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The Ubyssey Mar 18, 1966

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Array Slotman
Vol. XLVIII, No. 62
Wi UBYSSEY
IS
Batman's
brother
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1966
CA 4-3916
Provincial
arbitration
suggested
By ANN BISHOP
Provincial conciliation officer Jack Sherlock has recommended negotiations between
the university and the UBC
employees union over a 30
cent an hour wage increase go
before a provincial conciliation board.
Sherlock made the recommendation when negotiations
broke down Wednesday after
union and university representatives met with Sherlock
and came to no agreement.
Business representative of
the employees union Jack Phillips said the university had
put forward no proposal to increase wages.
• •      •
The 700 member union includes truck drivers, laborers,
cafeteria workers, building
service workers and traffic and
patrol personnel.
Union president, Robert
Black applied for a conciliation
officer March 1, after the university rejected the union's
demands.
UBC labor relations director
John F. McLean Thursday denied negotiations had broken
down.
Phillips said when his committee left the conciliation officer, Sherlock informed the
union he was recommending a
board be set up to solve the
problem.
• *     •
He said Sherlock did not
feel there was any useful purpose in calling any further
meetings between the union
and management as McLean
would not put forward any
proposal to increase wages.
"McLean feels he is walking
a tightrope and if there was
any wage increase it should be
a result of a recommendation
from the conciliation board,"
Phillips said.
"We feel Mr. McLean is abdicating his responsibilities in
collective   bargaining."
— powell hargrave photos
RUBGY THUNDERBIRDS defeated University of California
Golden Bears 12-8 Thursday at UBC in third game of annual World Cup Series. Birds now lead series 2-1 in games.
Two-school
race spurred
by $25,00
!_•_•
By PAT HRUSHOWY
UBC has a chance at $25,000 to start co-operative student
housing, but must act quickly to keep Simon Fraser from
getting the money.
The defunct University Students' Co-operative Association
which operated a co-op house
on West Eighth until last year
is holding $25,000 in trust and
wants to give it to a student
group wishing to start a housing co-operative.
Carl Drugge, UBC alumnus
and former member of the
board of governors of USCA,
said the association would like
to get rid of the money this
year or have a definite proposal from a student group.
SFA 'INTERESTED'
"If someone can come up
with a concrete idea, we will
be only too willing to listen,"
he said.
Drugge said iSFA students
have been approached and are
very interested.
"Whoever comes up with the
best idea will get the money,"
he said.
UBC AMS president elect
Peter Braund said he has called
a meeting for Monday with
treasurer - elect Lome Hudson
and Jim Slater, grad studies,
who have worked on co-op
housing.
'HOMEWORK FIRST
"We have to do our homework first," Braund said.
"After determining the size
of building we want and its
location, we will have to go to
the director of housing."
In the past, people have suggested scrapping SUB to build
co-op housing.
"We don't want to run co-op
against SUB," Braund said.
"SUB will benefit 14,000 students while co-op housing will
benefit only 600. The two projects can be run concurrently."
Viet vehicle
to land Lynd
in left field
The man who objects to
helicopters in Viet Nam will
descend on the UBC campus
noon today.
Staughton Lynd, a leading
critic of United States policy
in Viet Nam, will use a helicopter to get to UBC after he
arrives at the airport at 12:10
p.m.
Lynd is scheduled to speak
in the auditorium at noon.
The Viet Nam Day committee wanted to land Lynd on
the library lawn or in the stadium, but the idea was put in
left field by buildings and
grounds officials.
B and G director Tom
Hughes said Thursday the noise
of the helicopter would disturb
classes.
Hughes said the helicopter
would be allowed to land beyond Agronomy Road.
VNDC is paying the $35 for
Lynd's helicopter trip.
Although Lynd's U.S. passport was revoked after a visit
to Hanoi, Canadian immigration officials said he will be
allowed to enter Canada.
B.C.  STUDENTS
ARE  MEAN-EST
(SEE PAGE 14)
GREEK LEPRECHAUNS
TALK TO   MALCOLM
Holy shillelagh!  Green things at UBC
By   IRVING   O'PROTZEN
Green things walked all
over UBC Thursday, causing
consternation to campus authorities.
The green things, which
played havoc with early
morning traffic and Malcolm
McGregor, are small humans
known as leprechauns, The
Ubyssey was told.
Classics head McGregor is
the only person known to
have spoken with one of the
leprechauns.
"I meet a leprechaun every
St. Patrick's Day," he told
The Ubyssey.
"This year's was the most
intelligent one I have met.
"He was a Greek, so I
spoke Latin with him. He
said The Ubyysey was a liar
and a distorter. He suspected
it may also be a suppressor."
McGregor said the leprechaun disapproved of sex,
four-letter words, and people
who think residences aren't
perfect.
"He was an excellent leprechaun," said McGregor.
"But don't quote me on
that."
Traffic    czar    Sir     Ouvry
malcolm McGregor
. . . meets wee folk
Roberts said he spotted a
leprechaun while he was investigating alleged puddles in
C-lot.
"They were two little
green men," he said. They
were drinking Guinness stout.
I chased them but they disappeared into the medical
library."
Roberts said he couldn't
find  any  puddles on   C-lot.
"Anyone who sees puddles
on C-lot is seeing things," he
told a reporter.
AMS president Byron Hender  would not  comment   on
reports he had discovered
several leprechauns in his
Brock Hall office.
"I may have seen them,
but I'll have to ask Roger,"
Hender said.
UBC president John Macdonald denied seeing leprechauns.
"You confuse freedom with
licence when you talk about
leprechauns," he said.
Macdonald said his press
officer Ralph Daly would
send The Ubyssey a press release outlining the administration's leprechaun policy. THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 18, 1966
REPORT ASKS REVAMP
'Change college rule'
By RICHARD BLAIR
Ubyssey Ass't News Editor
The functions of the board
of governors, senate and presidents should be reorganized,
recommends a report on Canadian university government.
The report, released in Ottawa this week, advocates
closer cooperation between the
board, the senate and faculty
members.
The theory that the non-
academic board controls finance and the academic senate
controls academic policy is
more or less dead, it says.
•      *      *
"Today, finance and academic planning are quite inevitably and quite inextricably
linked with each other and
will be even more so in the
future-
"The boards are on one
hand getting more involved in
questions of educational policy
which are theoretically outside their jurisdiction."
The report blamed this involvement on the fact that
universities are getting larger
proportions of their income
from governmental sources,
thereby cancelling the duties
of the board as a fund-raiser
and estate manager  .
The    92-page    report    was
SF senate
sinks frats,
sororities
BURNAJBY (UNS) — Simon Fraser's senate has turned
thumbs down on fraternities
and  sororities.
In a resolution made public
Wednesday, SFA's governing
body indicated disapproval, if
not downright condemnation,
of Greek societies.
In a motion at its March 7
meeting,  the   senate  resolved:
"That the senate at this time
not make a definite ruling on
the question of the recognition of fraternities and sororities, but that the senate express to the faculty council
that its sympathies are not in
favor of fraternities or sororities at Simon Fraser."
SFA students will be able to
veto or approve Greek organizations in a referendum scheduled for Tuesday.
They will be asked to indicate whether they wish the
SFA students' society to recognize and sanction the Phi Epsilon fraternal group, a proposed Delta Epsilon colony.
The Phi Epsilon group has
run afoul of Burnaby municipal zoning laws in its attempt
to establish an off-campus
house at Grandview Highway
and Gilpin.
Burnaby reeve Alan Emmott
has said there is little chance
the group can remain in the
stone mansion, once the palace
of colorful Archbishop John of
Burnaby.
And Burnaby municipal
building inspector Mike Jones
says: "There's nothing I can do
but order them to leave in
order that the building revert
to single-family use."
