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The Ubyssey Feb 24, 2011

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Array I am not wronging anyone! SINCE 1918
BOSNIAN GENOCIDE
DENIER DRSRDJA
TRIFKOVIC'S LECTURE
SPARKS CONTROVERSY
ON CAMPUS.
PAGE 3
GIMME FIVE: WE
BREAK DOWN WHAT
THE PROPOSED
STUDENT FEE
INCREASE MEANS
TO YOU. _____
PAGE 3
X
I
FEBRUARY 24,2011
VOLUME 92, NUMBER XXXV3
ROOM 24, STUDENT UN30N BU3LD3NG
PUBL3SHED MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS
FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
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BYSS
RY
►
$1550 / 1BR - COAL HARB. VIEW 1
BEDROOM PLUS DEN/ SOLARIUM /OF-
FICEfCANBEEXTRABEDROOM) 19th
FLOORFROM FEBRUARY 1ST; NEWLY
RENOVATED , HARDWOOD FLOORS ,
STAINLESS STEAL APPLIANCES , IN
SUITE LAUNDRY ; SWIMMING POOL
.JACUZZI, SAUNA, MODERN GYM, PATIO , PARTY HALL , IN SECURE , CONCIERGE BUILDING ; STEPS TO BCIT ,
WATERFRONT SKY TRAIN , CONFERENCE CENTER, GAS TOWN, ETC. GORGEOUS MOUNTAIN AND COAL HARBOR VIEW I STRICTLY N/S , N/P .REFERENCES A MUST . STUDENTS ARE
WELCOME .. SORRY, NO PETS # 604
440 1756 # 604 440 1746f MESSAGES ONLY ) BETWEEN 12 00 P.M. AND
09 30 P.M.       	
^1
$2995 / 2BR - WEST END 2 BED FURNISHED CONDO 1 BLOCK TO ROBSON @ PALISADES Address: #305-
128 8 Alberni St, Vancouver Available:
Now - fully furnished Bedrooms: 2
Bathrooms: 2 Flooring: carpets, tiles
mixed Outdoor: large open patio Parking: 1 underground Deposits: half a
month security deposit. Lease term:
minimum 2 months stay. Pets: sorry not this one. Absolutely no smoking please. Included items: fully furnished from cutlery to linens, from
TV to soap dispensers; fridge, stove,
dishwasher, microwave, and washer/dryer; also includes, maid service, utilities, telephone, cable, and
high speed internet. Not included:
long distance telephone, additional
cleaning & move-out clean.
$1030 / 1BR - CONTEMPOR,
BED. EVERYTHING INCLUDJ^his
is an exceptionally well setuj^Re bedroom aparment in a newbui^Kg available right now. Everything included:
Utilities like radiant hea^mot water,
electricity, cable, internjMone parking spot. Appliances indBde washer,
dryer, stove, fridge. SepaMe entrance,
nothing to share. Bus sHp is across
the street, very well conBcted to sky
train lines. Pets are wel«ne. Meticulously clean, new paints ■ewblinds,
modern full bathroom, n^t light fixtures, ... Please contact 60 521.6169
or 778.237.3369 or emailbf^kfor further contacts. 8433 -16 aveni 'google
map) fyahoo map) cats are Oi ourrr
dogs are OK-wooof Location: IJ^kaaby
it's NOT ok to contact this poste^^
services or other commercial intei
$1150/ 1BR-BRIGHT APARTMENT
WITH BALCONY & NEW APPLIANCES Vancouver Located in the West End,
on the edge of Stanley Park yet walking distance to restaurants, shopping,
amenities and transit. This bright and
sunny 1 bedroom apartment with balcony overlooks the city. The apartment
is features a new kitchen and bathroom
cabinet doors, new granite countertops,
dishwasher, vertical blinds, mirror
closet doors, tile flooring and modern
lighting fixtures. The building offers a
professional on-site Resident Manager, a 24-hour laundry facility and gated parking is available. Heat and hot
water is included. Sorry no pets, lyear
lease. For more information or to view,
please call (604) 683-8578 .
$1985 / 2BR - ROSS HOUSE: TWO-
BEDROOM SUITE IN PRIME UBC
AREA (CHANCELLOR COURT) Features: 2 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom Chancellor Court consists of two 13 Storey Towers (Mackenzie House & Ross House)
Prime UBC location Unfurnished suite
with a spacious open balcony 3 appliances (fridge, stove, dishwasher) Secured, gated underground parking
and building access Visitor parking
available Well-equipped laundry facilities on site Quiet well-managed
building with on-site resident managers Included in Rent: Heat, hot water and electricity Amenities: Indoor
pool and sauna Policies: No Pets Minimum 1 year fixed lease
Contact: Karlo 604-219-0370 or 604-
732-3166 AVAILABLE April 1 Location:
1555 W 13th Ave, Vancouver
$1700 / 2BR - 2 BATH SUB PENTHOUSE WITH TWO BALCONIES Fabulous sub penthouse on the 34th floor
- south facing corner 2 bedroom and 2
bath condo in the Levo -Floor Plan Gl.
Suite area is 1016 square feet and the
total ofthe two balconies is 184 square
feet, www.levoliving.com. This unit
is different from all the rest with upgrades throughout. 10' ceilings, hardwood floors in the living room and dining room, full laundry room and upgraded kitchen to stainless Bosch appliances. This bright corner unit on
the 34th floor has spectacular views
from two balconies, 1 parking, 1 storage locker, gas and hot water is included in the rent. Excellent neighbourhood and location-close to everything
within a short walk to Coquitlam Centre, Pinetree Village, Douglas College
David Lam Campus, restaurants and
transit. No smoking. A small pet will
be considered with a pet deposit. A 1
year lease is required, as are references and tenant's insurance. Please
email ifyou are interested and I will
confirm a time to view.
$1650 / 2BR - MORGAN CROSSING
Large 2 bedroom, 2 bath, approx 900
sqft. only 6 months old in the Urban
Village, South Surrey. Beautifully finished open floor plan with stainless
steel appliances, granite counter tops,
lots of closet space, fireplace, 1 parking and 1 locker. Richly stained hardwood laminate flooring throughout living, kitchen & dining areas. Shops are
at your door, walk to everything, n/s,
n/p Available Mar 10 - $1650/month
"CREDITCHECKWILL BE DONE" Denise Decary Property Manager and Realtor to Investors Worldwide Homelife
Peninsula Propertv^^ 11.T0ement Condo and Tc
$1750 / 3BR - WHITE ROCK FAMILY Two level home, 3 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, 1040 square feet upper,
gas fireplace, hardwood & linoleum.
$1800 / 3BR - 3 BEDROOMS AT THE
MIRADASpacious l,389sqft. 3bdrm,
2.5 bath townhouse in quiet interior location, excellent floor plan features 9^ ceilings, gas f/p, 4 appliances, master bdrm has W/I closet,
S/S garage with extra storage. Clubhouse includes fitness, games, and
party rooms. Walking distance to all
shopping. Schools, and Transit, only 2
blocks from Park & pool, n/s, n/p. Available Apr 30 - $1800/month "CREDIT
CHECK WILL BE DONE" Denise Decary Property Manager and Realtor to
Investors Worldwide Homelife Peninsula Property Management Condo and
Townhouse Specialist 604-536-0220
(Office) 604-536-5699 (Fax) 604-763-
2242 (Cell) Denise@rentinfo.ca Follow me on Twitter to join in on showings! Website: www.rentinfo.ca Location: White Rock/South Surrey
$1450 / 2BR - LARGE (750 SQ FT)
SUITE 2 bedroom suite in an immaculately kept 3 story apartment
block. Hardwood floors, laundry in
the building, parking available. Located on a beautiful treed street very
close to public transit and shopping.
700 sq ft finished carpeted bsmt, cul-
de-sac, private fenced large backyard,
close to everything including the hospital, schools, shops, n/s, n/p. AvailabL
NOW - $1750/month "CREDIT CHF
WILL BE DONE"
10 / 1BR - Hfg I KENOVATED
lS OVER LOOKING
BEAUTIFUL OCEAN VIEWS Emerald $1300 1 bedroom w/ 3 balconies
(West End) Discover this fantastic 1
bedroom apartment which has been
completely renovated. Great West End
location on a quiet street block from
Stanley Park, close to shopping, transit, eateries and amenities. This spacious 1 bedroom suite features hardwood flooring, new kitchen appliances including dishwasher, new kitchen
and bathroom granite countertops and
cabinetry, new tile in kitchen and entry, vertical blinds, new light fixtures
and mirror sliding closet doors. The
suite has two balconies facing downtown Vancouver and the ocean. Professionally managed with indoor pool,
and 24 hour laundry facilities. Gated
underground parking available. Heating and hot water included. Sorry no
pets. 1 year lease.
$900/2BR-BASEMENT SUITE Available March 1, Large 2 bdrm above
ground basement suite in the beautiful neighbourhood of Brookswood. Gas
fireplace, shared laundry with direct
access from suite and carportparking.
(sorry...no dishwasher). Includes utilities. No smoking, catokay. 43 (google
map) (yahoo map) cats are OK - purrr
Location: Brookswood, Langley
$1000 / 1BR - PADDINGTON STATION Condo in Paddington Stn. complex in downtown Langley. Beautiful
townhouse one bedroom plus den end
unit, close to aU the amenities in downtown Langley. Pricesmart, Starbucks,
Liquor store. Casino and all the neat
shops and restaurants are in walking
distance fromhome. Itmeasures 600
sq.ft. with a patio in front. Granite counter-tops throughout, stainless appliances double fridge, glass-top stove, dishwasher, solid wood cabinetry, garbo-
rator, shaw laminate floors, A/C, electric fireplace, in-suite washer/dryer,
and one parking stall with availability for another. Utilities Included, n/s,
n/p. Available Apr 1 - $ 1000/month
$1000 STUDIO PLUS DEN LOCATED
IN KITSILANO!!! Close to UBC, convenient transportation and shopping
nearby. Street level entrance, cozy, high
ceiling, hardwood floor, corner suite for
added privacy. South facing patio from
livingroom. Lovely Murphybed on the
wall. Electric heating system and gas
fireplace. One year lease required. For
viewing please contact Noble & Associates Realty at 604-264-1001 ext 418 or
email rental@noblehomes.ca.
$1190 / 2BR - CALERA 2 BR + 2 BATH
Available immediately inner courtyard
facing 3 floor unit, 1 secured under
ground parking spot & storage locker included . Facilities include Gym
, Rec / Party room , elevator , court
yard view Credit check & reference
checkrequired.
$1050 / 2BR - BASEMENT SUITE
WITH SEPARATE ENTRANCE Separate entrance 1000.sf 2 bedrooms
and 1 bathroom. Well carpeted area.
It comes with : Fridge, Stove, Oven ,
Dish Washer In suite Laundry & Dryer Radiant Heat Cable and Inte1"10*
included Close to Bus Stop No sr
ing inside - No pets 1050+ 1/3 1
ties Ready to move
$1000 / STUNNING MODERN 1 BED
CONDO @ WATERSTONE POOL, GYM,
VIEWING 2PM FRIDAY These apartments are beautifully designed with
chic modern fittings. The apartments
are spacious with an openplan concept
living room and kitchen, large ceilings
and a balcony. The modern features include laminate floor, marble counter
tops, chrome appliances and plush
carpet in the bedrooms. It is a brand
new elegant space in a perfect location
on 6440 194th Street. Each apartment
comes with in-suite laundry, one parking space and one storage locker. This
fabulous development the Waterstone
has a calmingpeaceful place called the
wellness centre which includes a la±
pool, whirlpool, sauna, 17 media theatre, demonstration kitchen and wine
bar and lounge with fireplace
$1850 / 4BR- 4 BATH VIEW This lovely home has a panoramic view of the
Fraser Valley and Mount Baker. Located close to 2 golf courses, parks, miles
of trails and all level of schools. Hardwood floors in the kitchen and family room, stainless appliances, granite counters, high ceilings in the entry and living room. Spacious master
bedroom with full ensuite. 5 minute
drive to the West Coast Express, near
Coquitlam Centre Mall, communi
and recreation caj^es. This isljj
perpartoftheh^^re as thei^e
cupied baserj^^Tsuite^^tares are
shared - 60^^»and^^MPwn. They
are not inc^^pd ir^^^^nt. Utilities
are heat, l^HKai^^Plctricity and gas.
No smol^^^^^Var leasej^erences
andte^^l ^^fc_\]_^_^_^^^_%ived. A
__~_ *ed- a pet de-
Tilth's rentwould apply.
$3 '0 / 2BR - STUNNING 3 BED 2
FULLY FURNISHED This is a
stur. Ing 3 bedroom 2 bathroom fur-
property with modern high-
end iBniture. It is 1137sf with laminate 1 -oughout and slate flooring in
the kHhen. The kitchen has new ap-
plianHs with an open concept large
livinjRrea. There is a sectional sofa,
flatsWeen TV and high speed inter-
le master bedroom is large, the
id a good size with a queen size
'and the third a double. The condo
lefits from floor to ceiling window,
Fs situated on the 8th floor and comes
with one parking space. There are fabulous amenities in the building, a good
size swimming pool, whirlpool and
gym. A great location at Cambie and
Nelson close to boutiques, trendy cafes and restaurants. -Laminate floor
-New stainless steel appliances -Pool /
fitness room /Whirlpool -Modern furniture -High quality kitchen and bat-
hooms Rent per month $3400 u available immediately
$1450 / 1BR - CONDO ON ALBERNI STREET Bright & spacious 1 bedr
+ DEN in highly respected concrete
building The LionsfWestTower) Open
floor plan, hardwood floor, contemporary open-style design kitchen fully
equipped with all appliances (fridge,
stove, dishwasher, microwave, granite countertops) in suite laundry, wall
mount dryer Storage locker, underground secure individual parking, 24
hr concierge A wide variety of exceptional amenities— Fitness facilities,
sauna, steam room, recreational center, media center, board room, conference room & guest suites 5 minutes'
walk to Coal Harbor; ideal for jogging/
biking to Stanley Park Robson street,
restaurants. Urban Fare ^banking district around the corner.
