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The Ubyssey Jan 4, 2011

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 Ricardo S SINCE 1918
JANUARY 04,2011
• VOLUME 92, NUMBER XXV333
• ROOM 24, STUDENT UN30N BUTLD3NG
• PUBL3SHED MONDAY AND THURSDAY
• FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
h.    J
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EU
BYSS
EY
ONE TERM
DOWN,
ONE
TOGO
OUR ANNUAL TALK WITH UBC
PRESIDENT STEPHEN TOOPE
PAGE 3 2/UBYSSEY.CA/E VENTS/2011.01.04
JANUARY 04,2011
VOLUME XCII,  N° XXVIII
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@uhyney.ca
NEWS EDITOR
ArshyMann: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Kalyeena Makortoff: kmakortoff@ubysseyca
SENIOR NEWS WRITER
Mich Cowan: mcowan@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
ASSISTANT CULTURE EDITOR
Ginny Monaco: gmonaco@ubyssey ca
CULTURE ILLUSTRATOR
Jndiana Joel: ijoel@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Marie Vondracek: sports@ubysseyca
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate.multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
David Marino: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
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tel: 604.822.2301
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BUSINESS
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e-mail: advertising@ubysseyca
BUSINESS MANAGER
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PRINT AD SALES
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WEB AD SALES
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ACCOUNTS
AlexHoopes: accounts@ubysseyca
CONTRIBUTORS
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
7\V
^» %f^ Canadian
-r-r* q. >--» University
roL        Press
jpe- Rainforest
Alliance
Canada Post
Sales Agreement
#0040878022
EVENTS
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come help
us create this baby! Learn about
layout and editing. Expect to be
fed. • Every Sunday and Wednesday, 2pm.
AUDITIONS FOR BRAVE NEW PLAY
RITES FESTIVAL* Call for actors for
Brave New Play Rites Short Play
Festival. Actors needed for short
play festival which runs March
30, 2011-April 3, 2011. Nonunion, non-paying but great acting experience with exciting new
playwrights and directors. • Auditions take place Jan. 9-10, e-
ma/V bravenewplayrites@gmail.
com for more information.
MAN RAY, AFRICAN ART AND THE
MODERNIST LENS • A groundbreaking exhibition exploring the pivotal role of photography in changing the perception of African objects from artifacts to fine art.
• Ongoing tilJan. 23, Museum
of Anthropology.
SKATING AT ROBSON SQUARE* Free
public skating rink, with skate
and helmet rentals, skate sharpening and a concession stand on
site. • Ongoing til Feb. 28, Sunday-Thursday 9am-9pm, Friday-
Saturday 9am-llpm, free.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 5
THE IMAGINUS POSTER SALE* Hate
your dreary walls? Can't be bothered to decorate your walls with
homemade artwork? Don't worry! The Imaginus Poster Sale is
back! Browse through hundreds
of posters of all sizes, and bring
back some eye candy. • Jan.
5-6, 9am-7pm & Jan. 7, 9am-
5pm, SUB.
ETHICAL HUMAN BEHAVIOUR* Part
of the SFU Philosphers' Cafe,
moderator Dr. Roman Onufrik-
chuk will debate if there could
ever be a universal standard for
ethical human behaviour and who
would be its arbiter. • Jan. 6, 7pm,
False Creek Community Centre
(1318 Cartwright Street), $5.
THURSDAY, JAN. 6
THE RUFFLED FEATHERS WITH JULIA
AND HER PIANO AND GUESTS • Be
entranced by the smooth and
gentle vocals of songstress Gina
Loes as her band The Ruffled
Feathers entertains you with
guests like Julia and Her Piano,
Katie Schaan and Thomas Kolb.
Treat yourself to a mellow night
of sweet, sweet indie music. •
Jan. 6, 8pm-1am, The Media
Club (695 Cambie Street), $10.
FRIDAY, JAN. 7
ENGINEERS STORM THE PIT! • Celebrate your return to school (or
drown your sorrows) with good
friends and good music at the Pit
Pub! • Jan. 7, 7-10pm, Pit Pub.
BETA ANIMAL HOUSE • Adopted
from the 1978 classic, "Animal House" has been Beta's
dynamic social gem. So sport
your toga and start 2011 off the
right way. • Jan 7, 9:30pm-3am,
Beta House, $10.