The area is not zoned for
multiple occupancy.
drawn up by the Association
of Universities and Colleges
of Canada and the Canadian
Association o f University
Teachers.
The ineffectiveness of the
senates is the major cause of
the tension and disharmony
that exist today in far too
many Canadian universities.
• •      •
"Some senates are unable
to fulfill their function as the
voice of the faculty because
they are too large or too
heavily diluted with non-
academic members, or because
too few of their members are
elected by the  faculty.
The report recommended
the two-tier pattern of board
and senate be retained.
"But in place of the assumed separation of powers between board and senate, we
propose a system whereby
they are brought into much
closer contact at many stages."
It recommended that "more
professors and faculty members be placed on the board
to bridge the gap between the
academic community and the
laymen on the board.
* •      •
"These     faculty     members
should also be members of the
senate so that they will know
in advance the business that
is coming from the senate to
the board."
"The number of faculty
members on the board should
vary with the size of the
board, not exceeding 25 per
cent."
Another way to improve
board-senate relations would
be in the "formation of joint
committees, comprising equal
numbers of board and senate
to deal with problems where
academic policy and fiscal
reality are up against each
other."
These links between board
and senate would also relieve
much of the pressure on uni
versity presidents who, the
report says, have been the
chief victims of the defects
of structure in the university
government.
"The president's role as a
one-man link between board
and senate adds an intolerable burden to the office."
"With more links between
board and senate, and with an
elected majority on senate,
which itself elects members to
seats on the board, the president will have allies on both
bodies."
•      •      •
The report cautioned that
"a president who under existing conditions feels himself
baited and badgered by his
faculty association may find
this expectation difficult to
accept."
The report also criticized
presidents for appointing
deans without adequate consultation of faculty opinion.
It said these deans were regarded by the faculty as "tools
of the administration and resulted in a rise in tension
levels."
The report recommended
that: "Deans should be selected by the president after advice from an advisory committee on which both decentralizes and unifiers sit in
about equal numbers."
Athlone awarded
to  UBC  redshirt
UBC engineering graduate
James Ronald Goard has
been awarded the Athlone Fellowship.
Goard, 2905 West Forty-
third, is one af 44 engineers
from all parts of Canada who
will go to Britain next fall.
The Athlone Fellowship
scheme, financed by the British government, will give
Goard two years of advanced
engineering research.
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Final Year Undergraduates
You qualify for rewarding positions in Ontario's expanding Secondary School system now being advertised in
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES. Detach coupon below and
mail today for your FREE subscription:
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES,
1460 Don Mills Rd.,
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Take a Good Look
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THEN CONSIDER
LANGLEY
Teachers enjoy working at Langley because:
1. the Fraser Valley has a mild climate.
2. they appreciate living in a growing community,
only a short drive from Vancouver and Bellingham.
3. they are supported by an interested Board of
School  Trustees.
4. they are supported by a community which recognizes the need to educate its youth.
We are interested in your academic record, your certification and what you as an individual will bring to our district.
Address enquiries to Harold D. Stafford, District Superintendent of Schools, Box 40, Murrayville, B.C.
NOTICE
OF REFERENDUM
A referendum will be held on Tuesday, March 29th, 1966
which will read:
1.    Are you in favour of the following:
That commencing September ,1967 the University accept
full   responsibility   for   the   financing   of   athletics,   and
That the $5.00 presently collected by the Alma Mater
Society for athletics be collected by the University as a
University Athletic Fee, and
That this fee be allocated directly to the Athletic Com-
ittees.
YES
NO
2.    Are you in favour of increasing the A.M.S. fee
by $2.00.
YES
NO
Polling stations will be held at: Buchanan, Brock Hall,
Library, Bus Stop, Education Building ,Wesbrook, Vancouver General Hospital, Shaughnessy Hospital, B.C. Vocational Institute.
Advance polls will be held at: Totem Park, Lower Mall,
Acadia Camp, Fort Camp, Brock, Education Building. Friday, March 18, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
ERNIE LECOURS
— norm betts photo
booze not bad
LeCours raps law
tor booze problems
By VAL ZUKER
Most problems of alcohol and alcoholics are the fault of
inadequate liquor laws, according to Socred MLA Ernie
LeCours.
"Those who make up the
laws feel they must ride herd
on us," said LeCours, MLA for
Delta, to an audience of 18 students in Brock Thursday noon.
LeCours said the responsibility for liquor must be put
on the individual.
"The government has a duty
to help educate the population
so drinking will become a
social function rather than
being used to get drunk.
"Beer parlors exist only to
provide a place where people
can drink themselves drunk,"
he said.
"Rather than go to a beer
parlor after work, the average
working man should toe able to
go to the corner store and pick
up a case of beer to take
home."
The drinking of liquor is
only semi-legal because of the
restrictions placed on where it
can  be   drunk,  LeCours  said.
"Most of the people who are
against liquor are against it because they want to be miserable."
HANDS OFF, SAYS  McG
'Leave plane to pilot'
'In B.C., 1,000 members of
the Women's Christian Temperance Union give vociferous
opposition to the relaxing of
liquor laws, ignoring the wishes of 2,000,000 persons to
frighten the government into
retaining the strict laws."
LeCours accused the government of cowardice and hypocrisy in failing to make the
laws more reasonable.
"It is unreasonable and foolish to maintain an age limit
of 21. Children should be
brought up to accept liquor as
a normal part of life."
But LeCours favors the new
legislation allowing police to
confiscate the license of an impaired driver for a period of 24
hours.
He said he was wary of
young policemen throwing
their weight around, because it
is inevitable some people will
have their licenses taken unfairly.
LeCours said he would like
to see posters displayed in beer
parlors by the door leading
out, so people leaving could be
warned of the dangers of mixing driving and drink.
By DON  KYDD
Classics head Malcolm McGregor Thursday levelled a
scattergun at everything from
student participation in administration to current dance fads.
He told the University Clubs
Committee awards banquet the
duty of the student or professor  is  to have  an  opinion,
but to keep it to himself.
McGregor spoke for an hour
to about 50 club representatives in the Faculty Club.
On the participation of students in the administration: "I
pay $116 to Air Canada to take
me to Regina and back but I
don't go up to the pilot to tell
him how he should run his
plane, even though his actions
concern me.
"Why should the student
participate in the- administration?"
On The Ubyssey: "The Ubyssey is guilty of libel or near-
libel and one of these days
someone will come along who
isn't reluctant to criticize students and sue your campus
publication."
He termed the current free-
Brock  open  late
for  bookworms
You can now study late
in Brock.
Co-ordinator Graeme
Vance said Wednesday: "The
Brock management committee has decided to open the
conference and board rooms
for the purpose of quiet
study."
The rooms will be open
all day until 11 p.m.
"If many students use the
rooms nightly more rooms
will be opened," Vance said.
speech   movement   "collegiate
anarchy."
McGregor said the perfect
university would have three
classes: the administrative (the
Jaw), the faculty and the student body, with discipline
binding the classes.
The student role in the university is to learn; that of the
Best club'
awarded to
debaters
The debating union has
taken the annual university
clubs committee award for outstanding contributions to campus life from a university
cluto.
UCC president Mike Coleman said the award presented
at the UCC annual banquet in
the faculty club Thursday was
for the union's activities in
local, regional and national debating contests.
The debating union recently
won the McGoun Cup for western Canadian universities and
tied with the University of
Saskatchewan for the national
Macdonald-Laurier cup.
The individual awards for
outstanding contributions for
clulbs went to Carl Bethke,
Lutheran student movement
president, and UBC Liberal
president, Alan Gould.
The varsity outdoors club
topped the club's day booth
awards, with the varsity Christian fellowship second and
choral society third.