$1450 / 2BR - TWO BEDROOM MAIN
FLOOR OF HOUSE FOR RENT Two Bedroom main floor of house for rent.Hardwood floors in both bedrooms,dining
room and front room.Kitchen and
bathroom are both tiled.Wood Burning fireplace in frontliving room.Freshly painted and new blinds installed.
Ample parking on street and in secure garage.Plenty of secure storage.
Ten minute walk to new Canada Rapid Transit Line .Oak Street is a five minute walk.close to UBC and Langara also.
Shared laundry and utilities withbase-
ment tenants Very quiet area.Community Centre.pool .parks and schools
all nearby.N/P,N/S,References please.
■ Til
111; 5F
Insurance, Frogbox, GardenWorks, in living and 2 bedrooms, & new tile
Co-operative Auto Network, Fluff floors in Kitchen & a brand new reno-
Furniture Rental, English Bay Bike vated bathroom.
Poiit^i ^nri t\-         lichardson Mov-
$1225/ IE
"VPTS AVA
lutifull
e-stor<
ed in]
(Alma
ndfloo
■. availal
Stove, f:
Close to
market), tran:
downtown & a few blocks from
beach. Rent includes ho+ *
storage, newcoin-oper;
dishwasher, fridge, stove/oven, and    in this area. Close to UBC and Down    space available. For more information.
washer and dryer. Close to Hill High Town with buses everyfive min. Avail-
School, Save-on-food and Pacific Spirit able for March the 1st .Rent is $2195 /
Park. Great new neighborhood right b' nthplusutilities.NopetsNosmok-
UBC. Large living room with great <
$1150/ 1BR- BRIGHT AND SUNNY
1 BEDROOM APARTMENT WITH
RENOVATIONS Bright and sunny
1 bedroom apartment with renovations. This spacious 1 bedroom
suite with spectacular mountain
views features hardwood flooring,
new kitchen appliances including
dishwasher, tile flooring in kitchen
and bathroom, mirror closet doors,
vertical blinds and modern light fixtures. The building is located steps
from shops, restaurants, amenities,
transit and English Bay. You love the
Ubyssey. The building has professional on-site Resident Managers,
a 24 hour laundry facility and gated
parking is available. Heat and hot
water is included. In addition, as a
Hollyburn resident, you get to enjoy
exceptional savings from our value
added partners to include Safeway,
Costco, Shaw Cable systems, Falkins
library. Community center, etc. Quiet
neipVii->—^ind, private entrance; Ide-
. paneo. :... Jt
isalivingroom.diningarea.onekitch- lege, UBC, SFU, 99-B
en, one full bathroom, and one balco- month + 20u/oUtilitie:
ny. Laundry facilities on each floor (two electric stoves)
thf VmilrH--  ai1^ -" elevator ■- -thr——-'- '---31
00/
night.
appiiciiii.cn ex Granite UjL.^ier-uj^.
new top quality LG front load
er & Dryer Full private washro
eluded all Utilities, HD cablevisiojj
High speed internet Front & baa
are fenced in by beautiful &s|^Hmed
bushes & ivy Separate pris^^HHtrance
and lots of free parkii^^^Pltion: Only
a few minutes wal^^H^routes & Rupert Street S^^MPstation for UBC,
SFU, DowiT^^PKMetrotown Within
walkin^^^ffce to Starbuck, Renfrew
'Centre, Wallmart, Super-
^^ Canadian Tire Requirements
Smoking, No pets. Clean, Response and Friendly.
$700 / 1BR - FURNISHED 1 BDRM
GROUND FLOOR SUITE Short-term
rental: 1 or two month. AVAILABLE
March 1st or 15th till end of April of
2011. Very bright and spacious (approx. 650 sq/ft) one bedroom suite with
SEPARATE ENTRANCE (on the ground
floor). 2 blocks away from bus stop. 10
minutes bus ride to SFU. Close to BCIT,
SFU and Downtown. 135 and 129 bus
available. Furnished with: - dinning table and chairs - 32" TV and TV stand
(basic cable included) and coffee table
- Kitchen: fridge, oven, range hood, microwave, double sink, and some dishes and utencils (sorry, no dishwasher
available) - 1 queen size mattess - full
laundary shared with landlord living
upstairs - full bathroom - all utilities
and wireless internet included.
$975 / 2BR - BASEMENT SUITE
AVAILABLE NOW 2-bedroom basement suite available now. boundary of
Burnaby and Vancouver. Walking distance to BCIT, bus stops, shops/star-
bucks, 7-11, and easy access to Highway 1. Utilities included. Shared Washer/Dryer. No smoking. No pets aUowed.
Require security deposit and reference
check. Streetparking available. Please
contact 778-397-1744 for inquiries.
$6500 / 7BR - SOUTH VANCOUVER
WELL-MAINTAINED HOUSE Well
maintained home in popular S. Granville. Sits on a level 64.7x143.9' lot.
Beautiful street appeal. Impressive
grand entrance with double height
ceiling. Main floor features entertainment sized living & dining room, private den looking out to the mature garden; gourmet western kitchen, family
room & guest room. Total of 7 bdrms
(6 ensuites)&7.5baths.4bdrmsup, 1
on main and 2 in basement. Basement
has a big recreation room, sauna & hot
tub. Hotwater radiant heating, security system, 4 car garage. Maple Grove
Elementary & Magee High School. A
perfect home for your growing family.
$1850 / 1BR - PENTHOUSE Heat and
hotwater is included. Double pane
windows with screens. Locker storage and laundry (smart card) facilitis
on main floor. Parking-extra $25.00
per month. Convenient location - Har-
wooSt. and Thurlow St. Close to transit. 5 minutesto Davie St., shopping.
Shopper's Drug Mart, restaurants and
nightclubs. 30 minute walk to Granville Island Public Market. Walking
distance to Sunset Beach and Park,
Nelson Park and Stanley Park, and
Vancouver Aquatic Centre. Close to
St. Paul's Hospital and Vancouver
Dental Clinic. 15 - 25 minute walk
to Arts Club Theatre, Fifth Ave. Cinema and Vancouver Art Gallery. 15
- 20 minute walk to Oxford College,
Universal College of Language, and
Vancouve Film School. 40 minutes to
UBC by transit (#2 and # 9 9.)
$1200/2BR- 1.5 BATHS® 1460 W.
73RD AVE. 2 BD - 1.5 BATHS - Spacious north-east facing 2nd floor corner suite. Rent: $ 1,200.00 Available:
Now Heat, hotwater included. In-suite
video monitored front entrance. Gated
underground parking. Laundry facilities on each floor. Marpole location -
GranviUeSt. and 73rd Ave., across from
the park. Walking distance to shopping,
Safeway, restaurants and library. Close
to transit, Canada Line. Easy access to
Richmond and airport. Close to UBC,
Langara College and Downtown Vancouver. "1 Year Lease." Sorry, no pets.
$950 / 1BR - 3RD FLOOR APARTMENT FOR MARCH Maintained to the
best of standards 1 bdrm apartment
for $950 close to kits beach, shopping
along broadway and easy to transit to
ubc or downtown. The suite has hardwood flooring, balcony, one parking is
provided as well as cablevision, hydro
and heating costs.
. nar    ■   ■    ^ciiaaa liuk nation,
asyac    ^^^    hmond, airport, UBC,
ivnt ^ / 80/month, include heat-
; ana hotwater, lease can be flexible
call 778-861-9037 to view the suite.
$1420 / 2BR - SPACIOUS 2BR GARDEN SUITE One block to trendy Main
Street and King Ed., bus routes to Canada Line, Downtown, UBC, VGH and Airport. Recently renovated, comfortable,
clean, spacious ( 965 sq ft) 2 BR Garden unit in a heritage house. Big windows in unit and an open concept living room, kitchen and dining area. A
beautiful fireplace, Brazilian Cherry
flooring in living room. 2 bedrooms
are on each end ofthe suite for total
privacy. Coin operated laundry room
and lots of storage space. Shared utilities, NO pets, NON smokers, ease and
reference required.
$2800 / 3BR - STUNNING, FULLY-
RENO'D TOP 2 FLOORS OF HERITAGE HOUSE Be the first to live in
this beautifuUy-renovated, light-filled,
3-bedroomhome on the top two floors
of a 1910 heritage home in Cambie Village. Approximately 1,300 sq. ft. with
separate entrance and utilities. This
area is the most central location in
Vancouver and one ofthe most charming and friendly neighborhoods. Great
schools. Eric Hamber catchment. Suite
has been insulated and all appliances
are energy star rated. Bedrooms are
all on the large size with room for (at
least) queen bed, dressers, desk and
more. All bedrooms have closets and
suite has many other extra storage options. Gas hot water, gas fireplace and
electric heating. Unfurnished, Short-
term (6 months minimum) or 1 year
lease available: $2,800./per month
plus uitilities. Possible to rent semi-
furnished. Work and credit ref'sreq'd.
Absolutely no smoking (inside or outside). Preferred no pets.
$1999 / 2BR - LARGE 2 BEDROOM,
ONE OFFICE, ONE DEN! OVER 700
SQFT! Amazing luxury, incredible view
condo for rent in the best building in
the downtown core, access to the Skytrain and Pacific Center mall from
the building, as well as Steve Nash
gym, Tim Hortons, Starbucks, andthe
Liqour store! Buil ing is pet friendly,
as well as has a free gym to use! Very
high floor sub penthouse level.... Serious inquires only.
$1500 / 2BR- LARGE GROUND FLOOR
SUITE Abright 2 bedroom ground floor
suite with 8' high ceilings is available
for rent immediately. The suite is approx. with 1,000 sqft with its own entrance, near 21stAvenue and Dunbar
Street, close to public transit (#7, #32,
#33, & #16) and Dunbar shops. Restaurants, and Community Centre/Library Close to UBC, St. George school.
Lord Byng Secondary and Kitchner El-
ementary school. New laminate floors
$950 / 2BR - NEW BASEMENT SUITE
Basement suite in a newhome, custom
built, laminate floors, granite counter
tops, designer bathroom and kitchen.
Located on Worthington Drive- near
22nd Avenue, approx 750 sq feet. 2 bedrooms, kitchen and bathroom. Clean
and quiet neighbourhood, walk-in distance to Rupert Skytrain Station. Con-
venientlocation, short distance to Renfrew Community Centre, transit and
Superstore. Separate entrance in the
back ofthe house. Parking on street.
Nearby Bus# 25 UBC/Brentwood route,
takes you to Nanaimo Skytrain station,
UBC and Brentwood Mall.
2 BED - 2483 YEW @ BROADWAY VANCOUVER Large 2 bedroom, 2 bathrooms
located on the 5th floor - approx 1017
square feet AU NEW kitchen appliances Fridge, Stove, Dishwasher & Built
in Microwave' Washer Dryer, Gas Fireplace New Laminate Flooring and new
paint Great Location with IGA & London
Drugs just across the street and on the
UBC bus line No pets. Lease Required
$ 1900 per month + $50.00 move in fee
$1100 / 1BR - NEWLY DECORATED
FURNISHED 1 BR BASEMENT SUITE
Newly decorated furnished 1 bed room
basement suite in nice house (Cambie
St. and King Edward Ave.) Available late
March or early April 2011. Close to King
Edward Cambie Line Station, No. 25 buses to UBC and No. 15 buses to downtown
Vancouver and Langara college. Quiet and safe neighbourhood. Private entrance. Includes cable, wireless internet
and utilities. Full kitchen and bathroom
plus own laundry facilities. Bed room
has 2 single beds. Suitable for reliable
working person or mature college/university student. No smoking, drinking,
pets, drugs and parties. Prefer 1 year
lease. Good creditreferences required,
if interested please reply with detailed
personal details.
$1500 / 1BR - BRAND NEW 1-BED-
ROOM PLUS DEN AT UBC!! South facing brand new apartment with the view
ofthe courtyard, private back area separated by water. Carpet in living room
andbdroom, tiles throughout the rest
ofthe area. Stainless steel appliances
»86U 5TUU1U FUK KENT UN  OAiv
& 17TH Bright, spacious and clean
studio available for rent from March
first. Excellent location, close to VGH,
local stores and transit wit' access to downtown and UBC.'
is on the main floor facing
patio, blinds, carpet and di
Rent includes heat and hot
the building we have a coin
laundry and available underground
parking ($40.00/month). Sorry no pets
and no smoking.
./of-
.,e i;,.        .1 beau
tiful, quiet, safe and convenient area.
This is the TOP floor of a Duplex, (only
2 units, top and bottom), approx. 1500
sq feet. 1 and 1/2 baths, deck off the
"~'~     kjti-hen  nnd nwnya" "
Pages 6-10
^roiton House and St. George s.
Short walk to Kerrisdale village, and
the bus stop is very close. This is 4
bedrooms, plus den, for $2600.00 including utilities. Available March 1st.
please call Susan at 778-892-0803.
$1100 / 2BR - RENOVATED 2 BEDROOM BASEMENT SUITE Renovated 2 bedroom basement suite for rent.
Suite has fridge, stove and fully carpeted. Suite is close to Langara college, oakridge mall, bus routes to ubc,
Richmond and Downtown. Rent is 1100
which includes utilities. Sorry no pets.
$3550 THREE BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
RENT Three bedroom two level house
for rent in Point Grey. Minutes to UBC
and walking distance to schools. Two
bedroom mainfloorwithone bathroom.
One bedroom basement suite with one
bathroom and a seperate kitchen for
basement. Both floors have seperate
living rooms. Extra large garage and
fencedyardforprivacy. Fullyrenovat-
ed house with new flooring, appliances and cabinets. The house is vacant
and wiU be able to show at short notice.
