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The Ubyssey Nov 19, 1968

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Array THS UBYSSEY
Tomorrow's Eyes
are in
today's ears
Vol. L, No. 29
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1968
48
228-2305
[■tin fttiii pkiti
INDUSTRIOUS UBC SCIENCE MEN have taken the overcrowd-issue into their own hands and
attempted  a  cure  by  annexing  the  high   school   on   the   hill.   The  altruistic   rogues   visited
Simon Fraser University last weekend in the wee hours and replaced existing SFU signs with
those reading "Science UBC Annex".
'GSA liberation' purpose
of some bogus AMS cards
An unindentified source said Monday that
about 20 bogus AMS cards were made up so
students not eligible for entry to the Grad
Students' Association could "liberate the pub".
Discovery of fake AMS cards by the GSA
and the library computer caused the library
to re-issue new white library cards to all UBC
students by mail over the weekend. Starting
today, only the new cards will be accepted as
library cards.
The source said the 20 fake cards were made
"so as many people as possible could get into
the grad students' centre, use their pub, and
COPE pledges
to open suites
The Committee of Progressive Electors has
pledged to reopen illegal suites to ease the
shortage of student housing.
In its election program, the Vancouver political organization said they will re-open the
suites closed to meet city zoning requirements
if the suites met city health and building bylaws.
^ C&PE nominated a slate of candidates for
aldermen, parks board, and school board at a
meeting Thursday night.
end the  restriction of this club to an  elitist
group."
In addition to the 20 cards, "campus
sources" claim an estimated 400 other cards
were made. Some of these were apparently
sent to the U.S. to aid the entry of draft
dodgers into Canada.
The unidentified student said Monday he
knew of no draft dodgers who had entered
Canada by using UBC student cards.
Student cards were made up and distributed
in Brock hall during registration week by 24
workers hired by AMS internal affairs officer
Ruth Dworkin on behalf of the library.
"Ruth Dworkin should not be blamed because she was not there when the action was
taken and she had no way of knowing what
was happening," he said.
A number of students had not received their
new library cards by mail Monday. A spokesman for the library's circulation department
said this is probably because they have temporary addresses in Vancouver that are not
listed in the registrar's office.
Students having urgent problems with new
cards are asked to see the circulation department on the ground floor of the main library.
The main reason for the reissue of the
cards was to avoid confusion and possible theft
in the library from students carrying illegal
cards.
"We had no intention at all of messing up
the library," The Ubyssey's source pointed out.
Revisions
go to vote
in January
In a series of motions and counter-motions, the AMS council
last night decided to defer a general meeting, originally slated for
Nov. 28, to the second Thursday in January.
The meeting was to be held to discuss, among other things,
the constitutional revisions drawn up by ex-vice-president Carey
Linde.
The series of motions began when president Dave Zirnhelt
pointed out that there were two contradicting motions on the
minutes; one which said the constitutional revisions would be
voted on at a general meeting and the other saying it would be
decided by referendum.
Zirnhelt then asked that the motion for the referendum be
rescinded.
Ken Newcombe, Agriculture rep, as the mover of the motion
at a previous meeting, claimed that "the revisions are too important to be allowed to be shot down by the engineers and
foresters. The referendum is the only sensible way to decide it."
Zirnhelt retorted that the council was a failure if the
foresters and engineers were allowed to run general meetings.
He also raised the quest of cost, claiming it would) cost about
$1,000 to hold a referendum.
Russ Grierson, commerce president, said that despite the
cost, the referendum allowed the time for thought and discussion
that was necessary.
A heated debate followed which saw Fraser Hodge, engineering president, and Frank Gregory, forestry president,
opposing Newcombe and Grierson..
References were made to last year's general meeting which
failed to get a quorum and the meeting on the pub-in earlier this
year were engineers allegedly "railroaded" the motions by
voting as a block.
Both Gregory and Hodge blamed the "apathetic" faculties
for the failures of the general meting.
The vote to rescind the referendum motion was then taken
and it failed.
At this point treasurer Donn Aven said that it would take a
nine-page ballot to include all the issues that had to be approved.
He said that the AMS lawyer had called it ludicrous to
attempt a referendum with an issue of this  magnitude.
After general discussion which it was largely agreed that
if the reforms were to be voted on in an open meeting, since a
referendum now seemed impractical, it would have to be in the
new year.
After two motions, the original motion of rescinding the
motion for a referendum was passed.
Then another vote on cancelling the general meeting of
Nov. 28 and voting it to January was also passed.
As it now stands, the constitutional reforms will be decided upon at the general meeting in January.
Council also accepted Monday night the resignation of Carey
Linde . . . with regret.
They also gave formal support to the four demands of the
students who demonstrated at Simon Fraser Thursday over SFU's
admissions policy.   (See page  three.)
Council also approved a new structure for the AMS-Senate
ad hoc committee on academic reform.
Ruth readies report
on state of Ubyssey
Communications is the name, investigation Is the
game.
And The Ubyssey came under the communication
commission's gun Friday noon in SUB 211.
About 35 people at the meeting criticized the paper
fOr being 'too radical' or 'not radical enough'. Charges of
'immaturity' and complaints about 'obscenity' and 'bias'
also filled the air.
Ruth Dworkin, chairman of the meeting, was asked
to set up the investigation by the AMS as part of her job
as AMS  internal  affairs  officer.
Miss Dworkin said she will be making a report to
students' council about The Ubyssey.
The report will examine the role of a campus paper,
its relationship to students.' council, the appointment of
Ubyssey editors, and the financing of the paper. Page 2
THE        UBYS S E Y
Tuesday,  November,  19,  1968
CAUT ends SFU censure
BURNABY (Peek-a-boo) — The Canadian
Association of University Teachers voted to
remove their censure from Simon Fraser University.
The motion adopted Saturday read in part:
"We take the view that the resolution of
censure has served its purpose, in that it in-,
duced an energetic attack on the problems of
university government and ensured that the
role of the board was reduced to its appropriate
limits or something near them."
SFU faculty members voted last week in
favor of lifting the censure. (133 for unconditional lifting, 45 conditional, 22 against lifting
it now).
These results were presented to the CAUT
annual meeting in Montreal over the weekend.
The CAUT passed the censure last May
against the board of governors and the president for maladministration, interference in academic affairs, and failure to take steps to
rectify the situation.
CUS  rejected
by narrow margin
GUELPH (CUP) — The Canadian Union of
Students lost an important battle Thursday
(Nov. 14) when Guelph University students rejected membership in the union by a narrow
margin.
The vote went 1,006 to 859 against CUS in
a voter turnout of 43 per cent.
In the same vote, the Ontario Union of Students won continued approval from the student body.
Ken Stone, OUS vice-president said the vote
result was a "direct result of the biased commercial press coverage of the recent CUS congress."
He said rejection of CUS was a result of an
"uninformed electorate which was swayed by
the distorted press image of CUS."