CALL  FOR NOMINATIONS
UBYSSEY
BOARD OF
DIRECTORS
Deadline is January 7th, 2011. Nomination
forms Lire available in SUB 23. This is not an
editorial position. Member.'; ni 77fl1 Ubyssey's
Board oi Directors are responsible for
overseeing the tinar.ces or'the newspaper.
Responsibilities include attending a monthly
board meeting, tending to buisiness as it arises,
and overseeing per^ojial projects.
LSAT MCAT
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• Personal Tutoring Available
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminars.ca
Public Open House
New Student Union Building (SUB)
You are invited to attend an open house to view and comment on the new SUB.
The proposal is for a new four-storey building to accommodate AMS and student
services including offices, retail and food service space. Representatives from the
project proponent, design team and Campus + Community Planning will be
available to provide information and respond to inquiries about this project.
Date: Tuesday, January 11,2011 11:30 AM -1:30 PM
Location: South Foyer (by Design Cube) - SUB, 6138 Student Union Blvd
For directions visit:
www.maps.ubc.ca.
For more information on
this project, please visit
the C&CP website:
www.planning.ubc.ca
KJPIease direct questions
to Karen Russell, Manager
Development Services,
karen.russell@ubc.ca
(5cThis event is wheelchair accessible. For more
information about
assistance for persons
with disabilities -
rachel.wiersma@u bc.ca
SATURDAY, JAN. 8
STUDENTLEADERSHIP CONFERENCE
(SLC)»The SLC is UBC's largest
student-run conference, providing more than 1100 delegates
with the opportunity to develop
their leadership skills through engaging workshops and speakers.
• Jan. 8, 8am-6pm, The Chan
Centre, $30/50.
MONDAY, JAN. 10
HIP HOP KARAOKE (HHK) VANCOUVER • Love karaoke? Love hip
hop music? Well look no further! Welcome to HHK Vancouver, where you can spit out the
soulful beats of your favourite
hip hop tunes without being ridiculed! So if you're down with
being trippy, then grab a mic and
shimmey some rhymes like a
dawg. Peace! • Jan. 10, 9:30pm-
2am, Fortune Sound Club (147
East Pender Street).
TUESDAY, JAN. 11
BETTER SEX YOGA CLASS* Intune
Holistics founder Stephanie La-
fazanos will teach how the practice of yoga can improve your
sex life. • Jan. 11, 7:30pm, The
Art of Loving (1819 W. 5th), $30.
THURSDAY, JAN. 13
STYLUS PHANTASTICUS: MYSTERY
AND EXOTICISM IN 17TH CENTURY
TRIO SONATAS • A programme of
virtuoso Trio Sonatas from the
17th century, featuring leading
musicians from Canada and the
West Coast. The programme
will include music by composers
such as Schmelzer, Rosenmul-
ler, Reinecken, Erlebach, Legren-
zi, Leclair, Rebel and Cleram-
bault. • Jan. 13, 5-6:30pm,
Green College, free.
FRIDAY, JAN. 14
UBC'S GOT TALENT • Be a part of
history in the making—UBC's
very first campus-wide talent
showcase! Watch participants
as they perform their way into
your hearts on the world renowned stage at the Chan Centre. Don't have a ticket yet? Just
go online and claim one. Need
more incentive to make it down
to the show? UBC President Stephen Toope and AMS President
Bijan Ahmadian will sing a duet if
all the seats are claimed! • Jan.
14, 8-1 Opm, Chan Centre for the
Performing Arts. Tickets are by
donations at the door, book online at www.talent.ubc.ca.
THE AUS PRESENTS: MARDI GRAS •
What other way to end an awesome week dedicated to everything arty-farty but a Mardi Gras
dance party! Dig up your old love
beads and put on those glow-
sticks and face paint because it's
going to be awesome. With winner of the CiTR DJ contest, Vi-
nyla Xtrax, opening up the show,
followed by Hood Internet, be
sure to come early to dominate
the dance floor. $2.50 ciders and
beers. • Jan. 14, 8pm-12am,
SUB Ballroomm. Ticket info un-
released. 19+ event.
SATURDAY, JAN. 15
GREAT PIANO CONCERTOS • Piano
students of Corey Hamm present an evening of piano concertos by Barber, Rachmaninoff and
Liszt. • Jan. 15, 7-9pm, UBC Music Building Recital Hall, free.