$925 / 2BR - BEAUTIFUL NEW
HOUSE-CLOSE TO SKYTRAIN STATION New, bright and clean 2 bedroom on main floor. Very convenient
location that is 2 minutes walk to 2 9th
Ave. Skytrain station. lOmin to Downtown and Metrotown. Other transpor-
ationto UBC, BCIT. Close to shopping.
925 including utilities, cable, and in-
;rnet. Available March 15.
$1750 / 1BR - BRAND NEW LARGE 1
BEDROOM CONDO OVER 725 SQFT!
BrandNew 1 Bedroom CondowithFlex
Space and Enclosed Balcony totalling
over 725 square feet. Other features include living room, dining area, high
end stainless steel appliances, ensuite
laundry and one underground parking
spot. This great property is available
immediately on a 1 year lease. Sorry
no smoking and no pets. The Waterloo is a recently completed, brand new
16-unit apartment building located in
the highly desirable Kitsilano neighbourhood at the corner of West Broadway and Waterloo. This location offers
close proximity to public transit, shopping, dining and entertainment. Only
5 minutes from UBC and the beach and
10 minutes to Downtown. Lets make a
deal. Call for details on our tenant incentive program being offered.
$750 BACHLOR SUITE AVAILABLE
MARCH 1ST Basement bachlor suite
available March 1 st in Point Grey (14th
Ave. between Trimble and Discovery).
Clean, furnished, separate garden entrance, streetparking available. Laundry shared with landlords upstairs.
Walking distance to Pacific Spirit Park,
10th Ave. shops, UBC, and the beach.
Furniture includes a new bed with
good mattress (no bedbugs!), bought
two months ago, new microwave and
new full-sized fridge. Wireless internet
andutilities included. Fullbathroom.
Please no pets or smokers. Please reply by email. Available this weekend
and evenings for showings.
$1000 / 1BR - BRIGHT, MODERN
AVAIL MARCH 1ST 1 bedroom basement suite in Shaughnessy located very
close to Children's Hospital. Private entrance, shared laundry, laminate floors
and a full bathroom with a tub. Open
concept kitchen and living room with
a gas fireplace. There is also a designated parking spot. No smoking. The
suite is most suitable for 1 person with
NO pets. Easy transportation to UBC,
and Downtown. Utilities are extra and
are shared with other suite in house.
Please reply via email or phone 604-
733-1313 to view the suite
$1850 2BD/2BATH CONDO This is a
two bedroom, two bathroom condo of
over 960 square feetwhichhas an outside entrance. The fully equipped kitchen has stainless appliances, new granite countertops andupdated cabinets,
plus all cookware, dishes, cutlery etc.
There are hardwood floors throughout,
gas fireplace, in suite laundry, plus a
large balcony with barbecue. It is fully furnished and completely move-in
ready, master has anew queenbed, other bedroom a single which is optional.
Non smokers, no pets. It is a five minute
walk to the beach, two minutes to bus
stops, five minutes from shops, and 10
minutes by bus to UBC or downtown. I
am looking for a renter who will be responsible and who would like to stay
for a few months. This condo is available from the first of March onward
All utilities are included: heat, light,
cable TV, wireless internet.
$2195 / 3BR - KITSILANO MAIN
FLOOR OF HOUSE HARDWOOD
FLOORS AND HIGH CEILINGS Main
floor of a Kitsilano house with three big
and bright bed rooms that have high
ceilings .Big kitchen with dinning area.
There is a sun deck off the kitchen in
the back ofthe house with lots of yard
space. There are 5 appliances with laundry and storage in the basement. Located onthe corner of5th and Dunbar
close to the beach with good shopping
$1150 / 2BR-TWO BEDROOM SUITE
W/ PRIVATE ENTRANCE Basement
suite in the Cedar Cottage/Kensington area (East Vancouver). Suite is approximately 800 sq ft, with two bright,
south-facing bedrooms. Rent is $1150,
and you will share heat and hydro with
the upstairs tenants. Laundry is also
shared. Available March 1. We are looking for clean, quiet, and responsible
tenant(s), with a maximum of two tenants living in the suite (or a small family). No smoking inside or on the property, and no pets.
$1195 / 1BR - FULLY FURNISHED,
VERY CLEAN A very clean and fully
furnished, self-contained, smaU BSMT-
suite, located at Queen Elizabeth Park
area. The suite Is available from May
1st. It is furnished, including DVD,
TV, linen, towels, kitchen utensils etc.:
ready to move in. Nearby public transportation to Down Town, UBC, Langara and more. The suite can be rented
forperiods of 1 months andlonger, al-
thoughprice mightbe higher for short
periods. Will fit a single or ayoung couple. Ifyou are interested -please tell
us about your self, including the dates
thatyou arelookigto rent, where will
you be coming from and for how many
people. No pets and no smoking, sorry.
$650 FURNISHED ROOM Clean quiet cozy main floor furnished room in
character home 1/2 block eastofMain
Street on 22nd Avenue Conveniently
close to Bus Routes going to downtown,
UBC and Langara Lots of coffee shops,
restaurants, pizza, burger joints and
thrifty markets here Rent is $650 per
month includes all utilities, wireless
internet except cable Suitable for one
single responsible quiet person NON
SMOKER NO PETS Security Deposit
and References Required
$550 / 1BR - HOUSEKEEPING UNIT
Housekeeping room available March
1,2011 in a wonderful character home
in prime Shaughnessy location. Walking distance to South GranviUe shops.
Arbutus Meinhardts and on bus route
to UBC. Has kitchenette but bathroom
is shared. Utilities (heat and electricity)
are included in monthly rent of $550.
Call Elmar at 604.716.8080 for an appointment to view.
$1900 / 3BR - 3221 WEST 41ST AVENUE Cute and clean Kerrisdale bungalow at the corner of Balaclava and
West 41st. Greatlocation close to UBC.
Fleshly painted and new blinds. Lovely hardwood floors throughout t the
large living room, dining room and
two ofthe good sized bedrooms. The
third bedroom is carpeted and has an
ensuite bath with shower stall. Taint.
The second bath is nice an clean with
a tub, shower combo. Appliances include fridge, stove washer and dryer.
Pet ok. Priced to rent fast!
$1700 NEW AND NICE APT ON UBC
CAMPUS UBC brand newhuge, bright
.quiet and south facing 1 bedroom
and 1 den (may use as a bedroom )
with 2 baths on second floor inpresti-
gious South Campus area. Steps away
from the new U-Hill Secondary and
"Save-On-Food."
$1975/ 2BR-BETHE FIRST TO RENT
AT THE MEWS - UBC CAMPUS Introducing Mews, an exceptional collection
of 72 sophisticated 1 and 2 bedroom
unfurnished, pet friendly rental suites
nestled in the heart of Wesbrook Place,
UBC. Please visitthe Wesbrook Discovery Centre at 3 345 Shrum Lane, UBC or
livethemews.ca for more information
and to schedule an appointment to visit
our show suite. Bedrooms: 1 + den and
2 bedroom suites available Bathrooms:
2 Pet Friendly: Yes (with Restrictions)
Non Smoking Building Available: February 1, 2011 Rental Rates: Starting at
$1795 per month for 1 br + den, $1975
for 2 br 2 bath.
$700/ 1BR- 1 BEDROOM BASEMENT
SUITE NEAR CANADA LINE KING
EDWARD STATION Small one bedroom basement suite on west 27th Ave.
near cambie street. Include cable, wireless internet and utilities No.33 and
No.25 buses to UBC, No.3 and No.15
buses to Downtown Vancouver. Minutes to Canada Line King Edward station Please note thatthere's no parking
$1750 / 2BR - FULLY FURNISHED
APARTMENT Fully furnished 2BR,
1.5 Bath apartment available March
25, 2011 for short or long term rent in
one ofthe best areas in North Vancouver, BC. One queen size bed, two single beds. Sleeps 5 +. Everything is included -Cable, Internet, Local Tel. Fully
equipped kitchen. Close to everything
-only 3 min. walking distance to Lonsdale Quay and all shops and boutiques.
Two bus stop stations close by. Great to
have your friends ot in-laws in Vancouver for a visit. NO PETS, NO SMOKING
$900 / 1BR - BEAUTIFUL NEW 1BR
SUITE IN EAST VAN New 1 bedroom
basement suite in East Van, between
1st and Hastings and just east of Nanaimo. Brand new suite in a family
home. South-facing and very bright.
Deep soaker tub. New appliances and
full kitchen. Lots of closet space and
storage. Cork floors. Shared laundry.
Backyard with possible access to garden for growing vegetables. 15 min
walk to the Drive. Also 10 min from
cafes on Hastings. Very close to bus
routes on Nanaimo and Hastings. Heat
and electricity included.
$965 SPACIOUS 1 BEDROOM CHARACTER APT. This charming 2nd floor
apartment is in a quiet small building.
The suite has big new windows, hardwood floors, original tile countertops in
kitchen, laundry facilities in building,
secure parking garage, close to beaches, Davie Street, downtown, English
Bay, Stanley Park and Kitsilano. Quiet
neighbourhood. Available March 1st.
$1575 / 2BR - 2-BEDROOM GARDEN
SUITE IN HEART OF KITSILANO
Bright 2-bedroom Garden Suite in
a striking Kitsilano character home
with walkout access to a beautifully
landscaped backyard. Bathroom was
partially renovated recently. Large
livingroom, and dinning nook open
to the kitchen. Both bedrooms are a
large with a cottage feel built-in wardrobe in one ofthe bedrooms. Berber
Carpets throughout with ceramic
tiles in Kitchen and Bath. Suite has
private covered patio area leading
into the shared backyard. Approximately 900 sq. ft.
$1800 / 1BR - ENTIRE FLOOR OF
CHARACTER HOUSE IN KITSILANO
Enjoy the 1,049 sf living space that
takes up the entire 2nd floor of this
newly renovated 1 bedroom suite in a
true character house with great views
of English Bay. Comes with a storage
shed and 1 parking stall with lots of
street parking. Shared laundry with
2 other units. This unit has been completely renovated from top to bottom
while keeping the distinct heritage
feel intact. New appliances/fixtures/
carpet, hardwood and paint. Asking
$1,800 per month, available immediately. Utilities included
$1500 / 2BR -TWO BEDROOM RENOVATED SUITE Immediate occupancy,
one year lease with option to extend.
Beautiful area of Kits. Street parking.
About 700 square feet. Open floor plan
between kitchen, dining area and living room. Ensuite master bedroom.
Second bedroom near three piece bathroom. Both bathrooms newly renovated. Carpeted throughout except in
kitchen and near front and back doors.
Newly renovated kitchen contains
fridge, microwave, dishwasher and new
electric stove. Backdoor leads to shared
laundry, secure storage facility and an
enclosed garden. Rentexcludes ulitities
and laundry where costs are shared. 2/UBYSSEY.CA/E VENTS/2011.02.24
FEBRUARY 24,2011
VOLUME XCII,  N° XXXVI
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@uhyney.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Arshy Mann: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Kalyeena Makortoff: kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR NEWS WRITER
Mich Cowan: mcowan@ubyssey.ca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
SENIOR CULTURE WRITER
Ginny Monaco: gmonaco@ubyssey ca
CULTURE ILLUSTRATOR
Indiana Joel: ijoel@ubysseyca
SPORTS EDITOR
Marie Vondracek: sports@ubysseyca
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate.multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
David Marino: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubysseyca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
print advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
web advertising: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubysseyca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubysseyca
PRINT AD SALES
Kathy Yan Li: advertising@ubysseyca
WEB AD SALES
Paul Bucci: webads@ubysseyca
ACCOUNTS
AlexHoopes: accounts@ubysseyca
CONTRIBUTORS
Ben Cappellacci
Gordon Katie
Rachel Silver
Halle Hui
Kelsea O'Connor
Charles To
Michael Chung
Karina Palmitesta
LEGAL
Kait Bolongaro
Claire Eagle
Mike Dickson
Pierce Nettling
Andrew McCarthy
Hazel Hughes
Mandy Ng
Will McDonald
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appearing in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words.
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point will
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
Itisagreed byall persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS will
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad.
Canadian
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EVENTS
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby! Learn
about layout and editing. Expect
to be fed. • Every Sunday and
Wednesday 2pm.
RESOURCE GROUPS • Are you working
on a progressive project, but need
funding? Do you have an idea,
but can't get it off the ground?
Apply to the Resource Groups
for funding! Come in, pitch your
idea to us and we will consider
fully or partially funding your
project. • Every Monday 11am
in SUB 245 (second floor, northeast corner). For more info email
resourcegroups.ams@gmail.com.
ILSOOKYUNGMCLAURINARTEXMBIT:
THE BEAUTY OF NATURE • With
references to the tradition of
landscape painting that captures
the beauty of the land and
trees, Kyung's art pieces have
a surrounding landscape that
serves as a backdrop to her daily
life within her adopted homeland
of Canada. However, through her
works, she also illustrates the
darker side of the landscape,
confronting the troubling aspects
of environmental pollution that
threaten nature. • Runs until Feb.
26, artwork featured in Irving
K Barber foyer and Ike's Cafe
gallery.
THURSDAY, FEB. 24
SPARTACUS YOUTH CLUB CLASS SERIES • The Vancouver Trotskyist
Teach English
Abroad
TESOL/TESL Teacher Training
Certification Courses
• Intensive 60-Hour Program
• Classroom Management Techniques
• Detailed Lesson Planning
• ESL Skills Development
• Comprehensive Teaching Materials
• Interactive Teaching Practicum
1 Internationally Recognized Certificate
• Teacher Placement Service
• Money-Back Guarantee Included
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430/1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminais.ca
League presents their second
Spartacus Youth Club class discussion: Egypt After Mubarak.
• 6:30pm, SUB Room 42V,
call (604) 687-0353 or email
trotskyist_vancouver@shawca-
ble.com for more information.
