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The Ubyssey Oct 2, 1973

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Array .Retired dean in Gaae
Scarfe—case of privilege
By JAKE van der KAMP
Retired" education dean Neville Scharfe and his wife are currently
living in the Walter Gage low-rise apartment for married students.
Scarfe, still in the education faculty, has been in residence since the
middle of August and said Monday he expects to move out before the
middle: of October.
Housing director Les Rohringer said Monday he approved Scarfe's
stay because he believes the university owes Scarfe "a debt of
gratitude.
"This man has been working hard for the university all his life and
it wouldn't be decent to tell him to go to hell when he is retired and in
some difficulties," he said.
"The institution owes him this
favor."
Special favors
Rohringer said various members
of the board of governors have
asked for special favors for their
children at different times but he
said he has always refused to
comply.
"Last year we also had a faculty
member living in the low-rise,"
Rohringer said. "At that time
there was no waiting list since the
apartments were only just built.
Besides- the man helped students
with their work."
There are currently three
student couples on the waiting list
for the low-rise.
Rohringer said he would
welcome a few eminent faculty
members living in Gage residences
saying it would enhance academic
excellence among residence
students.
"But if anyone is to blame for
dean Scarfe's still living in the
apartment it's me," he said.
Scarfe 'at fault'
Scarfe disagreed, saying he, not
Rohringer, was at fault.
"Basically we're living here as
squatters," Scarfe said. "We find it
a very unusual situation and intend
to leave within the next two weeks,
whether or not we can move into
our new apartment."
Scarfe said he and his wife have
been living in the apartment,
because of difficulties moving into
a new apartment.
"We sold our house July 6 and
arranged to move into the new
apartments behind the village in
the beginning of September.
"We had applied in March for a
suite in the low-rise for the last two
weeks of August. During this time
there were no students living in the
apartments and so the housing
department granted us a suite," he
said.
Strike stops
"However, in September we
found that an elevator workers
strike prevented us from moving
into our new home and Mr.
' Rohringer allowed us to remain
here,""he said.
"We tried to find other accommodation but failed because
it's almost impossible to find a
place for a month or two."
TK UBYSSEY
Vol. LV., No. 10
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1973
48    228-2301
—larry   manulak   photo
TEMPORARY HOME OF former education dean Neville Scarfe, the
Wally Gage low-rise apartments, glisten in the fall sun Monday. But
storm clouds approacheth from the west. Cars seen on left are those
of married students waiting in line for a room in the apartment.
Students must live with their-families in the cars (including washing,
and eating) because they don't want to lose their place in line and
they can't afford to go elsewhere.
The co-chairman of the Gage
residence association Patte Pachet
said, "It's unfair that Scarfe would
be living here when there is a
waiting list though I can sympathize with his difficulties."
Association treasurer, Dave
Allen, said, "Scarfe is taking
advantage of his position. There
should be a student in the apartment."
Another student who wished to
remain anonymous said, "It's
ridiculous to have a person with his
financial resources living in the
area as a student, especially when
there are so many students waiting
to get in."
r^T^t^**
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Head says arts memo
badly misrepresented
ftt&# mmmm f« 4 Jtsttit J.
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SCARFE. .just  another  resident  on the   list
By RYON GUEDES
A memorandum circulated to
department heads by arts dean
Doug Kenny requesting a complete
re-assessment of all departments
in the arts faculty has been badly
misrepresented, acting philosophy
head Robert Rowan said Monday.
Rowan spoke in reference to an
article in The Ubyssey Friday
which said the memo cited possible
financial cutbacks as the reason
for Kenny's proposal.
"Anyone who read the memo in
full would see the dean asks for an
honest assessment of the arts
faculty that most people would
welcome," Rowan said. "More is
involved than just financial consideration."
Kenny's memorandum,
distributed May 18, mentioned in
its preamble three goals of the
faculty:
* "To meet the coming decade
with imaginative and practicable
plans to assure the study of the
liberal arts will provide an
education which will enable men
and women to cope with and help to
shape the rapid changes occurring
in our society;
* "To recognize and support a
wide range  of perspectives  and
programs, disciplines and interdisciplinary relationships in the
faculty;
* "To define and demonstrate to
university colleagues and students,
and to society and government, the
value of the specific goals of
departments and schools and that
these goals are worthy of financial
support."
Decline in faculty enrolment,
decrease in honors students, loss of
students after first or second year,
interests of professors as opposed
to student needs, lack of participation in low-level courses by
senior faculty members, lack of
public support, the high cost of low-
enrolment fields of study, and the
extended day for part-time
students were given as obstacles
against faculty goals.
The memo requested reports
from all department heads on
goals and objectives, structure,
progress, and plans for development in case a financial cutback is
made.
Kenny was unavailable for
comment.
Rowan said he did not
mimeograph copies of the memo
and leave them at the disposal of
the students as arts undergraduate
society president Bill Moen said in
The Ubyssey Friday, but
distributed copies to a department
philosophy meeting at which
graduate students were present.
Rowan told The Ubyssey he
hoped graduate students would
participate in his department's
report, but was unsure about undergraduate participation.
"Undergraduates usually lack
experience and understanding of
what is involved in running a
department," he said. "Of the
students taking philosophy
courses, only 25 to 30 of them are
philosophy majors."
"The rest come from all over
campus and are difficult to contact," he said.
"Graduate students are more
concerned with the department
and could better help us to fulfill
the dean's request."
Rowan said he was unable to
submit copies of the memo to other
members of the philosophy
department until the first meeting,
held in mid-September, because he
only received the memo last May.
"Peopje were just too hard to get
hold of during the summer," he
said. Page  2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday.October 2,  1973
Words vs ooze
By KENDODD
Stopping oil tankers from sailing
through B.C.'s coastal water is not
a question of lacking effective
means and powers but rather a
desire on the part of U.S. and
Canadian governments to do so.
This theme was the basis of
remarks from almost all speakers
to the sparse crowd of 250 people
gathered by the Peace Arch at the
Blaine border crossing to protest
oil tankers passing through the
strait of Juan de Fuca on their way
to Cherry Point, Washington just
south of Blaine.
Both Greenpeace foundation
member Irving Stowe and MLA
Karen Sanford (NDP - Comox)
demanded the federal government
to call for an emergency meeting
of the International Joint Commission for the purpose of barring
the tankers from the straits.
Claiming precedent Stowe, a
lawyer claimed "the USA has no
right whatsoever to inflict such
potential catastrophic damage on
its neighbor."
He said the waters were a joint
boundary as opposed to an international waterway.
Both Stowe and Sanford also
called on the federal government
to set up a 200-mile anti-pollution
zone. Stowe pointed to the recently-
enacted Arctic Waters Pollution
Act, which included such a clause
as a precedent for such a move.
Both speakers also called for
legislation to put liability without
fault on oil spills similar to present
liability legislation on motor
vehicles in B.C. This would mean
the offending oil company would
have to pay for all the clean-up
costs of any spill.
