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The Ubyssey Nov 1, 1966

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Array Vol. XLVIII, No. 20
wumssiv
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1966
Trip
or treat
^-Jft--i-i-_-Ma
■  '' *Y
3^6
2^4-3^16
—derrek webb photo
YOU TOUCH MY DRUM and I'll skewer you, says vicious attendant at the World University Service Treasure Van. But she will sell you the drum, or a pair of sheepskin slippers,
or an abalone ring — if you have the cash. The open market continues until  Friday.
Council studies democracy
for university students
\| * N|    MOV    ) vjbb      ■„- ;
Late ^ayffy
■--.With the great pumpkin in
the chair, student council Monday formed a new committee
to co-ordinate all student activity toward injecting democracy and reform in the university.
The pumpkin was an orange
jack-o-lantern, perched on a
stool in front of Alma Mater
Society president Peter
Braund, who was appropriately dressed as a shabby viking.
The committee is called
Students for a Democratic
University, proposed by second vice-president Carolyn
Tate and first vice-president
Charlie Boylan.
Both Boylan and Tate were
not costumed, but four other
councillors were for the Hallowe'en meeting.
"The SDU committee," said
Tate, "will not be a policy
body, but will instead formulate action plans for council
to democratize the student environment.
"It is analogous to last
year's Education Action Program, but there are significant
differences in that it will cover
broader problems,"  she said.
Council unanimously approved the new committee,
which will meet with all interested students Friday evening at Tate's home — 1291
West Fiftieth.
In other business, council
approved a recommendation
from housing coordinator, Ray
Larsen, that the housing action committee visit the Uni
versity of Washington residences in Seattle.
The committee will study
the favorable aspects of the
Seattle dorms with regard to
UBC's proposed new residences.
Education president Wayne
Wiebe criticized The Ubyssey
for not printing information
about this week's education
activities.
Braund recommended that
undergrad society presidents
discuss such problems with
the editor and inform themselves about the paper's news
policies.
Ubyssey editor John Kelsey
said the education omission
was an error.
Two students are still needed for each of three administration   advisory   committees.
Council members appointed
so far are Charlie Boylan on
the residence committee, Jim
Lightfoot, traffic, and Lome
Hudson, food services.
Next summer's CUS seminar needs a coordinator. The
seminar, tentatively called
"Community Organizing i n
the University," will be held
in the Gulf Islands. CUS must
raise $20,000 to pay for the
conference, of which half must
come from UBC and half from
co-sponsor Simon Fraser Academy.
OF BRITlSB f
rules stay'
Makepeace
By   KRIS   EMMOTT
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Dons and residence fellows at a lower mall residence
have moved to end women's late-leave restrictions and let
UBC co-eds come and go as they like.
The dons and resident follows of Phyllis Ross house, a
women's residence, Sunday
asked housing czar Malcolm
McGregor to abolish the late
leaves system.
They said they were tired
of keeping careful accounts of
how many late leaves each
girl has used up.
They also dislike having to
punish girls who forget to sign
out or take too many late
leaves.
Reasons for the request
were stated in a letter Friday
to Miss Lorna Makepeace, supervisor of women in residence.
At present curfew is at 11
p.m. Monday to Thursday and
midnight Friday to Sunday.
First year students are allowed two late leaves — until 4
a.m. a year, and four three
o'clocks.
Rules are less strict for second year students. Girls over
21 and students in third and
fourth year are allowed unlimited four o'clocks.
No late leaves are permitted Sunday nights.
Breaking rules brings a lecture or cancellation of further
late leaves for a specified
period.
Asked Monday when a decision would be made, McGregor said: "Oh, I don't
know. There's no rush.
"I will have to ask the advisory committee, and then decide."
Miss Makepeace was not in
favor of the proposed change.
"Housing has a  certain  re-
malcolm McGregor
. . . not in rush
sponsibility to the parents of
these girls," she said.
The housing administration
booklet Life in Residence
states: "The University does
not assume responsibilities
that naturally rest with parents. It is the policy of the
university to rely on the good
sense and taste of students for
the preservation of good moral
standards."
"I wish you could hear.some
of the telephone calls that
come in," Miss Makepeace told
the meeting.
"I had one mother tell me
she wouldn't let her daughter
come to university unless she
was living in dorms."
"Perhaps we should start
educating the mothers," answered one resident fellow.
SHOCKS DISBELIEVERS
Witch scrounges for goodies
By   SUE   GRANSBY
The Hallowe'en witch flew
through Brock Hall Monday
and shocked the (cackle) disbelievers.
"Enough to fill a cauldron",
she screeched as she hopped
impishly around displaying
her bounty.
Bearded and sandaled, draped in Scottish flag and topped with a UBC beanie, she
had made the rounds trick-or-
treating her way, through
Brock.
"With a touch of my wand,
I changed my broom into a
brief case into which I stuffed
all the goodies", said she.
"A french fry that was so
graciously donated, yechhk,
no wonder it was given away
— it belonged in the garbage".
She said the lemon cough
drops would come in handy
during a cold Hallo's eve.
"A curse on the person that
gave me the postcard but that
39 cents might come in handy,"
she said.
"The crumpled napkin saved
my raven locks from drops of
the brew some witch calls
coffee."
She had some complaint
about her wand being dissolved when she tried to stir it.
"It was wise to forgo the
wicked  attempt   to   burn   my
BROCK WITCH
. . . cackle
beard and give me the matches
instead", she said.
"What did that funny looking boy mean by 'stamp on it
before it starts molting'? A
curse on him and his family
anyway."
The witch claimed she met
all kinds of odd people.
"That poor fellow in the A-
MESS office. Is that all he can
say . . . 'you're kidding, you're
kidding, you're kidding'"? she
said.
"All in all you people aren't
such bad things. I'm going to
have to get to know you beeter
—in fact I will tonight—I got
invited to all kinds of parties. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November  1,   1966
Don't knock Red Guard
China visitor tells press
—kurt hilger photo
KER-LEAF GOES pretty co-ed Mary Ussner, arts 2, daintily
tripping over a pile of leaves as she tries to rid the campus
of the brown and yellow nuisances.
Centennial goes,
but UGEQ opts out
MONTREAL (CUP-PEN) — L'Union Generale des
Etudiants du Quebec won't participate in celebrations commemorating Canada's Centennial, a UGEQ spokesman announced here recently.
Western pressmen were called "criminal" Monday for their
failure to give accurate coverage to activities of China's
Red Guard.
Asian studies grad student
Clive Ansley, just back from
a tour of China, made the
accusation in the first lecture
of the China teach - in at
UBC's auditorium.
"In the Western system of
creative journalism newspapers print pure fiction," he
charged.
He claimed the current portrayal of the Red Guard
streaming through the streets
of Peking terrorizing foreigners and others who displeased
them were "utter fabrication."
"In reality," he said, "the
Red Guard demonstrations are
aimed at those in the Communist party who have capitalist leanings, academic reactionaries, and counter-revolutionaries who have been amassing
arms."
"The Red Guard is 90 per
cent students of the high
school and university level.
The remainder is from groups
of young workers."
"The group's purpose is to
carry the cultural revolution
needed to imbue the younger
generation with the spirit of
the revolution,"  Ansley said.
The United States had counted on the younger generation
to be of a more reasonable
frame of mind, he stated.
"They cannot count on it
now".
The message of the cultural
revolution is being taken
through the country by a series of "long marches in miniature".
Groups of Red Guard mem-
In a letter to Quebec's centennial service director, Pierre
Le Francois, UGEQ vice-president of public affairs, said
UGEQ feels centennial celebrations are projects "which
aim to celebrate a regime
which hinders the French-
Canadian people from realizing itself".
The letter followed an invitation from the University of
Alberta inviting French-Canadian students to participate in
Second Century Week, a cultural, academic and athletic
festival jointly sponsored by
U of A and the University of
Calgary.
While some Canadian universities are considering withdrawing support from Second
Century   Week   and   one   has
Fag prices up,
smokers cough
Brock Hall weed machines are the last in the city
to feel the inflationary
pinch.
Cigarettes in the machines, operated by The Bay
■went from 40 cents to 45
cents Monday.
It's now 2.25 cents per
weed.
done so, the University of
Toronto's students' council has
voted to support the $291,000
festival.
Cash crisis
hits U of A
Century Week
EDMONTON (CUP) — Second Century Week, the major student contribution to
Canada's centennial, has a
$31,000 financial headache.
Dave Estrin, the $291,000-
project's director, said a growing budget and lack of support
from some universities are
causing   problems.
"We now have $242,775 in
our coffers," a SCW spokesman said, and an additional
$17,000 is expected from business, industry and provincial
governments.