DISCOVER DANCE! LORITA LEUNG
CHINESE DANCE COMPANY* The
Lorita Leung Chinese Dance
Company is recognized by China as North America's leading Chinese dance performing
group. They will be showcasing
the astonishing diversity and
beauty of Chinese dance in the
next edition of The Dance Centre's popular Discover Dance!
noon hour series. From the poise
and control of the classical style
to the exuberance of ethnic folk
dances, the company will trace
a journey through Chinese art,
culture and traditions. There
will also be a question-and-
answer session with the dancers. • 72pm, Scotiabank Dance
Centre, 677 Davie St (at Granville), $10, $8 students, seniors
and children. Go to ticketsto-
night.ca.
[TITLE OF SHOW] • [title of show]
is Broadway's newest, hilarious cult hit musical and is
making its Western Canadian
premiere in Vancouver. Best
friends Hunter and Jeff decide
to write a musical starring themselves and their wacky and
sassy ladyfriends Heidi and
Susan. • Runs until Feb. 26,
Mon.-Fri. 8pm, Sat. 2pm and
8pm, Arts Club Revue Stage,
1585 Johnston St, Granville Island. $25, call (604) 629-8849
or go tovancouvertix.com to
reserve.
Q&A WITH MINISTER LYNNE YELICH
• UBC Campus Conservatives
are holding a Q&A with Minister Lynne Yelich and Conservative candidate Wai Young. Free
pizza will be provided. • 7pm,
Hillel House, north of the SUB.
FRIDAY, FEB. 25
UBC LIBERTARIAN CLUB DISCUSSION • UBC Libertarian Club
proudly presents a discussion
event regarding the WikiLeaks
controversy. Speakers Anthony Mayfield and Paul Geddes,
President of the BC Libertarian Party, will be discussing
Wikileaks, a non-profit organization that releases confidential documents to the public
from anonymous news sources. Discussions will be held
afterwards on issues like freedom of speech, national security and rights of the press.
Your opinion is welcomed. •
5-6:30pm, Room 203, Buchanan A, free.
LAUGHTER ON THE 23rd FLOOR •
The annual medical school play
will be Laughter on the 23rd
Floor by Neil Simon. Inspired
by Simon's early career as a junior writer for a variety comedy show, it portrays the manic antics of a group of comedy
writers as they struggle with
their show's inevitable cancellation. • Runs until Feb. 25,
8-11 pm, Medical Student and
Alumni Centre, 2750 Heather
St. $12 students, $15 non-students, e-ma/V medplaytickets®
gmail.com to purchase.
THE PILLOWMAN • UBC Players'
Club presents The Pillowman.
Katurian, a writer in an unidentified authoritarian state, becomes the prime suspect in a
series of child murders when
the police notice similarities between his violent stories and
the deaths they are investigating. The Pillowman takes a look
at violence, abuse and the influence of art in the modern world
without trepidation. • Runs until
Feb. 26, 7:30pm, Dorothy Somerset Studios. $5 members, $8
students, $10 non-students, tickets can be reserved by emailing
productions@ubcplayersclub.
com or at the door 30 mins before the show.
ENGINEERS WITHOUT BORDERS
WINEAND CHEESE* EWB will be
showcasing a brighter side of
Africa through music, pictures,
stories, speakers and possibly
dancers. Proceeds from tickets
sales, wine sales, the silent auction and raffle ticket sales will go
towards the funding required to
send two junior fellows to one
of four countries in Africa this
coming summer. • 7-9pm, Global Lounge and Resource Centre,
Marine Drive Bldg 1.
SUNDAY, FEB. 27
FILM SCREENING & DIRECTOR'S
TALK: CEDAR & BAMBOO • Join
Diana Leung and Kamala Todd
for a screening and talk about
their insightful film, which explores intercultural and community relations between
four individuals of mixed Chinese and Aboriginal ancestry:
Lil'wat elder Judy Joe, Musqueam elder Howard Grant
and siblings Jordie and Hannah Yow. Screening time: 22
min. • 1-3pm, Museum of
Anthropology, $14/$12 + HST.
MONDAY, FEB. 28
VANCOUVER 2010 ANNIVERSARY GAMING PARTY • Relive the
2010 fun on the anniversary of the closing of the 2010
Vancouver Olympic games.
Play on gaming systems, enjoy snacks and win prizes! •
10am-4pm, UBC Bookstore.
THURSDAY, MAR. 3
CARNIVAL IN JACMEL • Didier
Civil is a celebrated Haitian
painter and papier-mache artist, and the founding director
of an art school in Jacmel,
one of the towns devastated by the recent earthquake
and cholera outbreak. He will
show projections of masks
and costumes from the repertoire of Haitian carnival and
talk about the history of carnival and its art forms. His visit to UBC is co-sponsored by
the Department of Art History, Visual Arts and Theory
and the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery. • 5-6:30pm,
Coach House, Green College,
email gc.events@ubc.ca or
call (604) 822-8660 for more
information.
ENGLISH MAJORS: ICE CREAM SOCIAL* This event is for English
majors and potential English
majors (especially second year).
Alumni from the program have
been invited to speak about
their experiences in the work
force and also discuss internship
opportunities. • 4-6pm, Room
261, Irving K Barber.
FRIDAY MAR. 4
UBC SYMPHONIC ORCHESTRA •
Guest Conductorforthis concert
is Roman Brogli-Sacher, Chief
Conductor and Opera Director of
the Philharmonic Orchestra and
the Theatre Lubeck, Germany.
This concert also features a new
work by UBC composition student Eileen Padgett and piano soloist Bogdan Dulu, winner of the 2011 UBC Concerto
Competition. • 8-10pm, Chan
Centre, free.
Your campus radio station
with online streaming
and podcasts
CiTR
1Q1.9fm/CITR.ca
OWN YOUR FREQUENCY
and
publisher
of
H*<#M=H 2011.02.2 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT EDITOR KALYEENA MAKORTOFF»kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER MICKI COWAN»mcowan@ubyssey.ca
Serbian speaker accused of hate speech
Bosnian students concerned about lecture by controversial academic Srdja Trifkovic
MICKI COWAN
mcowan@ubyssey.ca
"Islamophobic." "Bosnian Genocide denier."
These are just two ofthe labels
that Ana Komnenic, a 4th year
International Relations major
at UBC and a Bosnian-Canadian, used to describe Dr Srdja
Trifkovic.
Trifkovic, whose lecture at
UBC is being sponsored by the
Serbian Students Assocation
(SSA), has some students concerned about what they consider hate speech targeted at Bosnians and Muslims.
Aside from being employed
by BBC and The Washington
Times and holding professor positions at universities around
the world, he also worked as an
advisor for former President of
Republic Srpska, Biljana Plavsic,
who was tried and convicted as
a war criminal after the Bosnian war.
When Komnenic heard of the
event, she immediately contacted university administration
and sent numerous messages
to the SSA requesting information. "I was blocked from the
[Facebook] group and my comment deleted," she said.
When asked about the concern
that some opinions might be stifled at the event, the president
ofthe SSA, Rastko Stanisavljevic,
said that "I can assure you that
Ms. Komnenic should not be worried about any issues of stifling
of opinion, because the security
PHOTO COURTESY OF BALKENSTUDIES.ORG
presence that we likely will have
there is precisely there to ensure that respectful dialogue
is held as outlined by the letter
that we received from Dr Toope's
associate."
The letter emphasizes respectful dialogue, saying that, "for
a university anything that detracts from the free expression
of ideas is just not acceptable."
Chad Hyson, executive co-ordi-
nator ofthe office ofthe VP Students, said that he is not aware
of a speaker being cancelled in
the past due to a controversial
viewpoint. "This isn't the first
time that the UBC community
has had speakers who've been
outspoken and whose views have
been controversial," he said, noting Norman Finkelstein's lecture
in October 2010. He encouraged
students who are against the
views of a particular speaker to
voice their concerns and attend
the event to engage in respectful debate.
Komnenic was uncertain just
how respectful the event would be.
"I don't see how this is respectful dialogue, because it seems
like they're trying to cover up
who this guy really is," she said.
Komnenic said that there
should be someone to monitor
UBC speakers and complaints
like hers.
"I think that clubs have a lot
of liberty to invite whoever they
want, but I think it's sort of on
the clubs to be cautious and respectful and careful about who
they invite and who that could
offend," she said. "Of course, a
lot of speakers will be controversial, I know that, but I think
there is a line that needs to
be drawn." This line, she said,
should fall under the purview
of an administrative board created for the purpose of evaluating speakers.
If the lecture does not get
cancelled, Komnenic hopes a
letter will be sent to Trifkovic
warning him about Canada's
laws against hate speech, as
well as assurance from the SSA
that she would be welcome to
voice her opinion at the event.
Stanisavljevic does not see a
need for the university to change
its policy on speakers.
"I think the outline made it
clear how to organize respectful
dialogue," he said. "I think that
a university should be a place
of free speech, and ultimately
that anyone is able to voice their
opinions as long as they do so in
a respectful manner and allow
the other party to engage them."
The event has been approved by
the university and will be held on
Thursday, Feb 24lh at Swing Space
222 from 5-7:30pm. tl
Second years click and kick to a world record
ARSHY MANN
news@ubysseyca
Four UBC students are hoping
their soccer stamina on the small
screen will earn them a place in
the record books.
Rene Rinfret, Jamie Tang,
Gerome Louie and Anesu Mu-
tangadura spent a grueling 36
hours in the Vanier Commons-
block shooting, sliding and scoring on FIFA Soccer 2011 in an attempt to break the world record
for longest session spent playing
the Electronic Arts game.
"I attended the Student Leadership Conference and I saw The
Buried Life...and I was really inspired to...get a world record,"
said Rinfret, who came up with
the idea for the attempt.
The four second-year students,
who all lived in Place Vanier last
year, play outdoor, controller-free
soccer either on club teams or
through UBC Rec.
But beginning 8am Saturday
morning, they took their talents
from the field to the sofa, slogging
through 63 games before finishing at 4:30pm Sunday afternoon.
"The hardest time, I would
say was around 8 or 9 am. That
stretch to noon was really hard
for me. I was about to fall asleep,
but my friends justkept nudging
me," said Rinfret.
A midnight marathon of video games. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
According to Mutangadura,
the most difficult part of the
challenge was maintaining
morale.
"I'd have to say the most horrible thing about this is to stay
motivated in some matches, just
to carry on going. Some matches will have a bad run through,
they'll score three goals against
us and I'll be like, 1 want to quit
now and just start a new game,'"
he said.
"But I know I have to go
through the entire match."
He said that this problem was
compounded by the fact that he
was attending a friend's birthday party until 4am the night
before the world record attempt.
He only regretted the choice
when he was "lazily nodding
[his] head back and forth," trying to stay awake.
More problems emerged when
the skill levels of teams were
mismatched. "My friend Gerome
and I started off as partners, and
it took us eight hours to win a
game," said Rinfret. "I think we
lost 17 games in a row."
Rinfret is currently compiling the group's official package
for Guinness World Records. The
previous record was almost six
hours shorter than the session
the UBC boys played. Set in December of 2010, it clocked in at
30 hours and one minute, tl
NEWS BRIEFS
ISRAELI-PALESTIANIAN STRIFE HITS
CARLETON UNIVERSITY STUDENT
UNION
WATERLOO, Ont. (CUP)—The
denial of motions proposed
by the Students Against Israeli Apartheid (SAIA) at the
Carleton University Student
Association (CUSA) caused
a mob of nearly 100 students
to bang on the walls and begin chanting slogans loudly in
disapproval.
The three recommendations
the SAIA was trying to get
passed were in regards to CUSA's pension, which had been
invested in companies that were
in violation of international law
in Palestine.
Though the night's events are
somewhat in question, Reem
Buhaisi, member of SAIA, assured that SAIA's goals for the
meeting were met and the
group was pleased with the
results, which will see that the
pension will be reviewed.
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT LOOKING
TO ENACT SALVIA BAN
OTTAWA (CUP) — The federal government has announced
it plans to ban salvia, a hallucinogenic herb that has recently
enjoyed a surge in popularity
among young people in North
America.
Salvia is currently considered a natural health product and technically is only allowed to be sold if it has been
reviewed and authorized by
Health Canada.
In a Feb. 21 release, the government indicated it intends to
add salvia to the Controlled
Drugs and Substances Act,
thereby making it illegal to possess, sell, import, export and
grow the plant. The herb will
not go under an immediate ban:
Stakeholders and members of
the public have until March 21
to comment on the proposal,
after which the federal regulatory process could continue for
up to two years.
UBC STUDY FINDS CANADIANS
RECIEVING UNRELIABLE INFORMATION ON PRESCRIPTION DRUGS
Canadian residents looking
to find information about prescription drugs online may be
directed to unreliable sources,
according to a recent study
led by UBC assistant professor Michael Law.
Their research has shown that
US residents who search for
prescription drug information
online are directed to the government-run National Library
of Medicine, while Canadian
residents are directed to Wikipedia or pharmaceutical industry sponsored sites, which are
criticized by the study for being
inaccurate.
The American National Institute of Health (NIH) and Google
have been in partnership since
2010, leading to the difference
in American results. Other
search engines, such as Bing
or Yahoo used in America produce results similar to those in
Canada.
—Micki Cowan and Will
McDonald 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2011.02.24
AMS pushes forward with fee restructure
$19 fee increase will cost most students $5 due to decreased health plan costs
How much more the new fees will cost most students. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
After a six month delay, the AMS
will be making an attempt this
March to shore up its finances
with a fee referendum.
The AMS cancelled a previously planned attempt to pass
a fee referendum last October, deciding to wait until a U-
Pass vote was called in the new
year. U-Pass renewals almost always reach quorum, one of the
most significant hurdles to any
referenda.
The fee restructure would see
$7.50 more for the AMS general
fee, as well as increases to other current AMS fees and the creation of entirely new fees.
