M.
Admission Free
SPONSORED BY
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST OF CANADA
Well, who cares that candidates
are constitutionally guaranteed 200
words, anyway? After all, if you
can break CUP's guidelines and
print ageist slurs, why worry about
complying with the AMS rules?
And I don't understand why it was
necessary to insult Alan Pinkney so
often, especially when he's not even
a candidate.
But I didn't get really concerned
until I read that outrageous garbage
(Money man seeks record fourth
term). I looked closely, but I can
find only one fact — that Hollis is
running for a fourth term on the executive; the rest of it is malicious, or
mistaken, or both. It obviously was
meant to be an expose, but the only
thing it exposes is the editors' ignorance of AMS finances, constitution, and recent history, and of
Canadian libel law — ignorance I'm
reasonably sure the author doesn't
share, since he had the sense to remain anonymous.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Hairy puce blorgs on this tiny island
community ran around today at the
site of ballot boxes once again.
"Oooga, wooga, vote once, vote
often," blorgs were heard to say a
they ran around madly stuffing
ballot boxes.
At first I was pleased that you
didn't describe in detail the zit on
my chin, or my verbal tics. I got off
pretty light, I guess: just the usual
misquotes (the AMS doesn 't make a
profit, it does make money and
spend it on services, and the concept of profit never came up).
But now I'm not so sure it's a
good thing that you didn't insult me
the way most of the other candidates were insulted. Because if I win
the election, I'll feel like it was an
unfair advantage, and if I lose, I'll
worry that it was because people
thought I was a friend of yours.
Margaret Copping
student board of
governors rep
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FILM
THE GOD MAKERS
THE MORMOM QUEST
FOR GODHOOD
Followed by discussion.
ANGUS 104
January 27th
at 7:30 p.m.
MARANATHA
CHRISTIAN CLUB
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Notice of A.M.S. Executive Election
Evening Polls: Wed., Jan. 25 — 4-7 p.m.
Totem Park — Common Block
Place Vanier — Common Block
Walter H. Gage — Common Block
Sedgewick Library
25th to Fri., Jan. 27th - 10 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Day Polls: Wed., Jan
S.U.B.
Law
C.E.M.E.
Scarfe
Angus
Buchanan
Hebb Theatre
Computer Science
Sedgewick Library
Woodward Library
War Memorial Gym
MacLeod
MacMillan
Poll locations and times are subject to the availability of poll clerks.
BALLOT:
A.M.S. PRESIDENT
BULMAN, David
COPPING, Margaret
NISHIHAMA, Peter
WILLIAMS, Sean
A.M.S. DIRECTOR OF
ADMINISTRATION
CHESTNUTT, Glenna
WENIGER, F. Ian
A.M.S
DOSDALL, Doug
A.M.S. VICE-PRESIDENT
LOW, Doug
ROOSEN, Peter
WALDERN, Barbara
A.M.S. COORDINATOR OF
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
BRADSHAW, Nancy
STEWART, Duncan
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
FRIGON, Frank HOLLIS, James
STUDENTS REQUIRE THEIR A.M.S. CARDS TO VOTE Tuesday, January 24, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Letters
Hollis accusations laughed off as inaccurate
I am somewhat flabbergasted by
the "Analysis" in the Jan. 20 issue
(Money man seeks record fourth
term). The "analyser" looks back
to student council in 1979 in his
comparison of expenditures and
points out that council debated the
purchase of a computer and this
current council did not debate the
purchase of a computer printer,
word processor or satelite dish. In
fact these items were both mentioned in council and the Alma Mater
Society budget.
The analyst suggests corruption
on James Hollis' part and points to
Aqua Society and the video club. It
is true that Aqua Soc received a
The Ubyssey to blame
if no students vote
Well, once again we see an example of The Ubyssey's fine objective reporting on issues relevant to
students. Thanks to your insightful
comments, I shall make a point of
seeing all the candidates in the upcoming executive election eat lunch
before I mistakenly vote for them
on the basis of previous performance in student groups.
