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The Ubyssey Jan 14, 1982

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Array Vol. LXIV, No. 36
Thursday, January 14,1962
228-2301
THE UBYSSEY
SPECIAL   •REPORT
UBC HITS ROCKS
1 Massive tuition fee hikes of 30%,
giant cutbacks in arts and library
recommended by advisory committee
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
In the quiet of the senate chambers early Wednesday morning,
surrounded by an attentive local
media, UBC administration president Doug Kenny, looking every
inch a bureacrat in his steel grey
suit, leaned forward and snapped
on his microphone.
The audience anticipated the
announcement of the recommendations of the retrenchment committee, a group which has been
working in virtual secrecy since
September, and the subject of
frightening rumors.
"I wish to provide you with a
snapshot of the worsening financial plight of the University of
British Columbia," Kenny read
from a carefully prepared statement.
And with these words he let fall
a fiscal blow which would boost
tuition fees a minimum of 30 per
cent, chop more than $500,000
from the faculty of arts, cut
almost $600,000 from the library's
operating budget and more than
$100,000 from graduate studies if
enacted.
The president's advisory committee on retrenchment has been
working to par at a $7.5 million
shortfall from an already lean
budget. On Wednesday, Kenny
announced the recommendations
which include the following:
• non-faculty budgets be
reduced $3.7 million, including
$12,000 from student health services, $141,000 from extra-
sessional studies and more than $1
million from Physical plant;
• faculty budget be reduced by
$1.9 million, cutting the number
of sessional lecturers' contracts,
"making it difficult to fill faculty
and staff vacancies and impairing
the level of instructional support
to students;"
• tuition fees be increased by
between 30 and 33 per cent totalling $1.85 million in revenue and
boosting the percentage of
students' contribution to the
operating budget to 11.5 per cent
from 9.8 per cent.
Kenny said the provincial
government has refused to give
the university the money to cover
the shortfall, claiming it "isn't in
the till." Kenny said it is obvious
the provincial government has
failed to make post-secondary
education a high priority.
"They're not placing a high
premium on post-secondary
education," he said. "One would
have to watch very closely to see if
that argument holds in other institutions though.
"These are realistic requests
and we've been trying to convince
the provincial government of
that."
And Kenny added coolly that in
an ideal world, there would be no
tuition fee increases, but the administration must be pragmatic
and the increases will comprise
almost 25 per cent of the total
shortfall.
But the administration is willing
to kick in an additional $849,000
for bursaries worth $750 each.
Kenny said the tuition increases
will not limit accessibility to
students, particularly those from
lower income groups.
2 In the face of major entrenchments,
UBC admin and universities ministry
play hot potato with mystery $5.2 million
By GLEN SANFORD
And now for the $5.2 million
question: what does the provincial
government expect UBC to do with
funds originally designated for expansion of the medical faculty?
It's a simple question, but between the universities ministry and
UBC's administration the answer
appears lost.
According to ministry policy
coordinator Jane Burnes, the
government has released the funds
for UBC to use at its own discretion. Meanwhile, UBC's administration president Doug Kenny
insists the money is earmarked for
the medical faculty.
The ministry says the money can
go a long way toward defraying
UBC's $7.5 million funding shortfall. Kenny says the money is completely useless for LIBC's plight.
"The real question is whether the
ministry will allow us to use the
money permanently or if it goes
toward temporary relief," Kenny
says. "I suspect the ministry is saying   it   could   provide   temporary
relief. And temporary relief is just
postponing the issue."
Kenny says UBC received a letter
from the ministry on Dec. 24 with a
cheque for part of the $5.2 million.
The remainder will be paid gradually over the rest of the fiscal year.
"The letter released the money
for medical school expansion,"
Kenny says. "Thre's no confusion
in my mind. The monies are earmarked for medicine and the letter
didn't say the money could be used
for other purposes."
Kenny said he would not comment on the impact an additional
$5.2 million would have on UBC's
fiscal crisis until he received official
confirmation the funds were released.
"But I would be delighted if the
monies could permanently go
toward relieving our financial
burden."
He cautions that the government
must relieve UBC's obligation to
expand the medical faculty before
"Every time we increase tuition
fees, people are concerned there
will be decreases (in the number of
students). We are concerned
about needy students," said Kenny.
The president also assured the
media that students are not
discouraged from attending
university because of increased
tuition fees, but the "needy"
worry about lost income.
Vice-president Michael Shaw
assured the small audience that
the administration "is certainly
aware of that problem."
"If I were a student going to
university,"  said Shaw,"  I cer
tainly wouldn't want to go to a
place where they'd kept tuition
fees low at the expense of the
quality of education."
Companies won't move into the
province if there is not a high level
of university education, Kenny
replied. "They'll stay away if
there are mediocre universities.
"You can't educate a high level
professional person without a
grounding in the humanities."
The arts faculty is facing the
largest cut — almost $600,000.
Kenny said unless courses in the
humanities are available, the
technical professionals wilt also
suffer.
"I worry a great deal about one
KENNY .
the  $5.2   million
university.
"If I were to suddenly use the
monies for other purposes and we
got the go ahead to expand the
faculty, the money would have to
go to that (medicine). And that
doesn't help the funding problem at
all."
UBC is currently expanding the
medical faculty from 80 to 160 first
year students.
. too late for salvation Wednesday morning?
will assist the The provincial government
originally earmarked $8.2 million
for expansion, but UBC used only
$3 million this year. The universities
ministry now says the remaining
$5.2 million can be used at UBC's
own discretion, and claims it informed Kenny of this decision in
late December.
Policy coordinator Burnes also
claims UBC "chose not to tell
anyone about it."
of the recommendations (of cutbacks in the arts) and that will
have to be examined very
closely," said Kenny, who added
he will speak with all the deans
before the recommendations go to
the senate or the board of governors.
Even though Kenny admitted
the situation is frustrating, he
claimed funding priorities currently rest with the provincial government. "Obviously I feel
frustrated, it's very disappointing.
But ultimately it's the provincial
government which makes the funding priorities. I don't view myself
in opposition to the government;
governments come and go."
3 Libraries staff
scramble to deal
with expected cuts
By ARNOLD HEDSTROM
UBC's sacred cow is on the butcher's block.
The university library, already
affected by chronic under funding, will have to cut $564,000
from its operating budget to meet
the retrenchment committee's
proposed cutbacks.
The effect on students and the
university community in the short
run would be reductions in services including reference personnel and material, closing reading
rooms and reducing library hours,
according to the committee
report.
"We can live with it," said acting university librarian Doug
Mclnnes. "Service will be affected. People will notice changes
in hours and our service will be
stretched a little further."
"The library will be a little less
useful," he added.
The library already reduced its
operation this year in anticipation
of fiscal retrenchment but the effects have not been visable said
Mclnnes.
Positions in the cataloguing and
processing areas remained vacant.
Now, facing further cuts, the
library is assessing which positions
can be left vacant and which must
be filled.
"This year, to maintain services, we gave priority to frontline positions like circulation and
reference," Mclnnes said.
However, Mclnnes stressed that
the library can't, for example continue delaying preparation of
books for the shelves.
"The effects won't show up immediately. But in the long term
the reduction could be very
damaging," said Mclnnes. The
decentralized library system is expensive to run and according to
Mclnnes, buildings like the Main
library are labor intensive; staff is
needed in several locations for
security reasons.
The retrenchment proposal will
not immediately affect the collection said Mclnnes. "We can't afford to reduce our collection
budget. It has to be increased."
The budget for new additions to
the collection recently received a
boost from a one-shot grant of
$702,000. But Mclnnes said there
are no assurances for the future.
ARNOLD HEDSTROM PHOTO Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 14,1982
Cxmie. join
<J(L   <U£yiuy.
D ve aLuraul
found Lt
jollu good jun.