AMS President Jeremy McElroy said that an increase in fees
was absolutely necessary to the
survival of the society.
"We really need to get across
that the fees need to pass in one
capacity or another," he said. "If
this particular question fails,
we're going to rework it and go
back to referendum again, hopefully before the end of the year."
McElroy said that the AMS's
current financial situation was
a result of declining revenues
from their businesses.
"Two consecutive summers of
the highest student unemployment in Canadian history coupled by the student loan program
maxing out, tuition going up every year—students are broke,
and they're not coming to our
businesses," he said. "So what
we're experiencing now is likely
what it's going to look like going
forward, which means we can't
rely entirely on that revenue.
"We've relied for the past 15
years on the fact that enrolment
was increasing and we were introducing more businesses and
doing better.
"We've kind of hit capacity for
enrolment at UBC and now, with
increased competition on campus as well as the world market situation, we're essentially
broke. So the only way we can
remedy this is to increase our
basic fee, the AMS general fee.
It hasn't changed since 1982, I
can't stress that enough. This
one fee hasn't changed in 30
years."
He went on to say that the referendum is not "a cash grab."
"The AMS's deficit is not because of misspending—in fact,
the student government budget is the lowest it's been in four
years. We're actually coming in
under budget this year [and]
we've done everything in our
power to be fiscally responsible."
According to referendum committee chair Ben Cappellacci,
the changes that the AMS is proposing are more a restructuring
of the fees than simply a raise.
"We're actually restructuring
the whole nature ofthe fees, looking at changing some ofthe opt-
out rules and changing some of
the prorating rules, as well as
increasing some of the existing fees, adding some new fees
for some new services, and just
sort of changing the way the fee
package works," he said.
Although the new fees would
affect students differently based
on how many courses they take
and what fees they opt out of,
most students will only pay $5
more, despite a $19 increase in
fees.
This is because the AMS
was able to re-negotiate the
Health and Dental Plan, accruing around $1.2 million in onetime savings.
"Now we have a unique system...that's unique in Canada,
and by restructuring, we saved a
bunch of money that would have
otherwise gone to the middle man,"
said VP Finance Elin Tayyar.
"We're still working on finalizing the...details, butwe're saving
definitely above $14 a year on
structural cost, so we decided to
go with a $14 cut in our fees to
go along with the referendum."
Tayyar said that these savings would entail no cuts to coverage, and that the AMS would
be no more susceptible to unexpectedly high claims than any
other year.
"We took those structural
savings and are essentially giving them back to students instead of beefing up the plan,"
he said.
Although the majority of students will only see a $5 increase,
students who opt out ofthe AMS's
Health and Dental Plan will have
to pay $19 on top of their current fees.
According to Tayyar, approximately 25 per cent of UBC students opt out ofthe health plan.
In addition, the changes
would lead to fewer AMS fees students could opt out of, meaning
that part-time students would,
for the majority of fees, pay the
same as full-time students.
In order to make up for this,
Tayyar said that the AMS is setting aside enough money so that
the neediest three per cent of
students would have all of their
fees fully reimbursed.
"1300 plus students will be
able to get all their fees reimbursed," he said. "UBC financial
aid will be determining that.. .so
when they apply for bursaries,
they'll automatically be considered for that."
Tayyar said he's very concerned about the state of the
AMS if the referendum doesn't
pass.
"I'm a little bit worried that
students don't realize that...this
referendum will definitely determine which direction the AMS
will be going," he said.
"If it doesn't pass, we will see
cuts [of] hundreds of thousands
of dollars." tl
FEE INCREASES
AMS GENERAL FEE—$7.50
Funds the major operations of
the AMS. Increase will allow the
AMS to reduce dependence on
its businesses.
52£*  »UIUM||
ams
LIGHTER FOOTPRINT—$2.25
Provides funding for student-
led sustainability projects on
campus.
P     Z;
CLUBS BENEFIT FUND—$1.50
This fund will fund events, activities and programs that are
run by AMS clubs. The money
will be administered by the Student Administrative Committee.
CHILDCARE BURSARY LEVY—$1
Will provide subsidies for childcare and contribute to the AMS
Childcare endowment.
STUDENT SPACES FUND—$1
Intended for capital projects
such as childcare facilities, upgrading the Whistler lodge and
athletic facilities by the new
SUB.
CITR—$1
CiTR will offer free DJ lessons
as well as DJ services for campus events put on by clubs, constituencies or the AMS.
z_L|9     =
THE UBYSSEY—$1
Allow The Ubysseyto move to a
24/7 online operation and have
a print edition published in the
summer. The Ubyssey Publications Society is, however, not a
part of the AMS.
EXTERNAL LOBBY FUND—$0.50
Will enable increased involvement in provincial and national lobbying organizations such
as CASA.
INTERNATIONAL FUND—$0.25
Intended to support student projects on campus with an international focus, such as conferences, speakers or events. 2011.02.24/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/5
t^--
v.  ^-.-
X
322
r
WANTED:
COMMUNICATIONS TECHNICIANS
"If our communications go down, lives could
be at stake. Myjob is to inspect and maintain
my team's communications equipment. Keeping
them in touch and keeping them safe."
Corporal HAEBE BAGUIDY
RECHERCHONS:
TECHNICIENS EN COMMUNICATIONS
« Des lignes de transmission rompues. ca peut
vouloir dire des vies en danger. Mon travail
consiste a inspecter et a reparer le materiel de
communication de mon equipe. Je fais en sorte
que tous restent en contact pour que tous restent
en securite.»
Caporal HAEBE BAGUIDY
FORCES.CA
FIGHT WITH THE CANADIAN FORCES      ^jSjf^
1-800-856-8488
COMBATTEZ AVEC LES FORCES CANADIENNES
Canada 6/UBYSSEY.CA/HOUSING/2011.02.24
WELCOME
to thzftabutouA
SUPPLEMENT
,   KALYEENA
MAKORTOFF
i   kmakortoff®
ubyssey.ca
Welcome to The
Ubyssey's housing supplement.
'   Vancouver  is  a
GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/ beautiful   city,
THEUBYSSEY and many of us
can truly say we
are lucky to live here. But as housing
prices
rise   and
commitments
to affordable housing
wax and wane, some complain that the luck we have is a mixed
blessing at best.
In this issue, housing across Vancouver is compared for prices and proximity to campus and services, as the real
tate prices on Point
Grey campus are
examined. We also cover the controversial fate ofthe Olympic Village, and
homelessness advocates explain Vancouver's barriers to low-income residents. And while UBC has recently
shown commitment to
creation of on-campus student housing through the new
student housing endowment, Downtown Eastside activists and residents
continue to fear gentrification and a
loss of community placement.
We only touch the tip of the metaphorical housing iceberg. I hope
you find this supplement informative, even though it gives only a
glimpse into the housing debates
throughout our city. Come in, and
-.jusseusQUh
student rental ootions
•1 ==" ?5p£
KELSEA O'CONNOR
Contributor
UBC housing lottery or are just itching to finally live off campus this year,
here's a look at some Vancouver neighbourhoods: in the areas that are popular with UBC students, what general
costs and perks can be expected for a
two-bedroom apartment rental.
GOOGLE MAPS CAPTURE
COURTESY OF LEEDMAN/FLICKR
COURTESY OF WASME/
COURTESY OF YORICK R/FLICKR
POINT GREY
The closest neighbourhood to campus,
Point Grey boasts quiet streets lined
with old trees and luxury homes, Spanish Banks and Jericho beaches and a
shopping village on W 10th Ave between
Alma and Tolmie. The area is home to
Safeway, smaller meat and produce
markets, cafes, restaurants and boutiques. Point Grey also borders Pacific Spirit Park, which offers great walking or jogging trails. You can expect to
pay between $1250-2000/month for a
two-bedroom unit—which is likely to
be a basement suite. Units found on
Craigslist were generally larger than in
other neighbourhoods, averaging 1000
square feet. It's only 6-12 minutes by
bus to campus.
COMMERCIAL DRIVE
The Drive is home to a mix of ethnic restaurants, grocery stores, cafes, bakeries,
nightspots and vintage clothing stores
with an arty vibe and strong community
spirit. Safeway, T&T Supermarket and
Shopper's Drug Mart are in the neighbourhood. Flanking Commercial Drive
are residential streets full of newer and
heritage homes. Expect to pay between
$1000-1500/month for a two-bedroom
apartment or basement suite. You can
get to UBC in 35 minutes by hopping on
the 99. The Broadway-Commercial Skytrain station on (you guessed it) Broadway and Commercial is your quick link to
downtown (six minutes) or to Metrotown
(nine minutes).
KERRISDALE
Kerrisdale has a small-community feel
to its mix of low-rise condos, heritage
homes and neighbourhood parks. Kerrisdale Village is home to boutique shopping, cafes and teashops, sushi restaurants and specialty food stores. However, don't expect to find any major supermarkets. The Kerrisdale Community Centre boasts ice-skating and an indoor pool. Expect to pay around $1200-
1600/month for a two-bedroom apartment or basement suite. Kerrisdale is
13-20 minutes from UBC on the 41
or 43 buses; the closest Skytrain station is Oakridge-41st Ave on the Canada Line, which you can reach in six to
eight minutes by bus.
YALETOWN
Yaletown's a mix of loft spaces transformed from old warehouses and densely-packed high-rise apartments. There's
close access to the Sea Wall, David Lam
Park and the aquabus to Granville Island,
as well as upscale supermarkets, classy
restaurants and bars and boutique shopping. The Roundhouse Community Centre offers a variety of programs and performances. Expect to pay $1800-2700/
month for a Yaletown condo. The apartments found on Craigslist were generally
the smallest of all the neighbourhoods, averaging 700-800 square feet. Getto UBC
in 30-36 minutes by taking the 4 bus, or
take the skytrain from the Roundhouse-
Yaletown station on the Canada Line to
Broadway-City Hall, then catch the 99.
COURTESY OF GILLICI0US/I
SOUTH MAIN STREET
'SoMa' is the centre of the Vancouver
hipster culture, with an abundance of hip
bars and cafes, antique stores, art galleries, restaurants and unique clothing
shops emerging out of a formerly rough
area. While there's lots of trendy eateries, delis and bakeries, there's no major
supermarket.
You can expect to pay $900-1500/
month for a two-bedroom unit. SoMa
is 30-35 minutes to UBC on the 99, 25
or 33 buses.
COURTESY OF PAYT0N CHUNG/Fl
KITSILANO
Kits has great views ofthe north shore mountains and attractions such as Kits beach, an
outdoor pool and Vanier Park. Broadway
and West 4th have many produce markets,
bakeries, supermarkets, cafes, boutiques,
trendy restaurants and yoga studios. The
surrounding residential streets are quiet and
close to the beaches. Expect $1250-2000/
month for a 2-bedroom apartment. Kits is
12-22 minutes to UBC on the 4, 9, 17, 44,
84 and 99 buses. If you're looking to get to
Granville Island, it's only a ten minute bus
ride, and only 15 minutes to get downtown.
COURTESY OF DUANE ST0REY/FLICKR
DOWNTOWN
Everything's waiting for you downtown:
shopping and fine dining on Robson
Street, Stanley Park and the Seawall,
the Granville bar and nightclub scene,
the VAG, sports arenas, theatres and
more. There's plenty to do and see in a
fast-paced, urban environment, ifyou're
willing to pay for it. Expect to pay between $1500-2500/month for a smaller condo, depending on the area. It's
35-40 minutes to campus on the 44,
17 or 4 buses.
THE VERDICT
If you're looking for a quick commute to
campus, Point Grey is probably your best
bet. If you're rolling in money and want a
fast-paced living environment, go for a condo downtown or in Yaletown. South Main
Street is becoming more attractive, while
rent prices are still pretty low: it'll give you
the most bang for your buck in a trendy,
up-and-coming neighbourhood.
Martha Lewis, a representative from the
Tenant Resource & Advisory Centre (TRAC)
in Vancouver, said the biggest problems facing students are affordability and landlords
not wanting to rent to students.
"The secondary suite market is disappearing, it's not what it was ten years ago," she
said. "Students with less money are in for longer commutes."
She noted that Commercial Drive is becoming less affordable for students because
of gentrification and young professionals moving in. Lewis suggested that students looking
to rent should visit TRAC's website (www.
tenants.bc.ca) and read their Tenant Survival Guide for important tips on renting in BC. 2011.02.24/UBYSSEY.CA/HOUSING/7
$900.000
andcotuitirux
THE PRICE OF UNIVERSITY LAND LEASES
TREVOR RECORD
features@ubyssey.ca
"$799,000: 1244 sf townhome feats wonderful floor plan with 2 ensuite baths,
vaulted ceilings, separate fabulous kitchen w/ S/S appls and a large eating area,"
reads an MLS listing for a property in
UBC's Hampton Place.
Sounds nice, but do you think it seems
a little steep for whatyou're getting? Still,
it's a below-average price for a lease on a
university property. Craig Munn, Assistant Manager of Communication for the
Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver,
explained that since January 1, 2009, the
median price of all properties sold was
just under $1 million.
"The average price of [university lands]
properties was $929,769," explained
Munn. "The high mark was $10,008,000,
and the lowest $238,000."
Those figures are based on 688 properties on the university lands that were
sold during that time period. He explained that prices tend to vary around
Vancouver. But in comparison, the average price of a property in the south-west
marine area, which had 159 sales, was
$1,428,000, with a high point of $6.8 million. David Ley the head of the UBC Geography department, said that the trends
prices on the university lands mirrored
the prices in Vancouver.
"That typically follows market prices,
which are high," said Ley. "There aren't
bargains out here; it's westside Vancouver, andithas considerable amenities....
prices are of little utility to students, or
indeed faculty."
Prices can still be advantageous on the
university lands compared to surrounding areas. UBC anthropology professor
Charles Menzies owns a townhouse on
Logan Lane. He moved to the university in 1996, originally as a renter. Due to
a family housing program, he said the
property he purchased a lease on was
about 25 per cent cheaper than a property in nearby Point Grey.