Glenna Chestnutt indeed shows
pitiful naivete in pointing out the
simple truth that dealing with issues
such as cutbacks and tuition increases is the job of the Alma Mater
Society president's and external affairs' offices. Also, the fact that she
has been innovative as a student administration commission member
and mentions her intention to continue with the projects she started
there is a clear indication that she
will add nothing to the scope of the
director of administration position.
But, against an opponent whose
haircut is clearly a reflection of
what's inside his head, which is the
lesser of two evils?
I appreciate your thoughtfulness
in mentioning the ages of the director of finance candidates. Obviously, every year that one ages beyond the numerical value of your
average IQ, by adding experience,
befuddles the brain and decreases
judgment.
I could continue, but added
length would give you an excuse not
to publish this. My concern is that
given the present limitations on
campaign budgets, the campus
newspaper is an important medium
for candidates to make their ideas
known to students. The irrelevant
sideswiping you have done in your
"analyses" has not only damaged
viable candidates, but drawn focus
away from what is really important:
their ideas.
If we have yet another low turnout for this election, there is little
doubt that substantial blame rests
with the unjustifiably dim view of
the candidates that students will
have gained from your paper.
Sherri Dickinson
medicine 4
loan (not a grant as the analyst
states) from the AMS. This loan
was applied for and received when
Jane Loftus was director of
finance. As for the video club, it
was started as a result of a presentation they made, not to James Hollis
but to council in 1982.
Conflicts of interest are heavily
implied in the statement that James
Hollis was treasurer of Aqua Soc
while he was director of finance. I
had a good laugh over this one. I
have been a member of Aqua Soc
tor three years and in that time
James Hollis, although an active
member of the club, has never been
treasurer.
The Ubyssey analyst rants on
about the actions of the AMS
budget committee saying that
James Hollis "railroaded" through
cuts to 'the Ubyssey budget while
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doubling the CITR budget. I
wonder how he did that. The
budget committee is chaired by the
vice-president as a built in protection for the society.
About budget cuts though,
wasn't it in 1982 that the Ubyssey
ran the Summer Ubyssey and it lost
some $13,000 in the three and one
half months of its existence. This
Summer Ubyssey was set up on the
provision that any loss would be
carried into the winter Ubyssey
budget which was a condition
agreed to by The Ubyssey staff that
year. Could this be the reason why
the Ubyssey budget was cut? Going
on   to   the   doubling   of   CITR's
budget, 1982 was the year that
CITR received its low power FM
licence and new equipment was purchased so that this student service
could be improved and made
available to more students.
One last statement on my part,
there are a lot of inaccuracies in
your analysis, enough to suggest
why the analyst wishes to remain
anonymous. That was possibly a
cheap shot on my part but like
everyone else I have a built-in
bias; you see, I have not been disappointed with the job James Hollis
has done as director of finance.
Pat Darragh
science 4
DON'T JUST HIGHLIGHT IT,,
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Put STABILO BOSS to work
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ot $1.69 on
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SHIRTS
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Irregulars, overstocks & end of lines.
Sport Socks
$1.99
Kid's T-Shirts
$2.99
T-Shirts
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Baseball Shjrts
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Football Shirts
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HOURS: Mon. to Fri. 8 AM - 7 PM
Saturday 10 AM-5 PM
LOWER LEVEL
STUDENT UNION BUILDING UBC
TELEPHONE: 224-1911
VISA & MASTERCARD
ACCEPTED Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 24, 1984
TODAY
AGRICULTURE
Boat races,  Aggie tug-of-war,  noon,  outside
SUB.
MUSSOC
Reheersal of Oklahoma; mix it up run, 8 p.m..
Old Auditorium.
ESPERANTO UBC
Club meeting, noon. International Houee, upper
lounge.
HILLEL HOUSE
Home cooked Sheta Dairy lunch, noon, Hillel
Houae.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Last day to register for the new Bronze class,
8:30 to 10:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
WEDNESDAY
VANCOUVER ADVENTURE AND
TRAVEL CLUB (UBC)
"Go Europe," budget travel talk by Russell
Jenkins of Westcan Treks/Adventure Travel; $1
at door, door prizes including a camel, UBC SUB
Auditorium, noon.