Paul Linnett of the
Washington coalition against oil
pollution said the U.S. Senate
should demand a sensible weight to
horse power ratio on tankers
plying the Valdez Alaska to Cherry
Point route.
"To give you an idea of the lack
of maneouverability of these
monsters the power of their
engines is equivalent to having a
40-foot boat equipped with a 1/3
horse-power motor," Linnett said.
The ships take five to seven
miles to come to a full stop once the
engines have been put in gear.
Linnett said the super-tankers
would contain 30 times the 200 tons
of oil spilled in Vancouver harbor
last Monday —- in one tank. There
are 13 tanks per ship.
Geoff Dulthwaite, a democratic
representative in the Washington
state legislature said the issue
represents the spearhead of a
campaign where the people have to
get power back from the corporations.
Sanford put the day's events in
perspective perhaps when she said
the proposals put forward at the
demonstration offered only a
"band-aid" approach to the
problems, which just isn't enough.
"A demonstration 100 times this
size wouldn't have any effect," she
said.
IT'S NOT TOO LATE
Hillel's classes are open to all at 12:30 every day:
Mon.      Where   Judaism    Differs   -   a v
comparison of Judaism and
Christianity
Tues.     Modern Jewish Philosophers -
Heschel, Buber and others
Wed.      Lectures of Rav Soloveitchik —
study of one of the 20th
century's most brilliant Jewish
thinkers whose refusal to
publish has denied him a place
among intellectual giants
Thurs. Hasidism — practice and
philosophy, with Hasidic rabbi
S. Levitan
Fri. Problems of Contemporary
Jewish Identity — a seminar on
growing up Jewish with Stephen
Wexler
AND THAT'S NOT ALL -
Come   and   fulfill   the  mitzvah  of  the
Succah —
Succah building party on Sunday, Oct. 7
at 1:00 p.m.
Succah Party on Sunday, Oct. 14 - 5:00
p.m.
Bet Cafe on Tuesday and Thursday at 12:30 - good
cooking!
Come in and see us about it all at Hillel House behind
Brock.
Anil man sokes,
rotten apples,
ari swral systems
you nughtregret
We do.
See your Pioneer dealer for
tuners, amps, headphones,
speakers, turntables and
tape decks.
CD PIONEER
Exclusive Canadian Distributor:
S.H. Parker Company, 67 Lesmill Road. Don Mills, Ontario (416) 445-8530
Carr Electronics Ltd.,
1037 Granville St., Van.
Commercial Electronics,
1305 Burrard St., Van.
Jan's Stereo West,
2839 West Broadway, Van.
W.E.B. Sound Ltd.,
1394 Main St., North Van.
MILLER
SOUND CENTRES
1820 Burrard St., Van.
622 Columbia St., N. Westminster
655 Granville St., Van.
1132 Davie St., Van. Tuesday, October 2, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
.•V t
NO, YOU IDIOT, this is not Mission Control at Cape Gage, nor is it a
decompression chamber for first-year students, nor the Christian
Scientists Reading Room, nor a re-enactment of a scene from Orwell,
nor a free  lobotomy clinic, nor an earwax bank, nor a hearing-aid
—marise savaria photo
manufacturers' convention. Au contraire, it is the SUB listening
lounge, open for the first time since April '72. Its nasty, scratchy old
discs replaced by snazzy new tapes, the lounge is open from 9 a.m. to
9 p.m. weekdays and from noon to 6 p.m. on the weekend.
Listening lounge reopens
By DENISE MASSEY
The SUB listening lounge has re-
* opened following extensive
renovations and a change in format.
Absent are the full time attendants, large collection of
records and the free choice of
listening  materials   that  charac
terized the lounge when it was last
open to student use in April 1972.
Instead, students will listen to
tapes. The new format was
adopted mainly due to economic
reasons according to SUB general
manager, Graeme Vance.
"The old lounge cost $20,000 of
SUB   budget   funds   annually,"
Vance said Monday. "Costs for the
new lounge should amount to
between $5,000 and $7,000, annually."
"The biggest cost in the old
lounge was wages," said Vance.
"Each year attendants' wages
amounted to $16,000."
However, economics wasn't the
Metcalfe struck off ballot
A student senatorial candidate
for Wednesday's senate elections
was declared ineligible Monday by
registrar Jack Parnell.
Following a meeting between
Parnell and Alma Mater Society
president Brian Loomes the name
of Fred Metcalfe, science 4, was
struck from the ballot due to
Metcalfe not meeting academic
requirements.
The candidacies of senate candidates   Art   Smolensky,   law   1;
Linda Kingston, science 2, and
Jeanette Auger, arts 3, were also
questioned by Parnell on the same
grounds.
However, Loomes and Pemme
Muir, AMS elections committee
chairman took the position the
wording of the AMS constitution
was unclear on candidate's
academic standing requirements.
The constitution states students
running for senate should have
completed a full course load the
previous year, obtaining at least a
second class standing.
However, Loomes and Muir
maintained the wording is unclear
whether candidates must have
fulfilled the requirements in the
previous academic year or in the
year they last attended UBC.
Parnell agreed to accept this
interpretation which cleared the
candidacies of Smolensky,
Kingston and Auger.
Metcalfe however, was still
declared ineligible.
Exposure
only consideration in the lounge's
transformation according to 1972-
73 Alma Mater Society coordinator Bob Angus, now
graduate student association
representative on council.
"The glass windows will be a
psychological device," Angus said
Monday. "It is hoped that passers-
by will make students in the lounge
feel guilty enough to move on after
a reasonable length of time."
The need for more general
lounging space was also a consideration, according to Angus.
In the old lounge students
selected a record from the
collection and an attendant signed
it out to them.
In the remodeled lounge there is
no such choice.
There are four tapes and four
FM channels in the renovated
lounge. Tapes are made by a
member of the campus radio
station, CYVR. Each tape is three
hours long.
"We are adding more tapes all
the time," said Vance, "but it
takes time to get equipment such
as earphones."
CYVR
gets
grant
CYVR radio has received its first
Alma Mater Society grant to repair
and maintain $50,000 worth of radio
equipment which has deteriorated
due to lack of maintenance funds.
AMS treasurer John Wilson said
Monday the radio is not in a
technical or financial position to
maintain their equipment.
A $2,000 grant will be administered through SUB building
manager Graeme Vance.
CYVR's news director Tom Quill
said their machinery was main-
tainted by engineering  students.
Some of the machinery dates
back to 1936 and the engineers are
just now pulling things together, he
said.
Wilson said the AMS is trying to
develop CYVR as an alternative
form of expression for students.
The grant was announced in the
1973-74 AMS budget which appeared in Friday's Ubyssey.
In the budget, Wilson said it was
not feasible for CYVR to maintain
their equipment.
"Their inability in the past few
years to maintain this equipment
has resulted in continued
deterioration of the equipment."
By ROSS "B.D." BARLOW
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Pango Pango pygmies go to the
polls today to decide how many
times a week The Blorg Wazie, a
left-wing radical newspaper,
should publish.