Rick Hagyard, organizer of the anti-CUS
petition which forced the referendum, was
"elated" by the results.
Dr. Patrick McTaggart-Cowan, then president, was placed on an extended leave of absence by the board, but later claimed he had
resigned, on May 31.
Current acting president Dr. Ken Strand
was elected by the faculty and ratified by the
board in August.
Chancellor Dr. Gordon Shrum resigned as
chairman of the board of governors Oct. 17 to
speed up the removal of the censure.
Strand said Monday: "I feel that the censure brought about a deeper appreciation to the
board of what their role is within the university."
"I was in favor of lifting the censure. In the
coming months the problems we will face won't
be with the board. They will be internal problems."
Dr. M. McClaren, SFU faculty association
president said that he viewed the lifting of the
censure with "mixed feelings".
"The faculty were very much aroused by
the censure and assumed an active role in the
government of the university. What the censure
gave to the university was a state of awareness
both within the faculty and the board."
Political science prof Tom Brose said, "Fuck
'em; the censure lifting carries no force. Nothing will change at SFU without student and
faculty involvement and change."
Those faculty who disagee with the lifting
of the censure feel the board has made no permanent commitments and nothing has really
changed.
Pen-Pal?
An American serviceman in Vietnam "would
like very much to correspond with someone
in Canada, preferably female."
In a letter to The Ubyssey, SP4 Roy Grob,
said, "any assistance you can provide will be
greatly appreciated."
Grob's address is RA 16 992 384, Box GX,
175th RR Co., APO, San Francisco, 96227.
Perls talks
in ballroom
Eminent psychiatrist Dr.
Frederick S. Perls will speak
Wednesday in SUB ballroom.
Admission will be 35 cents.
Perls, resident psychiatrist
at the Esalen Institute at Big
Sur, California, is the founder
of the Gestalt theory.
His basic theory is that
'maturation is a continuous
growth process in which environmental support is transformed  into  self-support.'
KRIS
AN M.A. THESIS PRODUCTION
NO TRIFLING WITH LOVE
By ALFRED DE MUSSET
New Somerset Studio
Nov. 20-23 - 8:30 p.m.
Box Office: Room 207 Frederic Wood Theatre
Mcdonald, currie & co.
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
Representatives from our Firm will be on campus on the
following dates to interview students for positions available
in offices of our Firm throughout Canada.
Monday, November 25: Tuesday, November 26
and Wednesday, November 27,1968
These positions are available for the graduates in
Commerce, Arts, Science, Engineering and Law.
Further information and arrangements for interviews
are available through the Placement Office.
TOMORROWS EYES
-/•*!
IN
CONCERT
SUB
BALLROOM
Thursday
Nov. 21
(Only 50c)
12.30-2.30 Tuesday, November 19, 1968
THE       UBYSSEY.
Page 3
"LEAVE IT TO ME" says hardy member of the   B   and  G  crew.  "I'll
no leaves left on the ground.
— (din Midi photo
make  sure there  are
Pickets stick it out
on eligibility issue
BURNABY (Staff) — Simon
Fraser University's administration building continued in students' bad books Monday as a
picket line was maintained in
protest against unfair admission policies.
About 20 students paraded
around the building in support
of the struggle of Vancouver
City College students for accreditation of their courses at
SFU. Observers said the picket
lines were generally honored.
The students plan to maintain their picket lines today
and Wednesday. The SFU senate will hold a special meeting
Wednesday night to consider
the question of accreditation.
If the senate does not agree
to act on their demands or approve them in principle, the
students will decide whether
or not to occupy the building.
A meeting today in the SUB
conversation pit at UBC will
discuss the question.
Speakers will include VCC
student leader Lyle Osmondson
and SFU student Sandy Lockhart, who claims he has had
rueful experience with the admission procedures.
The   VCC    students'   main
complaint is that they are not
given credit by SFU for some
courses on thedr university program.
Some charge that SFU associate registrar Douglas Meyers,
currently attending a conference of Pacific Northwest registrars, uses personal and
political discrimination and intimidation tactics in admitting
or refusing them.
The crisis has come to a head
because many VCC students
are applying now for admission to -SFU in January.
Students Thursday occupied
the building for seven hours
and gained nothing but a meeting of the senate admissions
committee,  which  discussed
their demands but failed to
come to a conclusion as to
whether or not to support
them.
The four demands to be considered by the senate Wednesday:
• adoption of a definite
policy of accreditation for
courses resulting in freedom of
transfer between post-secondary institutions;
• establishment of an elected admission board to hear appeals and general policy, with
equal representation from
faculty and students;
• opening of the SFU registrar's files to student representatives for further investigation of this discrimination;
• university support for an
increase in the government
financial aid to education and
action to release the freeze on
school construction.
GSA TO OPEN DOORS?
From Page 4
"Then there will be no change," beamed
our president.
"But it seems to me," one of our ranks
piped up, "that the referendum is biased in
favor of the status quo since the vote for
change will be split."
Shit, found out again!
Graduate students as a whole aren't as
stupid as some people — such as their executive—think they are. There was more clamour
and hissing at the preposterous antics of our
leaders.
At 1:20, in the midst of all these marvelous
insights, a mathematician walked in wearing
a bow tie and carrying an amplifying system
and a microphone.
OUTSIDE AGITATOR
"I have a class in here at 1:30, so get out!"
he bellowed. Discussion continued for a few
seconds so our learned Christian friend turned
the volume up to 9 and shouted, "Get out!
I don't care where you go, but get out."
"How about the faculty club?" someone
suggested.
Then with all the maturity that befits bis
post, the professor turned the dials so the
machine made a loud, whining noise which
drowned out all the conversation.
Shouts of "STAY, STAY" rang out and
then, just like the Yippies, we all marched
over to the grad centre following our president. There it was discovered that we no longer
had a quorum, so the whole thing was tabled
until Tuesday when our executive will no
doubt have a whole new bagful of wool to
pull over our apathetic  eyes.
At a time when the student body needs
leadership, the graduate students on our campus are in the vanguard of stagnation. Barriers between students should be broken down
and the grad centre should be opened up because grad students have a lot to learn from
undergraduates and maybe vice versa.
Aside from all the valid, moral and poltic-
al reasons for opening the centre, one of the
most important is that it's a boring place run
by people who seem determined to keep it that
way by any means necessary.
CUS supported
by campus NDP
The campus New Democratic Party club executive has urged
its members to support the Canadian Union of Students.
At a general meeting Nov. 15, the club passed a motion
censuring its president, Rod Dickinson and secretary Jo-Anne
Forbes for their actions in associating the club name with anti-
CUS activities.
In an interview Monday, Dickinson said the motion was
passed with his recommendation.
"I am pro-CUS. I suggested the censure motion in order to
show that the club is supporting CUS," he said.