Speaker at the banquet was
classics head Malcolm McGregor who compared modern
campus life with the golden
age of Greece.
faculty to teach and not be
academically idle, he said. The
collective duty of students and
faculty is to obey.
The result is intellectual discipline, he said.
On last fall's threatened fee
boycott: "Going on strike is
about as sensible as going on
a hunger strike in one of Hitler's concentration camps. The
professors would rather be
working on their projects than
teaching; only the students
would lose."
McGregor cited the dance the
"jerk" as an example of the
excess freedom of today. He
called it a "disgusting gyration
from  a   distance  of  six  feet."
"I am glad there are no
Ubyssey reporters or staff
members present to inhibit my
style," McGregor concluded.
Arts wants
breakaway
from AMS
Arts students next year
might not be AMS members if
a constitutional revision passes
at the arts undergrad society
general meeting Friday noon
in Bu.  106.
The revision proposed by
the arts council executive
would have the AUS withdraw
from the AMS and stop arts
students paying AMS fees.
The executive recommended
instead "an autonomous communal brotherhood based on
free elections and equality of
opportunity" called the arts
undergrad soviet.
The revision must have a
two-thirds majority! vote at the
general  meeting to  pass.
J.
—   kurt   hilger   photo
NAME OF THE GAME is frisbee, and these students managed to ignore impending exams
Thursday by spinning the funny plastic saucer for two hours behind M huts. Question is,
who threw the frisbee (upper left)? mvmstr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242.
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and  for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1966
Right shall not lack a champion;
wrong shall not go unopposed.
— UWO Gazette motto
Vote yes
When opportunity knocks, open the door.
On March 29 students get their biggest opportunity
to put athletics on a more stable basis by voting "yes"
on a referendum to put your $5 athletic fee, currently
controlled by the AMS, into the hands of the administration.
There are many good reasons why the administration
should have the responsibility of financing extra-mural
athletics.
If it remains with the AMS, extramural athletics
are doomed.
The AMS has the reputation of persistently changing its policy on athletics from year to year. Thunderbird teams have been bounced from the Evergreen conference to the Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic
Association to independent status and now back into the
WCIAA.
Our harrassed athletic officials are consequently
unable to plan their budget or schedule opponents for
more than one year ahead. It has been impossible to
make the long range plans which could result in a class
of athletics which parallels our size.
Athletic officials also want to be financed through
the administration because they feel they'll have a better
chance to get increased funds through the president's
office.
There are too many political problems facing the
AMS today and tomorrow for the student council to
worry about athletics.
When the AMS president-elect, current president,
the Men's Athletic Committee and the coaching staff of
the School of Physical Education call for the administration to take control it is time to act.
And the only right action is a "yes" vote.
—T.K.O.
Washed masses
In Ottawa, a report from the Association of Universities and Colleges in Canada recommends adding
student voices to university administrations.
Before the report came out earlier this week, the
need for such a move was already apparent.
At the University of Western Ontario, student leaders
were calling for more student voice in university affairs,
including senate seats.
At the University of Manitoba, a student was and is
running for a seat on the board of governors.
At UBC, Randy Enomoto gallops after the chancellor's chair.
Students, denied a voice in university affairs, react
the same way any people in a totalitarian system do —
they rise in a great washed mass.
Witness October's march, Berkeley's uprising separatists in Quebec schools.
Democratic systems, although potentially as unjust,
as totalitarianism, have a remarkable stability against
popular revolution.
President Macdonald has warned of the consequences and illogic of irresponsible student protest, but
so far has not taken  any steps to alleviate  a torchy
situation.
He might be wise to consider the simplest solution
and follow the AUCC suggestion.
Student representation on governing bodies could
certainly do the university no harm. —K.
You're really very virile, Brian . . . have you ever thought of running for parliament?
IN  THE  EAR
BY IAN CAMERON
Vital facts on log, sewers
Nothing happened to me
the other day, so I decided
to write a column about it.
This column takes the form
of a quiz of vital facts which
everyone should know.
Thanks to Norm Betts, Jeff
Wall, Saba, and The Standard Book of essential knowledge.
Answer the following and
drop in my letter box at The
Ubyssey.
1. When Roger Maris hit
his record - breaking 61st
home run into the stands,
who caught the ball?
5. What is the middle
nam« of UBC's Joe Workman?
6. What were Carol
Doda's original measurements?
11. What means John, Ian,
Juan, in Hebrew?
12. How many more miles
of sewer than water pipes
are there in Vancouver?
What  are they since the
silicone injections?
7. What was the production of the Newhall factory
in England in 1889? What did
they make?
13. Who was Zog the First?
14. What percentage of
Englishmen claim to have
seen a ghost?
2. Who was  the Beatles
original drummer?
8. How many people
were there in jail in Spain
on March 1st of this year?
15. How many student-
hours will be spent on exams
at UBC this year?
3. What is the average
age of orang-utangs in Borneo?
9. Who
AAONMS?
or  what  is
4, What
names of
parents?
are    the   first
Elvis   Presley's
10. How   many    myria-
grams per hogshead?
MORALMAN,
LETTERS
(SEE PAGE 13)
-^! /*4$fl
Mmm, oh really? department
"I don't know what has
happened to the Negroes of
Wilcox   County.   You   never
hear them sing anymore."
ALABAMA TAX ASSESSOR
PETE JONES
The New York Times,
Feb. 20, 1966
•      •      •
Whoever built this university did not allow for a female
population.
Washrooms are very poorly
equipped. Often facilities provided are never replenished.
Imagine my despair Monday
when every washroom I entered failed to fulfill my
needs.
Apart from this, I feel the
girls are being unfairly discriminated against. Boys washrooms   are   kept  clean.  Why
can't  the   girls  enjoy   clean
washrooms too?
The bookstore does not
stock any of the personal
items so necessary to our female population. The girls in
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
Newt          .....       Ron Riter
Associate George Reamsbottom
City .   _     ...    Al Donald
Photo     . ....   ..  Norm Both
Sports      . Ed Clark
Ass't News Dan Mullen
Richard Blair, Robbi West
Ass't City Danny Stoffman
Page Friday  ._       .     .     John Kelsey
Managing _       Ian Cameron
Features       _..   .     ___.._   Mike Bolton
CUP Don Hull
residence must build up several months supply or suffer.
GILLIAN LINDRIDGE
Editor, The Peak
Simon Fraser Academy
March 16. 1966
Sure and begorrah, someone told
me St. Patrick's day it was.
Danny O'Stoffman went out to
find St. Patrick but it was no
success he was having. It's fiin
they were having in the office,
those fine colleens and handsome
young men, Valerie O'Zuker,
Fr--oo 0'B°nton. Ann O'Bishop,
Patrick O'Unpronounceable, Marilyn O'Hill whose brother didn't
show up because it was sick he
was. Claudia O'Gwinn was looking after the handling of Page
O'Friday. Gillian O'Penwarden Was
at the printers. Photographers
were Kurt O'Hilger, Powell O'Har-
grave   and   Dennis   O'Gans.
What is green, lies on the grass,
is covered with gold? A drunk
leprechaun.
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OLUNNS
IN LITTLE PIECES: Incoming AMS pres Petey
(Break-up) Braund strikes
again.
Last week he broke a
glass-topped desk by
pounding on it; at Monday's council meeting,
while flailing about him
with the gavel, he smashed
a large brown ashtray into
small brown bits.
• •       •
INCOGNITO:   Engineers
recently held their iron
ring graduation ceremonies, presided over by new
dean Bill Armstrong.
They then adjourned to
the Fraser Arms for the
traditional beering session.
When Armstrong arrived,
the barkeep (as arranged)
rushed over to demand his
I.D.
The dean, nearer 50 than
21, produced driver's licence and birth certificate
and was duly served his
suds.