Wazie editor Lef Mackoff
pleaded with the masses in a rally
yesterday calling for daily
publication of the state owned rag
which has been plagued by yearly
demands that the paper cease.
"We are the almighty and the all
powerful. Our word is the law so a
vote for the Wazie is a vote for
democracy," said Mackoff.
The vote will be make or break
for Mackoff who has been trying
for the last six years to grow a
beard. "It gives me that confident,
collegiate air when I walk into the
newsroom," he explained.
Should Mackoff lose the election,
a state decree has been passed
appointing him head eunech at the
sultans temple of ill repute.
By ARTSMOLENSKY
The ultimate product to be recycled is
bullshit. And not the variety that flows
out of various politicians and assorted
professors.
According to an article in Saturday's
Financial Post, a high protein source of
cattle feed has been developed out of
cattle manure by the Ceres Land Co. in
the U.S.
It is estimated that 600 million tons of
manure is dropped by cows being fattened up in feed lots. This is the basis of
the new feed.
Not only is it high in protein — about 30
per cent content as opposed to 44 per cent
for soyabean feed — but it is cheaper.
The new feed should sell for less than $70
•per ton while soyabean feed sells for over
$200 per ton.
As the Financial Post points out, "if the
new feed catches on (and no one tells the
cows what they're eating), manure could
gain acceptance and an aura of
respectability by becoming the hottest
investment vehicle in the world's commodity exchanges."
*       *       *
The current fracas between the
graduate student association and the
Alma Mater Society has produced the
greatest turnout of graduate student
voters since the GSA separated itself
from the graduate student centre some
four years ago. And that was, to put it
mildly, a forced vote.
The issue revolves around the  new
(and arbitrary) charge against graduate
students by the AMS. Instead of paying
$26 to the graduate centre every year and
$29 to the AMS for one year only,
graduate students are being forced to
pay $29 to the AMS every year as-well as
the yearly $26 graduate centre fee.
The rationale for the one time payment
is that many grad students use the
graduate centre and not SUB. However,
they do use some facilities of the AMS
such as intramurals, housing lists,
photosoc, cinema 16 and other clubs.
One argument put forth by the AMS is
that a number of graduate students use
SUB (surveys by the graduate student
centre confirm that only a tiny fraction of
graduate students actually use the
centre).
The other major argument is the AMS
desperately needs revenue. In view of the
fact the students in referendums have
twice turned down increases in student
fees in the past five years, the graduate
students present themselves as the only
major group not yet fully taxed.
Graduate students, in a reactive but
understandable way, have demonstrated
via their opinion poll that their solution
to this $55 per year student fee is to withdraw from the AMS and thus be rid of the
$29 AMS charge. It should be pointed out
this move is against the political
philosophy of the current GSA executive.
To understand what is the best solution
for a potentially messy legal and political
problem some fine distinctions about who
owns what are necessary.
The graduate student centre is a
society, separately chartered under the
Provinces Society Act. Its members are
essentially the graduate students who
pay a $26 fee collected interestingly
enough by the university's board of
governors. A compulsory society!
The GSA is a creature of the AMS just
like the arts undergraduate society and
the law students association.
Coincidentally all members of the
GSA are members of the graduate
student centre. The reverse is only
roughly correct.
At one time the GSA controlled the
centre and operated it with a
management board mostly administration appointed. After a while it
was pointed out that in order for the
centre to get a liquor license it would
need to be a separately chartered
society.
Thus, the GSA lost control of the
centre, its only physical assets and income — both split. However, some
financial connections such as a $1 per
student grant from the centre to the GSA
remain today.
Based on the presumption there should
be one strong, unfragmented student
voice presented to the administration
there seems to be three solutions for the
eventual withdrawal of the graduate
students from the AMS.
The AMS could decide to assess the
graduate students $9 every year (the
activity portion of your AMS fee) and
exempt them from the $15 a year building
fee since they have a building of their
own which they are paying for.
The effect of this is to make a rough
cost accounting, replacing one time $29
fee with a $9 (or possible $14 if pool fee is
included) a year fee. Based on a
graduate student staying roughly 4 years
this would net the AMS the extra activity
revenue it needs.
Secondly, the centre could be made a
completely voluntary proposition open to
all students over 19 years of age (as per
liquor regulations). As such, graduate
students would be charged the normal
$29 a year AMS fee and anyone who
wanted to join the centre would be perfectly free to pay $26 for the privilege of
belonging to an exclusive club.
The third solution, and indeed the one
which appeals to me the most, is the
centre should be taken over by the AMS.
That way no one would pay more than $29
a year and it would technically be open to
most second year students and up. In
effect it would be open to everyone.
While this might grate on a few conservative graduate students who hold
themselves above and beyond other
students, the vast majority of graduate
students who don't use the centre will be
glad to rid themselves of their $26 a year
subsidization of UBC's haven for administration secretaries and UBC
Reports editor Jim Banham. As well as
law, architecture, theatre and social
work students whose buildings are in that
general area and sneak in anyway. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday October 2,  1973
Campus service
The service The Ubyssey, Canada's finest campus
newspaper west of False Creek, provides at UBC is being put
to the test — again.
Alma Mater Society council has decided to ask students,
along with a grab-bag of other things, how many times The
Ubyssey should publish.
Council wants students to suggest how a campus
newspaper — that will be the wording on the referendum —
can best serve the campus.
Students can vote for five, four, three, two or one issues
a week. Preferentially yet.
The referendum is not a popularity vote.
The - Ubyssey has never pretended to be, nor has it
wanted to be, popular.
If it were to become popular, the paper would stop
providing a service to the more than 30,000 persons who
work and learn at UBC.
It would serve small interested groups on campus —
council, clubs, men's athletics and other groups.
It would please, instead of attack.
The basic, simple services the paper provkles are in
Tween classes and Hot flashes. Students must decide if
these should be published more than the current three times
a week or less.
The service to the 6,500 persons in the intramurals and
all the followers of the various extramural teams is provided
in the sports pages.
If students vote to cut the paper and council agrees,
some team somewhere at sometime won't get covered.
There won't be the space.
If the paper is cut back, there won't be space for letters,
or what AMS president Brian Loomes thinks or what
administration president Walter Gage is doing.
The Ubyssey staff is prepared to publish five times a
week.
It's not in our best interests as students who have to pass
some courses to publish daily throughout the school year,
but it would be best for the people who have to exist out
here.
So get out and vote Wednesday.
If you don't, we'll cry.
Letters
Bullshit
Just a slight correction to the
article by Ryon Guedes in the Sept.
28 edition. In the article in Students
and Politics Newsletter on arts
dean Doug Kenny's request for an
evaluation of the faculty of arts, we
did not condemn the memorandum
as 'bullshit'. The reference to
bullshit in the article was to the
introduction of the memorandum.
To refer to that request as bullshit
would only indicate a lack of
analysis on our part. It is important for the students in the arts
faculty to understand what such a
request means to their education
and what purpose the faculty has in
providing the dean with the information he requires.