The action came after Dickinson and Miss Forbes, the club's
representatives on the parliamentary council CUS committee,
voted for a council motion condemning CUS.
"We voted for the motion so that the council would not
condemn CUS in stronger terms. But we still support CUS,"
Dickinson said.
Waterloo burns
over dog burning
WATERLOO (CUP)—Waterloo students followed the lead
of American students protesting against Dow Chemical Co. and
pulled off a gigantic hoax-teaching session Wednesday, Nov. 13.
Some clever advertising brought 2,500 students, 30 police,
SPCA officials and the commercial media to the campus to
witness the napalming of a dog.
Toronto area media picked up the story and played it
strongly.  Humane  society  officials  threatened  criminal  action.
Of course, there was no dog burning. There wasn't even
a dog.
The protestors in a brief speech told the assembled crowd
the purpose of the stunt had been achieved.
They said they had succeeded in proving people cared more
about dogs than they do about Vietnamese civilians.
Engineers in the crowd were incensed. They burned the
protest group's literature and one engineer scorched a hotdog.
Another engineer was mistaken for a radical and could not
prevent his colleagues from igniting his lab report. They thought
it was a pile of leaflets.
A similar hoax was pulled: off in Cincinnati last week with
even more people in attendance.
Students, profs invited
to English  union yap
All English students and profs are invited to descend to the
basement at the northern end of Brock Hall and join fellow
English union members in the old Ubyssey office.
The caustic comments and incisive pornographic news roundups on the walls are now being removed with lye and the room
is being ideologically fumigated to preserve the sanity of future
occupants.
A coffee urn will be wheeled in for those who won't be
taking their drug in the darkroom.
All members are urged to come down and gab, and to
bring Ayn Rand posters to decorate the walls.
.. m
— John frizoll photo
"WHAT THE HECK! Our feet are wet, the bumbershoot leaks
and its Monday morning, what the heck ... I mean if
you  can't smile what can  you  do ?"  Drown ? Pag* 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November,  19,  1968
THEU8YSSEY     GSA CL,QUE AND democracy
Published Tuesdays, Thursday! and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Page Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising
228-3977. Telex 04-5843.
NOVEMBER  19,  1968
LETTER ON THE LAW
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I have been asked as class representative of section 4, law I
to correct certain inaccuracies and misleading implications in
your story Friday concerning our boycott vote, and inform you
of further developments arising from a class meeting Monday.
Two issues were discussed at our meeting on Thursday: first,
that the scheduled dates for exams, the 19th and 20 of December,
restrict students' travel and employment opportunities and
should thus be reconsidered; and second, that as classes are
planned up to the date of the first exam, students are not
allowed sufficient time to prepare for the exams.
The motion passed by the class related to this second issue
only. It should be made clear that no approach had been made
to Dean Curtis in this regard—the LSA's presentation concerned
only the dates of the exams.
At a meeting today an attempt was made to clarify the
motion passed on Thursday, as The Ubyssey report of the meeting had somewhat distorted the implicit intent of the class.
Inasmuch as the motion unconditionally declared that classes
would be boycotted, that motion has been rescinded. However,
in the rescision of the motion, the class hasn't rejected the principle that strike action is a legitimate form of protest when the
reasonable requests of the student body, taken through the
recognized channels to faculty, are denied.
As a result of today's meeting, I will approach our professors to request that a reasonable period of review time be
allowed prior to exams, and since indications have been made
that such requests will be granted by faculty, any mention of
boycott action in this instance, and at this time, would be
premature.
SCOTT MARSHALL
By LANNY BECKMAN
Last Friday, the Graduate Student Association held a general meeting to vote on opening the grad centre to the entire university
community. About 300 of us turned out.
When we got there we found there were
to be three items on the agenda, the last of
which was the open centre referendum.
After the usual, ritualistic nonsense about
how long people could speak etc., Gordon
Alexander, a member of the executive, proposed the first motion. It referred to incorporating ourselves into a "society" —a meaningless, semantic-legal change to enable us to get
a liquor licence.
Just before we voted, a question was raised
about the relationship of this motion to the
open centre referendum: "If we all have to be
members of this society and if undergraduates
can't be members, can we then open the centre
up to everyone?"
ALEXANDER OPPOSED OPENING
"Well, um, no," Alexander replied in grand
oratorical fashion. We reacted to this crude
political underhandedness with great rounds
of laughter and hissing. When I asked Alexander afterwards why he hadn't pointed out that
passing motion One precluded opening the
centre, he said it was obvious, which shows
just how much in touch he is with his electorate.
I also asked why the society motion just
happened to precede the open centre motion
and he said that was just the order of business,
which is ridiculous because the latter motion
is far more important and was the main reason
why most people were there. It also just so
happened that Alexander opposed opening the
centre. But it's a free country so the executive
has the right to manipulate the order of the
motions and to want to keep the niggers out.
Well, participatory democracy raged on and
we finally got to the open centre referendum.
We each received a sheet of paper with four
proposals on it and we were to vote to approve
the form of the referendum so ballots could be
mailed out. The four proposals — one of which
was eventually to be checked by each voter —
were: A: Keep the centre restricted to graduate students and B. C and D — all three in
favor of removing the restrictions on who
might enter. The three verbose proposals for
change differed in only minor and unimportant
ways.
In the discussion period, it was pointed out
that since opening the centre entailed a change
in THE CONSTITUTION, the vote for change
would require a two-thirds majority. However,
since proposal A for no change didn't require
constitutional change, it would require only a
50 per cent majority. Fair enough. But we
then discovered that one of proposals B, C, or
D must receive 67 per cent to pass, that the
votes for change wouldn't be added together.
ALPHABET GAMES
The question was then raised as to what
would happen if no proposal got a majority —
if, for example, proposal A for no change got
20 per cent and proposals B, C, and D for
change  got  30 per   cent.
Continued Page 3
See: GSA
EDITOR: Al Birnie
News   John Twigg
Ass't News   John Gibbs
City    Peter Ladner
Ass't   City       Alex   Volkoff
Managing   Bruce Curtis
Associate    Mike  Finlay
Photo .... Dick Button, Powell Hargrave
Sports  Jim Maddin
Without   Portfolio       Paul   Knox
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
Wire      Irene  Wasilewski
+*   ** **"**.*'■■•*'<?«<**MA***    *~ $"*■"-^ft*****.      * *?* . *■**    "*
It was a slack eight pages today, and
you could tell—few people worked. A
notable exception was Erik Brynjolfs-
son, Conchie worked, and then went to
council. Rob Tyhurst slaved thirstily,
Elaine (baby) Tarzwell worked, in between sending porno through the campus mail. Nader Mirhady, had he wanted,  could have   been neither here  nor
d£'$<S'%?^Wtv"?WTi-' >;,      ■    ■
there. New blood also greased the
paper's wheels as a guy named Kennedy
didn't peter out. Flynn. frankly, showed
up. Nyland carried the puck for sports
when Maddin got the puck out of there.