• •       •
INSIDE: Some students
might be wondering why
ardent, adamant Roger
(SUBliminal) McAfee dropped the SUB chairmanship
apparently without a
whimper.
It wasn't that Roger did
not want a third term to
promote himself and his
project, it was about the
incoming AMS executive
threatening to resign if he
was re-appointed.
• •       •
INSIGNIFICANT: Yale
prof Siaughion Lynd, conscientious objector and
professional pinko, speaks
today in the auditorium
under Viet Nam Day committee sponsorship.
His campus arrival has
been preceded by two
black-overcoat types dis-
t r i b u t ing "background"
sheets smearing Lynd's pacifist history.
Ubyssey photogs report
the backgrounders are extremely camera-shy.
• •       •
IN THE GRASS ROOTS:
Our spies in the Interior
report more than a little
support for chancellor candidate Randy (Democratic)
Enomoto.
Teachers who are recent
UBC grads are the most vocal organizers of votes for
the grad student in his
drive to beat out establishment man John (Phantom)
Buchanan.
Their anti-establishment
feelings stem directly from
dislike of the infamous
closed-mouth policy of the
board   of  governors.
Candidate Buchanan remains very unreachable,
which doesn't enhance his
voter appeal with UBC
grads.
If  you're   making   book
on   the   Great   Race,   odds
■e now about even, with
Enomoto looking better all
the time.
• •       •
IN JOKE: 1$ you combine Ottawa's much-ballyhoo e d sex - and - security-
scandal and Playboy publisher Hugh Hefner's predilection for verbiage, you
get  the   obvious   one-liner:
Hefner has bought exclusive rights to reprint
Hansard.
• •       •
INFANTRY: In sparkling
prose, too magnificent to
have been written by a
mere reporter, readers of
the Sun's super-duper diary
on the new building were
let in on the secrets of the
editorial process.
A well-oiled team of reporters, artists, city editors,
and news editors — and at
the very nulb, yea, the
crossroads — was the catalyst, the quarterback of the
whole mess: SLOTMAN!
Question: Who is this W.
Rayner. author of the
deed?
Answer (known only to
the foot soldiers and other
minor cogs): Why, Slotman,
of course.
• •      •
INDEED: One can always judge the betting
odds on success of the
much-maligned student
union building by watching how fast construction
proceeds on the new stadium out in the boondocks
south of Totem Park.
The administration, responsible for the $1 million stadium, goes like
stink on the project when
SUB catches fire and looks
like a winner to replace
the present stadium.
When SUB bogs down,
the new stadium bogs
down because the administration is loath to lay out
the boodle to replace something that might not be demolished.
Right now construction
on the new stadium is
bogged down. Draw your
own conclusions, but our
money goes with the administration brain trusters.
•       •       •
INCENSED: A group of
Vancouver City College
students, unhappy at the
product put out by their
journalism class and in-
structor ex-Times man
Sandy Sanderson, gets a
chance at producing the
Crest next week.
If they make good, it's
theirs forever. If they
don't, the rag reverts to
Sandy and his journalism
class, members of which
aren't touching the rebel
effort with the proverbial
10-foot pole. pf
Friday
March  18 1966
editor:  JOHN  KELSEY
current affairs:  STEVE BROWN
science,  the  arts:  AL  FRANCIS
associate:  CLAUDIA GWINN
ON THE COVER: an "acid-
head" during an LSD experience. See lead story,
right.
idiocy
With haute - boys,
torches, and great lack of
foresight, the AMS terminated i t s agreement
with the Musician's Mutual Protective Union.
This means that hence-
forth union musicians
cannot be hired for AMS
functions under threat of
reprimand by the union.
Since nearly all bookings in Vancouver are
regulated by said union it
is virtually impossible to
work on campus without
a membership. Ergo the
non - amateur , non - member is scarce.
Quality music on campus will certainly suffer
the effects of this contract   termination.
Are we prepared to sacrifice this quality for amateurs?
Another complication
which might prove to be
more disastrous still,
stems from the apparently close affiliation of the
stage hands, equity actors
and the now-alienated
union.
Even UBC's narcissistic
tendencies will not permit us to imagine the dollar value of campus engagements ranks with
those of the downtown
night  clubs.
If one outfit blacklists
a campus the others will
follow- What would Freddie Wood Theatre company be if forced to employ only student talent?
The AMS prexy-elect
added the suggestion that
such black-listing could
be avoided by hiring the
band in the name of an
individual.
We still haven't come
to terms with the local
gendarmes in the liquor
license hassle.
Looks like an eight
month famine from the
arts next year.—CG
•tft'V.
■ * t-.ii
f .:'■■■
Acid heads disarm ego
Local doctor
probes LSD
By ROSEMARY HYMAN
" LSD: psychiatric breakthrough or
dangerous fad?
Fad, proclaims Time Magazine this
week, in a story headed, An Epidemic
of Acid-Heads.
An alarming problem, it claims, with
10,000 students at UCLA alone experimenting with the most familiar of the
psychedelic or consciousness-expanding
drugs.
Not necessarily so, claim medical
researchers involved with the drug,
who call it the biggest breakthrough
for psychiatry for years.
The controversy has been growing
since Havelock Ellis first wrote about
his experiences with mescaline, a related drug, in 1895.    Since then, some
A CUS exchange student from McMaster, Rosemary Hyman has written
for the Hamilton Spectator and the
McMaster Silhouette-
1,200 papers, scientific and popular,
have been written on psychedelic drugs.
Among the leaders in research have
been the staff of Hollywood Hospital
in  New  Westminster.
"The great thing about the psyche-
delics," says Dr. J. Ross MacLean, medical director of the hospital, "is that
instead of the great talking cure of five,
seven", 10 years through psychoanalysis,
you know within five or so days
whether you can help someone."
What scares those who oppose use
of the drug is growing illicit use of it.
In Vancouver, unauthorized use of
the drug is not extensive. E. L. Devlin,
regional director of the federal food
and drug department reports a few
suspected cases of peddling or use of
the drug, "but nothing we can pin
down".
"Some of it is used among university students, but there are businessmen
involved too-"
However, taking of the drug in the
city does have aspects of a cult. "If
you're in, and know the right people,"
said one 'head' (an LSD user), "you
can get the stuff without too much
trouble. If you're not, it can cost you
$600 a dose, and you won't know
whether you are really getting LSD
at all."
Drug researchers warn that unsupervised use of the drug can lead to
breakdowns—-but those who experiment with the drug outside hospitals
are not convinced.
"I decided that my little body had
carried me this far, and it would carry
me through this," said one UBC
student who took the drug completely
on her own. She reports no ill effects
from her two experiences, but stresses
she took the drug to find out about
herself, not for kicks.
"I have found out that if you do
something just for kicks, you pay for
it."
LSD's main attraction is that it
breaks down the rational defences of
the ego, and allows the subject to see
himself clearly.
In psychoanalysis, it is used as a
catalyst, to help patients relive a
variety of experiences, and view them
with detachment.
"Acid heads" have other reasons for
taking the drug. "I wanted to find out
about myself; to gain insight into my
personality," said another student.
"Whether you take LSD is a question of how willing you are to go
through a catharsis" reports a UBC
professor of religion. "The things I
was interested in were the reputed
mystical aspects of the experience."
"I'm not for the cult of acid-heads,"
he warns. "It's like a high-powered
jet plane—you don't put someone at
the controls who knows nothing about
it.
"You need a person supervising who
has had some experience with the thing
himself.
"A lot of times, the things you face
in yourself can be pretty ugly. A potential psychotic or neurotic shouldn't
have access to the drug."
Page 6
Right now, no one in Canada has
legal access to the drugs. A law passed
three years ago placed LSD on a restricted list, along with such drugs as
thalidomide.
It can be used only by approved research hospitals affiliated with a university school of medicine.