This still leaves a $31,000
gap.
The money won't be coming
from the University of Victoria, which withdrew its support for the cultural, athletic
and academic festival, because
.the University of Alberta withdrew from the Canadian Union of Students.
bers have been released from
studies by the closing of the
schools and have been transported at government expense
all over China.
"They stop to help the peasants get in the harvest on the
way," said Ansley.
The picture of the Guard
arbitrarily changing street
names is false, he said.
"They suggest changes to
the local council who discuss
its merits and then act on it if
they feel it is worth it."
The word of Chairman Mao
is gospel.
"Members of the Guard we
talked to didn't believe he
was a rich peasant".
Ansley    added    that    other
members were hostile to questions asking whether there
was any difference beween
the mass following of Mao and
that of Hitler.
"We soon learned that question was not discussable," he
said.
The news from the other
side of the world was sketchy
he said.
During the months he_jyas_
there he heard nothing of Canadian    affairs    except    that
housewives   were    on    strike
against high food prices.
"The Chinese papers give
little news from the West except the activities of Chinese
who are abroad."
The Huberman Educational Institute Ltd.
TUTORIAL COLLEGE
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CITY
ZONE No.         PROVINCE.. Tuesday,  November  1,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
—kurt hilger photo
HOLD STILL DAMN bubble says Joe Geographer as he tries to take the altitude of Main
Mall for a survey course. Someone forgot to tell him that there is no bubble in an altimeter.
Mac wants mediator job,
but nobody's hiring yet
By JOHN APPLEBY
Retiring UBC president
John Macdonald said Friday-
he is looking for a job that
hasn't been created yet.
He told a press conference
at the faculty club he wants
to work on a "Grants commission that would act as a liaison
between the various institutions of higher education in
the province and the provincial government.
At present there is no such
structure in B.C. although it
exists in a limited form in Ontario.
"The purpose of a grants
commission would be to
strengthen relations with the
government without harming
the internal structure of the
university,"   said Macdonald.
The commission iwould sort
out requests from the various
institutions and pass them to
the government together with
its own recommendations.
The commission should be
completely non-political, Macdonald stressed.
Under the terms of the proposals put forward at the recent federal-provincial fiscal
conference, the federal government would hand over the
money for education to the
provinces and then leave the
distribution up to provincial
authorities.
If the federal government
considers that higher education is no longer a matter of
national concern, "what is
left?" he asked.
Asked whether he thought
the provincial government was
lukewarm to UBC, Macdonald
replied: "I do not think that
the provincial government has
Councillors differ
on Mac's walkout
Alma Mater Society president Peter Braund Friday
blamed the 'intolerable burden of the office," for president
John Macdonald's resignation
During a noon rally in Brock
lounge, Braund said the president's move was "a sincere and
regrettable shock from most
students' point of view."
First vice-president Charlie
Boylan recalled his immediate
reaction to the news as "so
what".
"Students were outside of
any of the president's decisions and student problems will
remain the same," Boylan said.
According to Braund, Macdonald's role as fund-raiser
contributed most to his decision. He cited Premier W. A. C.
Bennett's   and   the   provincial
government's lack of concern
for higher education.
Many students expressed the
view that faculty and staff do
not have the insight to examine student problems, and
that their main attitude was
"don't rock the boat".
Turning to financing, Boylan
speculated that part of money
recently allotted by the federal government for education will be channelled into
B.C. power projects.
Braund called on the students to "work with the administration" in an effort to
receive more funds from the
provincial government.
really recognized that the cost
of education at UBC."
He specifically mentioned
expanding costs of graduate
and professional education.
"Federal grants give four
times the weight to grants in
these areas," he said.
Regarding the eight month's
notice he gave, he said the
board of governors needs
enough time to find a successor and he wanted to make the
changeover period as smooth
as possible.
He recommended that the
faculty "consider the responsibility and the role of academic administrators.
"Too many decisions are
made by committees rather
than by administrators. This
removes the opportunity for
creativity from the job of administrators."
"Committee decisions are
the result of compromise between the opinions of vested
interests," he said.
Commenting on his five
year at UBC, Macdonald said:
"Our budget has doubled to
about $40 million."
"The students are more content than they were and there
are no major battles at the moment," he said.
He admitted he had been
thinking of retiring for some
months and felt that now is
the best time.
"Six months from now I
might be in the middle of a
■battle."
Asked whether he thought
things would be tougher for
his successor he said "the opposition and the public are
now more concerned" about
the affairs of higher education.
"If the money does not
come, the university cannot
accept students.
"UBC is going to have to get
a ceiling and this will be hard
for a public university."
CUS LOSES
Islanders quit;
Acadia threatens
CHARLOTTETOWN (UNS) — Tiny St. Dunstan's University, following the lead of seven universities, has quit the
Canadian Union of Students.
The students voted in a referendum to leave the 160,000-
member national union, beset
this fall by its most serious
crisis in years.
St. Dunstan's feels that CUS
has overstepped its bounds in
formulating national and international policy, and that it
is not representative of Canadian students.
These feelings are shared to
consider Acadia's proposed
withdrawal   from   CUS.
Acadia contends that CUS
has carried the universal accessibility question too far.
John Coombs, CUS chairman,
claims the national union
wants free education with no
strings attached.
Discontent with CUS aims
and benefits arising from CUS
membership sparked the St.
Dunstan's referendum said student union president Charlie
McMillan.
"Aside from the dubious
benefits of mere fact of membership in CUS, it is now important to consider what else
is worthwhile from them,"
McMillan said.
At Acadia, a small pro-CUS
minority says it feels Acadia
should stay in CUS and fight
to keep the government aware
of students and their needs, a
pro-CUS  spokesman said.
Reliable sources say Acadia
is considering the Atlantic Association of Students as a pos-
ible alternative to CUS. Although Acadia withdrew from
the AAS last year, it may rejoin if the association can be
turned into a strong regional
unit acting as a pressure group
against CUS.
Red horde
riots gamely
The red horde will battle
Forestry in UBC's annual chariot race Thursday in UBC
stadium.
Each team has 35 men pulling, with the president and
vice-president of each faculty
steering.
Don Allen, chariot race coordinator, said "to insure that
the race doesn't deteriorate
into a riot, there will be a
joint engineering-forestry police squad of over 100 men.
This squad will be neutral and
keep al spectators off the
track.
"Anyone interfering with the
race will be held and dealt
with later," he warned.
Also featured Nov. 3 is the
Teacup Game, a ludicrous
football game fought between
nursing  and  home  economics.
Last year the crowd topped
5,500 and donated over $1,500
to the crippled children's fund.
DR. WILLIAM GIBSON,  UBC
professor of medicine speaks
Saturday, sponsored by Vancouver Institute. His topic is
President Wesbrook — His
University and His City.
Czar solid;
no booze
in dorms
Housing Czar Malcolm McGregor says campus residences
must stay dry.
Commenting on a story in
Friday's Ubyssey that drinking
was now allowed in dorms of
Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., he said: "I don't
care what they do in any other
part of the world. Any student
caught drinking in UBC dorms
will be expelled."
Georgetown University directors had legalized liquor to help
students develop personal
responsibility and to end the
pretence of enforcing an un-
enforcable rule.
"UBC is a public institution
and must obey the provincial
drinking laws," McGregor said,
noting that Georgetown was a
private Catholic college.
"All students must be treated equally, since it is impossible
to control the 21 age limit
among drinking students," he
.'■aid. "The closing of the
Georgia beer parlor proved
this."
McGregor said that he was
not in complete agreement
with the law, but added: "A
toad law is not changed by
breaking it."
Asked about possible coeducational residences in
future, McGregor said he doubted that most students wanted it.
"At least most girls
wouldn't," he said. "Not all
people are strong-willed."
Not amused
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Tangerine and opalescent
ivory blorgs, their thick hides
shimmering in the southern
sun, danced around the maypole today. Gynecologists observing the blorg tribal rites
were not amused. ~-"*>*n?m
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opiniont are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department,- Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and  editorial writing.
NOVEMBER 1, 1966
Education has produced a vast population
able to read but unable to distinguish what is
worth reading.
—George Macaulay Trevelyan
SSSSSSSSSiS*
Big mother
Shades of Betty Friedan and the feminine mystique—
they're trying to spring the chickens from the dormitory curfew.
It should have happened 50 years ago, along with
universal sufferage, but somehow it has taken until
now for resident fellows and dons to ask the axe for the
dormitory   late-leave   system.
It's taken 50 years because of an antiquated idea, that
every 19-year-old girl needs a mother to set her hours,
even though housing's own rule book disclaims a wish to
play surrogate parent.