IP.   g.   Wodzrlouss
Even famous dead people recognize tha worth
of this rag. So throw away any hesitations and
come visit us, even from the grave, in SUB 241k
SUB, any Monday, Wednesday or Friday from
12:30 p.m. on. Or give us a call at 228-2301, col-
lect.
WILLIAM G. BLACK
MEMORIAL PRIZE
A prize in the amount of $1,000 has been made
available by the late Dr. William O. Black for an
essay on some aspect of Canadian contemporary
society. The topic will be designed to attract
students from all disciplines. The competition is
open to all undergraduate students. A single
essay topic of a general nature related to Canadian contemporary society will be presented to
students at the time of the competition. Duration
of the competition will be three hours.
Time and Place:
SATURDAY, JANUARY 30th, 1982
BUCHANAN 106
10:00 a.m. • 1:00 p.m.
Free gold
Boy, wouldn't that be something. And believe us,
pal, our staff would be the first
in line to pick up that gratis
glittery stuff.
But they'll just have to be
content with serving our 15
gigantic, creative burgers,
super salads and other tasties.
Open 7 days a week,
11:30 a.m. till like late.
2966 West 4th Avenue. And
remember all burgers less than
$500 an ounce.
Committee to Select a
UBC PRESIDENT
Nominations are open for two (2)
Undergraduate Student Positions on
the University Advisory Committee to
select a new President. Nomination
forms are available in SUB 238.
Nominations close Friday, January
15th at 3:30 p.m.
All candidates are requested to attend
the Student Council Meeting on
Wednesday, January 20th at 6:30
p.m.
Non-Credit Courses Instructional Sports Program-Second Term
Registration for all classes will take place during regular office hours at the Intramural and Recreational Sports Office, Room 203, War Memorial Gym, Monday, January 4 — Friday, January IS, 1982
from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Max.
 Section     Day(s) Time Place  Cost Date(s) Number
Course
Code      Course
100       Fitness Division
111 Yoga (Hatha)
112 Yoga (Hatha)
121 Recreational Running
122 Explore UBC Trails
(Intermediate Runner)
131 Strength & Circuit
Training
132 Strength & Circuit
141 Strength & Circuit
Training
142 Strength & Circuit
Training
151 Rhythm Fit (Beg.)
152 Rhythm Fit (Advanced)
153 Rhythm Fit (Drop-in)
154- Rhythm Fit (Drop-in)
01
02
01
02
01
02
01
02
01
02
Tues./Thurs.
Mon./Wed.
Mon./Wed./Fri.
Tues. /Thurs.
Mon./Wed.
Tues./Thurs.
Mon./Wed.
Tues. /Thurs.
Mon./Wed.
Tues./Fri.
Mon./Tues./Thurs.
Friday
Sunday
Sunday
4:30- 6:30 p.m.
5:30- 7:30 p.m.
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
12:30- 2:30 p.m.
4:30- 5:30 p.m.
4:30- 5:30 p.m.
4:30- 5:30 p.m.
4:30- 5:30 p .m.
12:30- 1
4:30- 5
7:30- 8
7:30- 8
30 p.m.
30 p.m.
30 a.m.
30 a.m.
11:30 a.m.-12:30 noon
3:30- 4:30 p.m.
War Mem. Gym
Room 211/213
War Mem. Gym
Room 211/213
War Mem. Gym
War Mem. Gym.
Universal Weight Rm.
War Mem. Gym
Universal Weight Rm.
Universal Weight Rm.
War Mem. Gym
Universal Weight Rm.
War Mem. Gym
Gym B West—Osborne
Gym B—Osborne
Gym B West—Osborne
Gym E—Osborne
Gym B—Osborne
Gym B—Osborne
$15.00
15.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
15.00
15.00
1.00
per session
1.00
per session
Jan. 19-April 1
Jan. 18-Mar. 31
Mar. 1-Mar. 19
Mar. 2-Apr. 1
Jan. 18-Feb. 10
Jan. 19-Feb. 11
Mar. 1-Mar. 24
Mar. 2-Mar. 25
Jan. 18-Apr. 2
Jan. 18-Apr. 2
Jan. 24-Apr. 4
Jan. 24-Apr. 4
40
40
25
25
20
20
20
20
70
70
200       COMBAT SPORTS SECTION
211 Fencing 01 Mon./Fri.
221 Karate (UBC Karate   Club) 01 Tues./Thurs.
Women's Self Defense 01 Tues.
9:30-10:30 p.m.
7:30- 9:00 p.m.
7:00- 8:00 p.m.
Gym E Osborne Ctre.
Gym E Osborne Ctre.
Gym E Osborne Ctre.
10.00
10.00
5.00
Jan. 18-Feb. 26
Jan. 19-Apr. 1
Jan. 19-Mar. 30
16
30
40
300       OUTDOOR PURSUITS SECTION
321 Power Skating 01 Mon./Wed.
(Learn to skate)
322 Power Skating 02 Mon./Wed.
(Hockey Players)
331 Mountain Climbing 01 Thurs.
10:30-11:30 a.m.
11:30 a.m.-l2:30 p.m.
12:30-2:30 p.m.
Winter Sports Ctre.
Hockey Players Ice Rink
Winter Sports Ctre.
Hockey Players Ice Rink
Osborne Ctre.—Rm. 203A
10.00
10.00
10.00
Jan. 18-Mar. 31
Jan. 18-March 31
Mar. 4-Mar. 25
30
30
15
400       TEAM SPORTS SECTION
411 Power Volleyball
(Indiv. & Beginner)
412 Power Volleyball
(Inter. Level for
Teams & Indiv.)
421 Basketball
(Beg. to Inter. Level
For Teams or Indiv.
01
02
01
Tues./Thurs.
Tues./Thurs.
Mon./Wed.
3:30- 4:30 p.m.
3:30- 4:30 p.m.
3:30- 4:30 p.m.
War Memorial Gym
War Memorial Gym
War Memorial Gym
5.00
5.00
5.00
Jan. 19-Feb. 18
Jan. 19-Feb. 18
Jan. 18-Feb. 17
40
40
45
500 RACQUET SPORTS SECTION
512 Tennis (Beginner) 02 Tues./Fri.
513 Tennis (Beginner) 03 Wed.
514 Tennis (Beginner) 04 Monday
515 Tennis (Beginner) 05 Tues./Fri.
541 Badminton (Beg.) 01 Mon./Wed.
542 Badminton (Beg.) 02 Tues./Thurs.
543 Badminton (Inter.) 03 Mon./Wed.
544 Badminton (Inter.) 04 Tues./Thurs.
1:30- 2:30 p.m.
3:30- 4:30 p.m.
8:30-10:30 p.m.
1:30- 2:30 p.m.
1:30- 2:30 p.m.
9:30-10:30 p.m.
1:30- 2:30 p.m.
9:30-10:30 p.m.
Armouries
Armouries
Armouries
Armouries
War Memorial Gym
Gym A—Osborne Ctre.
War Memorial Gym
Gym A—Osborne Ctre.
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
Jan. 19-
Jan. 20-
Feb. 22-
Feb. 23-
Jan. 18-
Jan. 19-
Feb. 22-
Feb. 23-
Feb. 19
Mar. 24
Mar. 22
Mar. 26
Feb. 17
Feb. 18
Mar. 24
■Mar. 25
24
24
24
24
20
20
20
20
600       DANCE SECTION
611 Modern (Beginner)
612 Modern (Beginner)
613 Modern (Inter.)
614 Modern (Inter.)
621 Jazz (Beginner)
622 Jazz (Intermediate)
01
02
03
04
01
02
Tues.
Thurs.
Monday
Wed.
Mon./Wed.
Tues./Thurs.
1:30 3:30 p.m.
1:30- 3:30 p.m.
5:00- 7:00 p.m.
5:30- 7:30 p.m.