Wanted:
AWESOME EVENT
LISTINGS
e vents@ubyssey ca
■ffl THEUBYSSEY.a 2011.01.04/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT KALYEENA MAKORTOFF»kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER MICKI COWAN»mcowan@ubyssey.ca
Toope looking towards the next five years
JUSTIN MCELROY
coordinating@ubyssey.ca
In 2006, Stephen Toope was appointed the
12th president of the University of British
Columbia. In his first four years as leader
of this billion-dollar institution, Toope has
dealt with overhauling the university's finances, the effects of a global recession, a
multitude of land-use plans, along with the
day-to-day running of a university with two
campuses and 45,000 students.
In late 2009, UBC approved Place and
Promise, the first strategic plan enacted under Toope's presidency. In June 2010, the
Board of Governors approved a second five-
year term for Toope, to begin in July 2011.
Just before the break, we spoke to Toope in
our annual interview to look back at some
ofthe challenges of his first term and some
of his hopes for his second.
Ubyssey: Being a university president is a
tough job, it's an exhausting job. Why come
back and do it for another five years?
Stephen Toope: I think largely because
I'm feeling that with the completion ofthe
strategic plan Place and Promise, it's clear
where we want to go, and I think I have the
opportunity to really drive that plan, so I'm
excited about that. It seems to me a really
remarkable opportunity.
And I have to say UBC is extremely well-
positioned over the next few years to become stronger and become more influential, become more successful in undergraduate and graduate teaching. So it seemed
like a good time to be here.
U: There's no real training for the job of university president. What are places that were
sources of frustration inyour first term that
you're better prepared to contend with now
inyour second term?
Toope: If there's anything that surprised
me about UBC and where I had to spend
more time than I expected to, it would be
on whatyou might describe as systems: internal systems, finance, student information systems, alumni systems.
They weren't as strong as I hoped they
would be, and so I've had to spend a lot of
time working with members of the executive and lots of people across the university in trying to make them more effective,
more transparent, provide the sort of information we need.
I'm hoping I won't have to spend a lot of
time on that in my second term, that's one
ofthe reasons why I was keen on giving myself a second term.
I probably felt 2.5 years in that I was really able to start to focus where I needed to be
focusing my energies, and not doing some
things thatl thought I really shouldn'thave
to spend a lot of time doing.
U: When you came here, were you aware
that the question of how UBC would be governed would become such a large issue?
Toope: I think we have to put this inperspec-
tive. The question of governance per se has
not really arisen at UBC. Ifyou think of governance ofthe university as a whole, we still
have what is the traditional bicameral structure, which is the senate, focused on academic matters, and the BoG, focused primarily
on finance and property matters. And that
continues and nothing has changed and
there's been no challenge there.
U: But you're overseeing the change from
the administration of a university to a university that oversees a city while allowing
that city a certain amount of sovereignty.
Toope: I was going to say that I think the
governance of land is the specific issue that
has arisen, and interestingly even there the
change has been less dramatic then one
mightthink. I remember the first question
I was asked by any journalist when I came
here was "how does it feel to be mayor of
UBC?" And I said I don't think I'm mayor
of UBC, I think I'm president of a university I'm not really mayor of a town.
In a sense, I still feel my primary role is
president of a university. So we are going
to figure out in the medium-term what an
effective governance arrangement is for
the lands, and I would make a distinction
between purely academic lands where students live, where classes are held, where research labs take place and housing, which
involve some people from the university but some people outside the university.
And yes, we are going spend really concerted time and effort to get that right, so
people feel there is democratic accountability and we are effective and efficient
in managing these lands.
I'll be very honest with you; when I came
here, my gut instinct was it would make a
lot of sense for UBC to be part of the City of
Vancouver. It's turned out, for all sorts of reasons, that it wasn't going to go that way in
large part because itwas never something
Vancouver particularly coveted.
U: The biggest complaint that people have
about UBC's role in this is they're both the
landowner and the people deciding the future use of the land. Do you dismiss those
criticisms out of hand, or is this a valid issue?
Toope: I'd say a couple things. First of all,
I don't think we should look at the current
situation with the provincial government
as a defining feature. We happen to be in
a very strange period, there has been a remarkable transition, not a lot of stability.
That's going to change, and I think the government has a very important role to play.
U: Would you like them to play a larger role
than they are right now?
Toope: I'd like them to play the role they're
supposed to play which is to approve anything that is put forward from the BoG in
this interim arrangement, and they will
do that, I'm sure. Remember, so far all we
have is an interim period, we don't have a
final governance arrangement.