Against its stated wish, housing does play mommy —
a mother corsetted by elaborate leave calculations, long
series of locked doors and armed guards with great rings
of keys who escort UBC's female children from date to
sign-in book to bed as if they were Oakalla inmates just
in from the corrall.
The truth is some mothers don't trust their daughters
to be adults and some do—but the answer isn't and never
was mother games for everyone.
The girls involved in the charade have a simple solution to late-leaves—don't sign out, and momma don will
never know you didn't come in.
The drawback to the ad hoc solution is after 11 p.m.
a girl who didn't sign out can't come in until morning,
no matter how badly she needs to: if she does, she loses
all the late leaves she's managed to save up.
But then women's residence supervisor Lorna
Makepeace says she gets letters and phone calls from
mothers who want to be sure their children are safely
tucked in bed and that's why the late-leave system
persists.
A condition of residence admission could be a declaration of independence signed by the student and her
parents—and* those who are not independent at age 19
might be stqffed into one residence with all the iron
curfews a militant mom could ask.
But on behalf of the girls who don't want to be
bound by the strictures of the minority, cheers for the
dons and cheers for their typically feminine reasoning.
I The dons and resident fellows haven't asked foliate-leave abolition out of humanity, femininity or sufferage—instead, the freedom push is a cry for relief
from the bookkeeping pain that accompanies a leave
system.
Such are the ways of women, we guess, and it's the
same female logic that often keeps a girl safe long
after 11 p.m.
And if it takes a stupid reason to do a sensible
thing, use the stupid reason.
Wryly spoken
If consistency is the hobgloblin of little minds, UBC
housing czar Malcolm McGregor must be great.
Playing spin the bottle with the best of them, he
decrees any student caught drinking in dorms will be
expelled.
But McGregor knows as well as any residence
student a Friday night corridor sniff would solve the
on-campus housing shortage faster than you can say
chug-a-lug.
Caught is the key word — nobody ever is.
This is the same McGregor who often and loudly
blows the bull horn of the law, urging order by regu*
lation and demanding strictest respect for the Word from
on High.
Take a bow and have a beer, Malcolm.
f'i" ,>i"'■/,'■ V{"-,"'% '„   .,
LUNG, LUNG
BY  GABOR  MATE
Recognizing the Mao
The REAL story behind this week's China
teach-in:
My friend Actually Josephine and I were
sitting in my room, turning on with the
laughing gas from whipping cream cans, as
we usually do on Monday mornings. All of
a sudden the telephone rang.
"Lling, lling, lling," went the telephone.
"Must he a call from China," said Actually J. "Chinese telephone can't pronounce
the 'rr' in 'rring'. Let me answer it."
"How now brown cow ?" he said, picking
up the phone.
"Is not blown cow," replied a voice.
"Your mind is blown,"
said Actually J. "We are
taking a trip with Readi-
Whip."
"I not underste-d 'take
a   tlip  with   Leadi-Whip,"
said the voice.
MATE "Oh,"   said   Actually   J.
trying to toe friendly
I quickly grabbed the phone from his hand.
"Hello," I said, "is that you, Mao ?"
"Yes. Hi, Gabe-baby. Who is that guy who
didn't lecognize me ?"
"Lester Pearson," I replied quickly. "But
he might change his mind soon."
"No," said Mao, "I mean just now, on
the telephone."
"Oh," I said, that's just a friend of mine.
Don't worry about him. He will recognize
you before Lester Pearson will."
"That's what I am actually phoning
aibout," confided Mao.
"Why haven't you got Pearson to recognize me yet ?"
"Well," I said, "it's not entirely up to me.
Pearson doesn't always listen to me. Sometimes he will consult even Lyndon Johnson
first."
"NO!" cried Mao. "I thought you had
Canada all sewn up and safely under control !"
I hummed and hawed for a while, but then
finally had to admit this just wasn't true.
"Humm and haw," I said several times.
"But this isn't quite true."
"Do you know what this means?'* said
Mao, after an ominous pause.
"No! Not that!" I cried. "Give me just
one more week. I'll do anything. I'll organize
a revolution. I'll sign up all the girl scouts
for the Red Guard ! Anything! Just don't
send me to work in a fortune cookie
factory !"
"All right," said Mao. "One more week."
What could I do ? I had breakfast, and on
my way to the bathroom to wash my teeth
I organized the teach-in.
EDITOR:
John Kelsey
Managing
.    Richard Blair
News              _  __
_         .   Carol Wilson
City      __  ..     ...
_   ..    Danny Stoffman
Photo
Powell Hargrave
Page Friday    _
Claudia Gwinn
Focus
Rosemary Hyman
Ass't News
-    -      Pat Hrushowy
CUP    .     ......
 Bert Hill
Ass't Photo
Dennis Gans
Urgent meeting today at noon
in editor's office for all sports
writers.
Witch-hunting Sue Gransby
floated over Boni Lee, John Appleby, Ron Simner, Pat Lidkea,
Kathy Hyde, Norman Gidney,
Tom Morris, Charlotte H a i r e ,
Murray the filer McMillan, Lin
Tse-hsu, Kris Emmott, Angela
Ottho, and Kathi Harkness, who
pounded  typewriters.
Boss Kurt Hilger guided shut-
termen Derreck Webb, Don Kydd,
John Tilley, and Photosoc, who
kindly loaned an enlarger.
Don Maddin and Margaret Fair-
weather eyed the sports scene. Tuesday,  November 1,  1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  5
LETTERS TOi THE EDITOR
Who the hell'
Editor,  The Ubyssey:
Who the hell is this publicity-starved Gabor Mate? I
am referring to the column
Shock and Disbelief in Friday's Ubyssey and his leap
from the second-story EUS office while clad in a strait
jacket.
If he believes the students'
claim of shock and disblief to
Dr. Macdonald's resignation
hypocritic, why not say so
in so many words?
And what has the fact that
Dr. Macdonald holds a degree in dentistry, or Lyndon
Johnson and the war got to
do with this incident?
If he thinks more communication between president and student necessary,
then explicitely state it as
such, instead of hiding behind the curtain in saying,
"I could never get an appointment with him." I find
his articles particularly this
one, not at all funny — in
fact, sickening.
As to his acrobatic stunt I
cannot see it as fear, but only
as another of his efforts to
draw the spotlight on himself, 'Mate the Great'.
Instead of writing useless
columns and showing disrespect for our president, perhaps the Great Mate would
like to perform more spectacular, and more dangerous
stunts for the public's amus-
ment.
KENNETH   K.   AU.
Eng. 2
Irresponsibility
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I did not quite understand
what President Macdonald
meant by "irresponsibility"
among students until I read
your editorial following the
announcement of his resignation.
JEAN  BEDARD
'Serious threat'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The Dissenters Club is a
serious threat to the future
of our university. This club,
as its name implies, dissents
against everything it can, including the policies of the
university, the various faculties of the university and the
AMS.
It is a disgrace and a shame
that such a  club is  allowed
here. The AMS should investigate this club and stop
its activities.
There is no harm in the
friendly rivalry between university faculties, but when
a club starts to put up posters
which can slander these faculties and indirectly the university, this club should be
dissolved.
There is enough dissent
around without having some
crack-pots try to start a civil
war on campus.
I appeal to all students to
write to the AMS and demand the dissolution of the
Dissenter's Club.
NON-DISSENTER
Insidious threats
Editor, The Ubyssey:
With regard to the comments attributed to one Flack
of the Blue Guard (or was it
the Flat Earth Society?) and
his apparent demands for a
UCC grant, backed up by a
threatened petition if such
demands are not met, I would
point out that membership
alone does not entitle a club
to a grant as of right; this
provision is intended as a
guideline only.
The fact that Flack is UCC
vice-president will have no
bearing on the grant. The fact
that the Blue Guard has a
majority on the UCC executive <insidious, if not invidious, eh wot?) will have no
bearing on the grant.
And any 'threat' will quite
possibly have the opposite effect. Flack should remember
(and he will be reminded)
that the Blue Guard's constitution may be summarily revoked at any time, either by
UCC or by the epitome of
student wisdom, students'
council.
By the way, Flack should
suggest a monarchy to the
AMS constiutional revisions
committee, headed by Charlie Boylan. I'm sure the idea
would get a full and sympathetic consideration.
MIKE   COLEMAN,
UCC  President
'Only three years
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I expect that you will be
for the next president of this
university, as you have been
for the present one, an inexhaustible  fount of  good   ad
vice and friendly encouragement.
Dr. Macdonald's successor
may perhaps last only three
years.
PAUL   LeBLOND
'Lofty content'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Fridays forum (?), re Macdonald's resignation was the
epitomy of futility. They said
they wanted to discuss the
resignation. Lofty intent. They
discussed it, and man, what
lofty content.