AGRICULTURE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Student-Prof Night, all Aggies welcome, 7 p.m.,
Grad centre Garden Room.
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY AND
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Great Debate #1, Evolution vs. Creation: alternative theories of the origin of life, 7 p.m., Woodward, lecture theatre 12.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Singing and bible study, noon, SUB 213.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for winter session Ballet and Jazz
classes, noon to 1:30, SUB 216E. For more info
call 228-6668.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting, noon, Chem. 150.
DEPARTMENT OF SLAVONIC STUDIES, UBC
Lecture: Conversation of Mythical Reality: Soviet Mass Songs, by Professor Frumkin, Professor
of Russian, Oberlin College, Ohio, noon, Buch.
A202.
VOLUNTEER CONNECTIONS
Volunteer Awareness Day, table in SUB — find
out more about volunteering, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30
p.m., SUB concourse.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
General meeting, human rights violations in Pakistan, profile on prison* dossier, all welcome,
noon to 1:30 p.m., SUB 206.
AGRICULTURE
Pie eating contest, dead goldfish, noon, outside
SUB.
HOME ECONOMICS
UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Dr. Don Periman will be explaining the new
Master's program in Family Studies, noon.
Home Economics building, student commons
workroom.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting, 12 p.m., SUB 119.
UBC BRIDGE CLUB
Playing night in preparation for upcoming tournament, new members and beginners very
welcome, 7 p.m.. International House gate 4
lounge.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION
Guest speeker Manning Glickson: "Enjoyment
— an in-depth look," noon, Buch. B312.
MUSSOC
Rehearsal — Oklahoma, bits and pieces at 6:30,
run show at 8 p.m.. Old Auditorium.
HILLEL
Rap with the Rabbi, topic: What is (or is not a
Jewish issue?" lunch available noon, Hillel
House.
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
Israel information table, noon, SUB main hall.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Pledge forms available for the second annual
dance marathon on Feb. 11, 14-hour event, SUB
ballroom.
THURSDAY
*th YEAR DIETETIC STUDENTS
African dinner at SUBway, entree, veggies and
dessert, alt for $3.25, starting 4:30 p.m. at SUBway cafeteria.
CUSO-UBC
1984 Development Education series: Foreign Aid
— Help or Hindrance, free admission, 7:30 p.m.,
International House.
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY -
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Great Debate #2: Secular Humanism vs. Christianity: Which World View is Superior, 7 p.m.,
Woodward lecture theatre #2.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Small group meetings, call 228-8554 for more information.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for winter session ballet and jazz
dance classes, for more info call 228-6668, noon
SUB 216E.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobics class, 4:30-5:30 p.m., SUB 207-209.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Open house — art, music, cultural presentation,
noon, SUB 211.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
WEBA guest speakers on: How Abortion Exploits Women, noon, SUB 207-209.
DEPARTMENT OF SLAVONIC STUDIES
Lecture /concert: Poets and Minwtreto in Russia
Today: dissident songs in the USSR by Vladimir
Frumkin, graduate of Leningrad Conservatory,
presently professor of Russian, Oberlin, College,
Ohio, noon, Buchanan A100.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
General meeting, topic: Human rights violations
in Pakistan, aH welcome, 7-9 p.m., SUB 213.
AGRICULTURE
Pentathlon, egg tossing, noon, outside SUB.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Meeting, talk given by current dental stuent,
noon, IRC #1.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobic class, 4:30-5:30 p.m., SUB 207-209.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
General meeting to organize upcoming events,
noon, SUB 224.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Ski trip meeting, noon, Buchanan B214.
UBC FLYING CLUB
General meeting re airplane purchase and Boeing
trip, everyone please attend, noon, Henning 302.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film Showing: Zen Archer, and The Overcrowded Capital, both on Japan, admission free,
noon, Asian Centre auditorium.
MUSSOC
Oklahoma — dress rehearsal, 8 p.m., Old Auditorium.
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT
IN SCRIPTURE
Discussion on the evidence of the Messianic Prophesies, noon, Scarfe 204.