Hertzman, owin* for his inexperience,
saw half a rugby game. Frizell fotoed,
Button fotoed, and Visser almost got it
on the kisser when he brought in late
pics. Bibi.
v*  "SK* "v.**    t vdi wA
EXPOSED: My life as a secret CIA agent
By CAREY LINDE
I can't bear it any longer. The crushing burden
of guilt weighs all too heavy on my conscience. I
am bound to confess. Yes, it is true, it is all a deep
plot, and a very complex one at that. Below I shall
outline the leading role I have played in the various
events that have been occurring for the past year on
campus. As the protagonist, I take full responsibility
for all things such as the faculty club caper, the
AMS card fiasco, and any other thing that is objectionable.
It all goes back to just before the Korean war
when the then vice-president of the United States,
Richard Milhouse Nixon, a stalwart, honorable, and
worthy man, decided that the Canadian Liberal government was a threat to United States security. We
lived in Washington, D.C. in the fifties, and my
father was a leading policy man in the renowned
Central Intelligence Agency.
Under a classified directive from Mr. Nixon, my
father's section was given the assignment of hatching
a situation in Canada that would be so revolutionary
and distasteful to the overwhelming majority of
Canadians that the U.S. could easily dispatch marines
to restore order, all in the name of anti-communisim.
We all know the U.S. has always had its eye on
Canada and long since harbored territorial ambitions
in this regard.
In the pay of the CIA, I was to help ferment
revolution in Canada, so that the U.S. could come
marching in and save the day—never to leave again.
JEWISH CIA CONSPIRACY
There was an agent in my father's office named
Rubinsky who had a son my age named Gerald. I
first met Stan Persky through Mr. Rubinsky. Stan's
father had been a class mate of Mr. Rubinsky in
Berlin before the war.
Stan and I were sent up here to infiltrate and
undermine the student government. Once in student
government, we were to appropriate the funds of
the organization, so that a bankrupt AMS would
then gladly accept CIA funds, with the usual strings
attached of course.
Two events occurred that threw everything out
of Une. One was that fact that Stan was not permitted to become president of the AMS. That temporarily foiled us. Secondy, Kenneth Hare was once a
top agent in CIA espionage who out of some distorted love of Canada turned against the CIA. He
was privy to the plot. This past summer he was to
meet in Australia with anti-American agents under
the pretext of going to a Commonwealth University
conference. He had to be stopped, otherwise he
would discredit our cover.
CIA got in touch with MI-5 London, and it was
arranged, with consultation from myself, to have a
British agent create a stir in British Columbia to
provide a platform from which to distract Hare for
the summer.
LONEY SHAKES ADMINISTRATION
Martin Loney, therefore, brilliantly did the Simon
Fraser University stunt last spring. Under the pretext of university reform, I then railroaded through
an unwitting AMS council a reformist document
that so scared Hare, he cancelled his trip to Australia.
So we solved that part. Not only that, he got sick
nerves from the document and went to England,
where MI-5 drugged him and have convinced him
to join. He will report back to England for duty next
month.
But we were still without sufficient power in
AMS council. So we got some good Jews together
and captured two more executive positions. From
her position on the AMS executive, Ruth Dworkin,
a stunning Jewess, was to become an invaluable
member of the team.
My immediate instructions were to bankrupt the
student government. After that I was expendable.
Hundreds more agents are to work preparing for the
next step. But I must not expose them here.
PLOT HATCHED IN CHICAGO
The brilliant scheme on how to succeed in the
bankruptcy plot came to me this past August when
I was in Chicago at the invitation of my father's
roommate at The Point, Dick Daley, mayor of that
unimpeachable city. I met there my old friend Jerry
Rubinsky. He had of course changed his name to
Rubin, and for purposes of the agency had grown a
beard and looked a general mess.
We were fooling around with some pigs and talking about the future. He said he had one thousand
agents bivouaced in Oregon and Washington just
waiting. They were young and could easily pass as
students.
Figuring that the only people the student councillors-would pay out all their money to, were they
asked to, would be the faculty (there is a strong
Student as Nigger complex up there) Jerry and I
drew up a scheme to have the faculty lose lots of
money,  and then  bill the AMS,  thus  bankrupting
them.
RUBIN'S THOUSAND INVADE
Two of our experienced agents were to elaborate
this project. Ruth Dworkin had a thousand student
AMS identification cards made up during registration the next week, which were then run down to
agency headquarters in Seattle. This would get
Jerry's one thousand support personnel into the
country. John Mate had successfully infiltrated the
AMS upper circles and was speakers' chairman. He
sponsored the visit of his co-religionist, Rubin. The
orator arrived and the audience he spoke to that
eventful day last month was primarily made up of
the thousand agents he brought with him. And then
under the masterful guise of being a spontaneous
student demonstration, the whole clique followed
my pig to the faculty club. Once in there, sufficient
damage was done to write up a substantial bill.
To write up an even larger bill for the AMS, we
let a few of the fake AMS cards be seen in the
palacial graduate student centre, where the head
nigger of UBC, John Tilly, was sure to see them,
We knew that he would relish the chance to go running to his master, the administration. Sure enough
it work perfectly. The library go so scared it has
printed up new cards, and knocked up another five
thousand dollar bill for the AMIS.
RADICAL AMS FOILS PLOT
The only trouble is that the notoriously radical
AMS is refusing to pay the bills, thus not going into
bankruptcy, thus not opening the doors for needed
CIA infiltration. Mark Rudd, senior agent for the
agency, realized all this when he came in recently
to appraise the situation. His recommendation went
back to Washington, and I've been fired for bungling
the job.
My replacement is at this moment starting all
over again, at Simon Fraser, and will shortly seize a
building up there.
All the Jews, who since the diapora have consistently and internationally cohered, have scampered off and left gentile me to face Sargent Preston
and his dog King. (My dog Friar has deserted me
and flown to Mexico, going student half fare because his fake AMS card says he is only twenty.)
And that's how it is. MY COUNTRY RIGHT OR
WRONG.
SEIG NEIL NIXON Tuesday, November 19, 1968
THE
UBYSSEY
BCAS-Si    CUS-No!!
Page 5
CEd. NOTE: CUS will undoubtedly become a
major issue on campus shortly, likely with a
referendum in early spring. We will offer space
for regular articles and comment about CUS, both
pro and con. Articles must be concise, and be
informative or offer concrete alternatives. We will
reject articles which duplicate what has already
appeared. Opinions are not necessarily those of
The Ubyssey.)
By FRANK FLYNN
Mild-mannered Liberal Reformer
The Canadian Union of Students is a well-
intentioned organization wallowing in a mire
of inefficiency and self-admiration.
In 1926 the main objectives of the National
Federation of Canadian University Students
were understanding and advancing the legitimate interests of Canadian students.
