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The Ubyssey Oct 6, 1972

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Array 1 per cent puts us in swim
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Vol. LIV, No. 8
VANCOUVER, B.C.,
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1972
^533?^
228-2301
—ed dubois photo
AMS POLLING CLERK Laurel Akenhead carefully scrutinizes ballot of unidentified puce blorg who came to register his preference for parking
lots over wet, slippery buildings promoted by wet, slippery men. When finished voting he was seen to take a casual stroll through the throngs
that gathered to watch him. His pockets afterward bulged noticeably.
The heavily-publicized pool referendum barely squeaked past
the two thirds majority it required in campus voting Thursday.
The referendum passed by a 67.3 per cent majority — less
than one per cent over the necessary total.
Of the 4,124 students voting, 2,776 favored of the $2.8 million
covered pool, 1,318 were against and 30 spoiled their ballots.
By approving the referendum, students authorized up to
$925,000 of their funds — one third of the total cost — to be spent
on construction of the pool. The university administration has
already pledged the same amount. Organizers are hoping to
raise more than a third of the
cost from private sources in
which case students will
simply pay the balance.
If students pay the full third
they will hand over an extra
five dollars per year for 20
years — totalling about $2
million — for capital costs and
interest charges.
The referendum includes th3
provision that the pool must be
constructed near the student
union building and that
students have have equal
representation in planning and
management of the facility.
Students also get equal
swimming time with outside
groups.
Also passed Thursday was a
constitutional referendum
deleting the clause barring
political clubs from running
candidates in Alma Mater
Society elections.	
The referendum was. a
house-cleaning measure by the
AMS council after the same
vote failed for lack of a quorum
at last year's general meeting.
Voting also catapulted three
new faces into the student
political scene.
Douglas MacKay won the
AMS ombudsperson position
with 1,394 votes to Coreen
Douglas' 887 and David Varnes' 432.
The number of spoiled
ballots was unusually high at
806.
James McEwan was elected
grad studies senator with 64
votes beating Alan Davis at 47
and S. J. Rosval at 42. Thirty-
four ballots were spoiled.
The new arts senator is Jay
Munsie who was elected with
385 votes followed by John
Maclachlin with 354. There
were 179 spoils.
FUS urges chariot race boycott
By KEN DODD
Students should boycott the
annual Teacup Chariot race,
forestry undergraduate society
president Doug Baker said
Thursday.
He said his support of the
boycott stems from the
tragedy-marred race two
years ago. After it, the FUS
listed the causualties as:
"broken ribs on two guys, nine
stitches in the face, five on top
of the head, broken teeth,
numerous charley horses,
severed tendons on the hand
and multitudinous bruises.
More than 50 went to the
university hospital for tetanus
shots. "And of course there
was Dave Parminter," he said.
Parminter suffered severe
lacerations below the elbow of
his left arm and for a time
there was a doubt whether it
could be saved.
Fearing the members of his
society are forgetting the
events of two years ago, Baker
said he sees a movement
forming to re-enter the
foresters in the event they
overwhelmingly pledged to
drop out of two years ago.
"I saw the change before as
the race definitely took on a
more violent nature. The whole
thing builds up until the pin
drops and something happens," Baker said Thursday.
"Now I feel the trend
developing again. In three or
four years we may well be
back in the race."
Baker said he sees another
serious accident happening if
the rivalry is re-kindled. He
said alternatives should be
sought.
So obviously do the nurses
and women from Home
Economics, the competitors in
the Teacup football game.
They refused to play this
year unless the chariot race
was shifted from half-time
until after the game.
This gives people the choice
of staying to watch the race or
leaving after the game.
Baker said FUS  has  con-
Robinson quits
Alma Mater Society general manager Brian
Robinson resigned this week to return to his
original position as a social worker.
AMS president Doug Aldridge, in announcing the resignation Thursday, said SUB
building manager Graeme Vance will become
acting general manager Oct. 13 until a
replacement can be found.
•Robinson's contract with the AMS terminates Jan. 5, 1973. Aldridge said Robinson
has agreed to stay on in an advisory capacity
until then.
He will also be at full salary until then, and
will receive three months salary as severance
pay.
Aldridge and Robinson declined to reveal
the amount of the salary.
Vance said he has "no idea" whether he will
apply for the job as a permanent position.
"I will carry the position until such time as
the society and management people sort out
what they are going to do," he said.
Aldridge said the executive has not yet had
time to discuss its plans for filling the position.
Robinson said he has not heard any names
discussed by the executive but said: "I think
Graeme might apply if and when the job is
open."
He cited Vance's experience within the AMS
management organization as one reason why
he might apply.
Robinson said he is "kind of excited about
getting back into social work."
He said he cannot reveal who he will be
working for because negotiations are not yet
complete.
He said there were no major problems in his
one year term as general manager though he
said he found council members sometimes
overstepped their responsibilities and interfered with management.
"Relations between the university and the
society is another thing that is an on-going
struggle," he said.
University involvement with the AMS in
decision making concerning students is
sporadic, he said.
sidered two possible alternatives to raise money for
crippled children.
"One is selling Christmas
trees which anybody can get
wholesale. Or forestry could
grow their own. We have the
space to produce several
hundred trees each year."
The other, more novel
suggestion is selling cuttings
from the sycamore tree under
which Hippocrates once
taught, 500 of which are owned
by a forestry professor.
Baker said he is critical of
the engineers for not seriously
considering possible alternatives. He said their attitude
is "they've got a good thing
going so why stop it?"
EUS president Harold
Cunliffe echoes this. He said:
"It is very hard to think up
anything better than a chariot
race."
Outlining why he thought the
race should continue Cunliffe
said, "all participants have an
excellent time and engineering
spectators like to see it."
Two years ago an estimated
5,000, spectators attended. Last
year the figure dropped to
approximately 1,200. And this
year. Baker said he hopes
nobody will go. Even the
engineers. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6, 1972
School history
history of male
the
rule
By ROBIN BURGESS
Schoolbook history is
essentially the history of the
male ruling class, the UBC
women's studies audience was
told Tuesday.
Women, particularly
working class women, are
almost entirely neglected, said
Barbara Todd, graduate
history student at Simon
Fraser University.
About 400 people,
predominantly women with a
sprinkling of men, filled SUB
auditorium almost to capacity
to hear the first women's
studies persentation of the
year.
Todd, currently working on
her PhD., spoke on The History
of Canadian Women: . . . and
who besides Laura Secord?
Traditionally history "has
been written and used almost
entirely by, for and about
men," she said.
There are women historians
but they've been trained by
men.
There is a fair amount of
women's history but you have
to dig for it.
"It is very much the history
pf articulate women who wrote
their own stories or left copious
records — who were also
outstandingly successful in
fields that men have declared
to be important enough to be
history," said Todd.
Laura Secord, a war
heroine and articulate member
of the privileged class, is one of
the few women in Canadian
history to fulfill the
requirements of "historical
eligibility".
Nowadays most Canadians
associate her name mainly
with chocolates.
"She was one of the first
women to have her face exploited for a product she didn't
have anything to do with," said
Todd.
"It's a practice that seems to
have caught on.".
She corrected some of the
myths associated with the
Secord legend.
Laura Secord walked 20
miles across country to warn
the Canadians of an impending
American attack at Beaver
Dam. There was no cow in the
story as is popularly supposed.
As a matter of fact, added
Todd, as the wife of a
prosperous merchant she
probably didn't even own a
cow.
Laura Secord was a very
strong-willed woman and she
used the story of her war
service to win privileges for
her.husband and herself after
the war.
But history books don't
mention that aggressive,
unfeminine facet of Secord's
character.
Essentially she was a good
woman and mother "entirely
suitable to be an historical
image for Canadian
schoolgirls."
Todd talked about a number
of Canadian women who were
heroines to our grandmothers
but didn't make the history
books.
One determined woman, E.
Cora Hind, went out and rented
a typewriter when she was
refused a job at the Winnipeg
Free Press, taught herself to
type and bacame (pause for
effect) the first female typist
west of the Great Lakes," said
Todd and laughed along with
the audience.
She went on to say that Hind,
through her contacts with
farmers and manufacturers,
became a world famous crop
predicter and later the
agricultural expert on the Free
Press.
Another woman, novelist
Nelly McClung was inspired by
Hind to become a journalist
and in 1929 was one of five
women to force the British
Privy Council to allow seats in
the senate.
But these women were the
exceptional ones who made
their way in a man's world, she
reminded her audience.
The pioneer women who
struggled and died bearing
children and doing hard,
killing, domestic labor didn't
have time to leave written
records.
For the most part, said Todd,
"women's identity has
remained in the realm of
private memory.
"But I believe that a good
deal of it can be recovered."
Since the beginning of the
twentieth century women have
participated in history outside
the home as teachers, nurses,
midwives, seamstresses,
ranchers, sheepshearers and
so on.
"But farthest from the realm
of traditional history is what
the majority of Canadian
women have done — domestic
housework."
Todd said that throughout
history women have been pre-
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population.
"Historians have a prejudice
against writing about
housework."
The history of industrial
production has been written
about. Why not the technology
of cooking, sewing, and
preserving," she asked.
In fact, most modern
technologies such as food
preserving, soap-making and
preparation of medicines
started in the home and were
taken over by industry, Todd
said.
In the question-period
following, Todd urged women
to demand an accredited
course on women in Canadian
history be introduced at UBC.
Seminar groups on different
areas of interest to women met
after the presenation.
Annette Kolodny will speak
on The Land as Woman: A
Sexist Ecology at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday in SUB ballroom.
BE CRITICAL OF
SPEED READING COURSES!
Ever Investigated speed reading? Maybe now's the time. And
when you do, be sure to ask about other things besides speed
—-like unaerstanding, retention, concentration. Obviously, you
have to enjoy and remember what you read or there's *iot
much point in Increasing your speed. Sure speed's important.
Some people do read many thousands of words o minute but
that's not all there is to It. Come to a free demonstration by
the world's most honored reading school — and be critical.
ATTEND A FREE DEMONSTRATION
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA: S.U.B. Room 211
Thursday, October 12th — 2 p.m.
Thursday, October 12th - 3:30 p.m.
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Thursday, October 12th — 8 p.m.
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^^^i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^g Friday, October 6, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
T-Bird shop a lire trap' — Vance
By DAVID SCHMIDT
Failure to provide adequate
fire exits has forced closure of
the Thunderbird  Shop,  SUB
building   manager  Graeme
Vance said Thursday.
"As far as I'm concerned,
that place is a fire trap," said
Vance.
"The original plans, approved by the fire department
and the provincial fire office
called for two separate exits
from  the  Thunderbird  Shop
into the corridor.