Properties on university lands are initially sold by UBC through UBC-owned
companies as 99-year leases. Menzies lives in a property bought from
One of the multi-i
UBC-owned Village Gate Homes. Funding raised by the sale of real estate goes
into endowment, used for investing but
now also used in a special Student Housing Finance Endowment. The university
benefits over Vancouver housing developers by not having to pay for the land they
build on: Menzies said that five-eighths
of the lease he paid for his property was
for the land.
"The university very creatively priced
their land," said Menzies.
Business has been good: Ley who specializes in issues in Canadian cities, said that
Vancouver has been leading the country
properties on the
isted for $4.8 million. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/
;UBYSSEY
in real estate prices for 20 years. So what
is it that makes Vancouver housing so expensive? He said that the limited developable land in the area is driving up prices
somewhat. However, the price actually goes
far above the means of Vancouver, according to Ley. He explained that global investors are what make the price of homes in
Vancouver and the university so particularly expensive.
"This is a global market, and investors from all over the world are investing here, so I think you've got to look at
Vancouver as a global setting to understand why prices are so high," said Ley.
For graduating students hoping to buy
in Vancouver, Ley said that there are predictions that housing prices will eventually drop. But in light ofthe recent publishing of a livability survey by The Economist, he suggested that the market won't
be favourable to young buyers at least for
the immediate future.
"Vancouver is once again the most liveable city amongst the 140 that they looked
at worldwide," said Ley. "That means that
there will be even more desire for investors from outside Canada to be investing
in the land market—either as a seasonal
home, or as a pure investment." tl
KALYEENA MAKORTOFF
kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
Q
BOG CREATES
STUDENT
HOUSING
FINANCING
ENDOWMENT
UBC's Board of Governors (BoG) has unanimously approved the creation of a Student Housing Financing Endowment
(SHFE), with the goal of providing housing to 50 per cent ofthe university's full-
time undergraduates.
^ The new endowment will be draw
ing directly from land lease proceeds from the Utown@UBC
t.    residential community on
UBC's endowment lands,
a group of eight neighbourhoods that includes, among others,
Hampton Place and the
Wesbrook Place/South Campus Neighbourhood.
The creation ofthe SHFE "preserves the land lease proceeds generated from creating a residential community as a long-term source of income
for student housing," said BoG Chair Bill
Levine in a press release. "This ensures
that land revenues will continue to benefit future generations of UBC students."
"I'm hugely in support of [SHFE]," said
student BoG representative Sean Heisler.
"I think what it does is create something
tangible for students, so they can see
what market housing is doing [for] university life."
Creating the SHFE essentially places funding for student housing in a direct endowment. Nassif Ghoussoub, the
elected faculty representative on the
BoG, explained in a February 8 post
on his blog how this differed from how
market housing proceeds were previously directed.
First year students move into rez. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/
;UBYSSEY
"The endowment will be supported by a
portion ofthe proceeds of land development
on campus," Ghoussoub wrote. "Normally,
all proceeds go directly to the UBC endowment where it is invested in the market."
Heisler said the benefit would be directed funding, as opposed to the previous
system in which student housing was in
competition with other capital projects.
"It takes student housing off the normal priority list, and makes it so as soon
as you can build it you're going to because
there's nothing elseyou can do with [profits from market housing]," said Heisler.
Citing the BoG's response to student
concerns, a February 10 post from The
UBC Admin blog attributed increased interest in on-campus housing to the price
of real estate in Vancouver, especially on
the west side, closest to UBC.
Heisler said that the SHFE will remain
in place until the housing demands of students are met—he estimates this to be when
about 50 per cent of students can be housed
on campus. Currently, UBC provides housing for 29 per cent of full-time undergraduates with roughly 8000 beds.
"We know that students in residence
highly value the rich educational and social experiences that come from living on
campus," UBC President Stephen Toope
said in the same press release. "UBC already has the highest number of students
in residence of any Canadian university,
but we must do better." tl
—With files from Trevor Record 8/UBYSSEY.CA/HOUSING/2011.02.24
ywwr
HOUSING
TERMINOLOGY
PIERCE NETTLING
Contributor
SOCIAL HOUSING
In the Vancouver context, social housing means affordable housing or public
housing. Social housing also differs from
regular housing, as it does not involve
the market and is either built, owned or
controlled by the local government or a
non-profit.
COOPERATIVE HOUSING
Cooperative housing, or co-ops, differ
from social housing, as the individual residents within the apartment complex or
house collectively own the structure and
democratically decide the rules, lease and
residents. Like social housing, co-operatives are non-market based approaches
to housing and give the occupant lower,
subsidized monthly rent costs. John Lennon, the famous Beatle, lived in The Dakota while living in New York City, which
is a famous co-operative for wealthy occupants that was once a hotel. Housing
cooperatives are common on university campuses in the United States. The
largest student cooperative is the Berkeley Student Cooperative for the University of California-Berkeley, which houses over 1300 students. The North American Students for Cooperation is the cooperative body which represents and assists student cooperatives in the United
States and Canada.
MARKET HOUSING
Market housing is a general term encompassing all housing or real estate properties driven by market forces and speculation in order to make a profit. Except for
social housing, cooperatives and some
SROs, real estate within the Vancouver region is controlled, bought and sold
through the market.
CANADA MORTGAGE AND HOUSING
CORPORATION
The second largest federal Crown Corporation after Canada Post, the CMHC was
created help find and create housing for
soldiers and families after World War II.
When the CMHC had a federal housing
mandate, it pushed for the creation of
public housing, cooperatives and urban
renewal projects such as Granville Island.
However, since the mid-1980s, the CMHC
no longer functions in this manner; the
federal housing program was completely
eliminated in 1993. Today, the CMHC's
main purpose is to give out affordable,
high-risk loans to prospective Canadians
looking to buy a home for the first time.
SECONDARY SUITES
A secondary suite is an umbrella term
for garden suites and basement suites.
SINGLE ROOM OCCUPANCY (SRO)
Single Room Occupancy (SRO) units are
a type of housing which serves the most
vulnerable in our community. Vancouver's
SROs are located in the Downtown East-
side in former hotels. Each occupant pays
a small monthly fee to stay in a modestly
sized room, which does not come with a
private bathroom. An SRO can be a rather horrific place to live for some tenants.
Single room occupancy hotels have increasingly disappeared in the Downtown
Eastside due to gentrification.
PURPOSE BUILT RENTAL APARTMENTS
Purpose built rental apartments are apartments exclusively built for renting and not
owning. This type of housing has dramatically decreased in Vancouver in favour
of market condo developments.
\
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Data con
tling. Sour
sociates, A
TREVOR RECI
•   (fattn^icattw
KAITB0L0NGAR0
kbolongaro@ubyssey.ca
The Downtown Eastside (DTES) is at the centre of Vancouver's housing debate after the City of Vancouver and
private construction firms recently purchased local
residential hotels and surrounding lands.
DTES community members have raised concerns about
increased rental costs, creating less affordable housing
for current residents. DTES activists have been relentlessly pushing against "gentrification" the socio-cul-
tural displacement that can occur when more affluent
people acquire property in low-income communities.
"The condo development has ripple effects that increase property values," says Jean Swanson, coordinator for the Carnegie Community Action Project (CCAP).
"As a result, the rents in the hotels go up and businesses that serve low income [residents] get replaced by
those that cater to rich people." She said that there is
also concern that new tenants would lobby to remove
social housing and services from the area.
CCAP is also wary ofthe new residents moving into
the DTES for their potential impact on the neighbourhood's social fabric.
"There are all these effects that push low-income
people out and destroy the community" says Swanson. "Seventy per cent of residents from the Downtown Eastside are low-income. A lot of them are discriminated against for race, gender, type of addiction
and for beinglow-income. But because people who are
discriminated against are the majority they don't feel marginalized [in
the DTES], but at home."
For the city of Vancouver, however,
this is more an issue of development
and integration rather than the forced
removal of DTES residents from their
neighbourhood.
"There are legitimate fears about
gentrification," says Dr Kerry Jang,
city councillor for the city of Vancouver and UBC professor of psychiatry.
"[However], there is also fear of ghet-
toization and the push back of not allowing new construction, and deliberately making a low-income area. The city
has a policy of mixed neighbourhoods.
People can live wherever they want to, mix different income levels and experiences, without displacement."
There are also housing policies in place to ensure
that social housing rental units aren't lost in a one-
for-one replacement program. "This is a way to manage development and ensure renewal of building stock
without displacing people," says Jang. "There are long
negotiations with developers to guarantee units that
are social housing within the condos. [Then], the developer can turn a profit [from the more expensive units]
but it also helps subsidize the lower income units."
The city has also recently created a Local Area Planning Committee to give residents and activist groups
until December 31, 2011 to establish a clear community development plan in cooperation with housing plans already approved by city council. The city's
mixed-neighbourhoods policy may serve to help break
down some ofthe stereotyping of lower-income residents, which UBC student Nima Farzaneh noticed during his one week stay in the DTES community.
"I noticed that a lot of people who are low income
are [judged] to be a part of something negative," says
Farzaneh. "I think that people who do want to judge
them should go actually talk to some of them. The issue of people judging [the] homeless is a big one considering that [wealthier people] say things with a
certain view. But how many [low income Vancouverites] do you know and have sat down and talked to?
The best way to remove these stereotypes is to actually spend some time with people and talk to them." va 2011.02.24/UBYSSEY.CA/HOUSING/9
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FOR ALL?
CLAIRE EAGLE
Contributor
"Systemic problems."
"Unspeakable conditions."
"Crisis."
These were some ofthe words recently
used to describe the housing situation on
the city's Downtown Eastside (DTES) at
the February 3 Chapman Discussion Series presentation of a panel entitled "Affordable Housing for All?: Homelessness
& Legal Activism in Vancouver." Speakers Doug King ofthe Pivot Legal Society
Didi Dufresne, a legal advocate at First
United Church, and UBC Law Professor
Margot Young each brought a unique perspective to the housing issue.
"Ifyou see the situation of a lot of the
housing downtown, a lot of it is supposedly called 'social housing,' and I
don't see any way of describing it other than as a crisis," said King, whose
Red Tent Campaign during the 2010
Olympics aimed to bring attention on
Vancouver's poor.
The panelists did not focus on the lack
of social housing, but rather a lack of affordable social housing as the main contributor to homelessness in Vancouver.
Dufresne said that on top of social housing being overpriced, living quarters are
often unsafe and poorly maintained—yet
few options exist for low-income tenants
of the DTES.
"It's shocking to see that relationship between landlord and tenant in the Downtown Eastside, and it's incredibly frustrating to work with," said King. "You witness it and feel thatyou can tell the Residence Tenancy Act, you can tell City Hall
the kinds of things that landlords can do
in the Downtown Eastside, and nobody believes you because it doesn't seem like it's
true. It has felt like there is a bit of a lawlessness in how., .things work down there."
Beyond the DTES, the panelists commented on the housing situation in Vancouver generally, which is notorious for
its high housing prices.
"Vancouver is unique in its social dimension," said King. "It's almost becoming a place where the middle class can't
afford to live anymore."
Panelists said they believed that change
maybe coming, however, with Bill C-3 04,
put forward by Vancouver East NDP MP
Libby Davies.
"It's quite a remarkable piece of legislation... It's a secure, adequate, accessible
and affordable housing act," said Professor Young. "It puts forward the markers
recommended by the UN Rapporteur on
[Adequate] Housing."
UN Rapporteur Miloon Kothari commented in 2007 that Canada was one of
the few affluent Western nations without a national housing strategy and recommended that the government "embarks on a large scale building of social housing units across the country."
The panelists said that if passed, Bill
C-304 would give priority to the under-
housed and those suffering mental illness, among others. The Bill has gained
much momentum across Canada and is
in its third reading, but will be lost if
it fails to pass before the next election.
What is next for the DTES and for
Vancouver as a whole? Dufresne said
that while mixed housing strategies,
which combine social housing with
market priced condominiums in one
building, have found some success,
the businesses and communities built
around these housing developments
tend to be inaccessible to low-income
residents. But Professor Young concluded with hope, encouraging those
in the audience to continue learning.
"We need to rethink what is great
about the Downtown Eastside," she
said. "It's a place of belonging as well
as being one of displacement; people who live there enjoy a community
and a degree of acceptance and freedom that they wouldn't get elsewhere.
There's something to be saved, not just
changed." tl
HOUSING
TERMINOLOGY
STRATA
Strata are the governing bodies of some
condominiums, with powers similar to
those of a cooperative but without a non-
market approach to housing. Each resident pays their strata fee which goes towards the general upkeep of the entire
"common land"—any area within the
complex that is not owned by an individual occupant is considered common
land. Unlike cooperatives, residents cannot necessarily control who lives in the
condominium. This power is held by a
board, the management or the owner of
the property. Each strata complex has its
own laws and rules that are determined
by each strata's management.
CONDOS
From those "million-dollar condos" you
hear about on the news, to any building
with shared ownership of inside units.
SINGLE-DETACHED HOUSING
Single-detached housing refers to houses
found outside of the downtown core and
in the suburban neighbourhoods of Vancouver. Outside the control of an owner's association, they are still part of the
real estate market. In other words, the
house you grew up in by Nanaimo and
East Broadway.
DEVELOPERS
The corporations and individuals that are
responsible for creating or renovating
housing and other properties for profit.