By 1964 this had become "the advancement
of education through the promotion of cooperation and understanding in the student
community."
This organization has achieved much for
university students in the last teri years.
The major accomplishments started in 1959
when a CUS lobby made it possible for university students to deduct their fees from their
taxable income.
In 1963 the federal loan plan was implemented. The Liberal party had originally promised 10,000 scholarships of $1,000 and the loan
plan was implemented when the scholarships
were not given.
But for the last five years the achievments
have been few.
CUS, however, is more than a service organization.
CUS 'EXPRESSION OF MOVE**fENT*
Former CUS president Doug Ward described the union as "a bureaucratic expression of
a student movement which has decided upon
certain principles and is engaged in the task
of bringing those principles to life."
He also said the fee for CUS is an investment in the democratization of Canadian
higher education. Memebership is an investment, not a purchase.
Clearly CUS now emphasizes the political
involvement of the student in his education
and in society.
But CUS has lost the student. This organization has become a haven for student leaders,
employing their former student politicians and
thus extending and perpetuating their influences and ideals.
A political lobby in Ottawa is a good idea.
But CUS has ceased to be an effective lobby
and it has ceased* to be relevant to the students.
PROVINCIAL UNION
At a time when the federal government has
all but abandoned the cause of higher education and assigned responsibility to provincial
governments, the primary responsibility of the
students of UBC must be to a provincial union
of students.
In this province the B.C. Assembly of Students was founded in late 1966.
The aims of the BCAS can easily be related to those of CUS.
But the assembly is working in this province on problems that confront the students
of British Columbia.
Furthermore, the BCAS is working within
all the levels of the educational system in
B.C. This is something that CUS could not do.
But the BCAS is dying.
It has little or no money and few personnel willing to devote time to the reformation
of the provincial educational system.
Each year the question of withdrawal from
CUS is raised on campus and the organization
promises to reform and seek greater communications with this campus and change its ways.
And every year nothing is done and the
present system and manner continues.
I claim the same questions that are asked
of our society must be asked of CUS.
CUS has been warned, cajoled, and urged to
change.
But it has continued to maintain its status
quo, a mortal sin when committed by society.
The time has come to act.
Let us get out of CUS now!
&& Boutfa^
IO'.SD-4-OO        ^*
Graduate Scholarships
VALUE $6,000 PER ANNUM
A number of scholarships, each valued at $6,000 per annum
(tax free), are available to suitable graduates in any branch
of engineering—mech., elec, civil, etc.—or applied science
who are  interested  in  a career in  the Mining  Industry.
These are McGill University scholarships for an advanced
course leading to a master's degree in mining engineering.
Applications should  be made,
before February 3rd, 1969 to:
Chairman,
Dept. of Mining Engineering & Applied Geophysics,
McConnell Engineering Building,
McGill University,
Montreal 110, P.Q.
These scholarships are sponsored  by a
group of Canadian Mining  Companies.
FRIDAY
LINCOLN ALEXANDER M.P.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22 - 12:30
ANGUS  110
™*       JTRV     day        AT MR.
DAY IS      \ W§ MIKE'S
ChTARBROILED STEAKS
I4W—    r^4 4489 w*  10fh at Sasamat
Open to 12:30 week nights
8:30 on Sundays
SPECIAL  EVENTS "SPEAKERS'
DR. FREDERICK
PERLS
Founder ot Gestalt Therapy
Colleague of Paul Goodman
TOPIG
'GESTALT THERAPY
WEDNESDAY NOON
SUB BALLROOM
35c
35c
X
Chevron Standard
Limited
CALGARY, ALBERTA
offers careers in
Petroleum Exploration
and will conduct
campus interviews on
November 21 and 22
Post Graduates - Graduates
Undergraduates
in
Honours Geology
Geological Engineering
(Options 1, 2, 3)
Geophysics
Physics and Geology
Mathematics and Physics
Honours Physics
Engineering Physics
—Permanent and summer
employment in geology.
—Permanent and summer
employment in geology
and/or geophysics.
—Permanent and summer
employment in geophysics.
—Permanent and summer
employment in geology
and/or geophysics.
—Permanent employment in
geophysics.
—Permanent employment in
geophysics.
—Permanent employment in
geophysics.
Arrangements for Personal Interview may be
made through the
UNIVERSITY'S PLACEMENT OFFICE Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November,   19,  1968
PHARMACY
Presents
THE
GOOFBALL
SUB  Ballroom
November 23
8:30 - 1 a.m.
Cpl. $2.75
Males $2    Females $1.50
BAR
"I'l
111 call you back...
later"
Oh? You're afraid someone will discover exactly
what time of the month
it is? Fine. Stay home.
Give up your social life for
a week. Or try Tampax
tampons. They're worn
internally so nothing can
show. No one will know.
You're comfortable. Free
to swim, dance, wear any
clothes you wish...almost
forget about your period
altogether.
Tampax tampons were
developed by a doctor.
They're made of lightly
compressed, pure surgical
cotton. The silken-
smooth container-
applicator assures
easy, hygienic
insertion and, like the
tampon, it simply flushes
away after use. Don't you
think it's time you tried
Tampax tampons? They've
given freedom and comfort
to millions of modern
women all over the world.
O.K., now go out and
enjoy yourself.
»..-*_' . *»^***lK*>r *S" *
y*M
— dick button photo
BIRDS' MILES DESHARNAIS (15) drills a sure goal as the Huskies Mickey Cugnet is waiting to
make a move, but as luck would have it, the  puck hit the goalkeeper on the shoulder.
! FILMSOC SUB OPENER !
ll
Thursday & Friday
The Taming Of The Shrew
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Work in Europe
American Student Information
Service has arranged jobs,
tours & studying in Europe for
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listing jobs, tours, study &
crammed with other valuable
info, to: Dept. M, ASIS, 22 ave.
de la Liberte, Luxembourg
City,   Grand  Duchy   of  Lux.
Ice hockey
Birds lose
—twice
By RIK NYLAND
The ice hockey Birds held
their own this weekend but
came out second best to the
University of Saskatchewan as
they lost both games by scores
of 5-4 and 7-4.
In Friday's opener before a
large, enthusiastic crowd, the
Birds came on strong as they
opened the scoring at 4:34 and '
again at 7:45 on goals by
Mickey McDowell and Wayne
Schaab.
Al Popoff replied with the
first of his four goals to end
. the period at 2-1.
In the second period the
teams traded goals as Birds'
Jim Fowler scored between
two goals by the Huskies' King
and Pearpoint.
This made it 3-3 going into
the final period. Popoff scored
at 1:28 giving Saskatchewan
a one goal lead.
ftlike Darnbrough tied it up
for the Birds but Jim Twigg
scored at 11:22 to make the
final score 5-4 for the Huskies.
The (Birds outshot the Huskies 29-19.