"Collegiate Advertising, which
holds the lease for the Thunderbird Shop, changed all that
by substituting plate glass for
—ed dubois photo
UNTIL i FUTHER (SIC) NOTICE says the closure sign outside the Thunderbird Shop in SUB basement. The sign writer should be given nis or
her closure. Labelled a "fire trap" by AMS building manager Graeme Vance, the shop was closed because of lack of fire exits. This means
students will have to trek over to the bookstore to buy various vitals until the T-bird shop is re-opened.
the second exit. We were
consulted about these changes
and they have never been
approved," he said.
Vance said the fire department has repeatedly told
Collegiate Advertising to
provide a second door and this
door has been promised but not
produced.
"The fire department finally
sent us a letter informing us
that unless something was
done about this in the near
future, they would take the
matter to the provincial fire
office and this is something we
want to avoid.
"Also, we have been told by
our lawyers that the Alma
Mater Society, as owners of the
property, would be liable if
something were to happen as a
result of inadequate exits," he
said.
"It's a very simple matter to
fix," said UBC deputy fire
chief Jack MacKay.
"The original door is in the
corridor so all they have to do
is take the glass out and put the
door in and install panic
hardware and an exit light.
"If we can see some improvement then as far as we
are concerned all will be fine
and good," he said.
AMS co-ordinator Bob Angus
said the Thunderbird Shop will
not be reopened until the AMS
gets a firm commitment from
the leasee to have the work
done.
"We are hoping to get such a
commitment as quickly as
possible," he said.
"In the meantime, any
student who has property such
as develped films in the
Thunderbird Shop should see
me and I would be able to get it
for them," said Angus.
Exec overules council in Trekker vote
By LAURENCE LEADER
Alma Mater Society
president Doug Aldridge told
student councillors Wednesday
that the executive has
nominated former general
manager Ron Pearson for the
Great Trek award.
The announcement was
made at the AMS council
meeting at Place Vanier. But
the big question is whether the
council executive can legally
nominate a person for the
award without a council vote.
Council rejected Pearson as
nominee for the award Sept. 27
when the executive first
submitted his name after an in
camera meeting. So with
Aldridge's announcement on
Wednesday the executive has
essentially bypassed a council
vote.
Grad student representative
Stan Persky objected because
"for the executive to appoint
itself to select a nominee,
supposedly chosen by the
whole council, is against
regulations."
Persky's   motion   that  the
Profs might help Meszaros
The executive of the UBC faculty
association is considering supportive action for
Istvan Meszaros in his dispute with the
Canadian immigration department.
The government has denied landed immigrant status to Meszaros, an internationally-
known Marxist scholar, on grounds he is a
security risk.
At Thursday's association meeting,;
associate history professor Jan Bak moved
support; be given to a protest telegram sent to
federal immigration minister Bryce Mackasey
by the Canadian Association of University
Teacher's Committee of Academic Freedom
and Tenure.
However, few members were present so the
motion was referred to the executive for action.
Association vice-president professor Leon
Getz said the executive would consider the
request within the next few days.
Meszaros, formerly of the University of
Budapest, resigned a senior post at Britain's
University of Sussex to accept a teaching job at
York University in Toronto this fall.
But after being interviewed by Canadian
immigration officials in London, he was informed his visa had been refused for unstated
security reasons.
The CAUT committee's telegram urged
Mackasey to reverse the decision.
' 'We recognize the right, under the Canadian
Immigration Act, of the minister to exercise
discretion in cases where issues of national
security are involved.
"But we are not convinced that this
discretionary power would be wisely applied
against Meszaros whose political ideology,
rather than any criminal or subversive activities, appears to be the bar of admission."
Bak, a colleague of Meszaros in Budapest,
has been soliting support at UBC for his
struggle during the past 10 days.
He personally sent a petition with 30 names
to Makasey last week, and since then has
collected another 50 names.
The Canadian government has offered
Meszaros a special permit allowing him to live
and work in Canada for one year on the condition he withdraw his application for an immigrant visa.
Meszaros, however, rejected the offer
because it could be revoked at any time and
does not deny his alleged "security risk."
Bak said he agreed with the decision.
"It's not an issue where some starving
immigrant is on the street and we need to let
him work to feed his family.
"It's the political implication that is important."
executive be censured for this
action was defeated. The
strange thing about the vote on
the motion was that the
executive voted — for itself.
Then arts rep Keith
Richardson moved to censure
The Ubyssey for publishing
Pearson's name after the Sept.
27 in camera session of the
executive when Pearson's
name was first discussed.
The  motion passed   19  to
three.
Aldridge said things
discussed at in camera council
meetings are not to be
disclosed. "But we cannot tell
The Ubyssey not to print information from an in camera
meeting."
"I am very disappointed that
the name discussed in the
meeting leaked out," he said.
Aldridge then announced
that it was possible that
Pearson would sue the AMS
because some allegedly incorrect information had appeared with Pearson's name in
The Ubyssey.
(The AMS is the publisher of
The Ubyssey).
Council also reversed a
finance committee motion to
prohibit the speakers and
education committee spending
$728.50 on bringing the Neens
to UBC.
The expenditure was approved by council though it
amounted to about 35 per cent
of the speakers and education
committee's budget.
The council meeting was
held at Place Vanier's Gordon
Shrum common block to encourage residents to attend.
But few students knew that
there was a meeting there,
fewer knew what the meeting
was for, and still fewer actually walked in and listened.
The consensus of the council
was that the almost nil 'normal' student attendance was
due to poor advertising.
The council intends to meet
at a place other than its
chamber once a month.
Staff holiday declared
As Monday is the 423rd anniversary of the invention of goat
cheese The Ubyssey staff hereby declares a holiday.
Staffers will devote Monday to droll caprice and lecherous
merriment and will not be available for anything as vulgar as
journalism.
As a result there will be no paper Tuesday.
If anybody tells you he is celebrating Thanksgiving Monday
he's a liar and worse, a closet goat cheese fancier. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6, 1972
Goon show
See the picture? It's not very pretty, is it.
It shows what happens when a sadistic mob
promotes violence in the name of charity.
The injury happened two years ago at the annual
chariot race, a Gahan Wilson delight traditionally held
during half-time at the Teacup football game.
The race consists of groups of students hauling
makeshift chariots around the Thunderbird Stadium
track. During the race they hurl shit and other debris at
each other. Once acid was thrown and a student's eyes
seriously damaged. Great fun.
The whole affair seems to be a hang:over from the
days when mobs of engineers roamed the campus
looking for longhairsto throw in the library pond.
To put it bluntly, the chariot race is nothing but a
medium for a minority of engineers to exhibit the
sadistic debauchery they call fun. It's got to stop.
Granted there were few injuries in the chariot race
last year. But people forget and gradually the "fun" gets
rougher and eventually someone will get seriously hurt
or even killed.
To their credit, the forestry students have refused
to have anything to do with the chariot race since the
1970 debacle. And the nursing and home ec students
have refused to allow the chariot race to be held during
half-time of the Teacup game.
However, a few agriculture and engineering students
continue to promote the sordid event.
This is why we agree with forestry undergrad
president Doug Baker's suggestion that students boycott
the chariot race. It seems to be the only way to get the
event stopped.
The boycott is really very simple. When the football
game is over, get up and walk out.
It will take some self-discipline. After all, when an
event promises to produce a casualty list rivalling that of
Guadalcanal, people will want to hang around and
watch the action.
But we don't call watching people get hurt "fun".
We call it sadism.
So when next Thursday's Teacup game is over,
remember the boycott and walk out. We hope the
demonstration of non-support will be enough (to mix a
few metaphors) to haul the few remaining Neanderthals
out of the dark ages.
Letters
Idiocy
No. 2
The letter titled "idiocy"
which appeared in the October
3 issue of The Ubyssey
demands an answer.
Mr. Fox's suggestion that not
considering the possibility of
five successive $5 fee increases
demonstrates a lack of perspective is questionable to say
the least. His knowledge of the
current fee structure is
sketchy. The AMS fee is $24 per
student, not $29 as he suggests.
The $5 athletic fee is collected
directly by the administration.
The discretionary portion of
the current fee is $9. The
remaining $15 provides the
annual capital and interest
payments of SUB. The original
$10 SUB fee was introduced in
1961 bringing the total AMS fee
to is present level of $24. Approval was given in March,
1961, with an 85 per cent vote. A
further referendum was
passed in March, 1964, which
increased the building fee by $5
bringing the total AMS fee to
$29. In April, 1968, students
voted to transfer control of $5
for athletics to the administration which reduced the
total AMS fee to its 1961 level of
$24 per student. The last AMS
fee increase before 1961 was in
1953. Does this constitute a
dramatic rise in the last few
years, Mr. Fox?
A successful pool referendum will bring the total AMS
fee back to its 1964 level of $29
which will still be the lowest
student fee at any university in
Canada. Will this strangle the
aspirations of future student
bodies and councils?
A student takeover of food
services in SUB is considered
by this executive as "a real
issue". The idea was backed by
a 73.2 per cent yes vote in a
referendum held on Feb. 2 of
this year. I would be interested
to find out where the $500,000
figure, quoted by Mr. Fox,
came from. Negotiations with
the board have yet to take
place on this subject. In any
event, the takeover will not
mean an increase in AMS fees.
We are proposing to extend the
current $15 SUB fee for several
years (depending on the
purchase price). This proposal
is based on the idea that
students who will use the
facility   should   also   pay   a
portion of the capital cost. It
removes the necessity of
making $180,000 per year from
the operation itself — a
situation faced by the
university because of the
provincial government policy
regarding ancillary services.
The most important result will
be an improvement in the
quality and variety of the food
being served in SUB. As The
Ubyssey pointed out in an
editorial earlier this year,
students would be able to get
rid of the AMS executive if they
do not live up to this prediction.
That option is presently not
available and we are faced
with a food services monopoly
on campus.
I am happy to see Mr. Fox's
suggested programs. The 1971
grad class gave the university
daycare council a gift of $2,750.
The AMS has provided a $1,500
interest free loan and recently
granted a deferral on
repayments until May, 1973.
The AMS has previously offered to guarantee a $60,000
loan for the construction of a
daycare centre on campus
provided that the daycare
council became affiliated with
the AMS. This is required
under the societies act but was
not acceptable to the members
of the daycare council.
A student-owned cooperative store in SUB has
been under consideration since
the announcement of the
location of the Walter H. Gage
residences. An initial investigation carried out by Ken
Teskey, our assistant
treasurer, with the help from
Stan Oberg of the faculty of
commerce indicates that such
a facility is feasible only in
connection with a student run'
food service. Volume buying is
the key to low retail prices in
the grocery business. The high
volume business in the SUB
cafeteria could be used to
make a grocery outlet possible.