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
Seminar — speaker David Bercuson, history professor from U. of Calgary: Israeli Army volunteers in 1948, noon, Hillel House.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Remember: practice times available at noon
hours and on the weekends; check times on info
sheets, SUB partyroom.
FRIDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Rim: The God Makers, 7:30 p.m., Angus 104.
DUTHIE BOOKS ANNUAL SALE
January 26th to January 29th
AT ALL STORES
20% OFF ALL STOCK PLUS
THESE ANNUAL SPECIALS:
* Selected bestsellers and * Poetry corner: 30% off
1983 hardcovers: 30% off on all poetry
* The Dollar Trolley:
Eclectic, esoteric, hermeneutic,
and forgotten books for $1.00
* Slightly less than fresh: Art,
Photography and Architecture
books: 30-70% off
* Local wholesaler
specials: 30% off
* Reader s Digest
specials: 30% off
* Remainders: also
20% off
SALE HOURS: THURS. AND FRI., 9-9; SAT., 9-6
SUNDAY AT ROBSON STREET AND TENTH: 12-5
(Note: special orders and reservations at regular prices.)
STORES: 919 Robson: Paperback Cellar, Childrens, and Hardcover.
4444 West 10 Avenue,
Arbutus Village
MmmM^
Thursday, February 9, 1984
Register January 30-February 3 WMGYM 203
Information Clinic January 26, 12:30 pm WGYM Room 213
12 men per team
7 women per team
6 men —.
6 women-
co-ed team.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for winter session ballet and jazz
classes, noon, SUB 216E.
AGRICULTURE
Great Race (costumes mandatory), barrel buck-
ing, noon, outside MacMillan.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Open gym night, 4:30-6:30 p.m., Osborne gym
A.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
Bzzr garden, 4:30-7 p.m., Buchanan lounge.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Tennis night, 8:30-11:30 p.m.. Armories.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Bzzr garden, everyone welcome, 4:30-6:30 p.m.,
SUB 207-209.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Varsity men vs. Alberta, 8:X p.m., varsity women vs. Alberta, 6:46 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Eucharist to celebrate end of Andre's fast, noon,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
SPEAKEASY
IS A PEER
COUNSELLING
CENTER
STAFFED BY EMPATHETIC
PEOPLE WHO ARE WILLING
TO LISTEN AND
OFFER SUPPORT
Mon - Fri: 9:30 AM to 7:30 PM
Sub Concourse
DROP IN OR PHONE: 228-3700
rTHE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additionar |
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B.. UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
65 - SCANDALS
EVOLUTION
AND CREATION
Debate
Evolution — Mr.
Fred Edwords
American
Humanist
Association
Earl
Creation Dr
Hallonquist
Creation
Science Associa
tion of Canada.
Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre, Auditorium No. 2
Wednesday, January 25, 1984
7:00 P.M.
FREE
DEAR G.A., I do indeed want the item in
question back if at all possible. Feel free to
contact me any way you like; I'm sure you
will find the reward very satisfying.
70 - SERVICES
EXPERT research help for hire. 224-5802 or
224-6518.
HOME DAYCARE Bilingual Fr./Eng. 14th
& MacDonald. $15/day. Lunch & 2 snacks.
Christiane 732-5659 or 736-1684.
FORMER    UNIV.    PROF. (10   yrs.    exp)
will  critique Et  edit  term papers,  theses,
manuscripts.   Reasonable rates.   Fast  turnaround. 669-1284.
80 - TUTORING
20 - HOUSING
VACANCIES IN STUDENT RESIDENCES
for Ladies.  Room & Board. Come to the
Housing Office or call 228-2811.
ENGLISH TUTORING - Assistance in all
areas. Oral, written; grammar composition,
spelling, punctuation. 682-1043.
85 - TYPING
FOR RENT; Available Feb. 1st small one
bedroom apt. on campus near the Village
$310/month unfurnished 228-0357 (tenant
to view) or 261-6661 landlord.
ROOMS FOR RENT on campus Jan.
to Apr. or longer. Male students only
please. Call 224-9119. Ask for Craig or Dick.