Hollywood Hospital has no such affiliation. A disagreement with some
parts of the UBC faculty over the value
of the drug has prevented affiliation;
no other Canadian medical school exists
within reasonable distance.
Research continues — unrestricted —
with other psychedelic drugs and with
stocks of LSD on hand at the time the
prohibition was passed. (The law makes
no reference to such stocks.)
To undergo the five-day experience
costs $425, plus $18.80 a day for hospital room- Hospital personnel say the
cost is low for the amount of time,
supervision and testing expended on
the patient.
The hospital is mainly concerned with
alcoholics and those with mental problems.
THE      UBYSSEY
However, Frank Ogden, psychedelist
at the hospital, is highly optimistic in
his hopes for use of psychedelic, in
learning. "Lately, we have been giving the drug to people who don't have
these problems—for expansion of consciousness.
"This is going to be its greatest
potential. We have given it to space
scientists, writers, artists. . . ."
"It is like sending a real estate man
up  in  a  helicopter:  he  gets  a  whole
new concept of the city he saw from
the streets—for urban planning and
rearranging.
"These people gain a whole new concept of their field. They become more
tolerant and more aware of their surroundings."
More reserved about the future of
psychedelics is hospital research assistant W. E. Wilby. Unlike other members of the staff he has not taken the
drug-
"There are some who become too
evangelical, too involved with it," he
comments. "As a researcher, I would
like to stay aloof. I have my own complement of problems and vices, and I
am quite happy with them."
Wilby claims reports of the dangers
of LSD are exaggerated. "It's not the
use but the abuse that fouls it up," he
says. "Legitimate workers are becoming concerned with the possibility of
over-hasty legislation.
"There are indeed dangers in the
unsupervised use of LSD, if it is used
by essentially unintegrated people. If
you decide you are a butterfly and that
you want to fly out a window, you'll
fly out a window.
"But the dangers are frequently exaggerated by people who know little
about psychedelics."
Hollywood Hospital has been testing
LSD for nine years, treating 750 cases.
"We are now faced with a tremendous
problem," says Dr. MacLean. "The
demand is growing by virtue of the
drug's successes."
As chairman of the year-old International Association of Psychodelytic
Therapy, Dr. MacLean is heading a
drive to gain support for further ex1-
perimentation with LSD and related
drugs.
Members of the organization come
from nine nations; included on its
executive committee are doctors from
the United States, Germany, England
and Czechoslovakia-
"To my knowledge the only restrictions on LSD are in the U.S. and
Canada," says Dr. MacLean.
"I hope we're not going back to the
pre-war days when the best psychiatric
research was done in Britain and
Europe."
Friday, March 18, 1966 Mr. Bennett's view of universities:
7he ignorant keep me in power
By PAT HORROBIN
So Randy's really running.
And if he gets in — well,
the airtight board of governors will suddenly find it's
been ventilated.
It will have a constituency
on its hands.
Mr. Enomoto will consider
himself responsible to those
who actually make up the
university: the students, and
the faculty.
The secrecy of the board
of governors must go, he said
in a statement to The Ubyssey last week. And elaborated:
If something of vital interest to the students was
kept from them, and I were
chancellor, I would break
the secrecy and disclose the
contents of the meeting.
"I would do the same thing
for the faculty," he said.
Get that? Not every housekeeping item. But the sort of
thing that can get by in an
undisclosed minute of the
board, and not come out until
long after the fact.
"Recent legislation in
British Columbia will make
it possible for the legislature
to examine item by item all
university expenditures, even
to the details of individual
salaries. Given the sometimes rather peculiar attitudes of the present government, it seems clear that the
university's internal financial
autonomy could foe in danger," said the late Dr.
Stewart Reid, then secretary
of the Canadian Association
of University Teachers, in
1963 in the keynote essay of
the sleeper bestseller A Place
of Liberty.
Could it be this is the piece
of legislation agreed to by
President Macdonald, without consulting with the senate or the faculties — the-
presidential step which the
Faculty Association's five-
year study committee on university- government, chaired
by Religious Studies head
Dr. William, Nicholls, decried
in its report last spring.
That  report,  incidentally,
Pat Horrobin, former
Ubyssey feature writer is in
Ottawa as CUS parliamentary lobbyist and Ubyssey
correspondent.
landed the members of the
Faculty Association in the
Freddy Wood Theatre shortly afterward, for a tart statement from Dr.-Macdonald on
just who was responsible for
the running of the university
and who was going to continue to hold that responsibility.
The MacDowell-Friedson
compromise formula, from
that same Freddy Wood
gathering, called for a faculty-administration study to
determine how far faculty
participation in university
government should go.
Dr. Macdonald agreed to
receive the report. But he
made it clear he will not feel
bound in any way to accept
the committee's recommenda
tions as yet undisclosed.
Thus it came thisclose to
being a three-way race for
chancellor.
But the faculty's choice
from their own ranks refused
to stand, or be dragged anywhere close to the stance.
His language cleaned up a
bit, it turns out he considers
there are inherent difficulties attached to becoming a
faculty member-chancellor—
given the present administration.
He appreciates it would
have been a mightly classy
and effictive back-door onto
the board for one part of the
university community — the
faculty — specifically barred at present from sitting
on that board, but his word
is: Rots of ruck, Randall.
The university has always
had need of people of independent political analysis
to speak for it, both privately and publicly.
For seventeen years, it had
Dr. Norman A. MacKenzie,
Eisenhower-figure but canny
politician from away back.
When Bennett took over
B.C., he found he had MacKenzie to deal with when it
came time to take a look at
UBC.
• • •
One of the more deathless
W. A. C. Bennett quotes will
have to be the statement he
made to then UBC vice-president Dean Geoffrey Andrew as President MacKenzie actively pushed to get an
:4\^T\xpv<
'ernaps
Asian Studies department set
up.
"Why should we have to
teach Asian Studies?" the
premier finance minister
grumbled. "External Affairs
ought to look after that."
UBC has an Asian Studies
department to be proud of,
now: but Larry MacKenzie,
the buffer, is gone. The Senate has him now, here in
Ottawa.
And Bennett still makes
statements like the off-the-
record one he made to an
interviewer after a recording
session on education some
months back, after the mike
went off: "I know who keeps
me in power . . .I'm not going to educate anybody any
further than I have to.''
Given the immediate history and the present make-up
of the board of governors —
of the eleven board members, six (and effectively,
the president) are appointed
by the government; Einar
Gunderson, the premier's
man-friday and the Grey Eminence of B.C. politics has
until now actually sat on the
board — a strong minority
voice needs to be heard.
The young, strong voice of
a graduate student who has
proved he can say what he
means, and find backing for
it.
In fact, it's possible the
board itself should be thrown
wide open to the scrutiny of
both the student-faculty governed and the public.
There was a time when
even the Vancouver Sun called for open board meetings,
in the days before board
member Stuart Keate became publisher.
"Why Top - Secrets at
UBC?" a Sun editorial of
March 12, 1963, headlined
its enquiry.
It is the obligation of
democratic government at all
levels to conduct its public
business in public," the editorial began, ending with the
simple statement, "A university should be the last place
on earth to curb the dissemination of information."
•       •       •
Oddly enough — other
than a disagreement over
whether UBC does indeed
have a democratic form of
government (it hasn't says
Mr. Enomoto) — this happens to be the crux of Mr.
Enomoto's campaign.
Not that he's destined to
pick up much editorial support from either of the new
Siamese-laidies of Granville
Street.
It's up to us, all 16,000
students and 1,500 faculty
members.
(Continued on pf 8)
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THE      UBYSSEY
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enomoto
What would possess a twenty-two year
old student of slanted eyes, yellow skin, and
an inscrutably .Oriental smile to contest the
Chancellorship with an affluent fish merchant of venerable age?