A student-owned public
broadcasting station has been
considered for several years.
The problem lies with the
federal government's
Canadian Radio and Television
Commission. Their previous
rulings have indicated that
they consider the Vancouver
area to be saturated with
commercial stations. We could
apply for a public broadcasting
licence but this would disallow
any form of advertising. A full
time government certified
technician must be at the
station at all times when it is on
the air. Then, there's the
$20,000 required of a transmitter. I don't believe that
students would be willing to
subsidize such  an  operation.
The credit union scheme is a
good one and deserves further
investigation. Teri Ball, our
external affairs officer, is
looking into course credit for
AMS officers at other
universities in order to formulate a presentation to the
senate here at UBC. Course
credit could also be applied for
Ubyssey staffers and CYVR.
Hopefully, our student
senators will be able to present
and support Teri's proposal. If
we had more time, we would be
able to offer many other
programs.
Finally, as stated in Mr.
Fox's letter, the AMS is extremely short of discretionary
TM UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 6, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university
administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The
Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial  departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O Brien
Three thousand screaming puce blorgs today beat the shit out or a city
editor for forgetting to make a list of names for the masthead. If you've
been forgotten, tell us and we'll give you credit for next week. These
worked, we think: David Schmidt, Lorri Rudland, Gary Coull, Ken Dodd,
Lesley Krueger, Laurence Leader, Berton Woodward, Sandi Shreve,
Vaughn Palmer, Larry Manulak, Ed Dubois, Kini MacDonald, Forrest
Nelson, Kent Spencer and Simon Truelove. And Sasges said to say how
good his layout is getting. Friday, October 6, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
More letters
funds. What funds are
available have been allocated
in what we consider the most
equitable way. In order to
increase the grant to The
Ubyssey or to fund Karl Burau
would mean decreasing the
grants to other worthwhile
programs. The only other
option is to run special
referendums for increased
funding to support these and
other programs.
Doug Aldridge
AMS president
Irate
In your last editorial I was
mentioned as being opposed to
the proposed $5 fee increase
that the AMS wants from each
student to construct a new
covered pool.
Since the supposed reasons
for my opposition, that you
gave, were completely incorrect, I am writing this to set
the record straight.
I am against the fee increase
for the very simple reason that
no one has come up with cne
good argument in favor of it.
Of course it would be nice to
have a covered pool. It would
also be nice to have a new
covered racing track so that
anyone who wanted to could
engage in horse-racing or
equestrian competition.
It would be nice to have a
new indoor sports complex
modelled along the lines of the
Houston Agrodome. It would
presumably be nice to have a
new entertainment park
complete with roily-coasters,
ferris-wheels and freak shows
The point is, there would be
all sorts of "nice things" that
could be built here which would
be just as useful as a new
covered pool.
At the present time, the
universit entrance fees in B.C.
are so outrageous that only a
small sector of the population
can afford it. This has been
pointed out innumerable times
before but I will say it again:
the university at present is
restricted for the use of a small
elite of the population (people
from the upper income and
middle income bracket).
Obviously, persons from very
poor backgrounds can make it
but they constitute a minority.
This is not a matter of opinion:
it is a simple matter of
statistics.
And so, a five dollar fee
increase alone would not make
that much difference but I am
opposed in principle to the idea
of increasing an already
over large fee.
If the five dollars must be
spent, then there are so many
better things that it could be
spent on. It could be used to
build   day-care   centres,   a
student-run food co-operative,
cheap student housing . . . The
list is endless and you've all
heard it before. Perhaps, when
the millenium comes, and
every human being is happy,
free, content, etc. — then we
can start talking about
luxuries like new covered
pools.
To speak of constructing a
million dollar pool, when some
students find difficulty in
paying their room and board
would be laughable if not so
sick. If the five dollars must be
spent, it could be used to help
people on welfare buy proper
food (rather than the starchy
diet they live on now); it could
be used to help all the old
people who are barely subsisting on government alms; it
could be used to help all the
mangled and wrecked in our
society.
Of course, $5 charity (ugly
word) from a few thousand
students would hardly help a
damned bit, but at least it
would indicate a rearrangement in the students'
priorities, in his outlook. To
quote Lenny Bruce, so long as
there exists one man who has
two coats, when someone else
has none at all, the first man is
a criminal.
I will conclude by saying that
I fould your editorial in this
subject in last day's paper,
idiotic. In fact, in your whole
editorial policy this year, you
have excelled in only one
thing: fence-sitting, vagueness
and ambiguity. So far (unlike
papers of past years) you have
not attacked a single AMS
policy except one: when they
threatened to cut funds to The
Ubyssey.
You more or less supported
the pool referendum and the
incongruous AMS plan to buy
out SUB food services. In your
editorial on the board of
governors, you suggested
replacing the big business
hacks with a few pseudo-left-
wing hacks but did not question
the  concept  of   a   board   of
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governors itself i.e. a very
small group of people controlling almost all university
affairs. Your editorial on food
services consisted of a series of
insipid jokes. It's fairly obvious that AMS treasurer
David Dick's ploy has worked;
his threat to cut off your funds
has you running scared.
You're being good little
children now. As a former
staffer of The Ubyssey, I would
have liked to see three issues of
the paper a week, but I would
rather see no paper at all than
one that is a cover-up for
corruption and stupidity.
Bernard Bischoff
Arts 4
Aw come off it, Bernie. The
editorial was not meant to be a
summary of your views on the
covered pool. Your name crept
into the editorial because it
came out during a debate on
the pros and cons of the
covered pool that you can't
swim. I thought it was all
rather funny.
However, it is obvious that
you object to your name having
been used. I didn't think you
would and I apologize for
having used it.
I suggest you read our
editorial of Sept. 19 for a more
serious explanation of our
policy on the covered pool. I
think it answers most of your
objections.
I'm sorry we don't have
space to print a rebuttal to
your criticism of our editorial
policies.
As for your charge that The
Ubyssey is knuckling under to
the AMS executive, I recall the
paper was subjected to the
samp charges last year. At the
time we had an executive
which was basically sympathetic to us.
It's almost impossible to
refute such a charge so all I
can suggest is that you continue reading the paper. You'll
find out how obnoxious we can
become when we have to.
J.A.
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
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EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room to offer you
better service at no increase in prices!
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd. Phone 224-6121
This Year
BIRDCALLS
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Will Include
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BONUS
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on Campus
Available Next Friday Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6, 1972
World College opens in B.C.
John Young, former Campbell River High School principal and controversial B.C.
teacher, organized the new
Friends World campus.
Young says he was approached by Peter Wright,
faculty member at the New
Paltz, N.Y. campus, to plan the
school's strategy. They wrote
briefs, developed ideas and
made contacts necessary to
establish the school.
The Campbell River school
has 24 students, 19 or whom are
Americans. Organizers hope
another 30 Canadians will
register next year.
However, Schweitzer says
Friends World was "not here to
to educate but to learn" from
foreign countries.
First-year student Candace
White says she was receiving
an orientation at the school to
prepare for her travel to other
centres.
She says she is doing leg-
work for Young in his new
Campbell River ombudsman
service.
After the first semester she
hopes to go to the Mexican
centre and become involved in
their way of life.
Both students says they like
the amount of travel involved
because it forces students to
use their heads in practical
situations.
One student hitchhiked from
New York to the Gulf of Mexico
then took a banana boat to
Panama. By the time he
returned to the Mexican centre
he had learned to speak
Spanish.
The Campbell River campus
employs two full-time teachers
and has 75 adjunct faculty and
resource people.
When students pick a project
they must find someone who is
qualified to teach in a practical
way.
Schweitzer said most people
approached respond favorably
and many come to offer their
services.
Friends World pays costs
incurred   to   resource   per-
Biker course to start
The B.C. Safety Council aims at making skilled motorcyclists, volunteer instructors Becky Beaton and John Carnegie
said Thursday.
Classes for a five-week novice cycle course meet Sundays
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Boundary Bay's abandoned armed
forces airport.
The next course begins Oct. 15 and the cost is $30.
"That's not bad," said Carnegie, "considering that's more
than 20 hours of riding."
Gloves, helmet and a learners permit are required.
"A special bus goes out there every Sunday," said Carnegie.
"It starts at Hastings and goes up Granville stopping at the
regular Hydro stops. To get picked up you hold out your
helmet."
For further information phone Gary Walton of the B.C.
Safety Council at 684-1351.
The cycles are 80cc Yamahas, lOOcc Hondas, 90cc Suzukis
and lOOcc Kawasakis.
pan
ByGARY COULL
Friends World University
has opened its first Canadian
campus at Campbell River.
The world-wide network of
college campuses has branches in countries such as
Kenya, India, Mexico, Japan,
England the U.S. and now
Canada.
New York's State University
accredits the university and
grants its degrees. Friends
World, however has exclusive
power over discipline and
administration.
"You are out in a real world
as opposed to being in an
isolated, insulated community
such as university life," says
Carl Schweitzer,third year
education student.
He said Friends World
"utilizes the entire world as its
campus".
Schweitzer came to the
Canadian centre to study
differences between American
and Canadian education
systems. He helps administrate the Campbell River
school to gain practical experience.
The plan for a degree is
simple, says Schweitzer. A
student devises projects and
works until he accumulates
enough credits for a degree.
Each student keeps a journal
explaining his work.
At the end of four years work
the journal is submitted to
Friends World, along with a
thesis covering a topic in the
students' major, he says.
If the university believes the
student has done enough work
a degree is granted.
Schweitzer says the
student's work is evaluated
with an attempt to compare its
value against a regular
university degree even though
some of the courses in the
Friends World degree may not
exist at other universities.
The main admission
requirement to Friends World
is the desire to learn from
practical experience, he said.
Students choose the area and
method of study.
OH DAD, POOR DAD
by Arthur Kopit
An M.A. Thesis Production
Directed By Allan Gray
October   11-14 —   8:00  p.m.
Tickets: $2.00 Students: $1.00
Reservations - Room 207 - Frederic Wood Theatre
UBC Somerset Studio
sonnel, on whom the universities' structures rely.
The money comes from the
students' $2,000 tuition, which
entitles them to enrol at any
centre in the world. Depending
on need, Friends World offers
an extensive scholarship
program.
Because this is the Campbell
River school's first semester
there are still problems to be
ironed out. But Young says he
is enthusiastic about the
growing "sense of community" among students.
He wants to see this type of
education brought to secondary and finally the primary
school levels.
"Students can't see themselves as serving a useful
purpose. This system would be
far more useful if the factories
and companies would allow
students to work along side
adults. They could be socially
useful while being educated",
he says.
Students interested in an
unstructured yet complete
education all over the world
can write to Friends World,
Strathcona Lodge, Box 456,
Campbell River, for information.