Shared rooms, reasonable rates.
M/F TO SHARE 3 bdrm. hse., near VGH
$207/mo. incl. heat & Vn util. (board
negotiable) 873-4015 after 5 p.m.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
ESSAYS, term papers, reports etc. Writer
with extensive academic exper. can assist
with research, writing editing. 682-1043.
30 - JOBS	
WANTED; Person to translate book of ap-
prox. 100 pgs. from Polish to English. Lisa
988-3654 after 7 p.m.
WANTED: Commission student travel sales
reps. Contact Greg Hogarth at: Blyth &
Co., 84 Yorkville Ave., Toronto, Ont. M5R
1B9 (416) 964-2569.	
40 - MESSAGES
SO  YOU  THOUGHT WE   FORGOT!   But
we're full of surprises. Happy 19th Lena!
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
offers reasonable rates for students for term
papers, essays, £r masters thesis. 273-6008
evenings.
U—TYPE Micom word processor available
for rent @ $5/hr. Jeeva @ 876-5333.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.	
WORD PROCESSING(Micom) student
rates for theses typing $12/hr. Equation
typing available. Jeeva 876-5333.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Student rates
$1.25/pg Moneypenny's Office Services.
876-7313
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE. Special
students' rates; fast production; professional appearance - term papers, thesis,
essays, resumes. Rita 435-8251.
WORK PROCESSING, all jobs, tapes
transcribed, student rates. On King Edward
bus route, 879-5108.
90 - WANTED
WANTED TO RENT: 2 bdrm. apt. or suite
on campus or close to UBC. Sublets will be
considered. Call 298-6871. Tuesday, January 24, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Thunderbirds split hockey weekend
By HARRY HERTSCHEG
You don't always get what you
deserve.
That was the lesson UBC
Thunderbirds learned this weekend
when they totally outplayed the
visiting Calgary Dinosaurs, only to
end up with a two game split.
After outscoring the Dinosaurs
9-2 and outshooting them 59-30 Friday night, the Thunderbirds
squandered a 3-0 lead Saturday
night enroute to a 10-7 loss in which
they outshot their opponents 51-21.
'Bird forwards Grant Harris and        On   Saturday,   Dave   McKenzie The Dinosaurs scored six second    second-ranked   Alberta   Golden
Mike Coflin scored two goals each
on Friday in a game that was never
in doubt. UBC played a spirited
game and they displayed some of
their best forechecking and
backchecking of the season. Crisp
passes and fine playmaking enabled
the 'Birds to move the puck at will
against the last place Dinosaurs.
'Bird centre Kevin Argue, who
leads the team in scoring, played exceptionally well as he notched a
goal and three assists.
scored three goals to lead Calgary
to only their second win of the
season. Forward Jim Allison led the
'Birds with two goals.
'Bird netminder Wade Jensen,
who has given a number of stalwart
performances this season, would
probably like to erase Saturday
night's game from his memory.
After stopping 28 of 30 shots Friday, Jensen stopped only 11 of 21
Saturday.
Runner
from
period goals in only five minutes, 46
seconds.
UBC's power play also had its
problems. The 'Birds scored only
once in six attempts with .the man
advantage.
The 'Birds are now on the road
for the next two weekends. They are
off to Saskatoon this weekend to
play the nations' third-ranked
Saskatchewan Huskies, before
heading off to Edmonton to play
Bears the following weekend.
The Bears now have sole possession of first place in the Canada
West conference after their two
game sweep over the Huskies this
past weekend in Edmonton.
CANADA WEST STANDINGS
Team W     L     P
Alberta Golden Bears    11     3   22
Sask. 9     5   18
UBC 6     8    12
Calgary Dinosaurs 2    12     4
'«B*»W**
sets record
UBC's Simon Hoogerwerf ran
the 1000m faster than any Canadian
has ever run it indoors at a meet in
Edmonton on Friday. Hoogerwerf
was representing UBC in the
Golden Bear Open when he shaved
a tenth of a second off the old
mark. His time was 2 minutes 37.7
seconds.
Apart from Hoogerwerf UBC
won five more of the men's events
and gained two firsts in women's
competition.