First, it was suggested by a voluptuous
blonde, and the suggestion came well stacked
with forceful arguments. Secondly, the idea
was raised after a fifth bottle of beer was
downed.
The flow of ideas continued for a long
time, as did the flow of brew, with the
result that Randy Enomoto has become the
first male Japanese student in Canada to
present himself as a candidate for the position of UBC Chancellor.
insatiable radicals
But a thought germinated in unserious
circumstances may often blossom into a
serious venture. And no one should now
dismiss Randy's candidacy as an elaborate
stunt by insatiable radicals for whom two
election campaigns were apparently not
enough. While his defeat is definitely within the realm of possibility, Randy is conducting his campaign with the earnest desire
to convince people of the importance of the
issues he is raising.
The mere act of allowing his name to be
listed as a candidate is in itself precedent-
shattering, for it means that there will
actually be a choice, a situation that has
occurred only once before in the history of
UBC.    His very candidacy is a blow at our
democratic system of acclamation for the
single establishment candidate- Ballots will
have to be mailed, returned and counted
before our next chancellor can be announced.
It is unprecedented that a student should
dare suggest himself for this prestigious position. But it is generally becoming recognized that students must gain an increasing
share in the governing of their universities.
According to the Vancouver Sun, a report
sponsored by the AUCC predicts that "student rebellions may occur in Canada if
students are not given a role in administration." Nevertheless, we are expected to beg
for concessions, hat in hand, through the
"proper channels".
unprecedented
j)f 4our
Page 8
THE
UBYSSEY
Randy rejects this approach, and is willing to wage a public campaign to dramatize
the need and desire of students to have a
voice in the decision making processes of
their institutions. His cross-Canada radio,
television, and newspaper interviews have
already done more to create public awareness than a hundred politely-phrased obsequious, student council resolutions could
possible do in ten years.
What are Randy's qualifications? His
name is well-known around campus — he
seconded the nomination of a certain presidential candidate.
As acknowledged leader of the MCC,
Randy was the guiding spirit behind the
march — the consensus we were able to
maintain was often due solely to his patient
leadership.
Of all the student radical leaders Randy
possesses the most acutely probing intellect,
the clearest analysis of the student situation,
and yet is the one most open to logical
argument.
divine refusal
I am convinced Randy can propose solutions to problems of which his distinguished
opponent is not even aware. But unfortunately this will remain unverified due to
Mr. Buchanan's divine refusal to debate, or
to answer questions.
After all, under our democratic structure
it is sufficient that one has a name, need
one also possess the least inkling of what
is happening?
•By his very refusal, this venerable marketeer of fish has crowned Randy's efforts
with the laurels of victory.
For what better tribute can a candidate
receive than the public admission of his
opponent's complacency, confusion and inability to counter him in debate?
Friday, March 18, 1966 Ha id a social crisis
is unhealing sore
By GEORGE HEWISON
The situation at Haida
steadily deteriorates.
This village of 1,000 Queen
Charlotte Island Indians has
already experienced one
major social upheaval within the last two years which
challenged one hundred
years of relations between
whites and Indians on the
Queen Charlottes. Now,
another crisis at Haida
creates the soil for more ferment and antagonism.
In 1964, a truck, driven by
a white driver and carrying
36 Indian fish cannery workers, was involved in an accident which resulted in one
passenger being killed and
many  others   injured.
•       •       •
The driver was fined $200.
The cannery company which
owned the truck and employed the driver was fined $25
for operating a vehicle without a license.
The people of the area
were indignant that the sentence was so light. They felt
that if white passengers had
been killed1 or injured with
an Indian driving, the penalty would have been far
more severe.
The attorney-general's department turned down an appeal without apparently even
studying the transcript of the
case; and the company said
it would not fire its driver.
The cannery workers refused to go back to work until the driver was fired.
This widely publicized
"Masset Incident'' signalled
a change in relations between white men and Indians
in B.C.
•       •       •
It was not just a reaction
to "white man's justice". In
the background were resentment and grievances over
Indian treatment and living
conditions dating back generations. Now, on the brink of
another potentially explosive
situation, it is beneficial to
investigate whether the problem can (be resolved without retreading the ground of
the U.S. civil rights movement.
The Haida-Masset area on
the northeast tip of the Charlottes is economically depressed. The fish cannery
provides close to adequate income for only a handful of
people.
The salmon fishery, close
to depletion, is a frustration
to the Haida people, who are
unable to compete with big
electronically equipped seiners costing from $10,000 to
$250,000.
Housing at Haida is only
slightly above deplorable.
Damp, cold, wind-swept
houses afford little protection. A youth being escorted
to a correctional institute for
boys said he was looking forward to having a bed he didn't have to share with two
brothers and a sister.
The only hospital in the
area is a Red Cross outpost
George Hewison, 21, a
former UBC student, is now
organizer for the far-left
United Fishermen's Union.
He has been in close contact
with the many north coast
Indians in the union.
at Masset, the white village
three miles from Haida. The
outpost, which is supposed to
serve 1,600 people, is staffed
only occasionally, and never
with doctors. Except in extreme emergencies, Indians
are denied admittance to this
hospital and must travel 65
miles over a rough road to
reach Queen Charlotte City
for treatment.
The fuse has now been added to the powder keg. The
cannery may be closed down.
The financial hardships
can be attributed to (1) serious decline in salmon production off the Queen Charlottes
in the past few years, and (2)
a disastrous 1965 season of
crab-fishing upon which the
cannery largely depends.
The union supported the
company's application for a
$60,000 subsidy from the federal government to keep the
cannery operating in 1966. If
the plant fails to operate this
coming year, it is doubtful if
it will ever run again.
A union delegation went to
Ottawa to press for the subsidy and for secondary industry to provide jobs.
Northern Affairs Minister
Art Laing promised us he
would do everything in his
power to keep the Masset
operation going. When asked
about providing alternate
means of employment, Laing
said he would take a serious
look at the situation.
Unless the government initiates some concrete steps
soon to expiate the longstanding grievances of the
Haidas, the area will become
a festering unhealing sore in
our "war on poverty".
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All those students wishing to work on Frosh Orientation Committee
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BOX 45, ALMA MATER SOCIETY, UBC
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ECUMENISM?
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. how soon their daughters can
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years.
How soon can you use Tampax
tampons?
As soon as you really want
total freedom.
Here's a chance to experience it. A pilgrimage led
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Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
General Meeting
Thursday, March 24, 1966
PLACE:   Armouries
TIME: Noon hour 12:30
AGENDA:
Minutes  of General  Meeting  Last Year
Honorary Awards
President's and Treasurer's Reports
Constitutional  Revisions
Others
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THE
UBYSSEY
Page 9 Dm getting married...
CONSULTANT,  MR. R. YACHT,
Please forward a copy of your wedding
invitation album to:
Name  _.
Address
rm CARD SHOP
Corner Robson and Burrard MU 4-4011    j
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
WHITE   DINNER   JACKETS
TAILS, TUXEDOS
MASQUERADE      COSTUMES
Special Student
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Department of Theatre
Frederic Wood Theatre
April 1 - 8
Final Play of the Season
THE SCHOOL FOR WIVES
Hilarious Comedy by Moliere
DIRECTED   BY  DONALD   SOULE
with Mariko van Campen and Robert Orchard
STUDENT PERFORMANCE
MONDAY, APRIL 4-7:30 p.m. -75 cents
Note: — Tickets at 75 cents available for most other performances.
College Shop
YEAR-END
SALE
* CORDUROY  BLAZERS... reg. $19.95 now only $17.95
* UBC SWEATERS reg. $19.95 now only $17.95
* LADIES  PURSES
* SPORTS  ITEMS
* MANY   OTHER  ITEMS  REDUCED   IN   PRICE
ALSO . . .