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
Armouries Rm 208 15.00
Armouries Rm. 208 15.00
Armouries Rm. 208 15.00
Armouries Rm. 208 15.00
Gym A—Osborne 15.00
Gym B—West Osborne Ctre. 15.00
Jan. 19-Mar. 23
Jan. 21-Mar. 25
Jan. 18-Mar. 22
Jan. 20-Mar. 24
Jan. 18-Mar. 24
Jan. 19-Mar. 25
25
25
22
25
50
50 Thursday, January 14,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Iranians meet in bloody conflict
MONTREAL (CUP) — It was all
over in about an hour, leaving a
fourth-floor lobby in Concordia
University's main building strewn
with broken chairs and pools of
blood.
While bewildered students and
administrators looked on, a group
of Iranian students opposed to
Ayatollah Khomeini's reign clashed
with Khomeini supporters outside a
university meeting room Jan. 4.
Seven people were taken to
hospital, and one man was charged
with possession of a dangerous
weapon; an axe handle.
The fight began shortly after 4
p.m., at what was supposed to have
been a prayer meeting for the Concordia Muslim Students' Association (MSA) but MSA executives say
they didn't call the meeting or book
the room, claiming another group
was responsible.
"They used the name of the
association to book the room, but it
wasn't us," said MSA president
Abdul Rahman.
Ali Arlani, president of the Concordia Iranian Students' Association, said his group heard about the
proposed meeting, and thinking it
would be a forum for government
propaganda, decided to oppose it.
"They called a meeting, but the
whole thing is they come in and
start to advertise about the government," said Arlani. "We have over
200 (Iranian) students in Concordia, the majority of them opposing
the government," he said.
Iranian students opposed to the
Khomeini government began milling around outside the meeting
room early in the day. About 4 p.m.
a group of pro-Khomeini students
charged up the escalator, weilding
sticks and shouting slogans.
The two groups met in the
hallway outside the meeting room,
making barricades with chairs and
tables, and shouting slogans and
then insults at each other. The barricades were later dismantled when
both groups hurled furniture at
each other and several fights broke
out.
University officials say Montreal
police were called in to break up the
riot after university staff could no
longer control the violence.
Arlani said the clash was provoked by the pro-Khomeini group,
which he believes was brought
together by the Muslim Students'
Association in collaboration with
the Iranian embassy in Ottawa. He
said most of the pro-Khomeini
students were not from Montreal,
but came from Ottawa by bus for
the meeting.
Arlani said he saw "members of
the Iranian embassy staff with and
perhaps directing a mob of 80 to
100 people" who marched into the
building. Arlani said the careful
organization of the pro-Khomeini
group and the fact that same-day
news of the clash was carried on
Teheran radio points to Iranian embassy involvement.
A spokesperson for the Iranian
embassy denied his government
was involved in any way.
"No embassy officials were present at the meeting," said Iranian
embassy press officer Mohammed
Fadai. He said the pro-Khomeini
group was not responsible for the
incident.
Arlani said the riot was intended
to draw out Iranian students who
oppose Khomeini, enabling the embassy to identify these people.
"The embassy has recently
denied renewal of three student
passports and will probably deny
renewals to many of the students
who were at the riot," said Arlani.
"Students without passports could
end up being deported to Iran."
Arlani said that if the Canadian
government didn't offer support
there could be dire consequences
for those whose passports are not
renewed. "If they deport one student," said Arlani, "it can be
equalled to just handing him over to
the firing squad or, at the
minimum, to prison."
-arnold hoditrom photo
ADVENTUROUS PEEPING TOM takes a gander at goings on in
monolithic bi-sci building, where bisexuals and cyborgs meet for mutal appreciation sessions. Precariously perched peeper risks all to peer through
looking glass in vain hope of finding inner peace. Foolish Tom, peace is for
rabid political zealots like cutline writers who vent spleens to dismay of
world at large.
Nicaragua still in trouble
By CHRIS WONG
The Sandinista government has failed to solve
many of Nicaragua's problems, a UBC law professor
said Tuesday.
"The revolution has not been able to fulfill its promises. The economy is not at the level that existed
before the revolution and the transportation system is
worse than before," Doug Sanders told 45 people in
Law 178.
The Sandinistas were the leading force in the revolution which overthrew the dictatorial regime of
Anastasio Somoza in 1979.
Sanders, who visited Nicaragua twice last year to attend law conferences, said the cities are characterized
by widespread destruction that was caused by earthquakes and civil war.
"You are struck by the extent of the destruction,"
he said. "Somoza didn't even bother to reconstruct
Managua (after the 1972 earthquake)."
Sanders said the capital city of Managua has an opposing character. "If you look at Managua, it's a city
of contradiction," he said. "You have families living
in ruins and in despite of this, there is some high class
housing and some of the finest restaurants I've ever
eaten in."
The presence of the militia is very apparent
throughout the country, he added. "You are constantly aware of the militia all over the place," Sanders
said. "I was struck by how people are not intimidated
by this at all."
On a more positive note, he said the Sandinista
government is usually open to criticism of its actions.
"Their record clearly has been good in terms of
freedom of opposition groups," said Sanders. "The
extent of criticism of the regime is fairly widespread."
But he also said the newspaper La Prensa was
closed down three times last year for being critical too
of the government. "The closing was related to
specific stories which the government considered
dangerous," Sanders said.
The coalition government, known as the Sandinista
Front for National Liberty, is currently engaged in a
literacy campaign, and is concerned with the standards
of health in the country, Sanders said.
In comparison to other Central American countries
Nicaragua is not a poor country, and because of this
materialist attitudes exist, said Sanders.
"The awareness of North American materialism is
pervasive," he said. "Peoples' views of the good life
are terribly conditioned by the U.S."
Nicaraguans recognize aid that has been sent from
Canada, said Sanders. "The Nicaraguans are conscious of Canada," he said. "They see Canada in a
positive image as compared to the aggressive image of
the U.S."
Fadai rejected claims that student
passports were being delayed.
"There may be some delays
because of the work at the
embassy," he said, but "nothing
happens to people who are active in
counter-revolutionary activities
outside of Iran when they return to
Iran."
Fadai went on to say that the Iranian Students' Association at Concordia follows western ideology,
and accused the group of having
members who worked in the former
Shah's government.
"Some of these are ex-members
of the SAVAK, the Shah's secret
police," said Fadai. He indicated
that they would not have their
passports renewed.
"We do not renew false
passports," he said. "Many of
those so-called students carry false
passports."
Responding to a suggestion that
those who might be deported
because of the Concordia incident
might face charges at home, Fadai
said, "nothing would happen. They
would go home."
UBC to stay open
during TA strike
By NANCY CAMPBELL
For the UBC administration it
will be "business as usual" Friday
Jan. 22, despite a midnight-to-
midnight strike by the Teaching
Assistants Union.
That means about 1,200 payche-
ques will not be distributed until the
following Monday, since the
university will not move the payday
up to Jan. 21. Almost 90 per cent of
the employees due to receive cheques are unionized, and will not be
crossing the TAU picket lines.
"For the university, it will purely
and simply be business as usual that
day," university spokesperson Al
Hunter said Wednesday. "That is
the policy."
Employees who refuse to cross
the picket lines will not be paid for
that day's work, Hunter said.
"People are not being asked to
cross the picket lines. They are being asked to tell their supervisor if
they intend to stay away so that the
necessary paperwork can be taken
care of," he said. It is still unclear
whether the Student Union
Building will be closed down Jan.
22. Alma Mater Society employees
who are members of the Office and
Technical Employees Union will
not be crossing picket lines, according to shop steward Sue Cooper.
But AMS general manager
Charles Redden did not know if
other SUB activities such as the Pit
will be affected. "That's up to
council to decide at its next
meeting," he said. The Pit
employees are not unionized.
The TAU will ask student council
at its Jan. 20 meeting to support the
strike. An earlier request for support was turned down by council at
its December meeting.
The arts undergraduate society
voted unanimously Tuesday to support the TAU. Said arts representative Peter Goddard: "Given as
TAs are essential for the quality of
education for undergraduate
students and indeed the university
as a whole, the AUS thinks it's in
the best interest of Ihe university to
give the TAs a fair deal. We are
supporting the TAs to that end."