Last year the men won the west
and were rated second amongst
Canadian university teams at the
season's close. But this year they
seem to be in even better shape, said
team manager Ken Black.
With five weeks to go before the
Canada West championships they
have 12 athletes with national qualifying times in 15 events.
On Friday against their major
western opponents they won over a
third of the men's events.
Other victors for the 'Birds were
the four by 400m and four by 800m
relay team. Warren Lee in the 60m
hurdle, Bob Dalton in the 60m dash
and Ed Booth in the 5000m.
The outstanding women's performance was by Tracy Smith who
jumped 5.97 metres to win the long
jump. Last year she won the Canadian Intercollegiate championship
with a leap of 5.46m The jump
represented a massive 30 cm increase on her previous personal
best.
The other women's winner was
Tami Lutz who won the high jump.
This weekend Hoogerwerf with Ian
Gillespie, Ian Newhouse and Andrew Dawson travel to New York
they will compete in the Melrose indoor games 800m relay. Last year
the UBC team placed second. "A
remarkable performance for a
Canadian collegiate team" said
Black.
3 Improved women
lose close games
By PETER BERLIN
Although they lost both their
games in southern Alberta at the
weekend the women's basketball
team came close to upstaging their
male counterparts, for whom they
usually act as the opening bill.
Both the women's games were
much closer and more exciting.
On Friday they held the University of Calgary close until the final
minute when the home team more
than doubled their lead. The final
tally was 61-52 to Calgary. Calgary
were ranked number six in Canada
before the weekend's matches, but
following their trouncing of number
two ranked University of Victoria
on Saturday they'll certainly move
up.
Ranked one place above Calgary
was the University of Lethbridge.
UBC's game against the Pronghorns on Saturday was a real
nail-biter with the home team
prevailing 82-78 in overtime.
Cathy Bulitude led the 'Birds
with 22 points. Linda Edwards
scored  20 and drew praise  from
assistant coach Neil Brown who
called her 'one of the best shooters
in Canada'.
Brown said the 'problem is consistency' but that over the weekend
'even though we lost both games we
played consistently well.'
Brown said he was pleased with
the team's success in rebounding,
they had a two to one advantage
over Lethbridge, which shows that
practise in that area of the game has
paid dividends.
The next two games for the 'Birds
are on Friday against the University
of Alberta and Saturday against
Saskatchewan. Both games start at
6:45 as the undercard for the men's
games. If the weekend's games are
anything to go by fans with time for
only one game should try to catch
the women.
TEAM                <
SP
W
L
TPTS
Victoria
2
2
0
0       4
Alberta
1
1
0
0       2
Lethbridge
2
1
1
0       2
Calgary
2
1
1
0       2
Saskatchewan
1
0
1
0       0
British Columbia
2
0
2
0       0
'Birds get stuffed
— n.j.d. photo
A QUESTION OF BALANCE . . . coach Alana Branda watches intensely
as a UBC gymnast, who we think is Anne Muscat, maneouvres on the
beam. The UBC women, who are national champions, finished second to
Pacific Lutheran University in a meet at UBC over the weekend. The men,
meanwhile, triumphed in their half of the three team meet.
By MONTE STEWART
Like Dorothy the UBC men's
basketball team have discovered
there's no place like home.
Last weekend, the 'Birds opened
the regular season with a pair of
losses away from home. Friday, the
"Birds lost 81-62 in Calgary. Saturday, they fell 81-63 to the Pronghorns in Lethbridge.
If you recall, last season the
'Birds met with the same fate in
'Birds roll to Thundervolley win
The UBC women's team won it's
own 'Thundervolley' tournament at
the War Memorial Gym over the
weekend.
Tough U.S. team pushes
swimbirds to new peaks
The Thunderbird men's and women's swimming and diving teams
played host to the touring University of Washington Huskies Friday
night. The Pacific Ten powerhouse
have never lost to the 'Birds and
Friday was no exception.
In the men's competition the
Huskies dominated, they won 73 to
36. Several of the 'Birds gave exceptional performances. Geoff Donelly
picked up the home team's only win
in the 200m butterfly and placed second in the 200m backstroke.