The   Abominable
Dr.   Phibes
S.U.B. AUD.
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with SFU Sociologist Dr. Ernest Becker and ex-CBC commentators
and resident Nova Scotians Cathie and Brewster Kneen.
Oct. 13 Evening
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Books
Eve's apple
was also Beatles9
ByROBERTPERRY
Muckrakers having applied their peculiar
art to virtually every other sphere of human
activity, it was only a matter of time before the
rock scene, and in particular the Beatles,
became targets.
APPLE TO THE CORE, The Unmaking of
the Beatles, Peter McCabe and Robert D.
Schonfeld [Pocket Books, 1972, $1.25]
These efforts closely parallel the growing
tendency among socially-concerned writers to
take a highly critical view of the so-called
"counter-culture". Far too often the violence,
banality, crass materialism and cynical self-
indulgence of the larger culture is reflected in
the actions of those in apparent revolt.
Who can deny for instance that Mick Jagger
and   the   Rolling   Stones   are   uncrupulous
capitalists   and   the   worst   kind   of   male
chauvinists, and that they attract and stir up
ugly and violent scenes? The New York Times
Magazine  recently described the  Stones  as
having
used their radicalism to gain admittance
to the easy good life ol wealthy members of
the entertainment world's establishment.
The authors of Apple To The Core are more
gentle than the average muckracker.  They
fully   acknowledge   the   Beatles'   innovative
contributions to rock music. They don't deny
that a hell of a lot of people got a hell of a lot of
pleasure from the Beatles. What's more, they
are aware of the humorous and the outrageous
side of the whole Beatle story.
The major part of Apple To The Core
documents the events leading up to the breakup of the group. Needless to say, the spectacle
is hardly edifying. The four Beatles and hordes
of promoters and business managers lash out
viciously at each other in their efforts to get as
large a slice of Apple as possible. Tax evasion
and lawsuits are an accepted part of the game.
The Apple Company was originally formed
to "discover new talent, assist struggling artists and market inventions". The authors
describe the projects of one hired inventor
named Alex:
Alex didn't need to convince the Beatles
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that his gadgets had some practical value.
He brought them an electric apple which
pulsated light and music and a "nothing-
box" which had twelve lights, ran for five
years,  and,  as its  name  suggests,  did
exactly nothing. The Beatles were mightily
impressed and turned out their wallets.
During   this   period   the    Beatles   gave
evidence of their willingness to break new
ground in rock recording. Film producer Al
Brodax describes how Ringo
turned up one day at the studio stoned and
spent the entire time walking 'round and
'round,   until   eventually   he   prostrated
himself by tripping over a glockenspiel.
The resounding clang was kept in the sound
track.
The chapters called "It's Only A Northern
Song" and "The Long And Winding Road
Through The English Courts" describe the
feuds, business deals and legal action that led
to the placing of the Beatles' partnership in
receivership.
Much   more   interesting   is   the   authors'
historical sketch of the Beatles' rise to fame.
Brian Epstein, the hero of this book if there is
one, came from a family who ran a furniture
store. He discovered "four leaping figures in
leather jackets on stage" at the Cavern in
Liverpool and went to work:
His excellent taste was not merely confined
to furniture. He went on to apply his artistic
discrimination on another level, presenting
four talented but unpolished musicians in a
manner which made them appealing to as
wide  a  cross-section  of  the  public  as
possible, just as he had done with the chairs
in his father's furniture store.
He devoted his whole life to the Beatles and
thoroughly  insulated  them   from   any
business      involvement      whatsoever,
recognizing that they were artists and not
businessmen, a fact that proved to be more
true than he probably ever imagined later
on.
Beatlemania resulted. We all know the rest of
the story. Brian Epstein died in 1967 of drug-
related causes and the Beatles slowly started to
disintegrate  as   a   group.   Allen   Klein,   the
manager the Beatles finally settled with, was
See pf 4: BEATLES
Art
Cartoonist returns
The creator of UBC's only indigenous comic strip returns to
campus from Oct. 17 through Nov. 4 as part of an exhibition of
caricature and illustration in the fine arts gallery.
Arn Saba, whose Moralman cartoons graced The Ubyssey
for two years, and who also did other artwork and writing for
the paper, will be exhibiting illustrations from his two books —
the first and second Magenta Frog.
The exhibition is entitled Lines of Fantasy and Social Comment. Also included are works by three 19th-century French
graphic artists, Daumier, Gavarni and Steinlen. A gallery press
release says they "used the scalpel of social irony to expose the
iniquities and human folly present in the political and social
bodies of their time."
In the third part of the exhibition, students will be able to
compare their idle classroom doodlings with those of Pietro
Ricca.
On display will be Ricca's caricatures of a famous Italian
art history professor, Giuseppe Mazzariol, drawn while Ricca
sat in the prof's classes.
Former cartoonist Saba says illustration is an art form "as
closely allied to literature in its intentions as it is to the graphic
arts. The illustrator, above all, tells a story."
Saba's story has changed somewhat since he drew the often
savage, always anti-war and sometimes anti-capitalist comic
strips. The gallery's press release sums up his current preoccupations by saying he is "concerned with fantasy, gentleness,
the peaceable kingdom, and a childlike innocence, which also
incorporates magic, delight, charm and terror."
The gallery, in the north basement of the main library, is
open Wednesday to Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and
Tuesday and Thursday from 8 to 9 p.m.
Page Friday still desperately needs people who can put two
words together. Your literary genius will go unrecognized if you
write only English essays and lab reports. Come and see us in
SUB 241-K any noon hour.
Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6, 1972 Films
Unorthodox addition
Salzburg Connection's Barry Newman finds path strewn with corpses
A cheap concoction
The name of The Salzburg Connection gives
you a clue. It sounds like a European-based
rehashing of The French Connection to cash in on
some of the success of the Academy's "best film of
the year". Even though the two are totally
unrelated, the result predictably comes out like
done-over army stew: pretty thin and without too
much meat.
The Salzburg Connection, starring Barry
Newman, Anna Karina. Directed by Lee
Katzin, based on a novel by Helen Maclnnes. -
At the Odeon.
It's stock stuff. Lots of sinister heavies lurking
in big black Mercedes and the usual quota of blond
Aryan baddies with cruel blue eyes, tight-lipped
steely glare, etc. It's about as entertaining as an
average TV show.
A British ex-intellgence agent discovers a
chest containing Nazi lists and documents. He
hopes to get reinstated but his plans are foiled and
everyone wants the prize. It's hard to figure why
they are all killing each other over a box of soggy,
25 year-old records, but the agents for Red China,
the KGB, Israel, Britain etc., vie for the papers
and lots of guys get bumped off in the struggle.
The basic blandness of the movie stems from the
difficulty in accepting the value of the cherished
papers. The American interest is feebly explained
as fear of blackmail of top government officials
who maybe worked for Hitler.
The actual "connection" is an American
lawyer (Barry Newman) who is a nice, soft-
spoken guy and not at all the kind of hero this film
needs. For all the corpses around him, he doesn't
ever seem to be in too much trouble, and even his
car chase never takes him over a safe, boring 30
mph. He's not too bad, and Anna Karina mopes
around tolerably, but the rest of the acting goes
from moderately bad to dreadful.
It isn't really terrible, it's just not worth going
downtown for. If you do get down there and
manage to park your car, pop over to the Cecil
instead. Your $2.50 will buy you 10 lovely glasses
of beer — that way you get your money's worth.
See you there — CliveBird
At The Varsity last Sunday they turned about a
1,000 people away from Roman Polanski's
Macbeth. They'll be showing it again. This Sunday
it's Nicol Williamson's Hamlet. Go early.
*      *      ifi
Watch for Young Winston, Oct. 18 at The
Hyland. Reserved seats. Story of Churchill's early
life as a public figure. Also Fat City, next at The
Coronet.
The Master of Images is billed as "a new and
totally different motion picture" and that it most
certainly is. Conceived by, directed by and
starring former Texan Byron Black, it was filmed
in and around Vancouver and is a daringly
unorthodox addition to Canadisn film.
The Master of Images, starring Byron Black
and Lulu Ulul opens at the Hollywood Oct. 23.
As closely as one can describe it, it is a
comedy-satire parodying and ridiculing the
Hollywood film syndrome. It has a kind of un-form
that lets anything happen and blasts at every turn
the conventions of the feature film as we know it.
(i.e. as Hollywood has trained us to accept). The
audience is encouraged to relax and let the whole
thing happen like the fantasy trip that it's meant
to be. We are supposed to let this "ultimate in
weird, wild, far-out cinematic poems" take us
along on a new visual and sound experience and to
let our minds frolic free from the encumbrances of
the media as we have always known it. It's a great
idea but it's not that easy.
Black's free hand lets him pile image on image
and sound on sound and all these things happening
at once work well together and are often very
funny. There are a few technical slips that are
glaring but it soon becomes plain that the whirring
of camera motors, shadows of cameramen etc.,
are left in purposely as part of the whole free
satire. Black's main concern is to do something
completely new and to jolt audiences he thinks
have become too complacent and susceptible.
Again these are great ideas but not easy ones to
put across.
Mainly it's the audience that will be the
problem. They have fought new forms in art
before and will continue to do it and I sympathize
with them because new forms often fall short of
what they intended to do. Black's film does much
better than most. It's lively and fast-paced and
entertaining; but it doesn't survive the
metamorphosis into non-structure well enough to
make us forget that we have left the old structure
behind.
I felt myself wishing that it would get a little
closer to the accustomed pattern and whenever it
came near I felt my boggled mind give a sigh of
relief.
The girl, Lulii (Lulu Ulul), is having a bad
time in the city so she heads out to the islands to
find reality and meaning. She meets a group of
hippies and after various failures to relate to them
she joins (as a spirit) The Master of Images
(Black), who has been lurking around doubling as
an omnipresent God-figure and a cameraman.
The Master toys with his subjects and from
these antics with the camera and the soundtrack
comes the main assault on Hollywood. Black
makes us very aware that it is a movie and between dethroning Hollywood cliches he talks to the
audience and encourages them to get involved:
"As you look at this movie, are you looking at your
own movie? Along with accepting the abandonment of cinematic reality, we have to let our
imagination run and try to be transported by the
array of images. As you can imagine, it's not a
movie for someone who prefers the conventional,
well-proven cinematic form. -—CliveBird
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Friday, October 6, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 3 Beatles world's
biggest bores?
From page 2
more interested in wheeling and dealing than in uniting the
Beatles.
Apple To The Core describes the Beatles' public, rudderless wanderings among what happened to be topical and
fashionable in the contemporary scene. We see their excursions into the worlds of hard drugs, transcendental
meditation and psychedelic fashion. The result of their
attempt to free themselves from maintaining "a public
image of 'nice boys' " was that "life began to imitate art"
and a "generation began to extract a new set of values from
their music".