U: An issue a lot of students had around
the recent land-use consultation was the
area known as Gage South. There seemed
to be a general criticism that UBC wasn't
willing to have a honest debate, and they
didn't really want to talk about it. Is that a
valid criticism?
Toope: No. And I'll tell you why. First of all,
it's important to remember that when the
BoG made the decision they did around the
UBC Farm—and everyone's forgotten that,
it was last year's story—but it was actually
a big issue, and appropriately so.
I personally did not agree with the land
designation as future housing reserve, I was
delighted that the BoG made the decision
to change that designation, but it did say at
the time we have to find a mechanism to
ensure transfer of density from that land,
which is 24 hectares—a big piece of land-
to other parts of campus. And when the
detailed technical work was done on that,
it seemed apparent that there would have
to be some transfer of density to the Gage
South neighbourhood, because that was always designated as a neighbourhood.
You can't have an infinite giving up of
space, and then no counteraction on the
other side, and that's what the board said.
Having said that, I think this was a big
win for students...instead of Gage South
being designated as it was previously it's
instead being pulled off the table, it's now
an area under review, and we're going to
have a robust consultation process, and we
now have to figure how Gage South relates
to any transit considerations...So I actually think it's a win, and people should take
wins when they get them.
U: Over the past two years, we've had one
AMS President who has been very bellicose
with UBC, one has been very eager to work
with the university and see the two as close
partners, and both have been fairly roundly criticized by student council. What do
you think is the appropriate relationship
between UBC and the AMS?
GEOFF LISTER PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
Toope: I actually think I shouldn't have a
view on that. The relationship is what the
student government thinks it should be. I've
now worked with five AMS Presidents, not
just two, but the last two years have been intriguing because they have been quite different from the first three years.
The first three years, there were times
when people had both strongly positive and
strongly negative [views] about different
issues..! think that's Justin the nature of political relationships, and the AMS is a political entity. At various times, it's going to take
various approaches. I think that's perfectly reasonable, and frankly I just deal with
who I have to deal with. It's a student decision who they elect, and will be the AMS'
decision how to deal with the university
U: Final question: Most university presidents only go for two terms. Do you expect
a third five-year term?
Toope: Absolutely not.
U: So is it the case the goal of the next five
years is to see the promise of Place and
Promise fulfilled?
Toope: Couldn't have said it better myself.
Place and Promise actually builds on previous iterations, it is not a radical departure,
and that was purposeful.. .1 think there can
be a tendency among some university presidents to feel they're completely reinventing
the wheel, and they have to establish their
imprint. Universities are long-term institutions, they've survived in many ways unchanged and changed right from the medieval period. I don't think I'm reinventing a university.
What I do think is UBC has particular
promise because of its location, because
ofthe cultural attributes that we have, because of the strength that's been developed over the last number of years in the
research area, because ofthe fantastic students we're able to attract nationally and internationally you put all that together, and
we really do have an opportunity to be Canada's leading university with the greatest
resonance in the international milieu. And
that is UBC's promise, tl 4/UBYSSEY.C A/NEWS/2011.01.0 4
Student spent a week on the Vancouver streets
Nima Farzaneh went without money nor showers
ARSHY MANN
news@ubysseyca
While most students were enjoying hot meals and clean clothes
courtesy of their parents, Nima
Farzaneh was sleeping on the
streets of Vancouver.
A UBC student working on his
second bachelor's degree, Farzaneh decided to voluntarily
spend a week homeless.
"I was actually taking the
bus to UBC [when] this idea just
popped into my head," said Farzaneh. "We're really grateful for
everything that we have, and
with Christmas coming up, I
thought that it's the most important time for people to be
with their families.
"[I thought] maybe I should
try it for a week, maybe I should
give up my Christmas dinner,
maybe I should give up my
birthday—my birthday's on the
28th of December—just to see
what people go through. Maybe that way I would personally appreciate things more and
maybe I could share my experience with others."
Armed only with a sleeping
bag and the clothes on his back,
Farzaneh depended on the kindness of strangers in order to
get by and spent much of his
time getting to know the people who call the streets of Vancouver their home.
"They treated me very well.
They treated me as part of the
community. That was actually
one of the things that I was always worried about, they may
think a newcomer is coming in
and who is this guy and they
may give me a hard time," he
said.
"A lot of the times, when I'd
see someone panhandling or
even doing drugs, like smoking crack in an alley I would
ask them if it was okay for me
To understand other people we sometimes
have to be empathetic and put ourselves
in their shoes, and if we can't mentally put
ourselves in their shoes, then we should
physically put ourselves in their shoes.