The majority of fans came
back for Saturday's game expecting a win but as luck
would have it UBC goalie Rick
Bardal was in for a bad day.
With the game only 10 minutes old Bardal had let in three
easy goals and was replaced
by Don Cram.
From here on the Birds
worked to get back in the game
but each time they scored Saskatchewan would come right
back.
The final score was 7-4 but
in a loosing cause Wayne
Schaab scored three goals, set
up by his linemates Barry Wilcox and Mickey McDowell.
Jim Fowler scored the other
Bird goal.
Again the Birds outshot the
Huskies 29.25.
After the game Coach Bob
Hindmarch stated "We played
the team that will win Ihe
league."
I
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OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater Society
International Affairs Conference
Applications now being received for those interested in
attending the Ninth Annual Conference on International
Affairs from January 21 to 24, 1969 at the University
of Manitoba. This year's conference will center on the
theme — Latin America! Progress or Revolution in our
Hemisphere. Apply in writing to A.M.S. Secretary,
Room 248, S.U.B. before 4 p.m., Friday, November 22nd.
Chairman Required for Special Events
Applications are now being received for chairman of
the special events, performing arts committee. This
person will be responsible for planning events of a
specialized nature which are of campus wide interest.
Apply in writing to AJM.S. secretary, Room 248 S.U.B.
before 4 p.m. Friday, November 22.
Services Commission
For all those students who_are concerned about the
bread and butter issues of university life housing, food,
traffic and parking, library etc. and who want to have
a say in these matters and a hand in decision making,
there will be a meeting noon Friday, November 22nd
in S.U.B. F.
Student Protest
Gerald E McGuigan
8tudent Protest
■** in*******i**».c*.-*i«»** _^
The Student
Radical in Search
of Issues .. .
or
Please Don't
Shoot the
Piano Player
G.F. McGuigan
Just Published!
A Methuen Paperback       $2.50
Available at
THE BOOKSTORE Tuesday, November 19, 1968
THE        UBYSSEY
Weekend Action Star
KEN WITZKE, UBC VOLLEYBALL STAR
"He's the muscle on the team," says
the volleyball coach, when speaking of
Ken Witzke, a 200 pound, six foot one,
power spiker.
In his fifth year of applied science, Ken
has won three volleyball big block awards
in his five years of competition with the
team.
He also has won varsity pins in track
and field and rowing.
Some of his other volleyball accomplishments include a most valuable player
award in the Canadian Junior Tournament of 1966.
He was a member of the UBC team
which went to the student games in Tokyo
in 1967.
A consistently accurate spiker, he
helped lead the volleyball team to victory
in a tournament last weekend in Olympia,
Washington.
In the tournament Ken's team came
first, beating seventeen others, but also the
second team won third overall.
Rugby teams win  and lose
Saturday's rugby action at Wolfson field
produced two wins and two losses for UBC's
four rugby squads.
The Birds lost 6-0 to Trojans' A, the Braves
beat Trojans' B 18-11, the Totems lost a close
one, 8-6 to Trojans' C, and the Frosh walked
over BCIT, 12-0.
The Braves' victory moved them into sole
possession of first place in the second division
with one game to play.
In the feature game, the Birds played well
but were beaten by a combination of inexperience and their own mistakes.
They held the Trojans scoreless in the first
half, but although they had the best of the
play, they failed to capitalize on their good
scoring chances.
CAPTAIN DAI WILLIAMS of the frosh rugby team
clinched the Junior Intercollegiate League Championship for UBC as he kicked 4 field goals to
lead UBC to a 12-0 win over BCIT.
In the second half the hard hitting began
to tell as the Bird scrum was repeatedly out-
muscled by the stronger, more-experienced
Trojan squad.
Early in the second half the Trojans' play
became very dirty. The one casualty was the
Birds' fine centre, Doug Schick, who suffered
either bruised or cracked ribs when mauled in
a loose scrum.
He was taken to hospital in an ambulance
after the game for X-rays.
The Birds continued to play well, but without Schick they seemed to lose their edge.
The only try of the game came just before
the middle of the second half on a short side
rush by McCloy of the Trojans from a scrum
about ten yards from the UBC goal.
The Birds were still in the game
late in the second half when they
missed a crucial penalty kick.
Soon after this, a gamble on a
quick line-out backfired and led to
the final scoring play of the game—
a beautiful drop goal by Roy Ellis.
The Birds had their chances but
could not finish off their plays. They
were also hindered by a wet, mucky
field and the too frequent whistles
that sometimes slowed the game to
a crawl.
In the other games: the Braves
were led to their victory by Reams-
bottom who scored two drop goals
and set up one try.
They play their final game of the
season in two weeks against Mera-
lomas.
The Frosh were led to their
eighth straight league win by their
captain, Dye Williams, who scored
four field goals, and by Dave Barlow, who played a good all-round
game.
This team is so strong that it plans
to move up to the second division
after Christmas.
All in all it was an encouraging
afternoon for UBC rugby despite
the Bird loss.
Something Different!
GINZA
JAPAN ARTS
1045 Robson 684-6629
pizza smorgasbord
EVERY WEDNESDAY
• 6-9 P.M.
• ALL YOU CAN EAT
• MEN $2-WOMEN $1.50
THE FRIAR, 4423 W. 10th
Admiral Nelles Trophy now at UBC
EIGHT 5 PIN ALLEYS
With Automatic  Pin Setters
SUB GAMES ROOM
The Dal Grauer Memorial Lectures
Prof. C. Northcote Parkinson
Creator of "Parkinson's Law"
and a noted historian and political scientist
Free Public Lectures
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21  at 8:15 P.M.
In the TOTEM PARK RESIDENCES, UBC
//
MRS. PARKINSON'S LAW
a
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22 at 12:30 P.M.
In the FREDERIC  WOOD  THEATRE, UBC
"THE SCIENCE OF POLITICS"
Led by last year's champion,
Bob Tapping, the UBC cross
country team brought back
first and third place overall
finishes in a meet held at Royal
Roads.
The team has won this meet
three times in a row, and in
this year's victory- it retains
the winners' laurels, the Admiral Nelles trophy.
Bob Tapping and Tom Howard paced each other to a new
course record, beating the old
one by thirteen seconds over
the four mile course.
Taking sixth, seventh and
eighth places were Ken Elmer,
Laurie Bridger and Brian Lee.
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS:
fcfc
A
Fine
Madness1'
TODAY
in   OLD  AUDITORIUM
SOc
Time$: 12:30, 8:30 THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November,  19,  1968
ASSES
~~"-75iTSean battle
for fan support
FILM SOC
Sean Connery in "A Fine
Madness". Today: 12,30, 8:30.
Old aud. 50 cents.
NEW DEMOCRATS; LSA
Allan Emmott, Team candidate for mayor, today noon,
SUB ballroom.
PRE MED SOC
Dr. Graham in "Technical
aspects of entering and completing medical college",
Wednesday noon, Wes. 201.