The Ubyssey doesn't want me to write this because it is editorializing: developers are mysterious unnamed millionaire architects and urban planners
from Hong Kong, the United States and Canada who quietly control the Vancouver City Hall Victoria legislature and the UBC Campus Plan
GENTRIFICATION
There are many forms of gentrification,
but there are three specific forms that
predominate in Vancouver. The first occurs when a developer converts a brown-
field—a former industrial site—into condos. This can be seen through Coal Harbour, False Creek, Yaletown and Woodward's developments. The second form
| of gentrification is created through the
creation of public transit lines, specifically the Canada Line and its effect on Mar-
pole. The third form of gentrification is
when young, upper-middle class trend
setters move into low-income neighbourhoods. This generally leads to an increase in the neighbourhood's property
values which, in turn, makes the neighborhood less affordable for low-income
residents. This type of gentrification has
happened or is happening on Main Street,
Commercial Drive and 4th Avenue and in
the neighbourhoods of Gastown, Strathcona, Mt. Pleasant and Kitsilano.
FLIPPING
Flipping is when someone buys a single-
detached home and quickly sells the property after making a few improvements
or upgrades to the structure in order to
increase its property value and make a
profit. Flipping leads to a rise in the total property value ofthe neighbourhood.
RENT CONTROL
Rent control refers to laws and policy
set by the local municipal government,
which restricts individual landlords from
raising monthly rent levels past a specific monthly rent level. If there were
rent controls for the student residences on campus, the University could not
raise your residence fees past a particular monthly rate. Rent controls are usually introduced on socio-economic moral
grounds when it is believed the housing
within a specific neighbourhood or area
would otherwise be unaffordable to the
local residents, tl UBYSSEY.CA/HOUSING/2011.02.24
MIKE DICKSON
Contributor
The fate of the former Olympic
Village has grabbed the attention of housing interest groups
in Vancouver. The Southeast
False Creek projecthas 252 units
designated for affordable housing; half the units will be rented
at market rates, while the other half will be rented at below-
market and rate range.
Prior to April 2010, city council had promised to provide
all 252 units as social housing units, but then halved the
project. In November 2010, the
project gained enough financial trouble to be pushed into receivership with Ernst & Young.
While there is a recognized need
for more low-income housing for
downtown residents, city councillor Geoff Meggs said "the economic realities of the project
have to enter the equation at
some point.
"For activists to say that it
should all be affordable is akin
to asking the city to put the
whole project in a flying saucer; mismanagement by [ex-mayor Sam Sullivan's] NPA council led to a situation where we
The semi-deserted Olympic Village. CHARLESTO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
had staggering cost overruns
on the part of the project that
was supposed to be affordable
by their rules."
The irony of going over-budget
on budgetary housing was not lost
on Executive Director of the Cooperative Housing Federation of
BC Thom Armstrong either. Armstrong is tasked with filling and
administering two of the three
Olympic Village buildings. He believes that the oversight, which
has included the city pouring an
additional $32 million into these
already historically over-budget
buildings, comes on the heels of
a much larger issue.
"The report that was just tabled
to city council on the need for a
rental housing supply is illuminating," Armstrong said. "It demonstrates that the rental housing
market has not been able to meet
the demand for it in a long time."
The cost of ensuring that affordable housing is actually affordable means facing hard
facts, like the necessity of selling many units at full market
rates to operate the housing on
a sustainable basis. According to
a February 11, 2011
article in The Vancouver
Sun, condo prices at the troubled Olympic Village project will
be reduced by an average of 30
per cent from May 2010 levels.
"The gap between economic and market rent isn't one
you can just wish away," Armstrong said. Who qualifies for
affordable housing is partly
determined by the core-need
income threshold: the income
you'd need in any given area
to pay the average market rent
without it taking up more than
30 per cent ofyour gross income.
With provincial resources now
being focused on the demographic most in need, low-income families are taking a back seat to those
with addictions, disabilities and
other ailments. It is hard to argue
those needs shouldn't be served
first, but it's equally difficult to
create a new need demographic by neglecting the ones served
second.
"Ifyou have an addiction or disability, there are programs available for you," Armstrong said. "If
you've just got a low-paying job
and a family to support, it makes
it that much tougher."
Lost in
the controversy surrounding the Southeast
False Creek site and the issues it has come to represent is
the emergence ofthe first housing
co-op in a decade and the state-
of-the-art green technologies employed in the buildings to make
them more sustainable.
"The Urban Fare in one of our
buildings is being constructed so
heatgiven off from all ofthe fridges and freezers is used to help
heat the building," Armstrong
said. "Rainwater recycled for toilet-flushing, solar panels, roof-
gardens; I think people are going
to get really excited about that."
However, given that the Olympic bid included social housing
promises, it may be easy to understand how the Village's award-
winning sustainability innovations continue to take aback seat
amidst affordable housing debates, u
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Help us edit The Ubyssey.
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U THEUBYSSEYc 2011.02.24/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/ll
CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER GINNY MONACO »gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
ILLUSTRATOR INDIANA JOEL»ijoel@ubyssey.ca
NEWS
SUB aims for state ofthe art...art
Students consulted on role of art in new SUB
JONNY WAKEFIELD
culture@ubyssey.ca
A music lounge, graffiti murals and programmable video
projectors were some of the
suggestions students had at
a consultation on art held by
architects HBBH+BH in the
new SUB.
During Wednesday's meeting
with designers Bruce Haden and
Kate Gerson, students outlined
their wish lists for how everything from public art to signage
to audio would be incorporated
in the new SUB, slated to open
in 2014.
Representatives from CiTR,
the Photo Society and other clubs
and organizations were in attendance to advocate for arts space
and their own visibility in the
new building.
"We're very concerned about
public profile and having students know our radio station exists," said CiTR station manager
Brenda Grunau. "A profile space
in the building so people can see
what we do is important."
CiTR is currently slated to go
into the atrium, an open common area that sits partially on
the north slope ofthe knoll and
includes a black box theatre.
"It's a big sloping hill, and if
you took a toboggan down the
stairs you [would] run right into
our station," said Grunau. "The
one issue is that we're going to
be five feet sunk into the ground.
We're kind of going to be in a
cave, but at least we're in a visible cave."
The rest of the consultation focused on how public art could
The consultation was roughly circular. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
be used to improve the student
experience.
"One ofthe things that we keep
coming back to is that the new SUB
is supposed to create a sense of
community," said New SUB Project Coordinator Andreanne Doyon.
"It's really campus's living room."
"Ifyou respect the art that's on
the walls, you're going to respect
the furniture and facilities more,"
said Grunau.
One suggestion was to decorate the SUB with works from the
AMS's permanent art collection.
Compiled largely in the 1970s, the
collection is valued at around $2
million, according to AMS President Jeremy McElroy. He said
the idea was a possibility, but that
students shouldn't overestimate
the value ofthe collection.
"Essentially, we have like four
paintings that are worth like 1.8
million dollars collectively, and a
bunch of other stuff. I can'tstress the
'other stuff enough," said McElroy.
Another suggestion was a music lounge where students could
relax and program songs for public play. "The AMS used to have a
sound lounge," said McElroy. "You
could come in between classes and
you could put on records."
Other suggestions included
space for graffiti artists to tag,
space for commissioning murals, areas for students to skate
and programmable video installations that could be used for art
or club advertising. Haden joked
that wealthy alumni could pay to
have their skeletons incorporated
into the building.
Doyon said this is the second
stage of consultations and is an
attempt to fill in the details. She
said that initial consultations regarding space were completed
this fall. "Each [user group] gets
face time with myself and the architects," said Doyon.
At this point, these ideas are only
suggestions, said Gerson. "[We're
getting] ideas abouthowto bring art
not only into the sort of 'designated' performance and exhibit spaces but into the building in general," she said. "We're just starting
to bash those ideas around." *U
Pillowman may keep you up at night
"THEATRE
ANDREW MCCARTHY
Contributor
The UBC Player's Club's presentation of The Pillowman opens
tonight. With a script by award-
winning playwright Martin Mc-
Donagh and directed by UBC Theatre and English student Tanya
Mathivanan, the play promises
to bring to its audiences many
laughs—and a few screams.
In choosing the play, Mathivanan felt it "completely fell in line
with the type of plays I like...it's
dark and violent but not unnecessarily so and it has lots of issues
to it. It's very multi-layered, very
complex."
The Pillowman's protagonist is
"a writer named Katurian, who
writes these really gruesome and
grisly stories in which children
die. He's called into this interrogation room." The action is "set in
a totalitarian state. [Katurian] has
no idea why he's been called in, but
he finds out that there has been a
string of child murders that perfectly re-enacthis stories. And he's
the number one suspect."
Katurian is played by Daniel
Johnston, whom Mathivanan cast
for his grasp of Katurian's multiplicity as a character. She liked
that, as opposed to others who
play him in an overly sympathetic manner, Johnston portrayed
him as "extremely sad and just a
victim. Daniel has the ability to
create layers and to make us not
like him while still sympathizing
with him."
The play takes on the loaded issues of abuse, violence, freedom
of speech and the place of art in
society.
"Does the artist have creative
license to do whatever he wants?"
asked Mathivanan. "How much is
it the state's responsibility to control what's put out there? And what
ishuman nature andhowmuch of
it do we blame on ourselves, and
how much of it do we blame on
external circumstances?"
The production will feature fake
blood, a choreographed fight, severed fingers and heads, electric
drills, premature burials and, on
a lighter note, a dance number,
for which the director is particularly excited, tl
The Pillowman runs from February 23 to 26. Show times are 7:30
pm at the Dorothy Somerset Studios. Tickets are available 30 minutes before the show for $10, and
$8 for students.
Katurian is a tortured soul PHOTO COURTESY STEPHANIE NG
FOOD WITH KAIT
B0L0NGAR0
CARIBBEAN IN THE CITY
Although not
known as the
Caribbean-Canadian cultural hub that Toronto and its
boroughs are,
there is still a
strong Caribbean food heritage in Vancouver. Caribbean cuisine is a melange of flavourful ingredients, composed of African,
European, Asian and Native culinary traditions. This mixture
is due to the complex history of
the area. This has led to overlaps
in regional cuisines, with each
country creating its own national dishes.
"Jamaica has a rich history,"
says Andrea Goldson, a PhD Student in Food Science who is originally from Jamaica. "Its foods
have been influenced by many
different cultures including the
British, African, Asian and the
Spanish. Our national dish, ack-
ee and codfish, has its roots in
West Africa."
In this dish, the ackee fruit,
native to West Africa, is boiled
and cooked with onions, sweet
peppers and flakes of salted cod.
The end product looks similar to
an omelette with a stronger salty
cod fish taste, as ackee becomes
flavourless when boiled.
Another Jamaican favourite
is jerk chicken, says Goldson.
The jerk style of cooking, which
was created on the island nation, involves rubbing special
jerk spices—a mixture of mainly pimento (allspice) and spicy
Scotch bonnet peppers on meat
and letting it marinate for an
hour or so. Then the meat, usually chicken or pork, is grilled
for five minutes on each side.
This dish is spicy and the flavour fills the senses.
"Jamaican foods are known for
their distinctive flavours," says
Goldson. "Nothing beats an es-
covetich fish [fried fish served
with onion gravy] from Hellshire
beach. [In Vancouver], thebestja-
maican restaurant is Riddim &
Spice at 1945 Commercial Drive."
"Mostpeople don'tknowwhere
Guyana is on a map," says Meri-
ka Yong Ping, a Guyanese-Canadian and vice president internal
for the Caribbean African Association. Guyana, a landlocked country near Venezuela, is another
culinary gem of the Caribbean.
"One of the dishes my family cooks is cookup," says Yong
Ping. "It is a meat and rice dish
and is one of the most popular
in Guyana." Cookup rice, a Guyanese specialty, is made with long
grain rice, oxtail and beans, flavoured with thyme and coconut
milk mixed into one pot.
Another favourite is roti and
pumpkin. "We fry the pumpkin
with garlic, onion and pimento,"
says Yong Ping. "Then it is served
with roti [a flatbread brought to
Guyana via India]. Itis one of my
favourites." tl
Yong Ping recommends the Reef
(4172 Main Street or 1018 Commercial Drive) and Calabash (428
Carrall Street) as her favourite Caribbean restaurants. 12/UBYSSEY.CA/G AMES/2011.0 2.24
GAMES & COMICS
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VIRGINIE MENARD |
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Cappellaci: How I see the state ofthe AMS
BEN CAPPELLACCI
Perspective
Those who are quick to discount
student politics must first remember that the AMS, at 46,000
members, is larger than most
towns. And like most towns
there are citizens that are concerned with how things work.
Be it for the prestige, the wealth,
the power or simply to have
their voice heard, people choose
to become embroiled in what
inevitably results in the pandemonium of local governance.
Yet unlike a town, the students of UBC represent an unusually high level of diversity in background, opinion and
culture.
Facilitating and overseeing
many of the services that support these activities is the AMS,
whose leadership is composed
of elected students. Each year
they are elected based not on
their "platforms," but through
one concept: social leverage.
He or she who has the greatest
ability to have students directly
communicate to other students
to vote will win.
Those who say that students
are largely unaware of what
the AMS does for them are correct. By and large people don't
usually care about what their
government does for them until it goes away, especially if it
starts to negatively affect their
lives. Aside from that truism,
the AMS does a woefully inadequate job of communicating its activities to students in
a meaningful way. Moreover,
the great inconsistency in the
quality of what the AMS provides in food, services and especially events makes the activities ofthe AMS unappealing
to the masses. But what more
could be expected when each
year any student with enough
friends can run for the title of
"student executive"?
The AMS has been the organization ofthe students at UBC
since the university's firstyear.
Whether or not they've always
represented the voice of the
students is debatable depending on who you ask but by and
large it does its best to articulate students' needs and interests. The direction ofthe AMS
is largely dictated by executives,
especially the AMS president,
who gains the most attention
with his/her actions.
Like most democratic realities there is a political spectrum. There are students who
"fight" for things like lower tuition and believe the university
is an enemy. There are also students who "negotiate" for lower student loan fees and believe the university is an unfailing ally.
The year to year cycle of AMS
politicians is balanced by the
dependability ofthe permanent
staff and businesses. They have
a lot of institutional memory,
and if they are asked in time
they can help avoid a lot of very
common mistakes. Yet the recent recession has greatly impacted the AMS businesses.