In the diving competition UBC
dominated the 'boards. Steve
Church won both the one and three
metre springboard events. His
brother Calvin and Mark Duggan
were second and third in both.
The women also rose to the competition. The team was decimated
by the 'flu and lost 68-36, but they
still managed some exceptional
swims.
Anne Martin maintained her Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union number one ranking and her unbeaten streak in the 50m freestyle.
She also finished second in the
100m freestyle.
Helen Chow placed second in the
200m butterfly. Her performance
moved her up to third place in the
CIAU rankings. Brenda Jones recorded her best time of the year and
rose to fourth place nationally in
the 200m breaststroke. In the women's diving Nancy Bonham of
UBC won both the one- and three-
metre events.
Next action for the 'Birds is on
Feb. 4 at 1 p.m. when they entertain
Pacific Lutheran University.
The 'Birds won five of the six
games they played. Their only
defeat was in their opening round-
robin game against the University
of Manitoba, the team they eventually defeated in the final.
The 'Birds defeated Manitoba,
who were ranked number two in
Canada, 15-10, 12-15, 15-3 in the
gold medal game. In the round
robin play the Winnipeggers had
triumphed in two games: 15-5, 15-8.
The first of UBC's other four victims were Canada west rivals the
University of Victoria who they
beat 15-13, 18-16.
Next they played a team called
'Game Point' who took them to a
third game before going down 15-2,
6-15, 15-12. The 'Birds defeated the
eventual bronze medal team,
renegades 12-5, 15-11, 15-11 in
another close game.
UBC's final round-robin game
was against cross-town rivals Simon
Fraser University who they ground
down, winning 16-14, 15-5, to
clinch a place in the final.
Next UBC travel to Saskatoon
for a Friday matchup with unbeaten
University of Saskatchewan, who
are first in the west. The team that
leads the standings at the end of
league play hosts the Canada West
playoffs in late February, so the
'Birds have every incentive to try to
overhaul their opponents. The
following day they play in Edmonton against the University of Alberta.
The unbeaten men's team plays
the same opponents, in the same
places on the same nights.
CANADA WEST UNIVERSITY
VOLLEYBALL STANDINGS
WOMEN
W
L
F
A PTS
Saskatchewan
8
0
24
5    11
UBC
6
2
20
11      9
Victoria
4
4
13
18     6
Calgary
3
5
15
17     3
Lethbridge
2
7
10
21     2
Alberta
1
6
9
19     2
MEN
W
L
F
A PTS
UBC
8
0
24
5    11
Victoria
6
2
18
10     8
Sask.
5
3
18
14     8
Calgary
3
5
15
17     3
Lethbridge
2
7
9
23     3
Alberta
1
7
6
21     0
their two opening games. Both were
on the road.
All three of the 'Birds three
regular season victories came within
the confines of War Memorial
Gym. They lost all five road games.
Get the picture?
Despite the 'Birds mediocre
record last season, they just missed
the play-offs. Saskatchewan
Huskies displaced the 'Birds for the
fourth and final play-off spot
because they scored more points in
games played between the two
teams.
Considering the competitiveness
of the six team Canada West Conference, UBC cannot afford to give
up large numbers of points.
The 19 point margin of loss on
Friday and the 18 point deficit on
Saturday force the 'Birds to defeat
the two teams by at least one more
point than they lost by in the return
1 encounters at War Memorial Gym,
in order to break a possible play-off
tie.
Actually, what really counts is
victory. The 'Birds simply must improve on their rather dismal showing of last season. The results of last
weekend's action show that UBC's
opponents (like the 'Birds) are very
much improved from last season.
Friday, the University of Victoria
narrowly defeated Lethbridge
78-74. That is the Lethbridge team
which finished last in 1983 and
UVic, the team which was national
champion. In other games Friday,
Alberta beat Saskatchewan 71-55.
On Saturday, UVic beat Calgary
93-61.
CITR will broadcast the first
home encounter of the season for
the 'Birds this Friday as Alberta
pays a visit. Game time is 8:30 p.m. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 24, 1984
Coach Smith staving?