Remember, it is the security of
their jobs which they have to
protect and the interests of the
students, in most cases, comes
after looking out for number one.
But the understanding of such a
document can't end here. It must
be related to the proposed changes
in the educational system in B.C.
and the nature of the economic
system  that  we  live,   work  and
learn under.
Bill Moen
president
arts undergraduate society
Dear sir
Honorable Mitchell Sharp,  M.P.,
Secretary of State  for  External
Affairs,
House of Commons,
Ottawa, Canada.
Dear Mr. Sharp:
I am dismayed by the reported
comments of the Canadian ambassador to Chile, and at the
government's seeming
preparedness to confer recognition
on the junta as soon as it
"demonstrates its control over the
country".
Events in the last two weeks
have made it quite clear that the
new Chilean regime is essentially a
fascist dictatorship. Mass
detentions    and    firing    squad
r
THtUBYSSlY
~\
OCTOBER   2,   1973
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS
or the university- administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Vaughn Palmer, Michael Sasges.
The following gathered to work: Mike Sasges, Vaughn Palmer, lylarise
Savaria, Gary Coull, Ken Dodd, Barry Granary, Larry Manulak, Don
Hubbert, Rick Lymer, Tom Barnes, Peter Leibek, Pat Kenopski, Denise
Massey, Robin Burgess, Dave Taylor, Nick Stone, Jake van der Kamp, Linda
Derby, Monty Python, Sally Meyer, Dru Spencer, Art Smolensky, Jean
Clarke and the tottering twit, Ryon Guedes.
executions in the soccer stadium,
book burnings, renewed anti-
Semitism, the round-up of supporters of the constitutional
government and of presidents of
universities and heads of faculties,
all point to the solid entrenchment
of a right-wing dictatorship, not a
quick return to democracy!
I believe it therefore urgent that
Canada not indicate its tacit
condonement of the junta by according it diplomatic recognition.
Do we want to join the fascist
regimes such as Brazil, South
Africa, and South Korea which to
date form the majority of governments which have recognized the
junta?
An open offer by the government
of Canada to accept political
refugees and provide for their
transit and initial accommodation
(as was done for the
Czechoslovakians and Ugandans)
would simultaneously provide
practical assistance to those
Chileans who manage to escape the
junta, and clearly express the
feelings of Canadians on the
overthrow of democracy in Chile.
This is the least I expect of my
government.
Respectfully yours
Thomas L. Perry Jr.
1710 Knox Road
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Perry asked The Ubyssey to
publish the letter, so here it is—
Eds.
Bravo
j
Bravo to Edwards, Maynard,
Gisslow, etc. (microbiology
graduate students) for coming out
with the best offensive yet in the
current war between the graduate
Student society and the Alma
Mater Society. Their five points,
concerning the grad student centre
and SUB, speak the truth for all
graduate students, and demand the
attention of all of us.. Their two
proposals, to run the GSC on a
voluntary basis, arid to make
membership in AMS optional for
grad students, make democratic
and financial sense.
The current GSA executive has
proposed that membership in the
GSC be made open to undergraduates, in an effort to keep
the GSC solvent. If this viable step
is taken, then membership in the
GSC must be optional for all
members; not compulsory for grad
students and optional for undergrads.
Down with mandatory double-
club elitism! We demand a free
choice here on this free campus!!!
Illimar Altosaar
botany grad student
Censure
President Walter Gage
Administration Building
Main Mall North
University of British Columbia
Dear Dean Gage:
This is a formal request for
censure of the forestry undergraduate society for their
publication THE PLANK, that was
distributed with The Ubyssey on
Tuesday, Sept. 25th, 1973.
There can be no doubt that this
paper is as anti-woman as the
censured issue of the engineering
undergraduate society paper was
anti-semitic.
It is totally unexcuseabje that
this type of literature can be
published on a university campus.
It is here that the Canadian tax
paying public expects to see
examples being made regarding
many of the country's inequalities.
Therefore it becomes necessary to
eradicate this type of abuse and
abasement of women.
There is also the point to be made
that this paper negates all the work
done by Dean (John) Gardner to
bring female students into the
faculty of forestry. How can
women possibly survive, in a
meaningful way, in an atmosphere
so fraught with sexism?
Although this type of attitude has
in the past been tolerated, it is now
no longer acceptable to women on
this campus. If such overt
discrimination is allowed to pass
without censureship, it is tantamount to condoning it.
Sincerely yours
Marion Barling
women's action group
A copy of this letter to Gage was
also   sent   to   Gardner,   acting
women's dean Joyce Searcy and
The Ubyssey—Eds.
Byyr
Ydytyr, Thy Ybyssyy
Dyyr Syr.
Ys yyy cyn syy, my typewrytyr
ny lyngyr prynts vywyls. Whyt's
wryng wyth thy blystyd thyng? I
try ty prynt y y ynd it wynds up
lyky y y, it hyppyns yvyn yf I try ty
prynt y y, dymmyt. Tyll fyrthyr*
nytycy, thyryfyry, dyn't yxpyct ty
rycyyvy yny styryys frym my.
Thy pryblym cyyld by fyxyd by
thy wyy yf yyy wyry ty rystyck thy
frydgy wyth beer. Rymymbyr, yf
yyy wynt cypy gyt thyt BEER.
Yyyrs Syncyryly
Hymphry Hyrd-yp Hymplydynk
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Though an effort is made to
print   all   letters   received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
for clarity, legality, brevity and-v
taste. Tuesday, October 2, 1973
TH'E       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Byelection, senate
statements
Internal
affairs
By COREEN DOUGLAS
Socialist
I am running to provide a
socialist alternative in these
elections. As a socialist I think that
the problems of this society and the
university are rooted in its
capitalist character. The solution
to this means nothing short of the
establishment of socialism.
However, students may not
necessarily agree with this while
voting for the socialist slate.
If you are a feminist who wants
to see action on issues of women's
rights or someone who wants to see
action in defense of Chilean
political prisoners then your vote
belongjs with the socialist slate. In
short, if you agree with the need for
the university to become an
organizer for social change and for
an Alma Mater Society executive
that leads students in action, then
you should vote socialist.
An undemocratic clause in the
AMS constitution which bars
political clubs from running under
their own name has prevented me
from running as Young Socialists. I
am campaigning for a yes vote on
the political clubs referendum
because I think democracy in the
student movement must be
defended.
By DOUG BROCK
Students' Coalition
The office of Internal Affairs this
year will be primarily concerned
with student input into academic
reform. In particular to establish a
liaison with all undergraduate
societies and bring forth the
curriculum recommendations of
these groups and institute some
change by being a student
representative on the academic
planning board. In addition to this
main platform I will be involved
with the committee to save the
University Endowment Lands. I
plan to represent all student activities and organizations rather
than a select few. Through past
association with Speakeasy I have
become more aware of the issues
of primary interest to the student.
In past years the Students'
Coalition have been successful in
governing the Alma Mater Society,
representing the student interests
of this campus and can only continue to do so with your support.