It takes some pretty lofty
thought not to realize that the
problem isn't Macdonald's
resignation but Premier Bennett's apparent apathy towards
what the lofty call higher education.
It takes the same kind of
mind not to realize that once
you have the problem pegged,
the idea is to do something
about it — like bringing Bennett to UBC, putting him on
the platform and letting dialogue run its course.
Sticking pins in effigy is not
only futile, it's frustrating.
HENRY REMPEL,
Arts 3.
'Mime boycott'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We urge all responsible
students to join us in the
boycott of the San Francisco
Mime Troop's production of
A Minstrel Show or Jim
Crow A-Go-Go, which will be
on your campus on November 10.
Through infiltration w e
have discovered that several
members of this band have
offensive body odor, and
others have strange feelings
toward their mothers.
Do not be deluded by
phoney academic liberalism.
Some sides of an argument
need not be known, lest in
their leftist, deviate, brainwashing cunning, they shake
the foundations of your right,
white, fredom-loving, property-owning, faith - in -1 h e -
American-way.
MRS. ETHEL PLUMMER
Mothers of the American
Revolution
Maple Leaf Forever
OigjfDO
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
STUDENT'S COURT-
NOTICE OF HEARING:
Take notice that the Student's Court will hear charges
of the eligibility of the Arts Undergraduate President,
Don Wise, to hold office under the Arts Undergraduate Society Constitution in Room 25 of Law Hut G-l
at 12:30. Friday the fourth day of November, 1966.
Clerk of the Court, Murray M. Hanna.
VISITATION
HIGH  SCHOOL
COMMITTEE:
Students interested in participating in a joint U.B.C.-
S.F.U. student high school visitation committee are
asked to apply in writing (stating interest, experience,
faculty, and year) to the Secretary, Box 54, Brock
Hall. First and Second year students are particularly
encouraged to apply.
1967 CANADIAN UNION OF
STUDENT NATIONAL SEMINAR
CO-ORDINATOR:
Applications are now being received for the Co-ordinator of the 1967 Canadian Union of Students National
Seminar to be co-hosted by the Universities of British
Columbia and Simon Fraser in August-September,
1967. Please state interest, experience, faculty and
year. Further inquiries and applications should be
directed to Miss Daphne Kelgard, Chairman, Canadian
Union of Students Committee, Box 153, Brock Hall.
STUDENT ADMINISTRATION
ADVISORY COMMITTEES:
Applications are now being received to select students
to sit on joint student-Administration advisory committees concerned with:
1. Food Services
2. Traffic and Parking
3. The Bookstore
4. Student Residences
Applications in writing stating interest, experience,
faculty and year should be submitted to the A.M.S.
Secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall.
C.U.S. CONFERENCES and SEMINARS:
Letters of application for the Laval Seminar on "La
Greve" (the Strike) to Ibe held on November 9-12 are
being received by the CUS Committee, Brock Extension 258. Applications must be in by November 1.
Applicants must speak French. Further information
from the CUS office 224-3242 (local 43).
Letters of application for the 7th Annual Conference
on Commonwealth Affairs, Jan. 24-28, 1967, will be
received until Nov. 3. The top will be Independence,
Instability and International Tension. Further information from the CUS office Brock Ext. 258.
Letters of application arc toeing received for the McGill
Conference on World Affairs, The New China and
International Community, Nov. 9-12th. Applications
must be in by Oct. 28. Further information at the
.    CUS office, Brock Ext. 258.
Letters of application for St. Paul's College 3rd Annual Conference on Canadian Affairs, "A Critique of
the Canadian Press", to be held Jan. 27, 28, 29 will
be received until November 7. Further information
from the CUS office. Brock Ext. 258.
EDUCATION -
FACULTY COMMITTEE:
Applications will be received until Fri., Nov. 5, to
select ten students in the Faculty of Education to sit
on a student-faculty advisory committee to recommend
adjustments and/or improvements in curriculum,
practice teaching and general administration. Applications should include personal information and qualifications as well as reasons for desiring inclusion on
this committee, and be sulbmitted to the Secretary,
Education U.S., Room 1, Education Building.
to vude^ftdoutyx?
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If they're
U.B.C. Gals or Guys
You'll find them in BIRD CALLS
Your Student- Telephone Directory
NOW  AVAILABLE — Only   75c
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE, BROCK HALL or UBC BOOKSTORE CUP ROUNDUP
FOCUS
B of G choices protested
LETHBRIDGE (CUP) —Students at the newly-formed
University of Lethbridge have
sent petitions to Alberta's
premier Ernest Manning protesting its recently-appointed
board of governors.
Two separate petitions protesting the type of people
chosen by education minister
Randy McKinnon received almost unanimous support from
students and faculty members.
Lethbridge Junior College's
students' union has also published a circular protesting
the expected appointment of
J. O. Johnson, present college
principal, as the new university president.
One of the main objections
to Johnson's appointment is
that he presently receives $19,-
000 per year as president and
has only a BA.
In their letter to Premier
Manning, the students said
they felt a university president should have a doctorate,
or at least some record of experience at the senior administration level.
Chinese out
MOSCOW (CUP) —The last
of the Chinese students assigned for study in the Soviet
Union have left Moscow under
a Soviet expulsion order.
Thus one of the few remaining fraternal links between
Soviet and Chinese Communism is broken.
The departure of the 55
Chinese students marks a particularly significant rupture in
party relations for student ex
changes among fraternal communist countries hold high
priority in ideological indoctrination.
The students were expelled
in retaliation to the Chinese
expulsion of Soviet and other
foreign students last month.
No dodger aid
SASKATOON (CUP) — University of Saskatchewan students attending a debate here
voted against a resolution that
students' council give financial
and   moral   aid   to   American
student draft dodgers.
An estimated 1,000 students
attended the debate, sponsored
by the students' council. Council members, however, did not
participate.
One student said the Canadian Union of Students is providing U.S. draft dodgers with
living accommodation in Ottawa.
The student later said that
while CUS doesn't have houses
sheltering draft dodgers, it is
supplying them with funds.
CUS president Doug Ward'
has written an open letter to
U of S students denying any
CUS involvement with draft
dodgers.
Leader probe
VICTORIA (CUP) —Victoria
College's critical analysis of
student government at Canadian universities will be published and circulated before
Feb. 1, student council president Stephen Bigsby has announced.
The analysis mandated to
Victoria College at the 30th
Canadian Union of Students
Congress in Halifax last month,
will study the limitations of
outmoded structures on new
activities and the self-perpetuation of student leadership.
It will also contain a psychological analysis of student
leaders themselves.
Victoria will distribute a
comprehensive questioninaire
entitled Student Representative Government: A Critical
Analysis of the Student Move-
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800 pro-light
EDMONTON (CUP) — About
800 University of Alberta students marched here — not
against student award plans
of the Canadian Union of Students, but for traffic lights.
The students, all Lister Hall
residence dwellers, began the
march across 87th Ave. just
as the homeward-bound rush-
hour   was   starting.
Marching single file, the
students snarled up traffic for
more than a block.
The aim of the march was
to get traffic lights installed at
the busy three-way intersection in front of the residence
complex.
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Evening Performance: Students $1.25. Others $1.75
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Students $1.50. Others $2.00.
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ENGINEERING
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HONORS SCIENCE,  ENGINEERING & COMMERCE
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Specific information can be obtained from our posters and your
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Page  6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November  1,  1966 FOCUS'
University government:
here come the profs
A discontent is spreading
on Canadian University campuses—not among the students,
but among the faculty.
Professors have decided
they want more say in planning the aims of education.
But the present organization
of authority in universities
almost entirely excludes professors from responsible planning positions.
In Ontario, where 14 pro-
vincially-assisted universities
and close to 5,000 faculty
employed by them almost
constitue a 'multiversity',
tensions between professors
and admnistration are nearing
a critical point.
And so the cry has gone out
—re-organi_;e university government.
In answer to this cry, each
Ontario university has established committees to consider
re-organization of internal
administration and governmental structure.
Three groups are involved:
the non-academic administration which is supposed to control only the daily functioning;  the faculty, whose role
By Peter Calamai. last
year editor of Ihe McMaster
Silhouette, via CUP Calamai is now a deskman at
the Hamilton Spectator.
has been, until now, mainly
teaching; and the board of
governors, or trustees, whose
original duty was to control
finances and raise funds.
Re-appraisal of the responsibilities of these three groups
was prompted by the publication of the Duff-Berdahl report this spring.
The report, commissioned
"to examine charges . . . that
scholars no longer form or
even influence university
policy, that a new, rapidly-
growing class of administrators is assuming control
and that gulf of misunderstanding is widening
between academic staff and
administrative personnel . . ."
found all charges to be at
least partially true, and
blames defective university
government structure for
most of the present tension.