They deliver profits to a student government with increasing costs, yet limited revenues
due to student fees that haven't
increased since 1982. The shortfall in businesses isn't temporary and a better solution needs
to be found as the AMS transitions to a new SUB.
This pastyear there were significant cuts made to many sections of the AMS's budget. Student government, services and
events all had to deal with significant cuts in order to create a balanced budget after a
$250,000 structural deficit the
previous year.
With a decrease in revenue
from businesses, the AMS must
once again look to cuts, yet this
time there is little that can be
cut to account for the shortfall.
The solution to these problems
is the referendum, and if it's
successful it will be one of the
biggest events to happen to the
operations ofthe AMS in living
memory.
Despite the difficulties and
pettiness of student politics, the
AMS will continue to move forward. The allure of student politics draws all descriptions of
students. Working in the AMS
gives a student an unmatchable
level of control over an organization at a young age. Much
like UBC is a global leader in
universities, the AMS stands
out amongst its fellow student
unions. Its position on such a
unique campus, its heritage
and most importantly, its people make it a constantly exciting place, til
Ben Cappellacci was the VP Academic and University Affairs for
the AMS in 2010-2011.
McElroy: Here show to argue for the NCAA
JUSTIN MCELROY
coordinating@ubyssey.ca
Over the next two months, UBC's
Administration will be listening
to the campus community as it
decides whether to become the
second Canadian school to join
NCAA Division II.
So ifyou have an opinion—or
want to have one—on a giant de-
cisionyour university will make
thisyear, now is the time to read
the reports and bone up on the
issues.
Or, you can just read my next
two columns, as I present the most
honest, ethical and straightforward arguments I can for and
against moving to the NCAA.
Here's the case for the NCAA:
First, let's accept that the overwhelming majority of UBC students don't care about university
sport. They don't when we face
off against Trinity Western, and
they won't if we play Central
Washington University. The only
school we sort of care about is
SFU, who just moved to the
NCAA. Right now, we only face
them in the Shrum Bowl, but if
we move, we'll have an intra-
city rival again.
That's nice for the 5 per cent
of students who care about
such things, but for the other
95 per cent, the main question
should be, what is better for the
athletes?
Well, student-athletes are
generally in favour of moving,
for a couple of very good reasons. First, there's the matter
of competition—in too many
sports, UBC is a big fish in
a small pond. In basketball
and volleyball, our teams are
forced to play uncompetitive
blowouts with small universities year after year. In field
hockey and swimming, we only
play a few schools and are guaranteed to finish first or second
every year. And these problems are probably only going
to get worse.
Not only that, but we have
a number of sports—baseball,
track and field and golf among
them—that don't have a competitive CIS program, so we play
in the NAIA, a small American league. The only problem
is that they're looking to merge
with the NCAA in the next five
years. The CIS doesn't allow
teams to play in both leagues,
so the cost of staying with them
may mean the de facto elimination of a whole whack of programs we offer.
Joining the NCAA would also
allow UBC to offer full scholarships to talented Canadians,
who would otherwise have no
choice but to move to America to
chase their dreams and further
their goals. Unless they want to
go to SFU. And unless you're a
communications student, who
really wants to go to SFU?
Yes, full-ride athletic scholarships can degrade the mission of a university and lead
to corruption, as we've seen in
some large American schools.
But that's Division I. We're going to be in Division II, where
scholarship levels are low, corruption is scarce and academic standards are high.
Also, because athletics is an
ancillary department (meaning
it has to be economically self-sufficient), there's little risk of UBC
putting too much money into
new buildings and scholarships
for athletes. That's the case for
athletics. For students though,
there's one very enticing draw:
because there's no Division II
hockey, we would be allowed to
play in Division I. Eight players from the NCAA are on the
Canucks right now, some very
good (Ryan Kesler) and some
who maybe Tanner Glass. They
all played there first, and more
and more teenagers are opting
for the NCAA over junior hockey. What if there was a Canadian option for them, and what
if we got to watch it? Imagine
cheering on future NHL stars
at a packed Thunderbird Arena, hoping that UBC makes the
Frozen Four.
It could happen—but only if
we make the leap, tl
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Next week: We break down
proposed bylaw changes, Justin
McElroy gives the case against
the NCAA, and Taylor Loren
talks social media.
Its hacktackular!
Justin mcelroy | coordinating@ubysseyca
U THEUBYSSEYc
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OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www .oxfordscminars.ca
celebrate
research
2011
March 4-11, 2011
A campus-wide showcase of
public events on a variety of
research topics and themes.
All members of the UBC
community are welcome.
Visit our online calendar of
events for more information.
celebrateresearch.ubc.ca
VI^O^OLUE
(I)
We otter:
Compact and portable
Hydrogen Storage
MH Tank Refilling Services
Stacteble PtM Fuel Cells
Come on to SUB 24
Wednesdays and Sundays!
Ul lEUBYSSEYca 2011.02.24/UBYSSEY.CA/OPINIONS/15
OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
IN MIDDLE EAST, TV TOPS TWITTER
Journalists often feel that they have an expert
opinion when it comes to everything from wheat
price fluctuations to Wilsonian diplomacy to the
best way to remove beer stains.
And although The Ubyssey certainly has opinions about the revolution currently rocking the
Arab world, even we must admit that Middle Eastern politics are not our forte.
We know a little bit about social media, though,
and on that topic, we do feel we have something
to say.
Commentators, pundits and Geoff Lister have,
with an air of smug satisfaction, lauded Twitter
and Facebook as the twin hammers that have
smashed the stasis of the Arab world.
They argue, with near certainty, that without the ability to share information provided by
these tools, protestors would never have been
able to organize.
Make no mistake; social media was essential
to the success of any of the initial protests. However, with only Twitter, the uprising in Tunisia
would have remained a largely in-country affair.
But for a street vendor's self-immolation to turn
into an uprising throughout the Arab nation, it
needed a narrative, making turmoil in a small
country something historic.
And for this, Al Jazeera can claim credit.
While most Western media outlets ignored the
events in Tunisia until the very end, Al Jazeera
broadcast the news into households across the
Arab world.
When people saw that it could be done there,
they asked why not in Tunisia or Yemen or Libya.
Al Jazeera is by no means perfect. If the protests
were to spread to Qatar, whose government owns
and operates the station, it is highly improbable
that their coverage would be as omnipresent as
it was in North Africa.
But regardless, in this world of new media, it
was still the old broadcast form that was able to
take the disparate actions of small groups and
mold them into the narrative of a people galvanized into action. Turns out revolutions can still
be televised after all.
GETTING TO STUDY ON THE STREET YOU LIVE
This issue, we've talked about the wonderful and
inevitably expensive housing all around this city.
For many students, though, the most important
housing doesn't come with the labels of co-operative, rental or market, but Vanier, Marine and
Gage. Student housing is an integral part of this
campus and the fact that it's a crapshoot is infuriating whenyou consider how much land UBC has
and how expensive anything else in the city is.
But UBC has made many encouraging decisions lately. First, the Board of Governors gave
initial approval to the Ponderosa Housing Hub,
a new complex that will provide another 1100
beds for students, half of which will be in place
by August 2013.
Next, thanks to Totem's recent expansion, UBC
has guaranteed housing to all first-year students.
This means that students from Surrey—currently forced into unenviable and never-ending Skytrain rides—may now enjoy that quintessential Totem year of 90 per cent fantastic memories and
10 per cent crippling shame.
Finally, the university has created a Student
Housing Financing Endowment, which will prioritize student housing on this campus for decades to come. Any new market housing will directly benefit us in at least one way: we'll get more
beds on campus.
More than anything else, the lack of student
housing and affordable nearby rentals is the greatest impediment to improving the UBC experience.
When students spend three hours in transit every day, that's three hours that could be spent doing something substantially more productive—
not all of it, mind you, but enough to make this
campus a better place.
Because of the decisions made over the past
few months, hundreds more first-year students
will get into housing, campus will gain 1100 new
beds and there will be a sustainable model for
creating more student housing, decade after decade. It's a first, necessary step towards putting
student housing worries to rest, tl
BRYCE WARNES GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
OPINIONS
Katie: Who willyou stand with'.
GORDON KATIC
Columnist
All across the world ordinary people are standing together and saying
they will no longer be trampled on by
the political elite. In this historic moment of popular uprising, it's time to
decide which side you're on. Willyou
defend the interests ofthe privileged
few, or willyou stand with the many?
In Tunisia, astreetvendor named Mohamed Bouazizi, angered over unemployment, poverty and corruption, set
himself ablaze after his cart was confiscated by police. This act of defiance
sparked an uprising in Tunisia that
would spread throughout the Middle
East. Millions of Egyptians joined together to oust their long-time tyrant,
Hosni Mubarak. Libyans continue to
protest despite being slaughtered by the
hired mercenaries of Moammar Gad-
hafi. Similar protests in Jordan, Bahrain, Yemen, Iraq and others continue.
It's quite amusing to now read mainstream news outlets like The New York
Times condemning these tyrants—many
long-backed by US diplomatic, economic
and martial support—for their crony
capitalism and corruption, suppression of dissent and lack of legal accountability. The truth is, these Arab
regimes feature much ofthe same elite
corruption we see today in Western nations. Like them, we have a two-tiered
system of justice, one for the people who
matter and one for the people who don't.
In the so-called "war on terror," the
people who don't matter continue to
be held without charge and without access to legal representation, many suffering abuse, torture and even death.
The economic policy of the past 40
years has further demonstrated who
matters and who doesn't. Since 1973,
the real wages of ordinary citizens have
stagnated, while the financial elite have
seen enormous gains. As a share of national income, the top 1 per centhas increased from 8 per cent to 18 per cent
since 1973, while the top 0.1 per cent
has gone from 2 per cent to 8 per cent,
and the bottom 99 per centhas declined
from 92 per cent to 82 per cent. The
vastmajority of economic growth ofthe
past 40 years has been in the hands of
a very small minority, while ordinary
citizens are finding life increasingly
difficult. Simon Johnson, former chief
economist ofthe IMF, went so far as to
conclude that the US is a "financial oligarchy, on the verge of becoming a banana republic."
Those who impoverished millions
by perpetrating the most heinous of
frauds have seen not jail time, but
bailouts, extended tax benefits and
record profits. Conversely, those who
don't matter face foreclosure, unemployment and poverty.
Thankfully, it seems we may have
learned something from the Arab world.
In response to Wisconsin Governor Scott
Walker's vicious union-busting p olicies,
thousands of public employees in Madison have occupied the statehouse, reminding their political leaders that ordinary citizens will no longer be treated like they don't matter.
There is no way to predict where
this popular uprising will go. However, one thing is clear: the only way to
oust corrupt elites, be they Arab tyrants
or corporate shills, is to stand with
the many who long for a more just,
free and equitable world, tl
21 years and counting for DTES march
RACHEL SILVER
Perspective
For many, Valentine's Day is an excuse
for couples all over Vancouver to act
extra cheesy spend lots of money on
floral and delicious gifts and make all
of us single people band together in
various anti-romance plans.
But amongst all the lovey-dovey vibes
and all the romantic stigma, another
emotion was brewing in Vancouver:
grief, nostalgia and hope for change.
On February 14 at lpm, hundreds
from around Vancouver gathered for
the 20th annual Missing and Murdered Women's March to remember
women lost in the city of Vancouver.
Many of these women have gone missing from or have been murdered in the
DTES and along the Highway of Tears
in northern BC. Families of women associated with the Robert Pickton case,
most of whom are still waiting for justice also joined the March.
Standing in a sea of colourful umbrellas at the intersection of Main
and Hastings, emotion was thick in
the air as Aboriginal drums played
and many joined in singing for lost
loved ones. People held up plastic-
wrapped quilts made for lost sisters,
mothers and daughters, as February
rain drenched us all, covering up the
tears of many. A microphoned voice
ringing out from Carnegie Hall added to the noise, describing the ages
and heights of missing women whose
families were still hanging onto hope.
With a strong drum beat leading
the procession, I felt the Aboriginal
chant rise up in my own throat with
hundreds of others as we marched to
various locations in the DTES where
bodies of women have been found in
the pastyear: on Main, in Gastown,
outside hotels. Walking through the
rain amongst all sorts of people—
from all over Vancouver and its suburbs—brought a tangible sense of
reality to the proceedings. Issues
of racism, poverty and sex trafficking are prevalent here in our city
and the loss of women each year in
Vancouver affects people from all
walks of life.
In 1991, a woman was murdered
in January on Powell Street, inspiring a Valentine's Day March for her
and other women in the city whose
deaths had never been publicly commemorated. Nineteen years later, the
annual march has become a public
expression of concern and loss for
women murdered and still missing
in Vancouver.
Last week's March included healing ceremonies at Oppenheimer park
and finished with a community feast
at the Japanese Language Hall. For
many, the Valentine's Day March is
a significant and purposeful event-
calling leaders in BC to address the
issue of missing women and lead a
public inquiry into their cases, tl 16/UBYSSEY.CA/OURCAMPUS/2011.02.24
JUSTIN MCELROY
coordinating@ubysse
I The road to national cham-
]  pionships officially begins
I  this weekend at War Memori-
I  al Gym, as the Thunderbirds
I  take to the court in the Can-
I  ada West Playoffs. The women's volleyball team, ranked
I   No. 1 in the nation after a
15-3 season, face the Mani-
I  toba Bison at 5:30 Friday in
I the Canada West semifinals,
with the winner advancing
to both the conference final
the next evening (game time
5:30) and the CIS Championships, held next week in Montreal. Meanwhile, the men's
basketball team, ranked no.
2 in the nation, also face the
Manitoba Bisons in the best-
of-three Canada West quarterfinals, starting Friday at 8pm.
Meanwhile, the women's
basketball team (17-7) travels to Edmonton, where they
will face the No. 10 ranked Alberta Pandas (17-7) in a best
of three series beginning tonight. ^
^~
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