By GERALD deMONTIGNY
My decision to run as internal
affairs officer was a result of
coming to the realization that UBC
functions to preserve the interests
of the capitalist ruling class. The
university, due to its assimilation
of.bourgeois ideology, perverts the
very meaning of the word
education. Not only is the subject
matter being taught grossly
distorted, but the students
themselves are subjected to an
extensive conditioning process,
designed to make them absorb the
values for capitalist society.
The internal affairs officer can
play a significant role by
organizing a strong, central coordinating body with the purpose of
. initiating education programs
across campus in conjunction with
other student activities. I believe
the Alma Mater Society has a duty
to students and society to ensure
' the university serves the interests
of the Canadian working class.
This can only be achieved by exposing   the   true   nature   of   the
The Ubyssey is constitutionally required to carry
the following statements from candidates for Alma
Mater Society internal affairs officer and secretary
and for student positions on senate.
Advance polls will be held between 11:30 a.m.
and 3:30 p.m. today in SUB and Angus building and
from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. today in Gage, Totem and
Vanier residences. Polls on Wednesday will be open
between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. throughout the campus.
university through organizing
panel discussions, speakers and
symposiums. Such a program
would help to initiate serious
political discussions among all
students on campus.
The internal affairs officer must
organize and support consciousness raising activities across
campus.
Secretary
By GEORGE MAPSON
Students' Coalition
"A finger  in
longer a finger.'
every  pie  is  no
Why? Rumor has it that if one
becomes involved in too many
activities one loses an awareness
of which portion of the finger is in
which pie.
The problem is not that of a
quantitive distribution, but rather
a qualitive one.
Currently I have a finger in
many pies. The largest one being
director of intramurals. Why then,
run for secretary? Let someone
else become involved. Why try to
monopolize areas. True, the best
way to "decentralize" the AMS is
by involving more students on
more levels.
The idea I am trying to stress is
that with my involvement with
more than 3,500 men and 3,000
women in intramurals, there is an
opportunity to instill ideas on just
what the AMS is and ways and
means to get involved.
Secretary is a rudimentary
position which can be done by
others. I would like to work
towards realigning this position I
would be lying if I said I have all
the ways and means.
Elect me as I am and hope for
change. People are getting tired of
a stagnant AMS.
By STUART RUSSELL
Socialist
I am running to provide a
socialist alternative in these
elections. As a socialist I think that
the problems of this society and the
university are rooted in its
capitalist character. The solution
to this means nothing short of the
establishment of socialism.
However, students may not
necessarily agree with this while
voting for the socialist slate.
If you are a feminist who wants
to see action on issues of women's
rights or someone who wants to see
action in defense of Chilean
political prisoners then your vote
belongs with the socialist slate. In
short, if you agree with the need for
the university to become an
organizer for social change and for
an Alma Mater Society executive
that leads students in action, then
you should vote socialist.
An undemocratic clause in the
AMS constitution which bars
political clubs from running under
Senate
By ARTSMOLENSKY
I have had some experience in
dealing with faculty members and
administration officials which can
be an intimidating experience for
anyone.
I believe that I have demonstrated a concern for a number of
student issues: lack of student
housing, Canadian content,
campus food services, bookstore
rip-offs, university spending,
administration practices regarding good teachers and others.
These shall continue to be my
priorities and I shall continue to
fight for the student viewpoint in
these areas.
By JEANETTE AUGER, SUSAN
WAECHTLER, KATY YOUNG
Women's Action Group
The two most important issues in
our campaign are the need to
democratize the university and the
need for the university to take
responsibility for providing equal
access to education and equal
employment for women.
STUDENTPOWER
Students must be included in all
the decision-making that affects
the quality of their education.
Equal representation of students
and faculty at all levels of
academic government should be
adopted as a goal.
WOMEN'S RIGHTS
* Women must be proportionately represented on all
decision-making bodies of the
university.
* Women employees must be
paid equal pay for substantially the
same work, and all faculty and
staff positions must be open to
women.
* Part-time status of students,
faculty and staff should be
upgraded. More degree-granting
programs should be made
available to part-time students.
* UBC must provide child-care
facilities for its students, staff and
faculty.
departmental societies. We believe
the need for responsible students in
the senate to be crucial, and are
confident of our ability to use the
opportunity to the students' advantage.
By SANDY SMAILL
Who cares? So what if senate
decides a few odds and ends? Why
should I bother voting, let alone
taking time to see who's running?
Let other people decide the content
of my courses, what my profs are
like, who's running this place, the
status of women at UBC, changes
in the Universities Act, what
buildings go where, who goes to the
By NANCY DOWER
& LINDA KINGSTON
We believe the increasing interest of students in the current
issues — student participation at
all decision-making levels of the
university, improvement of the
learning situation of students,
increasing the relevance of our
studies to the outside world and
eliminating the secrecy of administrative policy — shows that
students are ready to assume their
responsibilities as members of the
academic community.
By serving on the senate we will
put these issues before the
supreme academic body of the
university, and fight for their
recognition. We will also inform
the student of all important
discussions and decisions made,
and communicate student reaction
their own name has prevented me to the senate
from running as Young Socialists. I
am campaigning for a yes vote on
the political clubs referendum
because I think democracy in the
student movement must be
defended-.
We are both active members of
the science undergraduate society
executive; Nancy focussing on
making the student aware of
current issues and Linda involved
in student participation  through
university and who doesn't... these
things don't affect me. Well, I care,
and if you care, even a little, about
some of these things, then support
me in the senate election.
By ARTHUR HILLIKER
The important issues before the
senate are neither political nor
philosophical, but practical. These
include athletics, the bookstore,
and the library. All three are
victims of inadequate space and
resource allocation by the senate
and its committees. The library is
in a near-crisis situation. Competing as a department at a time of
tight budget restrictions, the
library loses inevitably to the influential academic department
heads and deans in the struggle for
space and money. Surely, as the
university's indeed British
Columbia's, primary referential
resource; the library deserves
greater priority.
SELECTED WORKS OF
MAO TSE-TUNG
Volumes 1-4
Soft cover Edition $5.80 Cloth cover Edition $9.00
SELECTED MILITARY WRITINGS
OF MAO TSE-TUNG
Soft cover Edition $1.35 Cloth cover Edition $2.50
Subscribe to Chinese
Periodicals in English
PEKING REVIEW
A weekly political and theoretical journal
of Chinese news and views.
Airmailed all over the world.
One year - $4.50 Two years - $6.75
Three years-$9.00
CHINA PICTORIAL
Published every month in Peking for
readership abroad.
Each issue has 44 pages or more, 12
to 16 in color.
One year - $4.00 Two years - $6.00
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CHINESE MEDICAL JOURNAL
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PHONE: 681-4916 Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday October 2,  1973
Hot flashes
Career
opportunities
The government is after you!