The cry for re-organization
is being echoed by a second
and smaller group of faculty,
but for reasons more subtle
and fundamental.
'TO WRONG ENDS'
This group views the present orientation and structure
of universities not as mere
outmoded left-overs of a more
'humanistic' era but as a fulfillment of 20th century technological society.
Our universities are directed towards the wrong ends,
they chorus, and their rallying cry could be summed up
in a quotation from Lord
Bertrand Russell, British philosopher: "We are faced with
the paradoxical fact that education has become one of the
chief obstacles to intelligence
and freedom of thought."
A prominent McMaster pro
fessor states his contention in
a soon-to-be published article
on curriculum: "The chief purpose of the curriculum in all
Canadian universities is . . .
to facilitate the production of
personnel necessary to our
North American technological society."
Although the Duff-Berdahl
report opens the door for discussion, many professors find
it basically false because "it
prevents the question of university government being
raised in terms of the purpose
of the university."
SWITCH  DEBATE
They want to switch the
debate from university government to a discussion of
what a human being should
be concerned with knowing.
"We want the university to
have at least a double aim—
the training of personnel for
society's need, and the proper
education of individuals who
want an education," said Mc-
Master's faculty association
head.
This is an old argument—
education for education's sake
versus training for society's
needs, but these professors
want the two aims to be
mutually inclusive, not exclusive.
Professors have suggested
several courses of action to
accomplish these aims.
For students who want to
gamble, some professors have
proposed a system where students attend no formal classes, have no formal assignments, and write no formal
examinations.
That is, not until after four
years.
Then the student would
have to write a comprehensive examination on his field
of study—an examination set
by professors from another
university.
STUDENT ASSISTED
The student would be assisted during his four years of
study by a committee of faculty members who would plan
his curriculum. Under this
system a student could, for
example, study two such diverse subjects as mathematics
and    psychology.
Less drastic curriculum reforms include cutting down
on compulsory courses to allow students more ehoice,
and allowing students to carry reduced work loads if involved in extra - curricular
activities of an educational
nature.
But before the professors
can succeed in their re-organization scheme, they face at
least three major battles.
Battle number one will
probably be a power struggle
with presently - entrenched
board of governors members
who may be unwilling to accept any reduction of authority.
In Canadian universities,
the individual departments
make most of the decisions
concerning curriculum. If attempts to make curriculum
changes are to be successful,
these departments will have
to accept guidelines set down
by a coordinating committee.
Most important of all, a
major fight is inevitable if
universities try to shift their
role away from the training
of students to fit society's demands.
The other change •—■ from
graduating doers to graduating thinkers—appears more
difficult.
Here are two arguments:
"The salient characteristic
of the multiversity is massive
production of specialized excellence. The multiversity is
actually not an education
centre but a highly efficient
industry engaged in producing skilled individuals to
meet the immediate need of
business or government.
The first quotation is by a
McMaster professor, expressing a common feeling among
today's  university faculty.
ANOTHER BERKELEY?
The second argument was
written by Bradford Cleave-
land in a leaflet giving the
rallying cries to students during the Berkeley student revolts two years ago.
The four-month-long revolt
at the University of California's Berkeley campus involved mass meetings of up
to 7,000 students and brought
sweeping changes in the curriculum by the faculty and
daministration. The campus
chancellor was also forced to
resign by the student action.
The current discontent
among Canadian professors
appears to have all the makings of another Berkeley affair. Whether it becomes one
depends on the professors deciding — as did Mario Savio,
a Berkeley student leader-
that "the operation of the
machine has become so odious you've got to put your
bodies into the gears . . .
you've got to make it stop."
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CAMPUS INTERVIEWS ON
November 7, 8 and 9
POST GRADUATES - GRADUATES
UNDERGRADUATES
in
ENGINEERING — (Chemical, Mechanical, Civil)
—Permanent employment in engineering.
HONOURS GEOLOGY
—Permanent and summer employment in geology.
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING — <Options 1, 2, 3)
—Permanent  and  summer  employment  in   geology
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GEOPHYSICS
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PHYSICS AND GEOLOGY
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MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS
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HONOURS PHYSICS
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ENGINEERING PHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
Arrangements For Personal Interview
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Imperial     (€sso)
Seminars outlining employment opportunities available
to 1967. Graduates will be conducted as follows:
Engineering Career in Marketing and Refining
November 2 — 12:30 p.m.
CIVIL ENGINEERING  BUILDING - ROOM 201
Careers in Marketing for Art and Commerce Graduates
NOVEMBER 3 - 12:30 p.m.
HENRY ANGUS  BUILDING - 4th FLOOR
Tuesday, November 1,  1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7 Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November  1,   1966
•TV -.<
SUMMER TIME AND the living is easy mumbles Stanley Sunworshipper as he pauses during   Monday's   regression   into   summer.   Ho w can you study for midterms without rain ?
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Crossroads fights
white mystique
By KATHY HYDE
Many Africans associate the white man with the Euro
pean colonialist and have never seen a white man do any
work.
Wayne Mullins, arts 4, one
of three UBC students who
spent his summer working
with Operation Crossroads . . .
Africa, said the group is attempting to correct this attitude now prevalent in Africa.
Mullins, Frances Coates and
Bruce Johnstone, with 300
Americans and 30 Canadians,
spent nine weeks building
schools, hospitals, and community centres.
At a recruiting meeting Friday, Mullins said the group
was a private and voluntary
organization founded in 1959
and devoted to interracial
brotherhood.
Mullins stressed that the
was not a tourist affair — the
days were long and the work
was hard physical labor.
"One of the purposes of
Crossroads is to show the dignity of labor and to dispel the
notion now present in Africa
that anyone with an education
should not try to help the
people in the village from
which he came," said Mullins.
The UBC chairman for Crossroads, Jan Devries of the soil
science department, said that
the construction project is only
the vehicle for communication
between the North American
and the African.
Crossroaders live and work
with their African counterparts, and visit neighboring
villages and government officials in their spare time.
In this way they learn of
the problems of the contemporary African of all levels.
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\\
PRESENTS
FELIX GREEN'S
CHINA!
rr
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DOCUMENTARY
THURSDAY,  NOV. 3rd
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
COME FROM BEHIND
Birds win game
but lose players
SASKATOON (UNS) — The UBC Football Thunderbirds tried to play like the B.C. Lions this weekend in
Saskatoon but did not succeed — they won.
The Birds opened up a large
SFA falls
to Braves
hoop art
UBC bounced to victory in
their first basketball meeting
with SFA this year.
UBC Braves scalped SF's
Clansmen 61-49 in an Inter-
City Men's League game Saturday at War Memorial Gym.
Coach Norman Watts' Braves
got a 15-point performance
from rookie Gordon Hogg
with Sam Vandermulen, a returnee from last year, donating  12.
Score at half-time was
Braves 32, Clansmen 21.
High man for Clansmen was
Garry Field, who netted 14
points.
Approximately 200 people
saw the match.
Girl pucksters
UBC girls will have a
chance to clash hockey sticks
and skates with engineers,
Thunderbirds, and frat types,
this year.
An organizational meeting
for a grils' ice hockey team
will be held Wednesday noon
in Buch. 314.
first half lead of 20-1 against
the University of Saskatchewan Huskies, but managed to
lose most of their defensive
backfield in the process.
Defensvie halfback, Sonny
Brandt suffered a serious knee
injury and three linebackers
also went down with injuries.
The linebackers, Sam Kra-
vinchuk, Ben Stapleton and
Mo Hayden along with offensive guard Jim Fornelli had to
leave the game.
Brandt later returned to the
field to kick the winning
points when he connected on
a 22 yard field goal half-way
through the thrid quarter. The
final score was UBC 23, U of
S 22.
With the BC defensive back-
field weakened Saskatchewan's Walt Nibogie hit for
three touchdown passes in the
second half, each of which
Gord Garvie  converted.
Garvie also scored the single
point Saskatchewan got in the
first half.
The UBC points came on
touchdowns by Bob Sweet,
Lance Fletcher and Eric Sa-
vics with two conversions
from Brandt.
The Birds play the winless
University of Calgary Dinosaurs on Saturday at Varsity
Stadium.
UBC girls bounce to top
in Island doubleheader
UBC basketball Thunderettes lead the Inter-City Senior
"A" League after a two game
series against Victoria Rawl
ings this weekend.
UBC won the Victoria doubleheader, 52-41 and 57-50, to
gain four points and take a
two point lead over second
place Mount Pleasant Legion.