During the strike buses will not
enter the immediate campus
because the Amalgamated Transit
Union is honoring the TAU picket
lines. The Ubyssey will not publish
Jan. 22, and four other groups are
supporting the TAU strike.
Council agrees to
March referendum
The Ubyssey staff will push for a
March referendum to give the paper
financial autonomy from student
council, a Ubyssey representative
told council Tuesday.
Ubyssey staff member Arnold
Hedstrom, at a special council
meeting to discuss Ubyssey
autonomy, said the newspaper staff
voted Saturday to postpone the
referendum, originally scheduled
for January. The January date
would have coincided with Alma
Mater Society executive elections
and two other referenda.
Council agreed to postpone the
referendum vote until March.
Council also endorsed the principle of an editorially and financially
autonomous Ubyssey newspaper
last week. A motion was passed
Tuesday allowing The Ubyssey
"appropriate and reasonable" consultation with AMS lawyers on
drafting a constitution, by-laws and
referendum for the proposed
Ubyssey Publications Society.
Hedstrom said the newspaper
staff decided to postpone the vote
to allow time to finalize a proposed
constitution. The delay will also
allow a better and more organized
campaign to convince students of
the benefits of a free press at UBC,
he said.
He added the staff felt the two
weeks remaining before the AMS
elections was not sufficient time to
finish the work necessary present a
complete package for students to
vote on.
The March referendum will ask
students to support the formation
of a separate Ubyssey Publications
Society, with a $4 annual fee levy.
The board of directors of the new
society would look after the running of the newspaper, and would include representatives from the
newspaper staff and students
elected at large.
The AMS is currently the
Ubyssey's publisher.
Graduate studies representative
Rob Cameron told council
members they should consider what
to do with the current $3 subsidy
the AMS now gives the paper if the
Ubyssey gains autonomy. Councillors should consider whether to
hold a referendum to lower the
AMS free or to redirect the revenue,
he said.
Council members expressed concern that conflicts existed between
the constitution of the AMS and the
proposed Ubyssey Publications
Society. The additional time before
the vote would help solve these problems, councillors said. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 14,1982
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THE UBYSSEY
January 14, 1982
Published Tuesdays. Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Aima Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising,
228-3977.
it was cutback day at The Ubyssey. City editor Muriel Draaisma announced to a shocked staff that the budget was being cutback by $7.40, and membership
fees would increase 300 per cent. Craig Brooks and Eric Eggertson said it made no difference to them, while Tom Hawthorn counted the beer bottles in stock.
Arnold Hestrom and Glen Sanford took out their notepads and took notes, while Nancy Campbell agonized over butt-out day. Julie Wheelwright took out the
editing pencil and started cutting away at everything in sight. Sean Lafleur, still in shock at joining the paper, asked if he was going to be cut from staff. Kevin
McGee and Brian Jones reasured the rookie reporter, while Shaffin Sharrrff thought his movie review might be cut. Chris Wong sat back and relaxed, waiting
for the inevitable murder of the new and now outgoing city editor.
Future shock
Shock. Normally an overused word, shock is inadequate to describe the
reaction permeating every layer of academic life today as a result of the
recommended budget slashes Wednesday.
For months now we have all seen the writing on the wall: the possible
closure of six universities in Ontario by the end of the decade, the poorly
veiled threats from the provincial government to strengthen professional
schools at the expense of the arts, the 22.7 per cent tuition increase at
Simon Fraser University, the almost paranoid secretiveness surrounding
the president's retrenchment committee.
The waiting is over.
For UBC has now taken what can only be an irrevocable step towards
second-class, elitist, professionally-oriented education.
Second class because the support services needed to maintain an institution of integrity will take a $3.7 million blow from which recovery, if it
ever happens, will be a slow and arduous process.
Elitist because a minimum 30 per cent tuition hike, despite any increase
in bursaries, can only serve to deter prospective students from entering
UBC at any level, and is a harbinger of further hikes.
Professionally-oriented because the faculty cuts are directed almost exclusively at arts and the humanities, merely scatching engineering and
commerce — the two areas the Socreds see as the great white hope for
B.C.
Quite simply, it is sad UBC has had to come to this state of affairs in
order to survive.
The Socreds' fetish for a balanced budget, professionally-run society
has harmed many institutions throughout the province, but none more
than the institution of education. It is a right of the people — not a toy for
incompetent politicians.
It's a damn shame this had to happen to bring us to the realization that
the Socreds are deadly serious in their mission to cripple education. Ifs
time to fight, with all our resources. Don't let it happen.
UBC parasites: get the red out
By BILL TIELEMAN
A spectre is haunting UBC — the
spectre of parasitism.
Anyone at UBC who has attended any progressive event in the past
few months on campus must be
aware of the unpleasant appearance
of one of the worst types of parasite
imaginable: the 'proletarian
vanguard party' pest.
These parasites, recognized by
their wildly flapping newspapers
and strange calls of enticement, are
pathetic creatures, for they can exist
only by attaching themselves to the
activities of others, lacking any
flock of their own.
Although sometimes fed by
misguided liberals, ultimately the
parasites must be banished if genuinely progressive activities are to
perspectives
flourish. The dangers of letting
parasites get out of hand can be best
illustrated with some recent examples at UBC:
• When two student leaders of
the opposition forces in El Salvador
came to speak to 300 UBC students
in the SUB auditorium, a plague of
Trotskyist Leaguers descended on
the microphones, subjecting the innocent students to a banal, condescending and uninspiring 10
minute tirade on the 'class struggle'
etc., and attacking the two students
for not demanding the blood bath
of a 'full military victory' in their
troubled country. Fortunately some
fast thinking students warded the
Trots off with shouts of 'Get out
the icepicks', always more effective
than Raid.
• At a Students for an Accessible Education forum, different
parasites competed for attention.
One such pest, of the CPC (ML)
species, denounced the SAE as
'cynical bureaucrats' (myself
among the grouping) and demanded the revolution commence with
the issuance of . . .a petition. Not
to be outdone, the Trotskyist contingent outlined its radical aims on
education, to yawns from the
masses. Luckily once again students
dispersed the pests forthwith.
• While teaching assistants were
holding a strike vote to attempt to
force the UBC administration to offer a decent contract, who should
descend from the clouds but a
swarm of Trots (i.e. three of them),
complete   with,   revolutionary
paraphernalia to push upon the
downtrodden proles. Despite requests from TA Union representatives the party of the workers
refused to leave, intent on intimidating anyone attempting to
vote.
Having by this time determined
that parasites are harmful, I attempted to convince them their
presence was odious. Never quick
to take a hint, they persisted, forcing me to tell them that basically,
"Everyone on this campus hates
you." Instantly I realized my
mistake and amended my statement
to include, "except the masses —
they love you," in case I had been
too harsh. Needless to say, they
agreed with my analysis, begrudg-
ingly.
As I say, parasites are hard to
shake and true to form they were
back a few days later, demanding
time to address our TAUnion
meeting on the latest threat to a
Trotskyist future. We were forced
to decline their kind offer, noting
their failure to even acknowledge
our admonishments on their exploits of the previous week.
• Finally, I note that the League
has now resorted to calling
demonstrations inside newspaper
offices, The Ubyssey's to be
precise. I presume this is to ensure
they have an audience of some size,
the paper's dozen staffers no doubt
being the largest crowd they've
played to yet in their unceasing efforts to win over the UBC masses or
working classes, take your choice.
I'm relatively happy to see them remain in your office, being secure
that few converts are to be won
among the lumpen bourgeoisie
typically writing there, though if
they take over the only article I'll
read from Comrade Leon's
devotees is the annual report on the
turkey trot run.