SDU
General     meeting     tonight,
7:30, SUB upper lounge,
lounge.
COMMERCE US
Commerce council meeting,
tonight, 7 p.m., SUB council
chambers.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Policy meeting, Wednesday,
7:30 p.m., 224 SUB.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon today, SUB
215, final arrangements,
polka party dance.
WORLD UNIVERSITY
SERVICE
Dicuss "Student Rebellion in
Yugoslavia",   today   noon,
SUB "K".
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Important meeting, today
noon, SUB "L".
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Deputy Warden Watt from
Oakalla speaks Wednesday
noon, SUB "K".
COMPUTER CLUB
Dr. Kennedy on "Commercial and scientific computer
applications and areas of
grad study", Wednesday
noon, SUB "F", all welcome.
ARTS LECTURE SERIES
Sociology professor R. A. H.
Robson    speaks    Wednesday
noon, SUB auditorium.
AFRO-AMERICAN MUSSOC
Organize and listen, noon today, Bu. 202.
SDU
Meeting Wednesday, 5:30
p.m. at SFU with senate
members over accreditation.
Bring sleeping bags and food.
SDU
General meeting today, 7:30
p.m. club's lounge.
CIRCLE K
Bullshit session, Wednesday,
7 p.m., Pete's.
CHORSOC
Males — Join dammit! Practice 6 p.m. Wednesday, Bu.
104.
GOSPEL STUDENTS
Moody film, City of the Bees,
Wednesday noon, Bu.  104.
LECTURE
Dr. B. A. Robson speaks
Wednesday noon, SUB aud.
on developments in sociology.
PHOTO SOC
Last entry day for club contest is Nov. 22, details Brock
ext. 163.
INTL FOLK DANCE CLUB
Folk dancing every Tuesday
noon, SUB 125.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
General meet today noon,
Bu. 221.
FRENCH DEPT.
Important meeting of French
honors  and majors students
Wednesday,   Nov.   20,   S
213 noon.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting today noon, Bu. 105.
Also Wednesday, Nov. 27,
7:30 pjn., SUB "P".
CLASSIFIED
Retes: Students. Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commeicial—3 Unes. 1 day $1.00. 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Claaaified ad* are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline i* 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241  STUDENT UNION BLDG., UNIVERSITY OP B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
FOLK SONG CIRCLE
Join in with your guitar and
voice, Wednesday, 8 p.m.,
10th and Highbury — one
block from Alma.
FILM SOC
We're in SUB! See Taming of
the Shrew in SUB aud.
Thursday and Friday; 12:30,
3:30, 6, 8:30. 50 cents.
SPEAKERS
Dr. Frederick Perls, "Gest-
alt therapy", SUB ballroom,
Wednesday noon. 35 cents.
DEBATING UNION
Should hippies wear corsets?
SUB 130, noon.
ONTOLOGICAL SOC
Meeting SUB 115C, 8 p.m.
tonight, bring writing ma-
erial.
AQUA SOC
Land dive to States. Sign as
soon as possible to get rides.
Info on club notice board.
CUSO
Workshop on Africa, Saturday, Nov. 23, 10 a.m. to 1:30
p.m., IH.
PHARMACY US
The Goofball — SUB ballroom, Nov. 23, 8:30-1 a.m.
Couples $2.75, men $1.75,
women $1.50. (Bar.)
VOC
Last day for membership fee
payment is Friday, Nov. 22.
PHOTO SOC
General meet Thursday noon,
Bu. 202.
CONCERT
Tomorrow's Eyes Thursday
noon, SUB ballroom, SO
cents.
COMMERCE US
General meet Thursday noon,
Ang. 407.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Square dancing Thursday,
noon-2:30, SUB L and M.
VARSITY DeMOLAY
Meeting Thursday, Nov. 21,
7:30 p.m., SUB 215 "P".
Field hockey
teams all win
The Thunderbirds defeated
Pitt Meadows 3-1 in men's first
division field hockey action
over the weekend.
T'Birds marksmen were
Terry Lane, Antoine Schouten
and Maartin Tjebbes.
The Birds short passing and
fast break up the middle offense destroyed the Meadows
hit and run game tactics.
Coach Eric Broome said,
"The forwards displayed excellent mobility in interchanging positions but the team as a
whole must place more emphasis on following up a play.''
The junior teams proved as
successful as the senior team—
they all won.
Peter Curtis scored two
goals to lead the Braves to a
3-0 victory over North Shore
"A".
The Tomahawks continued
their winning streak with a
2-0 victory over North Shore
"B".
UBC IV defeated the Jokers
V by a 6-0 score.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
THE   BEST   BANDS
always play  at the Retinal  Circus
Fri. & Sat $2.  Sun. $1.50
ROCK AND  FLICK
at   the   Retinal   Circus.    $2.00   Friday,
Saturday.   $1.50   Sunday.
Greetings
12
i *mAmok"A
|Across the street from Fraser Arms*]
Full Facilities
Dine In - Take Out -  Delivery
11381 S.W. Marine    263.44401
THE UNKNOWN
SUBTLETIES OF
'68 - INVITATION - '69
1. SKIING—Mt.  Baker  ski  pass  Is
valid on any  holiday.
2. MOVIES—12   movie   passes   are
valid during 3 week
Christmas holiday except 3 legal holidays.
3. RESTAURANT—Valid  as  many
times    as   you
want anytime.
BUY NOW
Xmas
SPECIAL
$1.25
68    -    INVITATION    -    69
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
FOR SALE 1958 PONTIAC, GOOD
condition $300. Pone 224-9910. Ask
tor  Paul  Adams.   Acadia  29-12.
MUST SELL, 1959 HILLMAN, GOOD
clean condition, newly over-hauled,
$300 or best offer. Phone 255-5548.
1965 MUSTANG FAST-BACK, 289 4-
speed. Good shape, red line tires.
Phona   688-5195.
1956 VW. NEW BRAKES, SOUND
engine, trans. $150. 536-6878 or 228-
272fl,
MUST   SELL   '61  FIAT-TUDOR.
Good    condition.    Excel,    brakes,
clutch.  $400 or best offer. Ph. 224-1677
betw.  7-8  p.m.
1965 CORVAIR CORSA—JUST TEST-
ed, everything perfect. Immaculate
blue exterior, black leather interior.
See it yourself. Offers from $1,400.
736-6281.
1960 METIOR, 4-DOOR V-8 AUTO,
trans., good motor, body fair condition.  $250.   Ph.   224-7660.
Automobile—Parts
23
Automobile—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
26
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating & Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
SILK SCREEN POSTERS. BEAU-
tifully made. Lowest Possible cost.
24   hr.   service.   731-7301. 	
Lost b Found
13
LOST HOCKEY SKATES C.C.M.
make near U.B.C. Hockey Rink on
Oct.  31.  Call  Ken  738-9043.