The Apple in the title can probably be seen not just as
meaning the Apple Company, or the poisoned apple of the
fairy-tale, but also as the apple in the garden of Eden.
Having bitten the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good
and evil, the Beatles showed no evidence of being able to
distinguish between the two.
The authors reveal some insight into their subject when
they write:
Not until 1964 did Bob Dylan offer them their first joint.
But the initial barriers to drugs, which any five
provincial boys might then be expected to maintain,
were broken down in Hamburg. The Beatles'
willingness to experiment with anything new they were
offered, as behavioural pattern which a generation
copied, was evident even then.
This characteristic of a generation — the refusal to accept
limits to action — reached its 'reductio ad absurdum', its
most disgusting manifestation years later when
the management of the Fillmore East had decided that
its recent audiences had deteriorated far enough. It
announced that it was closing its doors forever. "The
floor was covered with broken wine bottles  some
nights," said manager Kip Cohen. "The people coming
here were almost Neanderthal in their approach to
living."
Yoko Ono's "nihilistic art" is just one more manifestation
of this tendency.
Yoko   Ono's   husband   John,   considered   the   most
"revolutionary"  of  the  Beatles,  is  spotlighted  in  this
hilarious description as a "gigantic hypocrite":
John was on public display, in bed with Yoko, staging a
demonstration for peace. At just a mention of Sir Lew
Grade's name, John forgot all about acorns and his
peace message. A.T.V.'s bid brought out the fighter in
him. "I won't sell," he declared.
John and Yoko deserve the treatment they get in this
book. They are described as "on their way to rivalling
Richard Burton and Liz Taylor for the title of world's
biggest bores."
It is with a description of Geroge Harrison's Madison
Square Garden concert in aid of the refugees of Bangladesh
that Apple To The Core begins. After reading the rest of the
book it gives one a feeling of optimism to return to this
concert. It symbolizes a possible re-orientation of the rock
world in a more sane, yet idealistic direction.
The title of the last chapter of this book sums up a lot of
people's feelings about the Beatles: "The Sum of the Four
Parts No Longer Equals The Whole."
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Page Friday. 4
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6, 1972 Friday, October 6, 1972
THE       UBYSS E Y
Page  11
Vote procedure difficult
By VAUGHN PALMER
Who says provisions in the federal election
act covering voting procedure for students are
difficult to comprehend?
Humphry Mostyn, returning officer in
Vancouver Centre for the Oct. 30 election, does
for one.
"Basically a student votes where he/she had
established domicile on enumeration day, Sept.
11," Mostyn said Thursday.
Nothing could sound simpler but as Mostyn
says, "the problem is in the definition of
domicile — it's very hard to put in writing."
A domicile, Mostyn says, is not necessarily
where a student was living Sept. 11, but where
he eventually will or would return to.
The main people to suffer from the ambiguity of this definition are those living in
university residences.
"A student living in a dormitory: well let's
face it, in most cases he's going to go home next
summer, live with his parents and look for a
job, so his parent's home must be considered
his domicile," Mostyn said.
"However, a student who by Sept. 11, was
living in a house, room or suite off-campus can
register and vote in the constituency where
he/she lives."
"If he/she returns home next summer then
domicile will be established there but for the
purpose of this election his/her domicile is
where he/she is now living," he said.
The problem with living in residence seems
to be that a university dormitory is considered
a transient residence much like a Salvation
Army or youth hostel and people living there
must vote in their 'home' riding.
"Of course an enumerator can use
discretion in cases where a student states he
has broken ties with home, and allow him to
AMS to join
B.C. union
By GARY COULL
The Alma Mater Society
student council Wednesday
night voted unanimously to
join the B.C. Association of
Student Unions.
External affairs officer Teri
Ball said one of the first things
they will press for is a student
bill of rights.
The bill of rights is now being
written by a president's subcommittee. Student members
are Grant Burnyeat, law 2, Ted
Zacks. law 3 and Ball,
agriculture 3.
Faculty members are Bill
Armstrong, deputy administration president, R. A.
Luckas and arts dean Douglas
Kenny.
The bill of rights will replace
the faculty council subcommittee rulings on student
discipline if it is approved by
the senate. This would then be
used as the official document
of the student court.
Ball said the new association
will give a voice to the smaller
colleges.
She said students on smaller
campuses will not be
recognized by the propsed
National Student Union.
The association's aims are to
pursue matters of concern to
B.C. students, create greater
communication between
campuses and allow use of
resources by other students.
The last organization to try
this was the B.C. Union of
Students headed by former
AMS president Tony  Hodge.
Ball said it did not work
because it was too structured.
She said the new union will
have a procedure manual and
will be conducted informally.
Ball said B.C. will be
represented as a block in the
upcoming National Student
Union Conference in Ottawa.
She said they wil work in cooperation with each other.
Other provinces having their
own student unions are
Quebec, Ontario and
Saskatchewan.
register as if his domicile were a university
residence," Mostyn said.
If your domicile is where you live then to
vote merely get in touch with the returning
officer of your riding before Oct. 13 and
register.
If, however, you are one of those unfortunate
whose domicile is where your parents live then
the procedure through which you must go to
vote is very involved.
First, go to the office of one of the political
parties or returning officer, or university
registrar and get a copy of the form covered by
Section 17-18 of the election act. Fill this in and
imail it to the returning officer, of your parent's
iriding, before Oct. 13.
Alternately, have your parents pick up the
form in their riding and fill it out for you.
Now you are registered, but unless you are
going to be at your parents home Oct. 30 you
can't vote. (!)
If you are going to be at the university
election day you can't vote absentee, because
there is no such thing in a federal election.
Instead you have to vote proxy.
So it's back to the office of a political party
returning officer or the registrar to pick up
form 47.
Form 47 establishes your residence at
university and transfers your vote to one of
your parents who will vote proxy for you on
election day.
Fill it out and mail it to them.
When your parents get this form they must
take it to the returning officer of their riding
before Oct. 27.
The returning officer will then fill out a
proxy certificate authorizing one of them to
vote for you on election day.
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WELCOME ABOARD A.0.S.C
What is A.O.S.C.?
Well, among other things, it's the largest Student Travel Bureau in North America.
Despite all the turmoil, in areas of chartered travel etcc . . . A.O.S.C. has once again served its
many thousands of student members in Ontario, Manitoba, and the Atlantic Provinces by
providing reliable and efficient charter flights, discount tour packages, language courses, rail
passes, cruises, car rentals. .. you name it.
A.O.S.C. stands for Association of Student Councils. It is a non-profit, co-operative owned and
operated by over 53 Canadian Student Councils.
Recently the A.M.S. of U.B.C. officially joined the Association, thereby giving immediate
membership to all registered students at U.B.C.
The U.B.C. Office of A.O.S.C.  is currently finalizing plans to operate charter flights from
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UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6, 1972
P+fl
BILL
CLARKE
CARES ABOUT QUADRA
With nomination papers filed (a week ahead of time) and with
more than 12,500 homes in our constituency visited, I can feel
some satisfaction as to the progress of the campaign to date.
We're on a winning team.
If you have been observing the scene in Quadra, you cannot
help but realize that your Progressive Conservative candidate
has a quantity of energy and enthusiasm for the job. Our signs
were up first, our house-to-house visits have been the most
comprehensive, and the important thing to emerge from
talking with you has been the defining of the issues closest to
your political hearts. Which is why it was important that I
meet you in the first place.
* * *
Emerging from the visits comes the fact that one of the major
concerns to most of us is the shocking tax mess that has been
allowed to happen by the Trudeau Government. As a
chartered accountant I am unable to understand many of the
new sections of the Act that Trudeau rammed through
Parliament last year.
Benson (remember him?) admitted that many changes would
be necessary to clarify the more glaring anomalies and
contradictions. While the Trudeau Government has been
experimenting with taxpayers, many companies and individuals have been unable to plan for the future and many new
projects have had to be postponed. These delays have added
considerably to the unemployment picture, especially among
the young voters.
What did Quadra's sitting member of Parliament have to say
about that?
To correct the tax situation, the Stanfield Team has proposed
that various taxes be reduced in order to stimulate the
economy through increased spending and greater demand for
goods and services. These are not pie-in-the-sky theories, but
sound economic practices that put the economic destiny of
the people in their own hands.
Also, we will cancel the three per cent income tax surcharge
that a Trudeau Government will reinstate in January of next
year.   Further,   we  will  reduce   taxes     by   four  per  cent,
retroactive to July of this year.
* * #
There is no doubt in the minds of the Progressive Conservative
researchers that such tax cuts can be effected, that compensatory savings can be initiated by paring off the bureaucratic
excesses that have taken place under Trudeau and that the
voters will have a share in shaping their own futures by'
managing more of their own money rather than letting the
government mismanage it.
We should be prepared to pay for essential services by the
federal government and then contribute to help the helpless,
but federal taxation should stop there.
Waste and inefficiencies must be stopped, and when the
Stanfield team stops them, there will be no need for high taxes
to support prodigal spending.
We also propose the "Constant Dollar Taxation Plan", under
which the taxpayer may deduct from his income the percentage increase in cost of living before arriving at a taxable
income.
Bill Clarke is the Progressive Conservative Candidate in
Vancouver Quadra. His Headquarters is at 2105 W. 38th.
Phone 261-2292.
Olympics,
By PAUL HOCH
CUP Wire Service
Avery Brundage, kingpin of the international sports establishment,
recently told the assembled throngs at
Munich that this year's Olympic
Games had been subjected to what he
called two vicious attacks. One, he
said, was the threatened boycott by
African states (and black American
athletes) if white-supremecist
Rhodesia was allowed to compete. The
other was the chain of events that led to
the deaths of the Israeli athletes, TV
commentators covering the games
expressed much shock that the
'Olympic peace' had been shattered.
And,' there were loud laments that
'politics had invaded sports'.
One may of course wonder about the
sort of mentality that equates a
peaceful boycott against a racist
regime with a commando action that
leads to 11 deaths. And, the people of
Vietnam may be excused if, in the
midst of the daily hail of American
bombs and death, they wonder what
the American news media mean when
they say that the 'Olympic peace' has
been shattered. Nor was there any
'Olympic peace' for the hundreds of
student demonstrators who were
simply rounded up and shot by
Mexican troops at the 1968 Mexico City
Olympics.
It's interesting to review the record
of the sporting establishment that wept
such plentiful tears at Munich. Once
before there was a German Olympics.