Lions go for Deslauriers
By MONTE STEWART
Frank Smith may or may not be
the Thunderbird football coach:
either way he can plant another
feather in his already overcrowded
cap.
Last Thursday, the B.C. Lions
did the expected and selected
Laurent DesLauriers as their 1984
territorial protection. This draft
allows each of the nine Canadian
Football League teams to choose
one local player, thereby exempting
that player from the annual draft of
Canadian college players.
The fourth year physical education student, a graduate of St.
Thomas More high school earned
the nickname 'Mr. Everything' last
season. He scored two touchdowns
on interceptions, while playing
defensive back.  He was also the
'Birds' most dangerous threat on
punt returns, running back one for
a 95 yard touchdown.
When the UBC receiver corps
became depleted as a result of injuries, DesLauriers returned to slot-
back. Late in the season, he was
playing both offence and defence,
while nursing a bad knee.
"I'm just really happy about being picked by B.C.," said
DesLauriers. "I haven't talked to
the Lions yet so I don't know where
they want to play me." He added
that he has no particular preference
as to what position he would like to
play.
If the Lions had not selected
DesLauriers, there is little doubt
that he would have been' a first
round draft choice. Edmonton
Eskimos Director of Player Person
nel, Frankie Morris, said "Laurent
is one of the best players in the
country. There's no doubt of that.
We want him but B.C. has first
choice," said Morris.
*    *    *
Meanwhile, there are conflicting
reports about the status of Smith.
During the 1983 season, the veteran
coach announced his resignation,
effective June 30, 1984.
However, shortly afterwards,
there were several unverified
reports that Smith would return in
'84. It appears that Smith just has
to say he wants to return and the
job is his. Athletic department officials are keeping silent on the subject.
"I don't want to comment on
that," said UBC Sports Information Director, Steve Campbell. Rick
Noonan, Men's Athletic Director,
Flying start for UBC skiers
UBC's ski teams started their ski
season with an impressive display in
all events at Whistler on Saturday.
The meet, hosted by Simon
Fraser University, was the first of
the American National Collegiate
Athletic Association regional qualifying events.
UBC won both the men's and
women's slalom, the men's slalom,
the men's cross country relay and
the men's individual cross country.
UBC leads the combined standings
in both men's and women's alpine
events.
UBC swept the first four places
in the men's giant slalom with John
Hilland first and Bob Leitch second. Leitch was also the winner in
the slalom event with Stuart Cairns
coming in third.
Donna Wright was UBC's
highest placed women skier in the
slalom. She was fourth one place
ahead of Darcy Eastbrook.
In the women's giant slalom the
placings were reversed. Estabrook
was UBC's top finisher in fourth,
one place ahead of Wright.
In the men's three by five
kilometer ski relay, UBC finished
almost a minute ahead of the SFU
team. The women's relay team tied
for second with SFU behind Pacific
Lutheran University.
Paul van Donklaar of UBC was
the fastest in the men's cross country, while Rhonda Delong was only
six seconds behind PLU's Paula
Brown in the women's distance
event. Cathy Beynon was the next
'Bird home in seventh place.
The next NCAA district meet is
across the border this weekend at
White Pass Washington.
said that Smith's teaching status
would have to be cleared up before
he could return. "All our coaches
are on faculty so Frank's position
there would have to be determined."
Sources close to the team as well as
other sources indicate that Smith is
indeed coming back. "He'll be
back," said one source. "He was
weighing one other option but he'll
be back."
That other option was apparently
the head coaching position with the
Calgary Stampeders and Steve
Buratto filled that post last week.
Another source said that Smith has
already told the Athletic Department that he wants to return.
"They should be announcing (that
[Corky says:
January got you down?
I Come to Corky's side of town.
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CORKYS
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Smith will return as coach) pretty
soon. He just told them that he
wanted to come back."
Smith has not really left yet.
Besides his teaching duties, Smith
has been actively employed in his
annual off season endeavour
recruiting.
After all, Smith cannot leave
before he finds another Laurent
DesLauriers.
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