NIMAFARZANEH
Farzaneh spent a week sleeping on the streets. He wore the same clothes every day and didn't shower. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
to sit next to them, and I've never been rejected when it came
to that.
"I brought myself a pillow and
a blanket, and any time they
said it was okay I would throw
my pillow on the pavement, sit
on the pillow and put my blanket around me and.. just listen."
Farzaneh recalled one man
he met at a 24-hour Blenz on
Hastings St.
"When I was there [at the
Blenz] it was a bit cold, so some
of the homeless people would
come in and warm up."
One person sat down with
him and spoke for two hours.
"He was crying, saying that
his heroin addiction, has caused
him to depart his entire family"
said Farzaneh. "There was such
a great big distance between
them that he created a separation that he was ashamed of."
"He said that about two or
three years ago his brother
passed away and he did not go
to the funeral and this is where
he started sobbing again, because he wanted to go, but he
was too ashamed to go."
Farzaneh thinks that if more
people simply had more conversations and interactions with
those who are homeless, then
many of the stigmas could be
eliminated.
"A lot of the problems that
people say have to do with homelessness and impoverished
people is that they're lazy and
they're all addicted to drugs and
they could get jobs if they wanted to, but they choose not to and
a lot of them are mentally ill.
"[But] I think that is actually
true across any kind of income
level or any kind of...there are
very wealthy people who are addicted to drugs, but they're not
on the streets.
"Rich people are lazy and
poor people are lazy. There are
liars, cheaters, criminals all
across the spectrum."
Farzaneh, who took 120 pages of notes during his week on
the streets, is now planning on
sharing them on his blog, god-
peasant.wordpress.com, as well
as having them translated into
Farsi and French.
"My philosophy is that in order to understand other people
we sometimes have to be empathetic and put ourselves in their
shoes, and if we can't mentally put ourselves in their shoes,
then we should physically put
ourselves in their shoes." vl
a place of mind    I the university of i
CAMPUI> +COMMUNITY PLANNING
Public Open Houses
You are invited to attend an Open House to view and comment on 2 new development proposals:
1 - St. John Hospice: 2-storey 1,243 sq.m (13,378 sq.ft) building to accommodate a
hospice facility and academic offices.
2 - Centre for Brain Health: 5-storey 10,027 sq.m (108,000 sq.ft) building to
accommodate outpatient clinical areas, research labs, lecture theatres, and academic offices.
The project proponents, architecture team and Campus + Community Planning staff will be
available to provide information and respond to inquiries about these projects.
Date: Monday, January 10,2011  4:30
Location: East Atrium - Life Sciences, 2350 Health
■ 7:00 PM
Sciences Mall
For directions visit:
www.maps.ubc.ca.
For more information on
this project, please visit
the C&CP website:
www.planning.ubc.ca
___ Please direct questions
to Karen Russell, Manager
Development Services,
karen.russell@ubc.ca
(3. This event is wheelchair accessible. For more
information about
assistance for persons
with disabilities -
rachel.wiersma@ubc.ca
Teach English
Abroad
TESOL/TESL Teacher Training
Certification Courses
* Intensive 60-Hour Program
* Classroom Management Techniques
* Detailed Lesson Planning
* ESL Skills Development
* Comprehensive Teaching Materials
* Interactive Teaching Practicum
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* Teacher Placement Service
* Honey-Back Guarantee Included
* Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430/1-800-269-6719
www.oxfoidseminais.ca
YOUR OFFICIAL
STUDENT
NEWSPAPER
BE A PART OF IT
coorc
coordinating@ubyssey. ca
Arshy, Arshy was no starfish
He liked the AMS and being stylish
But what he liked the best of all
Was having lots of helpers on the ball
So ifyou want to keep him merry
Just come down to SUB basement, not dreary
And make your contribution greatly.
arshy mann | news@ubysseyca
U THEUBYSSEYc 2011.01.04/UBYSSEY.CA/GAMES&COMICS/5
GAMES & COMICS
COMIC MASTER
BY MARIA CIRSTEA
IS KETCHUP ScippoSep
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U THEUBYSSEYc
Finish.
You may not have done as well on your
exams as you hoped, but with transfer
credits from Athabasca University, you can
pick up the classes you need to complete
your degree. AU offers over 700 courses
delivered online and at a distance, many with
the flexibility of monthly start dates. Let AU
help you finish your degree in record time.