In Saturday's game Rawl-
ings led 27-24 at half time but
were unable to break through
UBC's arrowhead zone defense in the second half. Janet
Douglas from 'Penticton debut
ed   with  the  Thunderettes  by
scoring 17 points.
Marilyn Johnson added 16
for UBC while Victoria's Mary
Coutts led all scorers with 19
points.
In a repeat performance of
Saturday's contest, the Victoria team led 19-17 at the
end of the half but was unable to sustain the attack long
enough to win.
In Sunday's action, Pauline
Gensick, a member of the Ca
nadian national team, and
Janet Douglas  contributed  12
NS leads league
by dumping 'Birds
The UBC Soccer Thunderbirds fell from first place in
the  Pacific  Coast  Soccer  League  standings   on  Saturday.
In their game against the
North Shore Luckies,, the
Birds were beaten 1-0 in front
of their largest home game
crowd this year.
Bruce Ballam, the Birds
goalie was beaten on a 25 yard
shot by Don Hunter half an
hour after the starting whistle
for the only score of the game.
The Birds continually advanced on the North Shore
goal but they were unable to
end their attacks with goals.
Early in the second half
Ash Valdai, Bird forward, missed a golden opportunity to
score when his free kick
bounced off the goal post.
The Birds are now second
to North Shore in the legaue
and do not play their next
game until Nov. 11 when they
play Burnaby Villa at Callister Park.
points each to the UBC cause.
Victoria's Mary Coutts,
another plyacr on the national
team, led Rawlings with 32
points.
The Thunderettes defend
their standing Tuesday at 8
p.m. when they meet Vancouver Molsons, defending Ca-
ndaian champions.
Not  much  cash
but  you  travel
UBC may not have athletic
scholarships, but it has it's
own kind of enticement for
varsity team players.
Thunderbirds travel
throughout Western Canada
and the United States.
The football team, for example, travelled to Honolulu
to play the University of
Hawaii this year.
EDUCATION SPECIAL EVENTS
presents
FROM SAN FRANCISCO
Bruce Gladwin
NOW AT THE BUNKHOUSE
and The Great White Light
folk-rock
plus
Joe Mock
folk and blues
Has appeared at the Hungry i, and winner of Bunkhouse Hootenanny Contest
plus
Gerry Nakatsuka
folk and comedy
Has appeared at the Bunkhouse and opened the John York Music Hall in Victoria
TONIGHT - EDUCATION AUDITORIUM - 7:30 - 75c
$AVE ON AIR FARES
Group Fairs via Air Canada DC-8 to
Toronto and London, Ontario. $196
return economy (leaves December 19
and 21). Return any time, any flight
within one year.
Phone Mr. Paul Bourke for Further Information
521-6496
Some companies say
bachelor graduates
are a dime a dozen.
We don't.
Because we
are involved in almost every phase of economic
life in Canada, we're looking for men with a
broad outlook. Consequently, we don't restrict
ourselves by any means to graduates with
specialized backgrounds.
Banking has become both a highly competitive
and fast-changing business. The Royal Bank's
decentralized operations provide many
active management positions to men of diverse
inclinations and talents.
We'll be on campus soon. Meanwhile, why not
have a word with your placement officer today?
ROYAL BANK Page  10
T r( E'     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November  1,   1066
'NEW ATTITUDE-
HOP to review policy
New Democratic MLA predicted Monday sweeping NDP
policy shifts over the next
three years.
Ernie Hall (MLA Surrey)
predicted the changes to 30
students in a speech in Bu.
204.
"A new attitude is being developed," he said. "With the
introduction of six new NDP
representatives, there will be
different methods and different approaches."
"We will be reviewing our
policy in forestry, Indian affairs, economics, industrial development, and education," he
said.
The NDP will also investigate current inflation problems. "It seems before anybody discusses inflation, some
investigation is required," he
commented.
Hall   said   the   executive   is
Frat votes
girls in,
rush out
Palo Alto — Females have
been invited to join a fraternity at Stanford University.
Bet Chi fraternity has voted
to remove the male only restriction in their house, but
they admitted details have to
be worked out in regard to
female   boarders.
The same fraternity has voted to abolish the rush and the
black-ball system used on ini-
ates.
The fraternity will be open
to anyone who can pay the
dues.
The problems encountered
by the possible women's residence in the house will be
worked out by the members
before the plan is submitted
to the university administration for approval.
A Challenging
Career
Opportunity
Representatives of
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
PROBATION SERVICE
will interview
candidates
PROBATION
OFFICER
POSITIONS
Enquire immediately at the
University Office of Student
Placements for an appointment November 1 & 2, 1966.
determined  to  solve financial
problems  within the  party.
"The NDP was disgusted at
figures in a recent government
report of election expenses,"
he said.
Although the passing of
legislative bills has prevented
trade membership dues from
being sent to the party, Hall
predicts a great deal of trade
union interest.
The NDP  will also become
increasingly involved in municipal politics, he said.
Outsiders and supporters
will no longer be excluded
from the formation of NDP
policy. Previously policy was
set exclusively by the executive.
Hall appealed to the young
New Democrats for help in developing policy.
"Problems will be solved by
you people," he told the students.
Grants available to
male theology students
Grants for male theological students are now available through the Rockefeller Brothers Theological
Fellowship program.
The fellowships are open to male students under
age 31, who are seriously considering entering the
ordained Protestant ministry.
Fellowships will cover room, board, fees, books and
some personal expenses, at any accredited Canadian or
American theological college.
A faculty committee will interview students for the
program on Nov. 14, in Bu. 258.
Interested students should contact Miss Nash in
room 222 of the Math Bldg., for an appointment.
*:•*:
______        •> j-*-     ™ JgkT7^^r——«*S»" *&«
What it means to work where things are happening
It's having ability—and using it. It's a feeling of
personal pride. It's doing something really
meaningful. It's challenging and changing the
world. It's living. And doing. And professional
growth. It's excitement. It's now.
What's happening at IBM?
Just about everything under the sun—and
beyond. Twenty years ago, the electronic computer was just getting off the ground. In this
short time, it has come to be called the most
beneficial invention in history.
The pace of new applications is literally
fantastic. Business, government, law, education, medicine, science and the humanities.
All are affected by IBM's information and
control systems. Positively affected.
Chances are there's a place for you in the
growing world of information and control
applications.
Whatever your educational background, whatever your discipline, you could be a part of
what's happening at IBM.
Make a point to investigate the advantages of
this growth company with the IBM representative who will be visiting the campus October 31
through November 4.
Your Placement Officer can arrange an appointment for you. If you cannot attend the interviews, please write or visit the IBM office in
Vancouver at 1445 West-Georgia Street.
IBM
International Business Machines Company LlmtftMl
BIRD CALLS - Available Now
Be sure of your copy - buy early - limited quantity
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE AND  BOOKSTORE - ONLY 75 CENTS Tuesday, November 1,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
SCOTS  WIN  DEBATE
Haggis isna welfare
A member of the UBC debating club, defending his
views Monday against two
kilted Scots, said Canadian
wheat farmers work six weeks
of the year and relax all winter.
Andy Sandilands told 250
persons that the Canadian welfare state, through large subsidies, allows the farmers to
live a life of ease and luxury
with little effort.
"The farmer seeds in the
spring, sits back and enjoys
the prairie summer, harvests
in the fall — a total of six
weeks work all year — and
during the winter runs off to
Las Vegas," he said.
Sandilands and team mate
Allan Gould debated the affirmative of resolved: the welfare state has sapped individual interest. They lost to the
visiting Scots team.
Kilt-wearing Lord James
Douglas-Hamilton represented
the University of Edinbourgh
and   Ian   Forrester,   Glasgow
LORD      HAMILTON
. .  . all that is best
University. Both are studying
law.
Douglas-Hamilton, second
son of the Duke of Hamilton
and Brandon, is an honors history graduate  of Oxford  and
Gould said the welfare state
has significently changed individuals.
"The Indians of Canada in
1700 were independent. Now
they are complete wards of
the government", h e said.
"They are no longer concerned with their lot, Their interest has been sapped."
Douglas-Hamilton said the
welfare state allows the best
possible treatment for all.
"A certain basic standard is
necessary", he said. "We want
a system where every man
can achieve all that is best in
him."
Forrester said it is the certain duty of the state to help
its citizens.
"If we believe it is good to
send aid to foreign countries,
why is it lax, sinful and corrupt to do the same for our
own citizens?" he said.
Antiquated island,
charges planner
NANAIMO (UNS) — A UBC
sociologist said here Saturday
19 century town planning dominates Vancouver Island.
Dr. Leonard Marsh was-
speaking to the Vancouver
Island community planning
congress.
He told 10© members: "City
councils do not know how to
use professional planners. They
settle instead for amateurs."