One hopes this primer on
parasites will be enough to convince
UBC students that such pests must
go. Further to that I have some suggestions on how to dislodge these
ideological silver fish:
• Never accept their pamphlets
or buy their papers or buttons. It
only encourages them. I've found
the best response to their approaches is to reply with something
like: "Vanguard parties suck,"
"Why aren't you out organizing
workers and peasants?" or "Where
do you get all the money to print up
this stuff anyway?" Don't wait for
the reply.
• If parasites attack your progressive event, don't be afraid to
tell them to shut up and leave. Only
liberals listen to idiots. And if they
claim to want to ask your speaker a
question,   remember   that   the
parasites really only have answers.
• Make it clear to people coming to your event that the parasites
are neither invited nor wanted.
Many students mistakenly believe
that these parasites are actually running or organizing the event and
therefore don't attend. By definition alone, parasites are unable to
hold their own events.
• Never, I repeat, never sign a
petition presented to you by a
parasite. Regardless of their apparent good intentions, these petitions are simply cynical manipulations and attempts to give the
parasites a veneer of credibility they
could not otherwise achieve. If you
are unwise enough to include your
address expect to receive their
literature in the mail for years.
The basic problem with vanguard
parasites is their failure to transcend
beyond spouting rigid dogma in
order to actually offer something to
people. I can think of no one better
able to outline the reasons for their
failings, and thus parasitism, than
Karl Marx. He wrote:
"We do not say to the world:
'Stop fighting; your struggle is of
no account. We want to shout the
true slogan of the struggle at you.'
We only show the world what it is
fighting for, and consciousness is
something the world must acquire,
like it or not. . . ."
"Our motto must therefore be:
Reform of consciousness not
through dogmas, but through
analyzing the mystical consciousness, the consciousness which
is unclear to itself, whether it appears in religious or political
form."
Given the difficulty of reasoning
with the unreasonable I suggest
students simply discourage the
parasites wherever possible.
(As a postscript, I apologize in
advance to Ubyssey readers for triggering what will no doubt be a
deluge of outraged howlings from
the offended vanguard. The only
sensible response is to read it and
laugh, or simply laugh.)
Bill Tieleman is a political science
graduate student when he isn't
rousing the masses on campus.
Tieleman is also a former Ubyssey
staffer who knows that all perspectives must be triple spaced,
typewritten on a 70 space margin.
Perspectives is a column of opinion,
wit, wisdom, news, views, etc. Thursday, January 14,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Realistic environmentalist fights Fulker
Chris Fulker's diatribe against
B.C. Hydro and environmentalists
in Damn damn dam (Jan. 7) indicates an attitude towards the environment which is totally
undemocratic, and therefore would
never obtain. Most realistic environmentalists have other ideas.
Fulker tells us that criticizing
B.C. Hydro's energy demand
forecasts is a "cop-out". This is a
dangerously naive and ill-informed
view, one which B.C. Hydro is no
doubt quite pleased to see in print.
B.C. Hydro's forecasts are suspect.
They are significantly higher than
the forecasts of the provincial
government. Jay Lewis, Society for
Pollution and Environmental Control economist, has shown that B.C.
needn't increase its overall electrical
demand between now and the turn
of the century, while still improving
the standard of living of our citizens
and the health of our economy.
This involves carefully choosing the
most appropriate energy source to
do a specific task, and using nonrenewable energy sources to build a
"bridge" to an economy using only
renewable sources.
I also argue against the arrogant
attitude that most people in B.C.
don't care about the environment,
but are simply interested in beer and
pretzels — the 'proles', who want
only bucks, and who are the class
that environmentalists are "fighting
against". First, I believe that most
people do care about the environment, and second, environmentalists are not fighting against these
people anyway.
The widespread concern for the
environment is seen in many examples. Polls show that the public
is very concerned about toxic
wastes, energy supply, transportation, housing, agricultural and
forest-land productivity, wilderness
preservation, and global problems
like acid rain and ozone layer depletion. Witness also the strength of
opposition to James Watt, the anti-
environment U.S. secretary of the
interior, and the European
response to the nuclear arms race
(the ultimate environmental issue).
Environmental law has become an
important field. Certainly, more
people should be actively involved
in improving the environment, and
environmental laws should have
more teeth, but we have made a
good beginning.
Statements such as those made
by Fulker are actually an obstacle to
environmental progress. People are
of course concerned with their
quality of life. Improving it is the
driving impetus of culture. The
main reason to upgrade the environment is to enhance the opportunities for culture to grow and
become ever more beautiful,
dynamic, and just. The view that to
have a healthy environment means
that Canadians must shiver in the
dark alienates people who want to
create and enjoy a better culture.
Instead, the environmentalist seeks
to include a concern for thrift and
consideration into people's sense of
a quality life.
Trying to change people's values
in this way is definitely not fighting
them.   Environmentalists   try   to
make available the information
and analysis which will allow people
to make decisions in their own interest (which I believe means improving the quality of their
habitat). In setting social (and personal) policy on land and resource
management, if a careful and comprehensive cost-benefit analysis is
done, then the policy can strike the
appropriate balance between
economic growth and environmental preservation. This would be a
policy of progress.
The main topic of Fulker's article
was land use. He said that land
must be respected. Of course. But
respect is a rational as well as emotional judgment. Some habitats
must be left alone (preserved) absolutely, for if they are disturbed,
then perhaps threatened species will
go extinct, or valuable natural
systems (e.g. watersheds, estuaries)
will be disrupted. In other instances, the appropriate type of
land use must be chosen, e.g. housing vs. farming, farming vs.
forestry, or salmon spawning and
farming and wilderness vs.
hydroelectricity, and based on the
choice, the impact on the land must
be minimized. This is true respect.
The land and its resources are our
habitat, so we must use them well.
We must ensure that land and
resource policy creates an enduring
economy, and an enduring relationship to the land.
Fulker made four suggestions
about land-and resource-use at the
end of his essay. The firsc (firm control of land use) is very good; the
ALR is consistent with is, and zon-
Board must address difficult
financial questions on student aid
The board of governors is the ruling administrative body at UBC. At
present, it has the difficult task of
balancing the university's budget.
Since the government has refused to
give UBC an additional $7 million
to meet an anticipated shortfall, the
board will be forced to cut back on
budgets that are already minimal at
best.
What should be the priorities of
the board in the immediate future?
The board should work diligently
ly at improving the university's
public image. Unfortunately, I
would suspect that the university is
perceived by the business sector as
being an antiquated institution and
by the general populace as a place
where the rich kids learn how to get
richer. These images are highly
counterproductive to the
university's attempt to obtain a
reasonable level of funding. The
university will successfully lobby
for sufficient funding only with
demonstrated public support.
The board must also expend considerable energy in searching for a
successor to current UBC president
Doug Kenny. The importance of
having a competent president cannot be overemphasized. A president, in her/his term of office, will
necessarily have a profound influence upon the direction of the
university. The successful candidate
must be able to lend credibility to
the concept that the university
serves as an invaluable resource to
society. The new president has to
receive the respect and support of
faculty members and students alike
and must be unwavering in the
quest to develop a university of
world class stature. Although this
position will not be easily filled, the
repercussions will be serious if any
compromise is made in the selection
process.
Recently, the universities
ministry has been exerting pressure
on the universities to prepare to expand in select professional programs at the expense of the
humanities and liberal arts programs. Clearly, the board would be
doing the university a great disservice if it yielded to this pressure.
The whole concept of the university
system revolves around the fact that
there are a great variety of academic
pursuits and research interests. A
university without a significant contribution from the humanities, fine
arts, and social sciences is stagnant
and predictable. Society requires
imaginative, environmentally-
conscious, progressive innovators
rather than the narrow-minded,
number-crunching technocrats that
Victoria would like to see produced.
An issue of great concern to most
students is the question of accessibility to a university education.
With respect to tuition fees, I would
think the board would not be remiss
if it adopted the idea that increases
should be limited to what the
students can reasonably afford.