A discussion of career
opportunities in the Departments
of External Affairs, Manpower &
Immigration, and Industry, Trade
and Commerce will be held in
Buchanan 100 at 12:30 on
Tuesday, October 9. Derek
Burney of the Department of
External Affairs will be the
speaker.
Ubyssey
Once again. The Ubyssey
would like to inform all students
we    have   openings   for   anyone
Tween
classes
TODAY
ANTHRO-SOC UNION
Meeting,  noon.  Auditorium Annex
261.
EDUCATION STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Bill Bradley will speak on the B.C.
Teacher's     Federation,     noon,
education 100.
PRE-MED
General    meeting   with    Dr.   Szasz
speaking    on    interprofessionalism,
noon, IRC lecture hall.
TAICHI CHUAN CLUB
Practice 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., SUB
125.
PRO-LIFE
Meeting, noon, SUB 213.
WOMEN'S    STUDIES
Women   and   the   law   with   Diana
Davidson, 7:30 p.m. SUB ballroom.
MY-JONG KUNG FU CLUB
Registration for new members, 4:30-
6:30 p.m., SUB 211.
KAYAK AND CANOE CLUB
Organization   of   North   Thompson
trip, noon SUB 205.
WEDNESDAY
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Speakers    from    the    school   social
work, noon, SUB 113.
VARSITY DeMOLAY CLUB
Regular meeting, noon, SUB 211.
SHITORYU KARATE
Meeting,     5:30-7:30     p.m.,     SUB
207-209.
NEWMAN CLUB
General  meeting,  noon, SUB 105B.
SAILING
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
LDSSA
General  meeting, noon, Angus 404.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE
Discussion   of   resolutions   for   the
national assembly, noon, Buchanan
towers 1127.
ONTOLOGY CLUB
Speaking     on     unstructured     consciousness, noon Buchanan 260.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Meeting  including Mount Pitt slide
show, noon, Angus 104.
WOMEN'S OFFICE
Portraits of Women film series, 7:30
p.m., SUB auditorium.
UNDERGRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY
SOCIETY
Meeting   to  discuss  upcoming  beer
garden.    Anyone    taking   a    Psych
course    is   encouraged   to   attend,
noon, Angus 204.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Testimony     meeting,    noon,    SUB
205.
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
Curling team tryouts, 5 p.m. winter
sports centre.
THURSDAY
AQUA-SOC
General meeting noon, SUB 205.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
SQUARE DANCE CLUB
Lessons for beginners, noon, SUB
207-209.
SUS
Open meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS' UNION
Selection    of   steering   committee,
noon. East Mall annex 116.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Meeting, noon SUB 213.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE
Slides and talk on 1973 WUS seminar in India, noon, International
House.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE
CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
FRIDAY
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
UBC CHEERLEADERS
A general meeting for anyone interested in cheerleading for UBC
teams, Noon, SUB 111.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Where Mao goes wrong — a Marxist
view. Wendy Stevenson will
speak, 8 p.m. 1208 Granville.
interested in any facet of the news
biz.
Contrary to the unfornunately
popular beleif, we are not some
sort of elite clique that excludes
anyone wearing the wrong color
of socks.
We like all sorts of folks to
come up and work on ye rag so
we can find out what everyone on,
campus is interested in and do it.,
As  it works out,  the  people'
with the most time are usually
arts   students,   because   of   slack
course loads in said faculty.
And because of that, we,
usually have 'ins' in arts that help
us dig the dirt and print it.
But we also want people from
every other faculty to come in
and do the work. In the past
we've had aggies, foresters, home
eccers   and   yes,   even   engineers.
Where are you all now?
So people from every faculty
interested in writing,
photography, cartooning (?) or
anything we can't think of at the
moment, the office is in SUB
241K. Come up and see us
sometime.
Libraries
All campus libraries except
Sedgewick will be closed
Thanksgiving Day, next Monday,
Oct. 8.
Sedgewick will be open from
9:00 to 11:45 p.m. Brock Hall
study area will be open 8:00 a.m.
'til midnight as usual.
Normal library hours will be
observed Saturday and Sunday.
Tomorrow's your last chance for
University Discount Prices on
HEWLETT-PACKARD
CALCULATORS
HP-35 and HP-45 (Scientific) HP-80 (Business)
Orders taken  Civil  Engineering Rm. 206 every noon
until Oct. 3.
Information  available  in  Main  Hall Civil Engineering
Bldg.
Anglican-United Campus Ministry
Sundays — 10:30 — Festival of Worship
Vancouver School of Theology Chapel, Library Bldg.
Tues. 12:30 — Eurcharist& Lunch
Lutheran Campus Centre
STUDY GROUPS:
OLD TESTAMENT AND LIBERATION:
A  comparison  of events and questions of liberation with specific Old
Testament themes.
Wed. or Fri. - 12:30
LIFE STYLES:
How not to be "seduced by the Canadian Dream". Theological resources to
restruct. _. .. _ __
Thurs. — Noon or 3:30
CHRISTIANS FOR SOCIALISM:
A study of Chilian Christians' statement.
Wed. - 3:30 or Mon. - Noon.
Sign up at Lutheran Campus Centre,
or phone 224-1614
Student Christian Movement
THE CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION
PRESENTS:   the next taping of
DR. BUNDOLO'S
PANDEMONIUM
MEDICINE SHOW
"Live    Radio    Comedy"
FREE
SUB Movie Theatre — Tues., Oct. 9
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
WE SER VE A UTHENTIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABL E PRICES
EAT-IN -TAKEOUT
We have enlarged our dining room to
offer you better service!
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd. Phone 224-6121
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
COMING OCT. 4-7 IN SUB AUD.:
Ken Russell's
THE BOYFRIEND
Starring
Twiggy & Glenda Jackson
Thurs. 7:00
Fri. 7:00
& 9:30
50<
Sat. 7:00
& 9:30
Sun. 7:00
ANOTHER SUB FILM SOC PRESENTATION
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c;
additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Lost 8t Found
13
YELLOW RIMMED SUNGLASSES
near, Angus. Kathy 736-6153 anytime.  I really need them.
Special Notices
15
WHERE ELSE?
Agfa, llford, Kodak,
Gaf, Colortone, Uni-
*Y 17 color, Luminof, and
"***   Dalco.
Where else in town will yon
find such a. full selection of
B & W paper ?
trje HenS ant) Shutter
Cameras!
3010   W.   Broadway 736-7833
DISCOUNT STEREO EXAMPLE:
AM-FM Stereo receiver. 2 speakers, turntable, base, cover and
cartridge, list $200. Your cost
$125. 2-year parts guarantee.
Call   325-0366   for   savings.	
U.B.C. BEAUTY SALON NEAR
Campus. No appointment neces-
sary.   5736  University  Blvd.	
WANTED — JEWISH PEOPLE 20-
30 from out of town and Vancouver for non-structured, non-
organizational functions. For information Ph. Days 731-4161,
Eves.   738-4062.	
THE CBC AND "THE ALMOST
Loyal Order of Bundolo" presents Dr. Bundolo's Pandemonium
Medicine Show, Tuesday, Oct. 9,
SUB Theatre,  12:30.  It's Free! !