Learn more at
www.athabascau.ca.
Athabasca University^ 6/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2011.01.04
CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER GINNY MONACO »gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
ILLUSTRATOR INDIANA JOEL»ijoel@ubyssey.ca
BE IT RESOLVED
i STUDENT LIFE
Wake up and
make the
most ofyour
fresh start
11. GO TO MORE THAN 50 PER CENT OF 9 AM CLASSES
GINNY MONACO
Senior Culture Writer
"Be more honest with strangers I
meet. AKA: don't make up outrageous lies about what I'm majoring in, or which boy band I used
to be a part of."
That is the first of Daniel Swen-
son's 11 Resolutions for 2011. The
third-year English major, like so
many others, is planning for self-
improvement in the New Year.
Some of Swenson's other goals include "exercise more," "get naked all
up on Wreck Beach's face (how am I
a UBC student without having done
that?)," and an emphatic "Buy. Less. Shit."
This charming specificity could actually help Swenson stick to his resolutions. Professor Richard Wiseman, a
researcher at the University of Hertfordshire in the UK, studies the psychology of New Year's resolutions. In
an experiment published in his book
Quirkology: The Curious Science of Everyday Lives, Wiseman tracked the
progress of 3000 participants inkeep-
ing up with their goals during 2007.
While 52 per cent of those studied
were confident of their success at
the beginning of the year, only 12
per cent followed through on their
resolution.
Wiseman found a gendered difference in successful techniques. Goal
setting is more effective for men.
Make small, measurable resolutions within a time frame to avoid
being disappointed by unrealistic
expectations.
As for you double Xs, tell friends
and family about your goals. Wiseman's study showed women have more
success sticking to a resolution if they
have positive social support. Going
public is motivational and keeps
you from forgetting about your plan.
It's also important for women to
realize that a setback doesn't necessarily mean failure (Wiseman
uses the mildly pejorative example of a "chocolate binge," which
doesn't herald the absolute end
of a diet).
Wiseman also suggests that people be honest with themselves,
much like Swenson's ninth resolution where he admits, "This
is where I'm supposed to say
'drink less,' but that is not going
to happen."
Beware of resolutions you failed
to keep in the past. Wiseman suggests changing the approach and
confronting an old problem in a
new way. For example, "procrastinate less," can be turned into
"cut out at least one TV show from
my growing television addiction,"
(number six on Swenson's list).
Persistence is critical for anyone
serious about making a change.
Don't rush yourself, and remember
that it's okay to miss a day at the gym.
As for Swenson, he's feeling optimistic. "I hope I get far! Because
there is no way I am getting naked
on Wreck Beach without working on
my abs." tl
"This is where
Im supposed
to say 'drink
less,' but that
is not going to
happen."
DANIELSWENSON 3RD YEAR ARTS
3. EXCERCISE. LIKE A LOT MORE. SAME GOES FOR STUDYING.
7. BE FRIENDLY TO STRANGERS
INDIANA JOEL ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
CAMPUS EVENTS
You have no homework, plenty of
Christmas money, and are recently single following an inevitable
holiday breakup. Whatis a student
to do? While there isn't too much
happening on campus the next
few days, there are a few events
that might pique your interest.
JANUARY 5-9: EASY A <
NORM, 7PM
THE
Emma Stone delivers a tour-deforce performance as the emotionally-withdrawn Olive Pend-
erghast, a young lady unjustly isolated by a society of post-consum-
erist anarchists. Michael Grady's
breathtaking cinematography—
which values pacing and visual austerity over the confusing
bustle of colour and movement
favoured by most coming-of-age
parables—is sure to win the film
a nod at Cannes, as is Lisa Kud-
row's return-to-form performance
as Mrs. Griffith.
JANUARY 5-9: THE SOCIAL NET-
W0RK@ THE NORM, 9PM
After screenning the groundbreaking think-piece Easy A,
the Film Soc unwinds with a
lightheartedromp about nerds
in love. The Social Network, a
screwball comedy, follows the
exploits of Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg), a romantically-
challenged programmer nerd
who writes the code that unlocks the secrets of love.
JANUARY 13: SKRILLEX
LA-based producer Sonny Moore,
aka Skrillex will be performing
for a sold-out audience at the Pit
onjanuary 13. Dubstep. Pit. You
get the idea.