He said town planners must
be made total partners in the
community.
Marsh pointed to British Columbia ghost towns.
"They are a result of reckless exploitation. We have been
barbarous in development tech
niques over the past 100 years,"
he said.
Marsh said some communities feel they must attract industry and everything else falls
into place.
"This is not true. A railway
yard and siding become a planners' nightmare."
Help, help
PANGO PANGO (staff) —
The leader of the great grey
blorgs currently in exile in
the mountains near this island
capital today asked the United
States for foreign aid in their
fight against the green blorgs
now in control of the city.
Latest Tar and Nicotine
Ratings on 25 Leading
Canadian Cigarettes
The current Reader's Digest
features a factual, new laboratory report showing the latest
tar and nicotine content of 25
leading Canadian cigarettes
and reveals that some actually
contain 200% — or more — tar
and nicotine than others. It
shows, that in some cases the
smoke from filter-tips actually
has a higher content, of these
injurious substances, than the
smoke from some plain ends.
It's in November Reader's
Digest — on newsstands now.
MARDI GRAS TRYOUTS
OCTOBER 31 to NOVEMBER 4
MALES: Monday and Wednesday
FEMALES: Tuesday and Thursday
BOTH: Friday
12 - 2:30
STAGE ROOM - NORTH BROCK
Set your sight in College
with glasses
OPTICAL DEPT.
LONDON f DRUGS
Limited
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS ONIV
Vancouver ■__^*_OTW«^^PWVVW   New w****"in**°r
677 GranvilU ||T|\TTTTEfl|TTTjTI      675 Columbia
Opp. THE BAY I ■!,*A _. 1 W 1 -L'A-lll°PP   *"■» * Novv
681-6174 ■■■____■■■■■««■■■■ ia 1-0751
SUITS!!    40  only
40 to 50?o OFF!!
Regularly 59.50 to  125.00 - Sale 39.50 to 68.50
SALE ENDS NOVEMBER 5
#(M*t&>
MEN'S WEAR
4445 West  10th
China Teach In
WEDNESDAY
Dr. Paul Ivory
"China as a Model for Development"
Brock -12:30 - Wednesday - 10c
Have you considered
the opportunities of a career
with The Mutual Life?
Why not obtain a copy of our Career Opportunities booklet from your Placement Office. It
describes the many rewarding positions available this year.
We would be pleased to discuss these careers
with you on
NOVEMBER 3rd & 4th
when a personnel representative will be visiting
your campus. Please contact your Student
Placement Officer for an interview.
The Mutual Life
ASSURANCE COMPANY OF CANADA
HEAD OFFICE: WATERLOO, ONTARIO/ ESTABLISHED 1869 Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November  1,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
From whence the Indian?
DESERET CLUB
Paul Rudolph speaks on the
Origin of the Indian, Wednesday at noon in BU. 104.
CHINA  TEACH-IN
Dr. Paul Ivory speaks on
China as a model for development, Wednesday at noon in
Brock lounge. Admission ten
cents.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Last minute tickets for Carlos   Montoya's   concert   Friday
at the Q.E., available from the
AMS cashier.
COMMERCE   LAW   CLUB
General meeting Wednesday
at noon in Ang. 410. Surprise
speaker, elections and free
coffee.
GEOPHYSICS
Gary   Boyd   will   speak   on
Ionosphere and Magnetic Mic-
ropulsations  in  Henn.   301   at
3:30 p.m. Wednesday.
POLAND'S   MILLENIUM
Dr.  John Norris  speaks  on
Polish   History   and    Self-De-
termination  in  Bu.   102  Wednesday at noon.
EDACT
Gabor    Mate   discusses   his
views  on   education   today   at
noon in Ed. lounge.
BRIDGE AND CHESS
Organizational meeting Wednesday at noon in Bu. 203.
NDP
Bob   Strachan   speaks  Wednesday at noon in Bu. 202.
I.R. OPTION CLUB
Meeting Wednesday at noon
in Ang.  415.
UN CLUB
Mr. Green will speak on the
Action-seekers
fester  at  SFA
Unity of action will be the
aim of the B.C. Assembly
of Students when it meets for
the first time Nov. 11-13 at
Simon Fraser Academy.
Delegates from all post-
secondary educational institutes in the province, will
attend.
The group, formed in January intends to establish
communications between the
provincial government and
the students, and to help alleviate common student problems.
Caribbean: A Political Culture Wednesday at noon in Bu.
219.
FENCING  CLUB
Lessons begin at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the Women's gym.
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
Dr. John  Conway will consider the Church in Nazi Germany   today   at   noon   in   Bu.
104.
ACE
Professor Cannon speaks on
Education in Africa with slides
Wednesday at noon in Ed. 204.
Non-members 10 cents.
PRELAW SOC
Joint meeting of Commerce-
Law,   Wednesday   at   noon   in
Ang.   410.   Surprise   speaker,
elections, coffee.
SEAFORTHS
Parade 7:30 tonight in UBC
Armory. Highland battledress.
COMMUNITY   PLANNING
Two films on urban renewals To Build a Better City:
Vancouver and Redevelopment in Windsor, Wednesday
noon in Lass. 102.
PRE MED
Vice-principal of Jericho Hill
discusses   the   School  for   the
Blind  Wednesday  at  noon  in
Wes. 201.
MUSSOC
Dancing   audition   Thursday
aat 8  p.m.  at Grace  Macdonald's School of Dancing, 2182
West  12th Ave.
IH
Tea and coffee party at IH
Wednesday 3 to 5 p.m.
ECONOMICS  SOC
Meeting  tonight   at   7:30  in
Kappa    Sigma     house,     2280
Wesbrook.
UBC   SCC
Meeting Thursday at noon in
chem. 250. Films will be
shown. Rally skull session
Friday. Time and room to be
announced.
ONTOLOGY
Alan   Hammond   speaks   on
Perversion   and   Drug   Addiction Wednesday at noon in Bu.
223.
WUS
Slides   on   Turkey   will   be
shown  today at  noon   in  the
upper lounge of IH.
BALKAN DANCE GROUP
Mbeting   Wednesdays   at   8
p.m. in hut L-5.
GAMMA DELTA
Lutheran  students: more  on
Bahai'sm,  Wednesday at noon
in Ang. 204.
SPECIAL  EVENTS
Dr. George Novak, speaks on
Marxism vs. Existentialism, today at noon in the auditorium.
Admission 35  cents.
LIBRARIANSHIP  CLUB
Meeting   Thursday   at   noon
in Bu. 225. A tour of the B.C.
Hydro building is planned.
PRE MED
Remember   medical   careers
conference.
Mousers take over campus
with week of talk and tea
Mickey Mouse will attempt a campus coup this
week.
Education Week kicked off with the Great Pumpkin dance, 8 p.m. Monday in the education lounge.
Speakers and an open-forum debate will be presented respectively Tuesday and Thursday noon in
Education 100.
Tuesday night is Folk Night with Bruce Gladwin,
The Great, White Light and Joe Mock entertaining at
7:30 p.m.
The Association for Childhood Education will hold
seminars Wednesday.
A grad student - faculty tea is scheduled for
2:30 p.m. Friday, in the education lounge.
ARLBERG
THE ORIGINAL SKI HUT
Cordially invites you to attend their
Eighth Anniversary Open House
between the hours of 9 a.m. and 9 p.m., Nov. 2, 3, 4.
Meet ski expert Art Furrer (Nov. 2) and Toni Sailer (Nov.
3) - 2 - 4 p.m.
(Refreshments and Gifts)
ARLBERG
SPORT HAUS
Downtown at
816  Pender  at Howe
and  at Whistler Mtn.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUNT-): OUTSIDE OP LIBRARY.
One silver bracelet. Apply Publications  Office.
LOST. TAIR GLASSES, BROWN
wood frame, blue lenses. If found
contact Jill Corner, 224-6106, after
6  p.m.
LOST. AT UNDERCUT. ONE RED
fibreglass hard hat with no hat
band, also one key chain, holding
two Chev. keys and plate replica
No. 100-144. Please phone 261-
3690.
LOST. EXPENSIVE EMBROIDER-
ed vest, part of Polish costume.
Does not belong to me but I am
responsible for it. Leave at International House Office, c/o
Carolyn   Charter,   Slavonic  Circle.
LOST. LADIES WATCH W_TH~A
black strap. If found please call
Ann  Taylor,   224-1238.	
LOST. GREEN CANVAS TENT
from Main Mall Tent City. Please
call   327-5153.   Reward.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO
took my man's black umbrella
from Chem. 160 Tues. between
noon and 3:30, please contact Sue
AM   6-0630.