Suggestions have been made by the
present student BOG representatives that tuition fee increases be
in the order of the rate of inflation
and I would concur with this. Bearing in mind that housing costs are
exhorbitant, well paid job opportunities will be scarce this summer,
and student loan programs are
often a limited "band-aid" remedy,
tuition fee increases much higher
than the rate of inflation will force
a great many students to discontinue their studies. Some work
should be done at addressing the
financial difficulties that face
students who reside a great distance
from the greater Vancouver area.
The cost for these students of moving to UBC to study is significantly
higher than for a lower Mainland
students.
The election for student representatives to the Board Of Governors
will take place Jan. 18 and Jan. 19.
I am running as a candidate for one
of the two student positions because
I sincerely believe I have the ability
to present an informed, rational
viewpoint to the board. I also
believe that I have the ability to
evaluate complex issues and form a
realistic opinion on the basis of
careful research and discussion. I
am presently serving on the president's advisory committee on student services and on the Alma
Mater Society elections committee.
I would ask that students take
note of who the candidates are and
listen to their comments on the
various issues. Please make a
special effort to remember to vote
on Jan. 18 (advance polls at the
residences) or Jan. 19 (polls at major buildings). The student
representatives can make a valuable
impact if students show their support and concern.
Francis Janes
candidate board of governors
ing laws and urban planning could
be used to better effect. The second
(persuading or forcing people to
lower their standard of living) is
democratically unviable, and
wouldn't work even under a benign
dictatorship. Consumption can be
lowered, however, through appropriate incentives and legislation,
without lowering the lifestyles of
any but the grossly wasteful. I am
suspicious of the third suggestion
(artificial limits on gasoline and
food, etc. imports). The fourth, a
moratorium on energy and resource
developments in the province, were
two of the resolutions that came out
of the ENGO (Environmental Non-
Sparkling
beckon
History students of UBC, unite!
That's it — out of the academic
mothballs in a formerly forgotten
closet springs the History Students'
Association. Other than threats of
bodily harm or the offer of illegal
drugs, what would drive history
students (and soon-to-be history
students) to join the HSA?
In the upcoming months, the
HSA will present various academic
and social functions guaranteed to
have you think about the Belgian
Revolution of 1830 and Cabernet
Sauvignon for months. The newly-
created Forum for Current Work in
the Faculty will give you a chance to
hear about the current research being performed by professors or
listen to their ideas on historical
subjects which haven't been offered
in class (perhaps due to their mature
nature?). The first forum will be
presented by Dr. Fritz Lehmann,
renowned for his unique lecturing
style in such courses as History 202
and 314. This Thursday at noon in
Buch 102 he will dissect our nation
in Moral Economy and Capitalism
in 19th Century Canada. Students
from all faculties are invited to attend. The HSA hopes to present
further forums every two to four
weeks.
For those of you who enjoy consuming such domestic grape-
concoctions as Sparkling Baby
Sneakers and then offering unsolicited opinions on the fall of the
Roman Empire, our wine and
cheese parties are just the thing.
Whether you want to tear apart a
fellow student's essay while his
mind is in a grape-fog or just have a
good time while plotting a revolu-
HAPPY
BIRTHDAY
Cathy
from
Jude & Megan
STUDENT BOARD - SENATE
CANDIDATES WILL SPEAK
THURSDAY, JANUARY 14,
12:30 Sub Conversation Pit
CIITR-UBC RADIO
will provide music from 12:00
Governmental Organization) conference in October 1981, in which
the UBC Environmental Interest
Group participated.
Environmentalism is a positive
social movement. It wants to bring
about a healthier habitat, and a
society that is happier and more just
because it lives in better harmony
with its environment. It is also a
keenly practical movement, realizing that achieving its goals requires
many small steps. I urge Chris
Fulker, and everyone else — help us
take those steps!
Arle Kruckeberg
vice-president
environmental interest group
Sneakers
to all
tion, be sure to come to our gala,
premiere wine and cheese party this
Friday at 3:30 p.m. in the Proviate
Room of the Graduate Student
Centre. Don't be intimidated by the
location — just stomp in there like
you own the joint and we will place
a glass of wine in your hand for the
outrageously small sum of $248.75
(my car payments, you know). All
history students should drop by, as
well as those of you who are intending to enter the history program.
Naturally, other events will be
staged, possibly a guest lecturer
series, but the HSA executive
hasn't told me about them. So join
up and find out what we will be doing in the months to come.
Randy Lane
1 propaganda section, HSA
ONLY AT
FELLINI'S
WILD
ELEPHANT'S
FOOT SOUP
(When available)
•GREAT SANDWICHES
• FABULOUS CHEESECAKES
• CAPPUCCINOS • ESPRESSOS
• NANAIMO BARS
Located at the back of the Village
on Campus Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 14, 1982
Tween Classes
i
TODAY
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 125.
SPEAKEASY AND STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
Nutritionist available for consultation, 11:30 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m.. Speakeasy area on SUB concourse. Until Jan. 22-
CLA88ICS CLUB
RehersaL noon, Buch. 2225. New chorus
members welcome.
BOARD AND SENATE CANDIDATES
Campaign speeches and question period, noon,
SUB conversation pit. CITR will provide music
from the outside world's noon until UBC'a
noon.
HISTORY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Fritz Lehmann speaki on Moral economy and
capitalism in 19th century Canada, noon, Buch.
102.
PRE DENTAL SOCIETY
Dr. Swanson speaks on oral and maxillofacial
surgery, noon, IRC 1.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for winter classes, noon, SUB216E.
Registration on Friday also.
INTRAMURALS
Referee club meeting, 1:30 p.m.. War Memorial
gym room 211. Volleyball, basketball and hockey
refs needed. Old hands please attend,
newcomers welcome.
Corec volleyball drop-in, 7:30 p.m.. War
Memorial gym.
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 206.
EISA
General meeting, noon, SUB 117.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Bible study, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
TOASTMASTERS/LAW SCHOOL ADVOCATS
Toasting,   I   guess,   1   p.m.,  SUB  chambers.
Everyone welcome.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Prayer meeting, noon, SUB 113.
COMMITTEE ON LECTURES
FOR MEDIEVAL STUDIES
Grenville G. Astill speaks on Medieval and early
modern gentry, 3:X p.m., Buchanan penthouse.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
For or against by Mike Matson, noon, Hebb 12.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Social justice meeting, panel followed by discussion, noon, St. Marie's. Meet at Speakeasy if an
escort is necessary.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, noon, Buch. 222.
IVCF
Gene Thomas speaks, noon, Chem. 250.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
German conversational meeting, 7:30 p.m., International House.
COMMITTEE AGAIN8T RACIST
AND FASCIST VIOLENCE
Literature  table  and  discussion,   noon,   SUB
foyer.
MUSSOC
South   Pacific,   entire   cast   (no   Emile   and
children), 7 p.m., SUB 125.
B.C. PIRG
Petition headquarters, 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Pick
up a petition.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
General meeting, 1:30 p.m., Henry Angus room
321. Fund raising activities will be discussed.
Safety seminar scheduled for Jan. 21.
COMMITTEE TO VIGOROUSLY
OPPOSE COMMITTEES
I; is forbidden to forbid I Death to Bob and Doug
Mackenzie!, all day, SUB 241K.
FRIDAY
MUSLIM STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Muslim Juma (Friday prayers), all Muslims are
requested to attend, noon. International House.
TROTSKYIST LEAGUE CLUB
Marxist literature and discussion, noon,
SUB foyer.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation hour and meeting, noon, main
lounge, International House.
INTRAMURALS
Final registration for women's basketball league,
volleyball league, suppertime softball tourney,
men's curling league, rugby tournament by 4
p.m., room 203, War Memorial gym.
WUSC
Meeting with Bill Mac Neil, executive director of
WUSC in Ottawa. Good chance to find out more
about WUSC, its policies and its programs,
noon. International House, board room upstairs.
WARGAMERS
Bzzr/diplomacy nite, everyone welcome, 6:30
p.m., SUB 212.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Come and have some fun at our games night. Bring games, friends, etc., 7 p.m. - 12 p.m., SUB
207/209.