And, then too, the Olympic kingpins
charged that politics had invaded
sports. The incidents which at that time
sparked a mass movement in America
to boycott the 1936 Berlin games are
eloquently described in professor
Richard Mandell's book The Nazi
Olympics. At thst time, the issue was
whether Hitler was barring Jewish
athletes from the German Olympic
team.
The American Olympic establishment repeatedly claimed that the
Nazis weren't discriminating
against Jewish athletes or, if they
were, it was irrelevant, Eventually,
as the movement to boycott the
Olympics gathered momentum in
America, they sent general Charles
Sherrill (a member of the American
and International Olympic committees) to Berlin to negotiate with the
Nazis. Sherrill vigorously opposed the
boycott and, upon his return, discussed
the reasons for his mission:
"I went to Germany for the purpose
of getting at least one Jew on the
german Olympic team and I feel that
my job is finished. As for the obstacles
placed in the way of Jewish athletes or
any others trying to reach Olympic
ability, I would have no more business
discussing that in Germany than if the
Germans attempted to discuss the
Negro situation in the American south
or the treatment of the Japanese in
California."
He also claimed that he k(W many
Jews who opposed a boycott and who
feared that it would be overplaying the
Jewish hand in America as it was
overplayed in Germany before the
present suppression and expulsion of
the Jews were undertaken. The next
day, Frederick Rubin, then secretary
of the American Olympic Committee
announced his position:
"Germans are not discriminating
against Jews in their Olympic tryouts.
The Jews are eliminated because they
are not good enough as athletes. Why,
there are not a dozen Jews in the world
of Olympic calibre."
General Sherrill later appeared
before the Italian Chamber of Commerce in New York and praised
Mussolini as "a man of courage in a
world of pussyfooters," adding, "I wish
to God he'd come over here and have a
chance to do that same thing."
The president of the American
Olympic    Committee    (and    close
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<> Friday, October 6, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  13
big-time sports 'political'
colleague of Sherrill and Rubin) was
Brundage. He has remained at the top
of the Olympic establishment ever
since, and is currently head of the
International Olympic Committee. He
opposed the anti-Nazi boycott just as he
was later to oppose the black boycott.
He opposed exclusion of Germany in
1936, of Japan in 1940, and of Rhodesia
and South Africa in 1968.
In 1936, according to Mandell,
Brundage and his supporters posed as
being far above petty chauvinism, a
position that did not prevent them from
occasionally praising the visible ac-.
complishments of the Nazis and from
slurring the adherents of the boycott
committee on fair play as being "reds"
or even "communists".
In May 1968, Ramparts magazine
reported that Brundage had told an
AAU National Convention that the
German Jews were satisfied with their
treatment under the Nazis. Was this
just a hastily thought out view based
largely on ignorance? Apparently not.
For, even after Brundage made the trip
to Nazi Germany with the 1936
American Olympic team, he returned
to a packed rally of 20,000 at Madison
Square Gardens with heady praise for
the Nazi establishment. According to
the Oct. 3,1936 New York Times, Avery
Brundage brought his audience to their
feet cheering in an outburst of enthusiasm when he paid tribute to the
Reich under Adolf Hitler. He told
them: "We can learn much from
Germany. We, too, if we wish to
preserve our institutions, must stamp
out communism. We, too, must take
steps to arrest the decline of
patriotism."
Ramparts reported that as late as
August 1940, Brundage was serving as
head of Citizens to Keep America Out
of War, a group now known to have
been Nazi-supported. It came as no
great surprise that the only two Jews
on the American track and field team,
Sam Stoller and Marty Glickman, were
mysteriously dropped from the
400-metre relay team just before the
start of the Berlin games.
No one would argue that the Nazi
Olympics weren't 'political'. It might
also be argued that all of the other
Olympiads and indeed all of our
bigtime sports programs have been
political too. Though Brundage has
always been very concerned about
politics invading sport when fascist
countries were threatened with
debarrment from the Olympics, he
never worried himself unduly at the
exclusion of the Soviet Union from the
Olympics until the 1950s. And ever
since then, it has not been uncommon
for the American news media, despite
their professed concern that politics
should stay outside sport to report the
games as if they were a main event of
the cold war contest: America versus
Russia.
"Olympics athletes," writes Alex
Natari in his book Sport and Society,
"have become soldiers of sport who are
indoctrinated with grotesque conceptions of national prestige." Today,
international competitive sport has
beome everywhere, whether openly or
secretly, a propaganda weapon in
world affairs which through the incitement of inherent nationalist instincts points ways and means to new
methods of psychological warfare". In
short, the Olympics has become
nationalism in a jockstrap.
But, except in degree, this is hardly
something new. The nationalistic
militaristic element has always been
present in sport. Indeed, what we call
sports evolved historically out of the
sort of 'blood sports' that provided
practice and perparation for battlle.
Thus, even in the original Greek
Olympiads, the sorts of skills emphasized (things like speed of foot and
javelin throwing) were the sorts of
things thought most useful in battle.
So, too, with the gladiator fights of
the Roman amphitheatre, the jousting
tournaments of Medieval knights, and
even with the rebirth of the Olympics in
1896. Professor Mandell points out that,
though Baron Pierre de Coubertin, the
founder of the modern Olympic Games,
is usually depicted as some sort of saint
concerned solely with the welfare of
mankind, he was in reality a French
jingoist, nursing a grudge against
Germany for her victory in the 1870
Franco-Prussian war. Baron de
Coubertin explicitly proclaimed that he
was the Olympics as a badly needed
way of re-invigorating French youth,
and toughening the nation up for
another round with Germany. A
position, incidently, not so different'
from that of President Kennedy, who
saw competitive sports and the
Olympics as a good way to build up the
'national fibre for the cold war with
Russia.
A couple of years ago, paraphrasing
the Duke of Wellington, the deputy
editor of the London Sunday Telegraph,
Peregrine Worsthorne, noted that what
he called "the race of Imperial Men
that built the British Empire" was
formed on the playing fields of Eton
and Harrow, the elite English prep
schools. Peter Mcintosh in his able
book Sport in Society, notes that the
militarized games like rugby that
gained popularity during the
renaissance of British imperialism in
the latter part of the nineteenth century
"encouraged just those qualities of cooperation and conformity to the needs
of the herd which were so much prized
by a middle class which was
establishing its power and influence
throughout the world."
In our own increasingly turbulent
era, there are many important voices
in the athletic establishment who look
upon sports almost as a weapon of class
warfare. "To me," said Washington
State University football coach Jim
Sweeney a couple of years ago,
"football and athletics are a fortress
that has held the wall against radical
elements. I look for them to continue to
play that same role". Speaking before
a chapter meeting of the American
Association of University Professors
last year, the University of Tulsa
football coach declared that "football
prevents communism". The rationale
for this kind of thinking was given a few
years ago by Homer D. Babbidge,
president of the University of Connecticut. "Our teams and our players,"
remarked Babbidge to the National
Association of Collegiate Athletic
Directors, "by and large, are the guys
in the white hats — they keep their hair
cut short, they're clean, they're or-
. derly, aware of the importance of law
and order and discipline. The students
and others who come to watch us play
are the people who respect tradition
and institutional pride ..."
Similarly, in a recent speech to the
Touchdown Club of Birmingham, Ala.,
in which he attacked critics of the
sports establishment, vice-president
Spiro Agnew remarked that "Sports —
all sports — is one of the few bits of glue
that holds society together ..." But,
whose conception of 'society'? And,
where there is disagreement • about
which forces in society should
predominate,   how   much   does   the
present organization of American sport
give support to one side of the
argument over the other? What
Berkeley sociology professor Harry
Edwards calls the 'plantation atmosphere' of American sports with
black athletes on the bottom and white
officials and coaches on the top has
already given rise to athletic strikes,
boycotts and disruptions at over 100
American colleges, as well as
threatened boycotts at the last two
Olympics. Oberlin athletic director
Jack Scott says that a nationally
prominent track coach told him that
"unless we can find a way to separate
the decent Negroes from the
troublemakers and militants, we're
going to stop recruiting all Negroes".
"Football is not a democracy," says
University of Pittsburgh grid coach
Carl DePasqua. "There's nothing to
debate. The players can debate in
political science class." Syracuse's
Ben Schwartzwalder agrees.
Back in the days when the jocks at
the University of California, Columbia,
and a score of other institutions were
beating up student demonstrators,
there was no great fear that the
athletes were 'political'. Jim Bouton, in
his book Ball Four, points out that as
long as professional baseball players
could be depended upon rabidly to
support the Vietnam war, the army,
the generals, the flag, no one in
baseball's establishement worried
about what they were saying or
whether it was 'political'.
In 1970, for the first time in history,
the American Broadcasting Company
refused to televise the half-time show
of the Holy Cross-Buffalo football game
because it was 'political'. The Buffalo
marching band had scheduled
simulated formations of smoking
factories and exploding bombs and
would play such 'controversial' songs
as We Shall Overcome and Give Peace
a Chance. A few weeks later, ABC and
the NCAA proudly televised the half-
time at the army-navy game, complete
with a squad of Army Rangers who had
just returned from an abortive raid on
a North Vietnamese PoW camp, and.
greetings from the joint chiefs of staff.
Nothing 'political' about that.
Similarly, when the two black
American trackmen Wayne Collette
and Vince Mathews were evicted from
the Munich Olympics, many American
sportswriters complained that it was
because they were trying to make a
political demonstration. This may well
be true. But, the fact is that the playing
of the national anthems at an international sporting event that claims
to be above politics is, in itself, a highly
political act. The fact was then that
Collette and Mathews were thrown out,
not for anything they did or didn't do in
the actual Olympic competition, but
because their casual behavior was
regarded as an unwarranted interference in what amounted to a
political demonstration by the international Olympic establishment.
Nor is the Olympic competition itself
all that apolitical. Though the actual
athletic events themselves be as pure
as the driven snow, when you introduce
nationalistic TV commentators to root
for their national teams, spend millions
of dollars on build-up and promotion,
fill the stands with thousands and
thousands of fans (not to mention the
multi-millions of TV watchers around
the world), you end up with something
which is so overblown that it becomes
what the Roman emperors used to call
bread and circuses for the masses.
Hoch, a former University of Toronto
graduate student, is an assistant
professor specializing in sport
sociology at Oberlin College. He is the
author of the forthcoming Doubleday
Anchor paperback Rip Off: the Big
Game, on the political sociology of
sports and their relation to society. Page  14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6, 1972
*t    '"•SW  ' "    *** ' t^ *   ' *■      ■**<" "SOY**  ■.   ">W*   ■V---™? '       '
'Tween classes
TODAY
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl    Burau    on    East    and    West
Germany, noon, SUB 211.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
"Repression  in Argentina", 8 p.m.,
1208 Granville.
ALPHA OMEGA
Meeting with Winnipeg SUSK rep.,
7 p.m., SUB 224.
NDPCLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 213.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Speaker from school of social work,
noon SUB 10SB.
SKYDIVERS
Meeting, noon, SUB 125.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Eucharist,     10:30    a.m.    Lutheran
Campus Centre.
MONDAY
SAILING TEAM
Eliminations,     10    a.m.,    Kitsilano
Yacht Club.
TUESDAY
ANTHROSOC UNDERGRAD
Meeting, noon, Angus 303.
UKRANIAN VARSITY
Meeting, noon, SUB 213.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Gordon Gibson on economic nationalism, noon, SUB ballroom extension.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Eucharist,   noon,   Lutheran   Centre.
WEDNESDAY
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Meeting, noon, SUB 215.
CROSSROADS
Meeting, noon,   International House
400.
ONTOLOGY
Glen    Lockie   on    "Election    Consciousness '72",   noon,  Buch.  216.
LUTHERAN MINISTRY
Eucharist,   noon,   Lutheran  Centre.
THURSDAY
KUNG FU
Practice,  4:30-6:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
STUDENT CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT
Meeting, noon, Westminster House,
room 33.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Meeting, noon-2:30, SUB 125.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Ron    Basford,    noon,   SUB    club's
lounge.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Meeting,      4:30      p.m.,     Lutheran
Centre.
FRIDAY
STUDENT LIBERALS
Grant Deachman, noon, SUB lounge.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Discussion: "Tasks for the church in
the university", 6:30 p.m., Lutheran Centre.
Hot flashes
Recent visitors
speak on China
Seven recent visitors to the
People's Republic of China will
speak on the revolutionary change
in that country's major social
institutions.
UBC anthropology professor
Bill Willmott will lead the
eight-session program which
includes speakers and discussions
on such topics as the family, the
new status of women, youth and
public morality and ethics.
The first program is at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday at the Kitsilano
Library,   Eighth and  MacDonald.
Progress
Ecologist Bill Rees from UBC
community planning department
will talk about limits to growth
12:30 Thursday in SUB 207.
The second presentation of the
speakers committee program is a
weekend symposium Friday to,
Oct. 14 featuring Ernst Beckef
from Simon Fraser's political
science, sociology and anthropology department.
Breads in
News of great joy from the
finance department which says
that bursaries and scholarship
cheques may now be picked up in
the finance office of the new
administration building.
Ski swap
A ski equipment swap and sell
will be held at the Pacific National
Exhibition from 1 to 6 p.m.
Oct. 14.
Equipment (no clothing) to be
sold must be registered at the
food building between 4 and 10
p.m. Friday, or 9 a.m. and noon
Oct. 14.
Owners set their own prices, 15
per cent of which will be kept by
the Canadian Ski Association.
Admission is free.
Penny-a-book
UBC libraries are running a
penny-a-book campaign for
UNESCO's international book
year.
The central idea is to drop a
penny in one of the money banks
distributed throughout the libraries on campus. The money
collected will send books to
further education in underdeveloped countries.
Revolution
The great proletarian cultural
revolution in China is the subject
of a lecture scheduled for noon
Thursday in SUB ballroom.
Speakers are Ann Tompkins
and Jane Uptegrove, Americans
who lived and worked in China
for a lengthy period of time.
From 1965 to 1971 Tompkins
was able to observe the unfolding
of the cultural revolution. Uptegrove worked in the Tachai
Peoples Commune and a Shanghai
factory.
Slides will be shown.
CAT     # 1) "Comedy-Erotic"
# 2) "Social Conscience"
Sponsored by
Media McGill
and Bellvue Pathe
Media McGill
3434 McTavish
Montreal 112
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional Unas, 25c;
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
36c; additional days $1.25 8t30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone end are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publication. 0fftce, Room 241 S.U.8.. UBC, Van. 8,.B.C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DANCES
11
NGOMA TA AFRIKA OCTOBER 6th
The unique sounds of Afrika, 9:00
p.m. to 1:30. $1.50. International
House.
Greetings
12
SATURDAY SALE 100 PUR COATS,
jackets, many vintage items, $29
or less — all day Saturday, 10 a.m.
6   p.m.    Pappas   Bros.    Purs.    459
...Hamilton Street at Victory Square.
Phone 681-6840 weekdays 12-6 p.m.
13
Lost & Found	
LOST: WHILE HITCHHIKING^
Thurs., Sept. 28, 1972, a brown
leather purse. Phone 224-3040. Very
important to owner.
14
Rides & Car Pools
PAYING PASSENGER IN  DELTA-
Surrey  area.   Please  call   596-0703.
Special Notices
15
$75 FOR 75c. WATCH FOR B.C.
Bonus Coupons coming early
October   .	
MUSIC, SOCIOLOGY AND RELIGI-
on, bible presentations. Day School
of Theology. Eight Mondays, 7:45-
10:00 p.m. Students $5.00, Oct. 16-
Dec. 4. Vancouver School of Theology 6000 Iona Drive. Information
V,  Anderson,  228-9031,  224-0069.
LAST CHANCE TO JOIN CHOIR
Planning CBC TV Christmas program. Monday Oct. 9, 6:30 p.m.,
Vancouver School of Theology Chapel,  6050 Chancellor. -
COME TO UNIVERSITY STUDENT
FELLOWSHIP — At lunch time
after the 11 o'clock services at St.
Anslem's and University Hill
Churches every Sunday. Bring a
bag lunch, tea and coffee provided,
meetings held at University Hill
Church. Ministers: Rev. Luis Cur-
ran and Dr. W. S. Taylor. HARVEST SUPPER at University Hill
United Church, on Friday, October 13, 6 p.m. All welcome! If
you plan to come, reserve in advance by phoning 224-1943, 224-
3663,   224-6963, J!24-7011._
CONSTITUTION REFORMRmEEtC
ing of UBC Fencing Club. Quorum
needed, Rm. 224. SUB, 7:00 on
Thursday,   October 19,   1972.
DISCOUNT- s¥eREO.~EXAMPLE:
AM-FM receiver, turntable, base,
cover, cartridge, two sneakers, 2-
year guarantee, list $200, vour
cost $125. Carrv Akai. A.G.S..
Zenith   TVs.   Call  732-6769.
Travel Oorjortunftw
IS
Wanted—Information
17
TWO RTGHT-ON MUSICIANS
looking for more. Ph. 253-2253
Eric: 224-6113, Mark: 435-7157. Rob!
Especially bass guitarist, singer,
whatever.
W»nt«>d—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Salo
21
1960—180 MERCEDES $425.  876-
A-l mechanical condition.
9118.
Autos Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairc
24
Motorcycles
75
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Serrices
31
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Dance Bands
33
Duplicating & Copying
34
Photography
35
■toe TLtnti anb gutter
Cameras
REGULAR FLASH
CLEARANCE
VARIANT FB $35., FT $41.,
CP $48., CT $60.
All  Fully  Rechargeable!
Have  We Got A  Flesh For You!
VIVITAR, METZ, BKAUN,
TOSHIBA, etc.
3010 W Brdwy.    736-7833
Scandals
37
CLAMP DOWN ON LAND SPECU-
lators. Put an end to politics as
usual. Support Ron Johnson, 1956
West Broadway, 736-0288. Vancou-
ver Centre Federal N.D.P.	
MACBETH—A ROCK OPERA—BY
Richard Ouzounian and Marek
Norman, Oct. 25-Nov. 4. Student
performances Oct. 29-30, $1.00-81.50
tickets now avaialable UBC Old
Auditorium Box Office,  228-3176.
Typing
40
ESSAYS AND  THESES  TYPED
Experienced Typist,
Mrs.  Freeman,  731-8096.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, Theses, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   263-5317.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, THESES,
Essays,   etc.   Phone   Mrs.   Brown,
732-0047.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PUBLIC SERVICE OF CANADA
offers careers in the field-of administration in various Federal
Government Departments to both
men and women.
A briefing session/career hour
will be held at 7:00 p.m., Thurs-
day,  October  12  at Buchanan  106.
CAREERS  FOR  ECONOMISTS
AND STATISTICIANS
This  Competition  is  open to both
men  and  women.
Interested in a professional career
in the Public Service of Canada?
Come to a briefing session:
ON: October 10
AT:   12:30 p.m.
IN:  Room  207 Angus
We  are   particularly  interested  in
graduates in  one of  the following
disciplines:
Economics, Agricultural Economics, Statistics, Labour Economics, Mathematics, Resource
Economics, Economic Geography,
 Transportation  Economics.
PART-TIME  WAITRESS  — SCAN-
dia   Restaurant,   Phone   254-3233.
Work Wanted
52
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY OF-
fers fast, accurate typing service
on own electric typewriter.
Reasonable rates. Helen Ashworth,
683-1161  (days) or 681-8921  (eves.).
INSTRUCTION &
SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
CLASSICAL   GUITAR
with    former    S.F.
instructor.   733-6888.
AND   LUTE
Conservatory
Special Classes
62
Tutoring Service
63
1ST  &  2ND-YEAR MATH  &
sics    tutoring.    Reasonable
Phone  Mike   738-7862.
PHY-
rates.
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
ACOUSIC GUITARS FOR SALE. 6-
string for $20. 12-string for $55.
Phone  Mike,  738-7862.	
FOR SALE: ELECTRIC TYPE-
writer; Remington 2-year-old standard, newly reconditioned. $200.00.
J. D.  James, 254-9451.	
ROBERTS REEL TO REEL
stereo, tapes, etc. $1150. Rossignol
Strato Skis, Salomon bindings, 210
cms,  $80.  Phone Chris, 224-7235.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
CO-ED ROOMS-KITCHEN — CAM-
pus, $60 mo. 5745 Agronomy, 224-
9549.
Room &  Board
82
2 SINGLE ROOMS WITH BOARD
& laundry, priv. entrance, Dunbar
area,  $110 each. 731-3732.	
Furnished Apts.
83
Houses—Furn. 8t Unfurn.      86
THREE GIRLS TO SHARE LARGE
house near UBC gates. Own bedroom. Available immediately.
Phone   224-0230.	
WATERFRONT SALTSPRING island. Over 80 acres with % mile
waterfront. 2 beaches. 15 acres
cleared farmland surrounded by
treed slopes. Absolute privacy.
Ideal for group development or investment at less than $100.00 per
waterfront   foot.   Call   228-8126.
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Friday, October 6, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page   15
SPOR TS
THE UBC NURSES TACKLE home economics Thursday at noon at
Thunderbird Stadium in the annual teacup football game. In the story
below, home ec Hannah takes an unbiased pre-game look at the teams
and their chances of winning.