LOST. STAPLE GUN OUTSIDE
Engineering Building, Homecoming Day. Finder Please phone 224-
9045, Rm. 4»1, evenings after 7:00
p.m.   Eric.
Greetings
12
GAYI.E: HAPPY ANNIVERSARY
dear and thanks for waiting up
in my patch for the great pumpkin  love and kisses.  Ed.
Coming Dances
12A
ED. II.S. INVITES YOU TO THE
Blue Grotto formal, Commodore
Sat., Nov. 5th, $5.00 ($4 with Ed.
card). Tickets in AMS office and
Ed  Building,   B.Y.O.B.
Special  Notices
13
EXAM JITTERS GOT YOU? NER-
vous? Tense? Don't Be! Brock
Hall,  Nov.  9,  12:30.	
USING ONLY 10% OF YOUR
brain? Find out why Brock Hall
Nov.   9,   12:30.	
MY MOTHER-IN-LAW BOUGHT
a Hookah from Treasure Van at
International House and tripped
out on a camel saddle. Open 12-5
and 7-10 in I.H. today and Saturday.	
Wanted
15  Help Wanted (Con't.)
BOY'S   BIKE,   WORKING   ORDER.
About  $10.   Phone   Ellen,   738-2485.
Travel Opportunities
16
A REVEALING FILM ON THE
new Communist China, Thursday,
Auditorium,   50c.	
SAVE ON AIR FARES
Group fares via Air Canada DC 8
to Toronto and London, Ontario.
$1!)6.00 return economy, leaves on
December 19 and 21. Return any
time any flight within one year.
Phone Mr. Paul Bourke for further   information.   521-6496.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'58   JAGUAR   XK-150   Coupe   $1,035.
Phone   Bob,   Room   213,   Sherwood
Lett,   224-9752.
MUST SELL OR QUIT SCHOOL!
'61 Corvette, excellent condition.
Two  tops  call  Jim   LA   2-0467.
1954 ZEPHYR IN GOOD RUNNING
order and body. A-l, phone Ber-
nie 224-9064  $145.
YELLOW '59 TR 3,  $650.00  PHONE
224-5031.
FOR SALE. 1962 M.G.A., BLACK,
glass slide windows, $1,260.88.
733-4858.
1950 PLYMOUTH. GOOD. CONDI-
tion. Recent engine overhaul.
Radio.   Offers.   738-8180   after   6.
3-HORSE     TRUCK     EXCELLENT
condition, 266-6398 or 261-4474.
Accessories & Repairs
22
IMPORTED CAR PARTS! SPORTS
car accessories! Metric tools! Get
them  all  at:
OVERSEAS    AUTO    PARTS
12th   &   Alma 736-9804
(10%    Student   Discount)
Automobiles Wanted
25
WANTED IMMEDIATELY — ANY
type of automobile. Will pay up
to $100. Phone Murray Brasseur,
224-9986.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
ASIAN STUDIES STUDENTS SEE
Felix Green's documentary on
Communist China, Thursday, Nov
3rd,  Auditorium.	
HE-ELECT     LOCKIE     FOR     MR.
Gullible,    1966.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quailify for our good driving
ates.   Phone   Ted   Elliott,   224-6707.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM — F & G-ll-
o p e n Monday-Friday 12.30-1.30.
Students  Faculty  and  Staff  Wel-
PIZZA PATIO CONTINUES TO
expand, specializing in Pizza
take-out and delivery. Pizza Patio's normal policy of making
part-time employment available
to those students over 21 with
clean drivers' licences to work
one or two evenings a week is
again in effect. Openings are
available at any one of their six
locations. For further information, contact 681-2822, 10-4. P.S.—
For   campus   delivery,    736-9422.
HAIR CUTS WHILE YOU WAIT!
Campus Barber Shop. 153 Brock
Hall.
FROM SAN FRANCISCO— BRUCE
Gladwin (now at Bunkhouse) and
the Great White Light folk rock
group. Joe Mock — folk, blues,
Gerry Nakatsuka — folk, Tuesday, November 1st. 7:30 Education   Auditorium   75c.
Transportation
14
WEST VAN CARPOOL, VICINITY
Taylor Way and Upper Levels,
requires one driver. Phone WA
2-7965.
Miscellaneous
34
KNITTED WEAR. SWEATERS,
skirts, dresses, all styles. Made-
to-order.   Tel.   224-3968.
OFFICE MANAGER
MALE: REQUIRED FOR UBC
Alumni Association to supervise
a small office staff and manage
all aspects of office operation:—
accounting — stock payroll —
mass mailings — records. Address
all applications in writing to: Mr.
Tim Hollick-Kenyon, Alumni Director, 252 Brock Hall, U.B.C,
Vancouver 8.
FEMALE:     APPLICATIONS     ARE
invited  for position  of
PROGRAM   DIRECTOR
of the
UBC    ALUMNI    ASSOCIATION
This   position   requires   a   young,
energetic    person    to    service    a
v/ide range  of alumni committees
and programs, on a full-time year
round   basis.   This person,   preferably a UBC graduate, must have
organizational  skills,  and be  able
to  work under pressure.  Applications in writing to: Mr. Tim Hollick-Kenyon,  Alumni Director,  252
Brock   Hall,   UBC,   Vancouver  8.
Music
63
FOLK   GROUP    REQUIRES
bers.   Phone   929-2769   Steve.
MEM-
INSTRUCTION  —
SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Also pronunciation lessons in French, Spanish, German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available. Now. Limited
Number. Buy now, only 75 cents
from Publications Office, Brock
Hall,   or  the  Bookstore.	
FOR SALE: SEVERAL PROFES-
sionally completed manuscripts —
Authors Agency, 767 Kingsway,
TR  6-6362.	
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life so
we are selling 1964, 1965 and 1966
issues for only 50 cents — Pub-
Iications office in Brock.
Scandals
39A
FINGERS FULTON FINDS THUMB
fun at Fort Camp.         	
TONIGHT — THREE ACT HOOT-
enany in Education Auditorium.
Show starts at 7:30 p.m. featuring
Bruce Galdwin, Joe Mock and
Gerry   Nakatsuka.  Ad.   75c.
TAKE A PEEP UNDER THE
Bamboo Curtain Thursday in the
Auditorium,   no   minors.
Tailoring
41
Typing
43
LEGAL SECRETARY NEEDS
extra work — types thesis, essays and notes. Please phone 738-
76S1,   after  6   p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
DELIVERY BOYS WHO KNOW
UBC and have own cars. Late
evening work. Modest salary plus
car allowance. CA 4-0833 — 4423
W.   10th.
WANTED. EXPERIENCED BLUE
and rhythm guitarist. Phone Ber-
nip    936-1559.
RIDE WANTED. NEED A RIDER?
from West End (Harwood) Mon.
to Fri.  Call Bob 684-0748.
FEMALE OFFICE MANAGER RE-
quired for UBC Alumni Association to supervise a small office
staff and manage all aspects of
office operation: — accounting —
stock — payroll — mass mailing
— records. Address all applications in writing to: Mr. Tim Hollick-Kenyon, Alumni Director, 252
Brock Hall, U.B.C, Vancouver,
B.C.
FOR SALE: 2-SPEED TAPE RE-
corder $45.00; several 5-tube electric   radios   $9.95   each.   Phone   TR
4-5025.	
ROBERTS 1600 RECORDER, Philips
portable record player, Pentax
35 mm camera; as new. Bryan,
after   6   p.m.   261-2831.
RENTALS   & REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
SLEEPING ROOM FOR MALE
student. Private entrance. Share
shower,   toilet.   Phone   224-5883   —
3917   W.   11th.	
SHARE APARTMENT WITH TWO
female senior students. $42.00 per
month, 12th and Oak. Phone 738-
6065,  after 6:00 p.m.	
FOR RENT TO MALE STUDENT:
Single basement room near University Gates; basement entrance
and bathroom; $30 monthly. 224-
4209   evenings.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD. 2 MALE
students. Bedroom on main floor.
Private study room in basement.
$90.00 each. 733-5573.
Furn. Houses 8e Apts.
83
WANTED SR. FEMALE STUDENT
to share apartment. Quiet non-
smoker with two of same. Phone
731-8832 after 10 p.m. Granville
and Mathews,  car pool.	
SUITE FOR RENT. $50.00. 4559 W.
2nd. Suitable for student. 224-0725
Available  immediately.
Halls  for  Rent
85
FURNISHED AUDITORIUM FOR
rent. 50 cents per day. November
3rd only. Sharing with 800 million
Chinese.
SHARE THE AUDITORIUM WITH
800 million Chinese. Six times on
Thursday.
FURNISHED AUDITORIUM FOR
rent today only 50c. Sharing with
800 million Chinese.

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