COMMITTEE ON LECTURES -
FOR MEDIEVAL STUDIES
Professor Grenville G. Astill, University of
Reading speaks on "Archaeology of a Medieval
English Monastery: Industry at B or dealey
Abbey", noon, buchanan 102.
WOMEN GYMNASTICS
Thunderette gymnastics meet, U of Alberta versus U of Calgary, 6 p.m., Osborne centre, gymnastics gym,
WOMENS VOLLEYBALL
Thunderette volleyball tournament, 7 p.m. and
all day Saturday, War Memorial gym.
IVCF
Evangelism workshop — "Jesus the Friend",
Gene Thomas speaks. For more info, contact
Doug Rintoul at 734-0643, Friday eve and Saturday, not sure where.
SATURDAY
CVC
"The beet goes on" — first dance of the year, 8
p.m. — 1 a.m., SUB partyroom.
CHESS CLUB
U.B.C. chess championship winner for 1982
U.B.C. chess team. Entry fee $1.00 members,
13.00 non-members, combined membership plus
entry fee $5.00 for new members. Registration at
she 9 a.m. - 10 p.m., SUB 207/209.
INTRAMURALS
Men's Totem tennis tournament — round III, 10
a.m. - 6 p.m., Armouries.
SUNDAY
CHESS CLUB
U.B.C. chess club charppjonship continues, 9
a.m. - 10 p.m., SUB 207/209.
AFRICAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Organizational meeting, 2 p.m., SUB 215.
U.B.C. CYCLING CLUB
Bike ride, mett south of SUB, 9 a.m.
MONDAY
INTRAMURALS
Final registration for men's bookstore 3 - on - 3
basketball tournament by 3:30 p.m. War
Memorial Gym, room 203.
Press conference for the Grouse Mountain
Slalom Ski Challenge, noon, Mary Murrin
lounge. Gage residence.
TUESDAY
PRE-MED SOC
Film presentation on acupuncture, noon, IRC 1.
LSLAP SUB CLINIC
Law students give free legal assistance and
lawyer referrals, noon (12:30 p.m.) to 2 p.m.,
SUB 111.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Video presentation on The consumption
assumption, noon, Centre for Human Settlements library, library processing centre near
Woodward Library.
COMMITTEE TO EXPLAIN WHY
12:30 P.M. IS NOON AT UBC
Who knows, forever, eveywhere on campus.
WEDNESDAY
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Soiree avec vin, fromage et musique, 6:30 p.m.,
Cecil Green. Tickets are $5 for members, $6 for
non-members and are available at the AMS box
office, the French department or the French
club.
INTRAMURALS
Final registration for men's racquetball tournament round III, wrestling tournament, corec
bowling and pizza night, outdoor adventure
snowshoeing at Mount Seymour, 3:30 p.m..
War Memorial gym room 203.
[
I
Hot Flashes
A, B, BI2, C, D
and other*
Can't get enough B12 in your
life? Has the big freeze in Florida
prevented you from getting 500
mgs of Vitamin C everyday?
An unidentified nutritionist
(rumor has it that Madame Benoit
will make an appearance) will be at
the Speakeasy desk in SUB today, tomorrow, and all next week.
The Big Mac cook-off starts at
11:30 a.m., and continues for two
hours. Bring the special sauce.
History moot*
This one should make history.
Wine and cheese party Friday 3:30
in the private dining room at the
Graduate Student  Centre.   Spon
sored by the History Students'
Association (isn't school enough
for these keeners? is it really
necessary to form an association?).
Anway, all students are invited, not
just history majors. Good thing too,
history majors are so insufferably
dull.
Hacks spout
Come to the all candidates
meeting at noon and find out.
You will have the pleasure of
listening to at least an hour of
bullshit wafting through the air in
the SUB conversation pit today.
Your hairs
on fire
Okay, so the headline's a lie.
But while you're here
just imagine our 15 monstrous,
gigantic, scrumptious, creative
burgers; our huge, crunchy
salads, and other great stuff, too!
Yummy.
2966 West 4th Avenue at
Bayswater. Open 7 days a week,
from 11:30 a.m. till God knows
when.
Now the truth: there's a
hamster in your pants.
EARN
512,000
PER MONTH
IN YOUR SPARE
TIME
Then come and
spend a little of it at
FELLINI'S
GREAT
SANDWICHES,
FABULOUS
CHEESECAKES,
CAPPUCCINOS,
ESPRESSOS,
NANAIMO BARS
Located at the back of the Village
on Carhpus
GRAD CLASS
GIFT PROPOSALS
Are now being accepted. The proposed gifts
and/or projects should provide a service to the
University community or community at large. Proposals must include:
a) the name of the group requesting funds
b) the nature of the gift or project
c) whether the proposal is a gift or project
d) the amount of funding sought
e) a brief discription of the proposal and the planned allocation of the funds
Deadline for applications is noon February 1st.
Send applications to Box 118 in SUB. Late applications will not be accepted. Proposals are selected
by vote by all 1982 UBC Graduates.
HELP YOURSELF
FREE WORKSHOPS TO ENHANCE
ACADEMIC AND PERSONAL SKILLS
1. TIME MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP:
A two hour introduction to the time management planning.
2. STUDY SKILLS WORKSHOPS:
A program to assist students in developing more effective
study methods.
3. CAREER EXPLORATIONS:
A series of workshops to assist in exploring the process of
career decision making
4. PERSONAL GROWTH:
Small group workshop to help define personal goals, set
plans to reach them and practice new behaviours with the
support of other interested persons
5. ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING:
Six session experiential workshop designed to develop
basic assertive skills
6. SELF DEVELOPMENT ORIENTATION GROUPS:
There will be orientation meetings for students wishing to
discuss the concepts involved in various self development
programs. Arrangements will be made for individual follow
up programs.
Stress Management
Self Control
Personal Problem Solving Strategies
Study Skill Program Development
All programs are free and voluntary. Interested students
should sign up at
STUDENT COUNSELLING & RESOURCES CENTRE
ROOM 200, BROCK HALL
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $2.00; additional lines, BBc.
Commercial - 3 tines, 1 day $3.83; additional lines
56c. Additional days $3.30 and 50c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance, headline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Off ice, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
5 — Coming Events
70 — Services
CUSO
1982 Development
Education Series
Starts: Tuesday, January 19th at
7:30 p.m. and runs every Tuesday until March 9th.
Place:    International    House,
U.B.C.
A series of discussions accompanied by audio-visuals, on why
after thirty years of Development the people of the Third
World are still poor.
For more information phone:
228-4886 (a.m.).	
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS: A store full of ski
wear, hockey equipment, sleeping bags,
jogging shoes, soccer boots, racquets of all
kinds, and dozens of other items at very attractive prices. 3615 W. Broadway.
EXPERIENCED UBC typist will type your
thesis, papers, manuscripts fast and accurate. Call 946-2185.
MODE COLLEGE of barbering and hair-
styling. Student hairstyle, $8.50. Body
wave, $17.00 and up. 601 W. Broadway,
874-0633.
COMPLIMENTARY HAIRCUT. Have your
hair cut and styled by students under expert
supervision. Phone 733-7795.
80 — Tutoring
COMPOSITION SPECIALIST will tutor
native speakers with writing problems or
edit. Ms. in humanities. 228-1382.
85 — Typing
11
For Sale — Private
WATERBED, SINGLE. Frame, heater, liner
and mattress, $225. Call Dave at 224-0104.
15 — Found
FOUND: Racquetball racquet, Jan. 5 near
hospital. To claim call 228-3977.
ESSAYS, THESES. MANUSCRIPTS, including technical, equational, reports, letters resumes. Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
SPECIALIZING in academic typing. Fast,
dependable, top refs. North Vancouver.
Iona Brown, 985-4929.
WORD PROCESSING Specialists for
theses, term papers, resumes, during
regular office hours or evenings/weekends
if arranged in advance. 736-1208.