LOST: ENG. 340 NOTEBOOK IN
Brock Bsmt. Fri., Nov. 8. Reward.
Phone   Bill,   733-3733.
LOST ONE MAN'S GREEN RAIN-
coat Thurs. Angus Rm. 315. Phone
738-6257.  Ask for Brent.	
LOST: UBC JACKET FROM COAT
rack, Place Vanier dance Fri. night.
Phone  Fraser  224-9927.
Hides & Car Pools
14
RIDE WANTED FOR TWO FROM
West Van. 20th & Gordon call 926-
1208   Max.
Special Notices
15
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Carda, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find it across from
the Liquor Store at 3209 Weat
Broadway. 	
'6S   —   INVITATION   —    '•»
A atudent-oriented booklet of 33
different entertainment passes
valued at over $50.00. Available
at the Bookstore, He & She Clothing* (The Village) Canteens in tha
Residences and the Information
desk at S.U.B. $2.60.      	
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to
know.
REDUCE   THE COST  OF  YOUR IN
surance   by   as   much   as   20%.   All
risks   insured  and  no  cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott.
299-9422.
BUSES FOR CHARTER
Available in Vancouver
For Rates That Please
SQUAMISH COACH LINES
580 Howe 684-0522
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
YES,   WE   STILL   HAVE   COCONUT.
oil best for your hair and skin. Plus*
appointment   service.   Upper   Tenth
Barber, 4574 West 10th Avenue, 224-
6622.	
HOFNER 'BEATLE' BASS GUITAR,
'violin' shape, immaculate. New
Model, Machine Heads, Pickups!
$150.00.   738-2217,   Ian.
MODERN CHESTERFIELD AND
two matching chairs for sale. Call
685-6057.
HOLIDAY  MAGIC  COSMETICS
30% Discount All Products
Free  Delivery —  Call  581-8084
HEEKSUEDE PILE-LINED JACKET
size 38, $10.50. Mohair Cardigan $4.50.
2-shirts  $3.00,   Men's  skates,  size   S~>
$4.50.  Good hotplate  $10.00.  224-5801.
BLACK   HARDTOP    FOR    M.G.B.
Phone  263-0174 after  6  p.m.	
ENGLISH 200 NOTES SECT. "A".
Full term compiled by English Grad
student $2.00. 24 pages. 988-0847 or
926-1205.
The Handled Book on Campus
BIRD        UBC'i STUDENT
CALLS    TELE|,HONE DIRECTORY
Only 75c at Bookstore
Also al Publications Office &
Information Office, SUB
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
(M)  $40.00. 224-9662 KIT PRIV. MEAL
Services.  Close at hand. Lounge &
T.V.   2250 Wesbrook.	
Home Entertainment
35
GUARANTEED EXPERT AND
EFFICIENT   REPAIRS
Color  T.V.  — Black  and White  T.V.
Record Players — Radios
Stereo  Equipment —  Tape  Recorders
ALEXANDER  AND  AXELSON  LTD.
4512 W. 10th — 228-9088
Complete   Record   Department
Rentals—Miscelleous
36
ROOM FOR RENT. KITCHEN FA-
month. Call 733-9753 after 7:00 p.m.
cilities.   Separate   entrance   $35   per-
Room & Board
82
GIRL TO SHARE, 3 MEALS, LAUN-
dry, extra study-studio room,  semi-
private   entrance.   224-0074.	
ON CAMPUS ST. ANDREW'S HALL,
Men's residence. Share double room,
224-7720  or   224-5742.	
ROOM AND BOARD IN FRIENDLY
home near U.B.C. offered to female
student in return for baby sitting
and   light   duties.   Phone   224-7986.
Scandals
37
RENT THE PAISLEY MULTICOL-
ored Strobic Light-Show to make
your party or dance happen. Rea-
sonable rates. Paul 731-7301
THE GOOF BALL NOV. 23 SUB.
Final big blast before exams. BE
THERE BAR
STEPHAN SHEEHAN SCIENCE 2
says tankings in Faculty Pond
rathe;   inconvenient.
WE FINALLY MADE IT! SUB AT
last! See "Taming Of The Shrew"
in SUB Aud. Thursday and Friday.
12:30,  3:30,   6:00,  8:30 — 50c.
Typing
40
•GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
phone   277-5640."
RELIABLE HOME TYPIST AVAIL-
able for essays, etc. Please call 435-
0882.
EXPERIENCED    TYPIST    30c    PER
page.   874-2661.
EXP. TYPING ESSAYS AND THES-
es, reas. rates; legible work; phone
738-6829 after 10 a.m. Monday-Friday,   and   Sundays.	
C.U.S.O. WORKSHOP ON AFRICA.
Intn'l. Hse. Sat., Nov. 23, 10:00 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Panel discussion will feature African Students and returned
volunteers. Everyone is welcome.
CANADA'S FIRST BLACK M.P. —
Lincoln Alexander — speaks Fri.,
Nov.   22,   12:30.   Angus   110.   Free!
CHRISTMAS IS COMING BUT
Youth Cards are here Now. Fly half
fare until your 22nd birthday only
$3. Call to get yours delivered personally. Deirdre SwingAir Rep. 738-
1678.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
ait
and
SPITFIRES
at
GRAND PRIX MOTORS
Special Consideration To Students
Ph.  Lee 682-7185 or WE  6-2067
TEAR END DISCOUNT SALE ON
new Peugeot — all models. Call at
1162  Seymour  St.
GRAND PRIX MOTORS
APEX   TYPING   SERVICE
(Mrs.   Gow)
Mimeographing,  Typing
4370   W.   10th 224-6033
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Furn. Houses 8c Apts.
83
TIRED OF LANDLORDS? OURS IS
dead! Have a room for senior student. Either sex. Cheap! Yew &
8th.   732-8074.
WANTED   MALE    STUDENT   TO
share   West   End   apt.   with   same.'
Phone   Neil   at   688-2074.
TWO SENIOR GIRLS TO SHARE
modern house near U.B.C. gates.
Phone  736-6835.
BUY — SELL — RENT
USE
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED
Help Wanted*—
Male or Female
53
THE CENTRAL VANCOUVER YMCA
requires four students to help with
Saturday morning youth program.
For further Information please call:
681-0221, Local 28.
MATHS TUTORS REQUIRED.
Fourth year minimum. Phone Tuesdays only from 9:00 to 10:00 p.m.
736-6923. 	
X'MAS COMING — LIKE TO EARN
extra money in spare time? No obligation. Phone Mr. Wu 263-5982
weekdays  9  a.m.  -  12 noon.
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
Tutoring
 A_
FIRST YEAR MATHS, CH
physics lessons given by
tutors. 736-6923.
64
ISTRT,
cellent
UBYSSEY ADVERTISING
OFFICE
Now Located In
ROOM 241 — S.UJ3.

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