Special Events ISA
C.U.S. SPONSORS "OKTOBER-
fest" Oct. 5. Tickets available
from  A.M.S.   office.
Wanted—Information
17
FACULTY OF ARTS HOCKEY
practices, Tuesday 3:15-4:45 at
Arena Rink No. 2. Begin October 2nd. Al] interested players
must   attend   first   practice.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autoi For Sale
21
•65 AUSTIN 1800 F.W.D.. NEW
trans, and motor parts. $650. ph.
263-5392  eves.	
1952 CHEV. PICKUP, REBUILT
engine, new brakes, new tires,
etc.   $350.   Phone  Mike,  438-1981.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Babysitting 8e Day Care
32
EMPLOYMENT
Typing
40
EFFICIENT, ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work, Reasonable
rates.   Phone 263-5317.
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFES-
sional Typing. IBM Selectric —
Days, Evenings, Weekends. Ph.
Shari at 738-8745 — Reasonable
Rates.	
 51
WAITRESSES, DANCERS. CASH-
iers,.. hostesses; up to 13.50 per
hour. Contact Mike Hamilton,
684-3426 or 524-8581. (Call No.
1125) answering service.
Help Wanted
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
PIANO LESSONS BY GRADUATE
of Juilliard School of Music. All
grade   levels   welcome.   731-0601.
Special Classes
Tutoring
62
"64*
Speakeasy SUB Anytimel
228-4557 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Nowl 12:30-2:30
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
Rooms
81
Room & Board
82*
Unfurnished Apts.
84
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, October 2, 1973
THE      U "6 Y.S SE Y
"Page 7
Coverage vs money
By DON HUBBERT
Sports Editor
* This Wednesday you
get an opportunity to express
your opinion about how
many issues of The Ubyssey
should be published each
week.
If      previous
referendums    are    any
indication, this one too will
be steam-rollered by apathy.
It's a sorry comment about
UBC students that they just
don't seem to give a damn.
We think it is about time this
attitude was changed on
campus and it is up to you to
do something about it.
We    in    the   sports
department prefer to see The
Ubyssey published at least
three times per week. We are
even prepared to handle
sports five times per week if
that is your preference.
We have some very
definite reasons why we want
to go to press at least three
times.    These   concern   the
SPOR TS
type and quality of coverage
which would be given if we
published only once or twice
a week.
We think you will
agree with us in our
endorsement of at least three
issues per week.
We are also sure
you'll have a lot of
unanswered questions after
examining the proposed AMS
budget.
Our interpretation
of the two  issue  per week
endorsement by the AMS is
they hope the student body,
will vote for only one issue
per week.
We are sure you
want more and are aware one
issue or even two issues per
week are not enough. We
need your support on
Wednesday to ensure the
survival of your student
newspaper.
Remember — vote
three or five. We're counting
on you.
'Birds were socked
By RICK LYMER
The UBC Thunderbird footbaH-
team got rocked 53-7 by the Alberta
Golden Bears Saturday in Edmonton.
The game was marked by the
'Birds lack of offense compared to
the Bear's 531 yard total. The
'Birds only managed 60 yards
passing and 82 rushing for a
meager total of 142 yards.
'Bird quarterbacks Jim Tarves
and Bob Spindor completed only
eight of 29 pass attempts.
This spiking of the 'Birds major
weapon perhaps tells the story of
the game. Although the 'Birds had
planned to throw short, starting
quarterback Jim Tarves went
long. This change of plan proved
unsuccessful.
Brian Fryer did the damage for
the Bears. He scored all five of
their touchdowns. Three of these
came on punt returns, which
speaks volumes of the coverage.
Fryer scored his first touchdown
when the Bears intercepted a
Tarves pass.
The score at half time was 36-0
for Alberta.
The second half was much like
the first. The Golden Bears ran the
score to 53-0 before there was a
reply.
In the fourth quarter, with
seconds left on the scoreboard,
'Bird quarterback Spindor passed
four yards to Don Heinz for the
only touchdown UBC scored on a
long afternoon of football.
Tarves and defensive halfback
Doug Young were seriously injured
in the game. Tarves sustained a
torn hip muscle and will be out of
action for two weeks. Young
received a serious head injury and
will be out for the season.
If excuses are needed, there are
several. The 'Bird team was up at 5
a.m. Saturday morning to catch a
6:30   flight   to   Edmonton.   They
Twas not to be
It could have been a happy ending.
The UBC Braves were leading
Burnaby Spartans in a junior
varsity football game Sunday, but
ield
hockey
nets first
t The UBC Thunderbirds Saturday
defeated the Delta Falcons 5-1 in a
lower mainland men's field hockey
league game at Spencer field.
Alan Hobkirk and Kelvin Wood
each scored twice, while Don
McFarland added a -single. With
the victory UBC took over third
place in the league.
In division II action, the Braves
lost 4-2 to the Jokers. Joe Popoff
and Guy St. Pierre scored for UBC.
Cricket
honoured
UBC's cricket team was honored
^at the graduate student centre
Saturday night.
Ed Harris, secretary of the B.C.
Cricket Association, presented the
B.C. Mainland League Trophy to
team captain Trevor Arnold. UBC
won division II this September.
Brinsley   Stewart,   one   of   the
team's top batters, said UBC ex-
* pects to advance to division I next
season which starts in April.
dreams of winning their last game
ended in a 24-13 loss.
UBC was ahead 6-4 in the third
quarter.
Dennis Kelly's touchdown pass
to Wayne Johnson overcame
Burnaby's 4-0 half time lead.
Then the Spartans struck back.
Brian Baldock ran for a touchdown. Seconds later, Darrel Harris
returns a punt for another. Then,
Mitch Gunn grabs a blocked punt
for a third touchdown.
Kelly and Johnson combined to
score again in the last quarter, but
Spartans' defense killed the rally.
Sports
comments
By DONHUBBERT
1) With the federal government
its preoccupation is physical fitness for all Canadians. With REC
UBC it's $5 in order to discourage
all but serious athletes. Seems sort
of screwed up to me.
2) Never realized Lymer was as
big a ham as he turned out to be on
Friday.
3) I don't mind getting ripped off
once in a while for a good cause,
but $7 on top of the $5 REC UBC fee
just to rent a lousy locker and get
towel service! How about
somebody wising up somewhere?
Students don't have bottomless
wallets.
4) Lions vs Argos — money team
vs money team; loser vs loser.
5) Excluding Saturday's game,
the 'Birds defence has allowedonly
one touchdown in three games.
That's damn good football and a
sign of good coaching.
6) How about some fan support
for junior varsity football?
arrived sometime around 9:00.
This left them five hours before
kick-off to prepare mentally and
physically for the game.
A screwed up thing to happen in
any sport.
The only thing for the 'Bird team
to do now is begin preparation for
the game with the Saskatchewan
Huskies this Saturday at Thunderbird Stadium.