THESIS TYPING: Micom word processing.
IBM Selectric, $1.25 page. Equation typing
capability. Pick up and delivery. Call Jeeva
at 826-5169 (Mission). Monday-Thursday
after 6:00 p.m.
20 — Housing
ROOM AND BOARD for non-smoking
student in Kerrisdale in exchange for some
housekeeping. 263-9198.
30 - Jobs
INTRAMURAL REFEREES needed for
men's and women's basketball, volleyball
and hockey. $5.00-$7.50 game. Interested
- see Larry, WMG 211 (228-2203).
EXPERT TYPING: essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
TYPING: $1 per page. Legible copy. Fast,
accurate, experienced typist with IBM
Selectric. Gordon, 873-8032 (after 10 a.m.).
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence, etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric. Call 736-4042.
35 — Lost
90 - Wanted
40 — Messages
50 — Rentals
SUBLET one bedroom apt. Furnished. Kitsilano. Single quiet person only. $375 month.
733-8861. From Jan. 17 to April 30.
BABYSITTER required on occasional weekend and weekday evenings for 4 and 6 year
old. Five min. from Gage Towers.
References required. 224-11X.
SQUASH PLAYER looking for partners.
Average ability. Call Brian at 228-0317 after
6 p.m. Thursday, January 14,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
I I
-A DOCUMENTARY FILM
See
this shocking expose of conditions in the
Soviet Union. Filmed with hidden cameras. Of interest to Christians — Jews — Advocates of
Human Rights.
BUCHANAN 102 - 12:30 p.m.
I Tuesday, Jan.19
_i i__
i
-roac burnatt photo
Orient thyself mortal
By ROSS BURNETT
"Orienteering is the ultimate
sport because it is primarily a personal challenge in a natural outdoor
environment." So says Mark
McMillan, Canadian junior mens
orienteering champion.
(sports)
His is a common view of those
addicted to this little known (in this
neck of the woods) sport. To put it
in another perspective, consider
what one veteran of the sport once
said: You can't attract hikers to the
sport because they're not competitive and you can't attract runners because they're, afraid to go
out in the woods.
In a nutshell, orienteering involves navigation through unknown
terrain using a map and compass.
On a competitive level this involves
completing a set course, punching
in at a series of checkpoints located
at intervals on the course.
These checkpoints, called controls, are placed at natural or man-
made features that are represented
on the map by various symbols. The
controls must be visited in order but
the route a competitor takes from
one control to the next is entirely up
to him or her.
This route choice is really the
basis of the sport. A good runner
may take a longer but safer route on
trails whereas a good map-reader
may try a more direct but riskier
route following a compass bearing.
But, as McMillan says, the latter
is a lot easier said than done. "It's a
game of interpreting the map as you
go, making sure that the terrain
around you is doing what the map
says it should be doing. Once you
lose contact with the map it's very
easy to get lost."
You're never lost for long
though. Orienteering events are
usually held in areas with many
'catching features' such as roads,
trails or lakes. The maps that are
used are large scale, highly detailed
maps that have been prepared
specifically for orienteering.
Besides the contours, roads and
buildings that are drawn on government topographic maps, small
trails, vegetation boundaries, fences
and even large boulders are shown
on orienteering maps, allowing the
competitor to pin-point his or her
position and follow a route.
The sport originated in Scandinavia where its impact today can
be measured by the fact that
orienteer Oyvin Thon won the gold
medal for strongest sport effort in
Norway in 1981, the equivalent of
Canadian athlete of the year. In
Sweden an annual five day event
called the O-Ringen attracted
20,000 competitors last year running in 94 different classes according
to sex, age and ability.
In Canada, orienteering has its
biggest support in Ontario and
Quebec where suitable forest areas
are plentiful. B.C. is limited
somewhat by its rough terrain (try
off-trail running up on Mt.
Seymour) but areas in the interior
are slowly being opened up as
potential orienteering country. In
August the most successful Canadian championships ever held were
staged near Kamloops, the first
time B.C. has hosted the event.
Orienteering in B.C. will get a
further boost this month with the
visit of 16 European orienteers as
part of a world orienteering tour.
They will be stopping in Vancouver
Jan. 18 and 19 and participating in
Wild
YUp, it sure is something,
right? But hold on, buster,
there's none of that stuff here!
Just 15 blast-my-socks-off
burgers, fair prices, and tons of
other great stuff. So keep
your hands to yourself!
2966 West 4th Ave., open
from 11:30 am seven days a week.
Opening soon corner of
Georgia and Hornby (Yuk, yuk.)
an event to be held on the Endowment lands on Tuesday Jan. 19. The
starting area for this event will be at
the resevoir off 16 Ave. at 2 p.m.
Included with this group will be
Oyvin Thon, Brit Volden, Ruth
Humbel and Jorgen Martensson.
Thon has won the last two world
championships (Switzerland 1981
and Finland 1979) as; well as
Norwegian championship for the
last ten years. Brit Volden was second in the 1981 world championships and has been the Norwegian
womens champion six times.
Ruth Humbel is the best female
orienteer in Switzerland and finished fourth in the 1981 world championships.
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT
OF STUDENT HOUSING
INVITES APPLICATIONS FOR
RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1982-83
These positions are open only to full-time registered U.B.C. students. Successful applicants
will be required to live in the residences. Application forms and detailed job descriptions
are available at the Ponderosa Housing Office
and at the Front Desk of each residence area:
Totem Park, Place Vanier, and W.H. Gage.
Applications will be accepted from January
4th to January 15th, 1982 at the Front Desks
of the Residences, or at the Ponderosa Housing Office.
ONLY AT
FELUNI'S
HAVE YOUR
COFFEE CUP
READ
(OR BLUE OR WHITE)
p^p'-Q)
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT HOUSING
Invites Applications for
SENIOR RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1982-83
Walter Gage Residence, Place Vanier Residence,
Totem Park Residence
The ideal applicants for these positions will be students who are in their final
undergraduate year, are unclassified, or are graduate students and who have
substantial experience living and working in residence. These positions will
be attractive to those who have skills and interests in working in an extensively people oriented field. Major responsibilities include the following:
(a) Supervising the residence's Advisors;
(b) Being the contact person between the Department and the Residence
Association;
(c) Ensuring that proper standards of behaviour are maintained.
Those interested in applying for one of these positions should submit a
resume and letter explaining their reasons for being interested in the position
to Dima Utgoff, Coordinator of Residence Student Affairs, at the Ponderosa
Housing Office (mailing address: 2071 West Mall, University Campus, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Y9 on or before Wednesday, January 13, 1982). Please
phone Dima at 228-5778 for further information about these positions.
Why Pay For Your Frames?
At Opticana, our policy is: You ALWAYS
have your choice of any optical frame
NO CHARGE
when filling your prescription.
FAMILY EYEWEAR STORE
ONE LOCATION ONLY
877 West Broadway, Vancouver 872-0501
Open till 9:00 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 14, 1982
Tired of Cramming?
s^r ^sg^y^-x■/'
.-.-A) ..&J'*5*?
-^
Cut your study time by 2/3!
We'll show you how — FREE
Would you like to:
□ Read 3 to 10 times faster, with better concentration, understanding and recall.
Raise your grade average without long hours over
texts.
Learn effective study skills.
End all-night cramming sessions.
Have more free time to enjoy yourself.
□
□
□
□
Evelyn Wood works — over 1 million people including students, executives, senators, and even
presidents have proven it. A free 1 hour demonstration will show you how to save hundreds of hours of
drudgery this year (as well as how to increase your
speed immediately with some simple new reading
techniques).
It only takes an hour, and it's free. Don't miss it.
SCHEDULE OF FREE SPEED READING-LESSONS
You'll increase your reading speed
      up to 100% on the spot!
TODAY ONLY
JANUARY 14th
5:30 p.m. or 8:00 p.m.
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
ROOM 205
□
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS
© 1982 S. CROMPTON

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