LAST CHANCE TO OBTAIN
it SWEATSHIRTS — many styles, colours and sizes
it JACKETS -- lightweight — all sizes — UBC crested
it SWEATSUITS—navy blue, all sizes
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it BEER MUGS — assorted colours and sizes
ik CAMPUS TIES
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SHOP WILL CLOSE FOR THE YEAR
ON APRIL 1st
REMEMBER . . . THIS IS YOUR COLLEGE SHOP
COME IN AND BROWSE
Hours:   8:30 — 1:30 Monday - Friday
METROPOLITAN OPERA national company's Polyna Savidra
plays Cio-Cio-San in Madama Butterfly tonight at the
Queen E. The Met is also staging Carmen at 2:30 p.m. and
Cinderella at 8:30 p.m. Saturday.
'Mate represents
ignorance in action
By H. G. WEILER
It is difficult to argue
with your correspondent
Mate the Great, for how can
you ever expect to win when
you argue against opinions
with mere facts?
Before talking himself
into a corner, Mr. Mate
should read a bit of
the history of the rise of
Lenin, the Allied intervention — which was small,
inefjfectual and militarily in-
H.   G.
Weiler
is   a
UBC
graduate
student
from
Ger-
many.
significant — the Commin-
tern and the subjection of
foreign Communist parties
to the foreign policies of the
Soviet Union.
Further, he should read
the writings of Lenin and
Stalin on the necessities of
various strategies, which,
embarrassingly enough for
Mr. Mate, cannot but reinforce the view that the duty
of Communist parties in
general, and the Rumanian
(and now Chinese) party in
particular, is the destruction
of "capitalism" and the setting up of "People's Democracies".
Despite peaceful co-existence, the basic expansionist
attitude has unfortunately
not changed; only the means
have.
Hence, the constant referral to "just and unjust" wars
—still   a  definite  policy   of
pf 6.x
Page  10
THE
UBYSSEY
Russia ("just wars" lead to
people's democracies, "unjust" wars are any attempts
to prevent this).
This attitude is not the
figment of some fanatical
rightist's imagination; it is
the policy of all Communist
parties behind the Iron Curtain.
And, if we are to accept
the necessity of buffer zones
as Mr. Mate seems to suggest, then certainly there
can be no criticism of the
U.S. role in Viet Nam. It is
simply creating a buffer zone
—which is perfectly okay
with Mr. Mate, or so he says.
Anyone knowledgeable of
East European and Russian
affairs would, with justice,
accuse Mr. Mate of ignoring
history.
For to claim that one
country, Russia, has the right
to create puppet states to
protect its interests, desroys
he basis of critcism of any
other country that acts in
a similar fashion.
The occupation of Czechoslovakia and Poland, then,
were being singled out for
special approbation.
While not expecting to
convince Mr. Mate of the
basic inconsistency in his
attitudes, I hope at least that
those who perpetually rise
up in wrath will take time
to familiarize themselves
with the facts before they
whip out the placards and
slogans.
There can be no excuse for
not knowing facts at a university well stocked with
books.
And there is nothing more
frightening than ignorance
in action.
Friday, March 18, 1966 CANUCKS
Swap stirs pot
By THOMAS COCKING
The recent, rather sudden
enchantment of France and
French Canada with one another has resulted in a great
number of cultural and
quasi - political exchanges.
While this movement appears
to threaten Canadian unity,
it actually does not.
Some Canadians feel that
the exchanges of cultural embassies and the signing of
treaties is a fearsome bogey,
an attempt by the French to
reverse the military decision
of the Plains of Abraham,
and an unwarranted interference in Canadian internal
affairs.
To others this is merely a
logical correlative of the
Quiet Revolution in Quebec
which seeks, not unnaturally
or unreasonably, a closer tie
with its mother culture.
Even from the Anglo-
Saxon point of view, is there
anything wrong in French
Canada seeking a spiritual
home or parental image
when in fact its umbilical
cord was never severed even
after the Conquest?
Anglo-Saxons in Canada
have for years worshipped at
the shrine of Britain; and
this has never lessened, in
spite of various radical imperialist movements, their intense loyalty to Canada as a
North American nation.
The real issue is that by
worshipping two different
parents, the English-speaking
and French-speaking children may cloud their perception of what the other aspires
to and may, by muddle-
minded actions and declarations, force one another into
extremist positions from
which extrication is impossible.
Remember that Confederation was not just a submergence of French Canada to
the overwhelming interests
of nine other predominately
English-speaking provinces.
In the union of 1867 only
four different entities were
joined — upper and lower
Canada and the Maritime
provinces of New Brunswick
and Nova Scotia. A bargain
was struck at this time between French and English
self-interests, but since Confederation the addition of
English-speaking populations
and provinces has tipped the
scales against the French.
Since the Conquest the
French Canadian defence of
their culture has been very
effective. The two nation
theory is not and never was
j u s t a theory, but is the
French fact in North America — a French nation in Canada. French Canada, to the
growing anxiety of many,
has not become submerged;
in fact it now appears to be
the march. The melting pot
is not melting in Canada.
In Quebec the reverse of
expectation appears true. In
1851 Quebec City was one-
third English-speaking. It is
now almost completely
French - speaking. Montreal
which was over one-half is
now only one-quarter English-speaking.
Friday, March 18, 1966
The pan-Canadian belief
that French-Canadians, given
enough time, will come to
accept the English language
and will eventually retain
some of their institutions in
the.way Scotland and Wales
have is not justified by available facts. Since they are not
being absorbed, and since
they already have most of
qualities of nationhood, why
not recognize that the
French-Canadians do have a
distinct community?
If we recognize the French
fact the emotional fog sur-
rounding contemporary
events will clear. We will see
that although there are extremists ,the present movement in Quebec is not separatist in character. It is primarily an economic and social movement which aims at
improving the French-Canadian and his nation.
When French Canada demands control of its own
house, the end of all real or
imagined discrimination, and
the return to the basic tenets
of Confederation (as interpreted by French Canada) re-
memiber that these demands
are the political expression
of a creative desire to improve Quebec.
The recent exchanges (between Quebec and France
are a part of this desire to
enrich the French Canadian
nation with a transfusion of
parental culture. It is not a
unique movement.
A similar one in the 1880's
saw French honors and
money loans being bestowed
on French Canadians. It
created a temporary stir
which soon died out.
In the present issue there
is no cause for alarm on the
part of English Canada. Instead let us follow John A.
Macdonald's dictum of 1856:
"Treat them as a nation and
they will act as a free people
generally do—generously."
Coquettes...
The girls come through
again!
Judy Bing writes (PF,
Mar. 11) "Sector's scenario in
Winter Kept Us Warm is
weakest in portraying his
female characters, a pair of
shallow, predatory coquettes
difficult to accept as university students."
Oh come on now! The
movie was great precisely because it showed the typical
university girls: "shallow
predatory coquettes".
"Sector's s c-e n a r i o" is
weakest in portraying the
male characters. Who ever
heard of a male at university
still being a virgin; and sitting around the piano with
his parents singing folk
songs? And singing love ballads — specially for his buddy? How the hell are we supposed to accept that?
UNBIASED MALE
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Formal  Wear,
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Designers and  Dressmakers
Sales and Rentals
2608   Granville 733-6727
4691    Kingsway 435-1160
University Hill
United Church
on University Boulevard
Invites You to Worship
SUNDAY,   MARCH   20th
11:00 a.m.   —
"A  GOLDEN   OPPORTUNITY"
Rev. Harold L MacKay
7:00 p.m. —
University Young People's
Theme:  "THE  POINT  OF
PRAYER"
Discussion.      Devotional,      Folk
Singing.