They split their games last year
with the Huskies, but it'll be an
upset if they win this Saturday.
In other western league action
the Huskies beat the Calgary
Dinosaurs 29-15, to remain unbeaten in three starts.
Trivia
1) James T. Blackmore of
Seattle. Washington bowled 299-
1/2.
One pin broke in half and
remained standing.
2) Illinois vs Michigan — 1924.
Red Grange handled the ball five
times, gained 278 yards rushing
and scored five touchdowns.
3) Charles McCoy of Fort Worth,
Texas, made 31 errors in one
baseball game.
Professional Equipment
for the BEGINNER
and ADVANCED DIVER
• 10% OFF Masks, Fins
and Snorkels
* SCUBA Package Specials
WETSUITS:
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WILLOUGHBY'S
2745 W. 4th
738-6929
di
ivers Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday October 2, 1973
Likker guzzlers to suffer
Pit beer prices take hike
The Pit has only 760 beers left at
the old price of 35-cents-a-bottle.
Once they're gone beer will be 40
cents a bottle.
But all outstanding Pit tokens,
whether purchased for 35 cents, 40
cents or three for $1 will be
honored, Alma Mater Society
treasurer John Wilson i said
Monday.
The price hike, the first since the
Pit opened in 1969, is the result of
the provincial government's 16-
per-cent raise in the price of beer,
announced last week, Wilson said.
Wilson said the government's
plan to raise the minimum wage to
$2.50 an hour was another factor.
"When we opened, beer was $2.52
a case and wages were an average
$1.60 an hour," he said.
"Now beer will be $3.00 a case
and wages an average $2.83 an
hour."
"We have to sell 120 cases a night
to break even," Wilson said. "But
we should do better than break
even in order to cover the cost of
such things as furniture repair."
Currently the Pit sells about 100
cases on week nights, and 160 on
Fridays.
There are 2616 beer in stock but
1956 outstanding Pit tokens. The
remaining 760 beer will be sold at
35 cents beer which whill have to be
redeemed on night of purchase.
The Pit, currently located in the
SUB ballroom, is open 4 p.m. to
11:30 p.m., Tuesday to Friday.
The new Pit in the SUB basement
won't open until a union dispute
over the air conditioning system is
settled, probably next year.
The Pit operation cleared $61 last
year, Wilson said.
Monopoly protested
EDMONTON (CUP) — Only five
days after the Alberta Supreme
Court dropped monopoly charges
against Safeway in a compromise
move, Edmonton consumers
started a boycott to protest the
monopoly and Safeway's handling
of boycotted products.
Safeway is one of the largest
purchasers of boycotted products,
including table grapes and lettuce
from the U.S., Kraft products,
Dare products and all products
from South Africa, Angola and
Mozambique.
Pickets were set up at Safeway
stores, and according to
organizers; 20 per cent of the cars
entering'the Safeway parking lots
have turned back when informed of
the boycott.
Safeway is a virtual monopoly in
Western Canada and has been
charged, with monopoly practices
in Edmonton and Calgary for the
period of 1965-1972.
As a compromise between the
. •WCKlW ON DOWN
THE   LINE-
Alberta prosecutors and Safeway,
the monopoly charges were
dropped but Safeway won't be
allowed to expand any of its
grocery stores in Calgary or Edmonton for three and one-half
years.
During that time, Safeway can
GORDON IMPORT AUTOS
10th & ALMA
36 YEARS
A FRIEND INDEED
1973 AUSTIN MARINA
Not just a car it's a
series A — Three
models to see and test
drive today. How about
right now! The 4-dr.
sedan is completely
equipped. A radio and
an automatic
transmission are the
only extras.
GORDON IMPORT
AUTOS LTD.
Dealer Lie.
No. D 1943
3695W I0TH
VANCOUVER
733-8105
SERVICE   •   PARTS
Authorized
Dealer
SALES   •
only open one new store in each
city.
The boycott committee points
out, however, that Safeway still
remains without any competition
in the two cities and the court order
does not apply in the rest of the
province.
PONDEROSA CAFETERIA
on the West Mall
ANNOUNCES
EXTENDED SERVICE
Commencing Mon., Oct. 1, 1973
Mon.-Thurs.
Fri.
Spaghetti suppers
Our specialty
8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
refreshments
Tues. & Thurs.
B.C.Tel
B.C. Hydro
Collections
University
Pharmacy
FREE
DELIVERY
LTD.
ONE BLOCK EAST OF THE GYM ON UNIV. BLVD.
THE WINNERS!
Guessing $72, Jim Martens won a 10-speed.
Other winners included:
N. Martens ($72). World Globe
Tim Sebastian ($69.35). World Globe
Kirk Tougas ($72.50). T-shirt
Luke Quisquaker ($69.29). T-shirt
Lmda Shaw ($69.25). T-shirt
Deborah Bruser ($69.00). T-shirt
Correct amount in "Jar": $70.90 (& 1 slug)
STORE HOURS:
9 a.m. til 10 p.m.
Every Day
Except Sunday 12-8
A NEW CONCEPT
in hair cutting and styling
SANCT U HAIRY
A   newly  designed   room   at  the  back  of  our   regular salon
specializing in blow-waving and mod stylings.
About Town Hair Stylists
4603 West 10th
(One block from campus gates)
224-4384
*
From the Republic of China^
TAIPEI TAIWAN
by arrangement with HAROLD SHAW
»<Ur *
FIRST U.S.     ^££&ji£j¥&!       Featuring:
national     T^BB£    ■ THE ART OF KUNG FU
™he 2.000 year old Chinese ■ RITUAL SWORD FIGHTING
Opera Theatre ■ A Magnificent      ■ BREATHTAKING  ACROBATICS
Spectacle • Lavish Costumes and _ eiNfilNfi   DANCING    MIME
Exquisite Pageantry . Dramatic     ■ alNtalNta, UANUINVj,   mime.
and Daring Entertainment. ■ ENCHANTING   MUSIC & DRAMA
/(OPENS NEXT FRI. - TWO SHOWS ONLY^
OCTOBER 5 and 7
Ic3 Q.E.T.-*:30p,m.
■    V-. Tickets: $6.50, 5.50, 4.50, 3.50
Vancouver Ticket Centre (683-3255)
All Eoron's Stores, ond other V.T.C. Outlets.
50% OFF
on top two prices
with A.M.S. cards
CP Air and the Vancouver symphony orchestra launch
20fli CGNlllKY
SOUND TREK
Saturday, October 6 at 8:30
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
GUNTHER SCHULLER
"the Protean Man of Music" conducts
Ives Sets Nos. l'& 3
Schuller Tre Invenzione
Schonberg        Erwartung
with dramatic soprano Linda Phillips
Tickets NOW at the Vancouver Ticket Centre
Adults ONLY S10 $12 $15
STUDENTS HALF-PRICE
for all 4 super-concerts
singles $3.50 $4.50 S5.50
call 683-3255 to charge to your Eaton account
Sponsored by CP Air tHd CP

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