Countdown to T-Cup
The annual teacup football
game between Home
Economics and the Nurses
. piomises to be yet another
tough one as even now the
Homewreckers eagerly wait to
walk all over the nurses.
This year the Homewreckers
have a big front four, with not a
girl under one hundred pounds.
Killer Kathy, Shakey Shelia,
Crazy Donna, and Muscle
Maureen are confident that
they can handle those beefy
bedpanners from Nursing.
The practices have proved
costly for both teams. The
Homewrecker's top running
back, fleet foot Barb, suffered
a sprained ankle when she
collided   with   all-star   quar-
Team notices
Any potential track and field
competitor who missed
Thursday's meeting is asked to
contact Lionel Pugh Tuesday
at 4:30 p.m. in the armouries.
Both men and women are
asked to attend.
Practice sessions for the
UBC women's curling team
began Saturday at 10:15 a.m.
in the curling rink at the
Winter Sports Centre. All new
curlers are welcome.
The mens' and womens' ski
team are dry land training
Tuesdays and Thursdays at
5:30 p.m. in the new gym
complex. Anyone interested in
pre-season conditioning is
welcome.
terback Catapult Brinkey.
Unfortunately, neither will be
able to play.
The Nurses are also having
their problems. Wednesday at
practice the Bedpanners were
scrimmaging with the coaches
when Thelma Thermometer
knocked head coach Harry
unconcious. Poor little Harry
still has not recovered.
Both teams are known to run
wide with the ball, and the
Nurses are famous for double
reverses. It should be quite a
game.
Game time is noon Thursday
at Thunderbird Stadium, with
all proceeds going to the
crippled children's fund.
The game will be a bit different this year, because both
Home Ec. and the Nurses did
not want to play with the
chariot race at half-time.
However, the engineers
insisted on the chariot race
because they felt that the race
is what draws the crowd to T-
cup. To compensate, T-cup will
take place from 12:30-1:15 and
at 1:15 the engineers will take
over the field.
Anyone not wishing to see the
chariot race and who also
wants to discourage future
chariot races should leave the
stadium after the T-cup.
Intramurals
There will be a women's
intramural meeting for all
managers today at 12:30 p.m.,
Mem. Gym 213.
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'Birds hammer opposition
By BRENT O'CONNOR
The Thunderbird rugby
squad returned to its winning
ways Saturday in downing the
Georgian rugby club 43-12.
The 'Birds led 21-6 at the half
and combined good rucking
and ball control to dominate
the game thoughout the second
half.
They got three ties from
newcomer Doug Carr, two
from veteran Spence McTavish,   and  one  each  from
Intramural talk
By SIMON TRUELOVE
Turkey Trot, the men's
cross-country race was run
Thursday with great speed and
stamina shown by about 50
enthusiasts.
The turkey winner was
David Stenning, ap." sci. 2.
Craig Knapton, com. 2,
acquired one dozen eggs tor a
gallant fourth place effort. The
second place prize was a large
chicken due to the surprising
unavailability of geese at this
time of year.
The top team standing went
to P.E., who were mostly ski
team members. Unfortunately
some of the later places were
in doubt as someone inadvertently sprayed the place
tokens all over the ground.
In football action Monday the
scores were: Dentistr-y 2,
Engineers 0; Forestry 13,
Sigma Chi 0; Sammy's 23,
Alpha Delts 0; Betas 18,
Education 0.
Wednesday games had
Sigma Chi beating Education
9-6 and Kappa Sigma losing to
the Engineers 8-0.
Tennis, badminton and golf
ladders are outside the men's
intramural office in Mem.
Gym 308. Badminton is
scheduled for Monday and
Wednesday p.m. at Mem. gym,
this Monday excepted.
Entry deadlines for
basketball, hockey and soccer
teams are 3:30 p.m. today.
There is a hockey referees'
clinic coming up soon, and
soccer refs are still needed.
Willie Mackenzie, Lee Hillier
and Warrick Harivel.
Harivel, a big red Aussie,
has already surpassed his
scoring pace of last year with
his first try of the year.
Ray Banks completed the
scoring with one penalty kick
and four converts.
UBC coach Donn Spence
appeared pleased with the
performance and commented
after the match: "The pack
was tremendous, they rucked
hard and combined for a solid
team effort."
Dennis Quigley, playing with
a nose injury, played a solid
game at scrum-half despite
being hit in the face early in the
game.
The 'Birds next game is
Saturday against Vancouver
Kats at the UBC rugby fields.
The University of British Columbia
Centre for
Continuing Education
WRITING
IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 1972
Writing Improvement is an 18 hour non-credit program designed
to improve essay writing and composition skills. This program is
open to university and college students of all years, to persons
who are pianning to resume their studies and to those who
generally want to improve their writing for personal or
professional reasons. The course will deal with problems in
writing such as essay organization and structure, sentence
structure and punctuation, as well as special topics including
organization of the long research paper and bibliographic
techniques.
Each week students will be encouraged to bring their assignments
to class for discussion. Classes are small and instruction is
individualized. Students will have an opportunity for writing
practice every week.
Fee: $60 for non-students, $30 for students.
Dates and times: Six Tuesday evenings, 7-10 p.m., beginning
October 10.
Location: Buchanan 3248.
For further information please contact the Education Extension
Department, Centre for Continuing Education, at 228-21 81, local 220.
REGISTRATION FORM
RC 09 FEE: $60, non-students
$30, students
WRITING IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
Name (Mr., Miss, Mrs.)   	
Address	
 Telephone	
Faculty Year	
Please make cheques payable to the University of British Columbia and
mail with this form to: Registrations, Centre for Continuing Education,
University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
THUNDERBIRD
FOOTBALL
U.B.C. Thunderbirds
vs
Univ. of Calgary
SATURDAY, OCT. 7
2 p.m.
THUNDERBIRD STADIUM
General Admission 'I.'0 — U.B.C. Students Free Page   16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6, 1972
Former warden says:
Habit patterns stay
despite jail reforms
By LORRI RUDLAND
Despite many reforms in the
prison system, few efforts are
being made to change the
habit patterns of individuals,
Clinton Duffy, ex-warden of
San Quentin prison, said
Tuesday.
In his 32-year career as a
prison warden he introduced
therapy programs and
Alcoholics Anonymous while
abolishing such things as the'
lash and head-shaving.
"But too may convicts were
still being returned to the pen,"
he told the audience of about
200 in the Hebb building.
Duffy was guest speaker at a
public meeting sponsored by
the UBC prisoner project and
the Seventh Step on prison
reform with seven other panel
members, ranging from B.C.
corrections officers to a
present inmate of Matsqui
correctional institute.
When questioned on his
views of capital punishment,
Duffy affirmed that he is and
always has been totally against
it.
He said it does not have any
deterrent value.
"I feel where you have
capital punishment, you have
more homicides — it's
statistically proven," he said.
"There are more homicides
per 100,000 in the death penalty
states."
Duffy stressed the importance of an organization
like Seventh Step, which is
composed of former and
present inmates and ern
courages self-help therapy in
rehabilitation.
"Men are more willing to
listen to other men who've
been in the same situation," he
said.
Lome, an inmate at Matsqui
correctional institution,
told what the penitentiary was
like.
"There is nothing happening
there — you walk around like a
dead man. Nothing to do. You
feel like a dead man."
He said that in the Seventh
Step meetings, "I had to face
the truth about myself and it
wasn't very pleasant. But I
think I'm partially on the way
back — I'm now working five
days a week."
UBC law professor Mike
Jackson looked at the ways in
which Canada could learn from
Californian prison reforms.
"In California they have an
indeterminate sentence with
the idea being you release the.
inmate when he's
rehabilitated."
But Jackson said there are
more and more prison
rehabilitation programs and
psychologists deciding when
the inmates can be released.
He said more prisoners
were joining programs only to
get out of prison, but that in
California most of the
programs had little effect.
When asked whether self-help
is the only answer, Jackson
said the prisoners are saying
thay are the products of
ghettos, poorer communities,
and low education and they're
trying to work out alternatives
that would be of value to them.
"All we're offering is a
trade, but this is not enough."
He said prison life strips a
person of all responsibility but
"to give a person more
responsibility may be one way
to encourage them to re-enter
society."
He said prisoners should be
given more responsibility in
actually running the prison but
added prison officials would
have to divest themselves of
some of their responsibility
and they might be reluctant to
do this.
Tom Gordon, an ex-convict
and executive director of the
Seventh Step Foundation, told
the audience meetings in
Canada are smaller than those
in the U.S. to allow more
personal involvement. Sex
offenders and "stool pigeons"
aren't allowed to join the
groups.
Gary told a query from the
audience an ex-convict serves
his sentice for the rest of his
life. A credit bureau wouldn't
finance his house because he
was an ex-con, he said.
"But why hide it, they have
their systems of finding out.
You've got to learn to live with
it."
An ex-convict speaking from
the audience claimed: "I don't
believe in Seventh Step or,
anything else. When you decide
to quit doing time, that's it.
"All that counselling can
only help make you a better
behaved convict."
Doug McGregor, director of
Matsqui correctional institution, asked: "How do you
sort out the phonies from the
inmates who are really interested in doing something
with themselves?"
He said at present there are
hot enough members and no
facilities for Seventh Step to
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maintain a separate institution
from prison.
"Like anything else, if we
have an organization with
special status, it attracts the
jerks, goofs, and screwballs."
McGregor stressed the
community role in
rehabilitation, saying that
although some changes can
take place withing the prison,
the best results take place in
the community.
When asked whether Seventh
Step membership has any
bearing on obtaining parole,
Duffy said it was not any one
thing but a pattern of considerations that would help
members get out of proson,
such as learning a trade,
joining a group and personal
behaviour.
Donna Tyndall, representing
the B.C. Association of Non-
Status Indians, said Indians,
made up only ten per cent of
the Canadian population and
yet .the largest per cent of
prisoners.
Addressing her question to
Doug McGregor she said:
"Trudeau agrees that native
people have special
problems — what are you
doing to cope with these
problems?"
McGregor at first said "no
comment" but after some
hissing from the audience, he
added a woman has been
appointed in Ottawa and she is
travelling around to learn
about prison systems.
"Why do they send someone
around to tell us what we
should do? Why don't they send
someone        who knows
something? Why don't they
send an Indian?" asked
Tyndall.
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FREESEE
Sponsored by the Dean of Women's Office
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
Conducted by Kazuyoshi Akiyama
 —PROGRAM ~	
BEETHOVEN: Overture Egmont
MENDELSSOHN:        Symphony No. 4 (Italian)
M. SCHAFER: Canzoni for Prisoners
PROKOFIEV: Romeo and Juliet Suites I and II
1
THURS. OCT. 12  12:45 - 2:15 p.m.
WAR MEMORIAL GYM FREE

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