JANUARY 14: AUS MARDI GRAS
Continuing their grand tradition
of throwing parties themed as
parties you might actually want
to attend (notable example: the
No Pants Party), the Arts Undergraduate Society presents Mardi Gras, the bead-collectin'-est,
girls-shouting-woo-est bash you'll
see this week. Body shots for all!
JANUARY 14: UBC'S GOT TALENT!
After months of breathless speculation, it's finally here. Or, almost here. UBC's Got Talent takes
place next week at the Chan Centre, and 16 acts have been chosen as finalists. Singers, dancers, Rubiks-cube wizards (we're
serious) will take the stage to—
if all goes according to plan—entertain. A sellout will result in
AMS President Bijan Ahmadian
singing a duet with UBC President Stephen Toope. We have no
idea whether this will be a onetime oddity, a galvanizing force
for campus spirit, or a hilarious
trainwreck, but one thing is for
sure—we'll be there, tl 2011.01.04/UBYSSEY.CA/OPINION/7
OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
LEADERSHIP RACES GIVE LEVERAGE TO STUDENTS
Student loan repayment rates are the worst in
Canada. Funds for bursaries and scholarships
haven't been substantially increased in years.
UBC is undergoing land-use changes where the
provincial government is supposed to be providing oversight, but thus far hasn't. Tuition has been
capped at inflation for several years now, but the
timeframe on that promise has since elapsed,
and no new tuition policy has been put in place
by the provincial government.
Simply put, there are large issues surrounding
post-secondary education in our province right
now and they will be resolved one way or another.
That they be resolved with meaningful student input is the goal—but it won't happen automatically.
Campbell and James' departures and the ongoing leadership races are good news not just for the
province, but for university students.
After doubling tuition rates and turning a spate
of colleges into universities, the Liberals have
stopped pretending to care about making changes
to post-secondary education. The NDP haven't put
forward any proposals of their own that would galvanize voters who care about advanced education.
The candidates from both parties, however, have
to appeal for the youth vote if they hope to get in.
It's a tremendous opportunity to change a stagnant
conversation, but it's also a chance to prove that
the youth vote is one that deserves to be listened to.
When it comes to politics, our generation is criticized for being constantly cynical and apathetic—
an iPod listening, blog-reading, Colbert-watching
caricature that can't be bothered to be care. Yes,
"kids today" are more pessimistic about politics
then their predecessors, but that's mostly a result
ofthe times. You can cull your information sources to those you agree with, making it so you get
whatever you want. As a result, we don't want to
settle for second-rate politicians.
Until two months ago, Gordon Campbell and
Carole James had been leaders of the two main
political parties for what seemed like an eternity.
They were forced to resign because their caucuses
finally realized what most of the public had long
since accepted: their leadership was stale, lacking in new ideas and less than inspiring. Yes, two
leadership races can make things better for students—but only if they dispaly a real interest, tl
ASK NOT WHAT YOU CAN DO FOR LOKO
Some have said that student protests in the UK,
following a December vote to nearly triple tuition
fees, represents an end to student apathy. That after being pushed to the brink, the 'screwed generation' is finally fighting back.
"This was meant to be the first post-ideological generation. This was meant to be the generation that never thought of anything bigger than
our Facebook profiles and our TV screens," said a
15-year-old student rounded up in a police kettle
during the protests. "[These protests] show that
we're as ideological as ever before."
Down south, a grassroots protest movement is
taking hold amongstyoung people as well. Except
they're not interested in increased accessibility to
higher education, or against austerity measures
that hack the safety net to pieces. No. They want
to get blackout drunk.
On November 16, it was announced that Four
Loko, the caffeinated malt beverage that sparked
international controversy after several underage
Central Washington University students were hospitalized after drinking it, would be reformulated
to remove the taurine and caffeine that earned it
the catchphrase "blackout in a can."
Since the ban, Lokoponents have expressed
their outrage the only way any one knows how to
anymore: Internet parody. Sites like freeloko.com
popped up, as well as numerous petitions and outpourings of support. Memes of Four Loko cans
standing in front of tanks in Tiananmen square.
You get the idea.
We'd like to think that these protests are mostly a reasoned criticism of underage drinking, and
how a legal age of 21 encourages binging, no matter what the liquor of choice. But it's probably not.
So, young Americans, try a little harder next time.
We know you can get upset about issues. Let's see
ifyou can harness it to a cause a little less crazy
than Loko. vl
WMTA'RE lou For?
^GOs: Envies Ujr tHWgtEnMCoNsuineRism     2'olfisr LoKo
BRYCE WARNES GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
OPINIONS
Burrty baby, burn: Resolutions for the Teenage soul
PAUL BUCCI
Contributor
I don't do New Year's resolutions. Being
a critical, cynical, post-postmodern boy
(CCPPMB), I hate Christmas, stopped
believing in rock 'n' roll, and certainly don't subscribe to such crass mainstream ideas such as "New Year's resolutions." As a friend quietly reminded me, you can change your life at any
time. Why wait for an arbitrary date to
set that change in motion?
That being said, I've still got a column to write, and being a CCPPMB
with no beliefs in anything, including having beliefs about beliefs, I believe I'll check my ego and promise to
change my life.
Resolution Number One: Stop being
a CCPPMB.
Damn, that feels good. I'm so tired
of constant skepticism and intellectual
one-upmanship. I find that I grow more
intellectually the less I care about being the most intellectual. I was never
more boring than when I was worried
about how bored I was.
In fact, I'm going to scale back the
skepticism as well. I'll focus more on
clarity of thought. I'll focus on saying
"Yes" before I say "No." Who cares if
someone believes or says something
stupid?
I used to refer to myself as a "constant pilgrim." It was a trumped-up
way for me to explain that I didn't really care whether or not there was a God,
and I was willing to listen to people's
ideas about life, the universe and everything. I'll try anything once. Right?
Yes. Going back to those core ideals.
Trying to believe in things again. Exploring art, truth and beauty.
Resolution Number Two: Drink less,
but drink more with friends.
No more drinking a bottle of wine
or two while re-watching old Futurama
episodes. What happened to that fantastic metropolis I imagined Vancouver to be while I was still back home
in lowly old Abbotsford? They keep telling us that this is a "world-class city."
I'm sure that Terminal City is No Fun
City not just because of bars that close
early, but because there are legions of
CCPPMBs re-checking Reddit a thousand times waiting for something interesting to happen to them. At least
that's what I've been doing.
So no more! It's time to take to the
streets in the middle ofthe night looking for secrets. It's time to walk down
railroad tracks hoping to find others
doing the same thing. It's time to see
how far I can run for the sheer joy of
running, rather than feeling hung-over
and fat and stopping after 20 wheezy
steps! That's my newyear's resolution:
bringing back a hopeful, joyous, teenage Paul Bucci to slay the CCPPMB I've
become. Who's with me? tl
UBC Dairy Centre transparent model of animal research
KATY PROUDFOOT
Perspective
Over the last few months, UBC has been
under public scrutiny over its use of
animals in research. Animal advocacy groups are asking that the university be more forthcoming about animal
research. Most research at UBC is publicly funded, and people want to know
how their money is being used.
Asa graduate student in the UBC Animal Welfare Program, I am very interested in the discourse between UBC
and the groups that have expressed
these concerns. This discussion has
also made me reflect on my own involvement in animal research. All of
my research has been conducted at the
UBC Dairy Education and Research
Centre in Agassiz, BC. I have always
felt comfortable sharing the details
of my research, and often bring people to the Centre to see the facilities
and the animals. This feeling of openness and 'transparency' is a common
value among individuals working at
the Centre.
The Dairy Centre functions as both
a research centre and as a commercial
dairy farm. Financial support for the
research comes from both the dairy industry and a government agency funded by taxpayers—the Natural Sciences
and Engineering Research Council of
Canada (NSERC).
The Centre's research answers questions relevant to dairy producers, addresses public concerns of animal use
in agriculture, and helps support the
growing need for a sustainable food
supply.
This information is then used to provide science-based recommendations
to dairy producers across Canada and
abroad.
All parts of the research process—
from data collection to results—are
shared with dairy producers, visiting
scholars and the public with a fully
open-door policy. The Centre is a regular host to school tours, open houses,
picnics and this year's Slow Food Cycle
Tour. Scientists from the Centre also
travel widely to share research findings around the world.
The open-door policy provides an opportunity for dialogue between dairy
producers, public visitors and scientists such as myself working with the
animals. At a time of public concern
over the appropriate use of animals in
research, I believe that the Centre can
serve as a model of 'transparency' by allowing this dialogue between the public and a publicly funded university, tl
Wanted: Letters. Under 300 words. Sent by noon the day before the issue in which you want them to appear.
feedback@ubyssey.ca
THEUBYSSEYc I ft I
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