YOU ARE WELCOME HERE ANYTIME
THE  LYRIC  THEATRE   PROUDLY  PRESENTS
A FESTIVAL
OF RUSSIAN FILMS
WED.
MAR. 23
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MAR. 24
DON QUIXOTE
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MAR. 25
DIMKA
7 & 9 p.m. Only
SAT.
MAR. 26
BALLET OF ROMEO  & JULIET
Starring   Ulanova
2, 7 & 9 p.m.
SUN.
MAR. 27
Tchaikowsky's   Immortal   Opera
EUGENE ONEGIN
2, 7 & 9 p.m.
MON.
MAR. 28
ALEXANDER NEVSKY
7 4 9 p.m. Only
TUES.
MAR. 29
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THE        UBYSSEY
Page  11 Two columns
gutlessly
anonymous- Wise
Editor-appointee,  The  Ubyssey, Sir:
I strongly object to This
Page has Two Columns in
the Page Friday section of
The Ubyssey.
My objection is not based
on its content. It is the prerogative of a journalist to
creat his journalistic image
by his choice and presentation of news items. My objection is both an ethical
one and a concern about the
future editorial policy of The
Ubyssey.
Two Columns is gutlessly anonymous. It is undoubtedly the end product of gossip sessions where everybody throws in his bit of
garbage.
Being the editor of Page
Friday and therefore directly responsible for its content, you can only leave us
with the impression that you
condone Two Columns.
I have serious doubts
about your ability to "objectively analyze news stories" as told to AMS Council
Monday night or, perhaps
more accurately, your desire
to do so.
If your treatment of personal news items, as evidenced by Two Columns
this year, is carried over
to the Ubyssey as a whole
next year, you can expect
strong criticism.
Can we have some assurance that next year's Ubyssey will not be an eight page
editorial ?
If not, in the general interest of the university, I
understand that the Arts Undergraduate Society will
publish a regular enlarged
paper next year. Applica-
ions are now being considered for the right editor.
DON  WISE,
Arts III
Chancellor...
(From Page 3)
Go looking for votes. Pass
the word. Talk to alumni,
whether they are responsive
or not.
Suggest that perhaps before they cast votes they
read, say, A Place of Liberty
(Ed. George Whalley, publisher Clarke Irwin) and.
Clark Kerr's outline of the
multiversity, The Uses of the
University.
They might particularly
catch Kerr's warnings of the
pros and cons of along-side
private industry, the sort of
smokeless-industry research
plants UBC's administration
is already talking about.
It's up to us. We could
come out of it as a constituency.
PLAYHOUSE  THEATRE  CO.   PRESENTS
THE WORLD PREMIERE
LIKE FATHER, LIRE FUN
by ERIC NICOL
Beloved Campus Humorist for 10 years "Jabez"
Opening March 24 - April  19
QUEEN ELIZABETH PLAYHOUSE
Be sure to see this fresh new comedy
by famed  humorist Eric Nicol
THE LUSTROUS LOOK IS IN
Glenayr
-wiprA
Move into the easy going
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the Bay Campus and Career Shop, second floor
the
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FOR SPRING!
,_C__a,.       , t^
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It's so feminine—the
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Both in the fabulous new
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Look for Kitten's
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good shops everywhere!
^ about this label
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it is not a genuine KITTEN.
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Moving
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SOCKS ALL 69c
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SLOCK WEST OF MccDONALD
Page   12
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, March 18, 1966 Friday, March 18, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page   13
tU Socko Smash Boffola
Milltifflg^
rShA\A2p,NoEbO^
SATURDAVISM RXJR BILLIONTH AJWERSARVOF THE CREATIOMOFTHEIDRLD.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
HORDE NOT SHY
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The "thoroughly disgusted
at Red Horde" individual
(Thursday's Ubyssey) should
remain anonymous. He's
ashamed to sign his name to
the printed trash about the
Engineers.
The facts are:
• SFA President Mr. McTaggart-Cowan publicly complimented we Engineers on
our excellent conduct, and
apologized for the behaviour
of SFA students!
• SFA Student Pres.
Tony Buzan complimented
us for promoting UBC-SFA
rivalry.
• We Engineers had the
stunt to initiate friendly UBC-
SFA spirit, and we succeeded.
• A minority of childish,
high-schoolish SFA monkeys,
too immature to appreciate
anything, only hurled fists,
yet Engineers held these apes
down, not promoting fights.
I only wish there was another faculty at UBC with the
spirit Engineering has.
DON  B. ALLEN
EUS Vice-President
•      •      •
REDS NOT RED*
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I found Gabor Mate's excellent article entitled Cold
War in your Mar. 11 issue
most timely.
Right in the same issue on
the next page there is a notice
from Special Events announcing a concert by the Foerster
Trio from Czechoslovakia,
bearing the caption "direct
from behind the Iron Curtain".
It is grievous to see people
so embedded in the Cold War
mentality, that they continue
to juggle with worn-out
cliches of the Dulles era,
which have no more .relevance to the reality of this
fastly changing  world.
I have more than once in
the local press — including
The Ubyssey, come across announcements that Canadians
were going to meet "Reds",
when  all   it  was   about   was
hockey, basketball, artistic or
scientific events.
I can guarantee you that,
when there is a similar Canadian appearance in Czechoslovakia, Poland or the Soviet Union ,you will never find
a headline like "direct from
Capitalist Canada".
I do not know if the authors of the Special Events notice meant it seriously or in
jest.
Whichever the case may be,
to bring a political epithet
into an announcement for a
cultural- event, to which it
has no relevance is a lack of
taste of which, as pretendents
to the dignity of being intellectuals they ought to be
ashamed.
In the occurrence, it was a
pointless   insult  to   this   fine
Trio,   who   were  our   guests,
and a mark of plain stupidity.
RENE GOLDMAN
Instructor
Asian Studies
Treasures from
The Art Gallery of
Toronto
Through March 27
31 important paintings by
Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Hals,
Reynolds .Canaletto, Monet,
Renoir, Degas, Picasso and
others.
at
The Vancouver Art
Gallery
open Tue.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Fri. 7 p.m.-lO p.m.. 2 p.m.-
5 p.m.
Last
Minute
Tickets
Available for Tonight & Tomorrow's
Metropolitan Opera
NATIONAL COMPANY
Madame Butterfly (in Italian) March  18-8 p.m.
Carmen (in French) March  19-2 p.m.
Cinderella (in English) March  19-8 p.m.
$1.00 voucher to be exchanged for unsold seats the night
of the performance are available at the -Special Events
Office, Room 255, Brock Extension.
SPECIAL
EVENTS
PRESENTS
DR. STAUGHTON LYND
Outspoken critic of U.S. Foreign Policy in Viet Nam. Yale
Prof. Lynd is a prominent leader of the New Left. He is
one of the most painful thorns in the side of the Johnson
Administration.
Today - 12:30 - Auditorium — 35c
»vi!   vi'«
Y-'o Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 18, 1966
B.C.  STUDENTS
EARN MOST
Means survey viewed
By   PAT   HORROBIN
Special lo The  Ubyssey
OTTAWA (CUS) — The results of the Canada Student
Means Survey released here
Wednesday show that one half
of Canadian undergraduates
come from the wealthy one
quarter of Canadian families.
The report on the survey,
prepared by analyst Robert
Rabonovitch for the Canadian
Union of Students also shows:
• The six per cent of Canadian families earning salaries over $10,000 provide 25
per cent of all university and
college   students.
• The 52 per cent of families with incomes less than
$5,000 a year send just over
one quarter of the students.
• Farm families, 11.4 per
cent of the population, send
10 per cent of the students.
• The 19 per cent of Canadians who live in towns with
under 1,000 population send
only seven per cent of the
students.
"Canadian students, by and
'irge, are not representative
of the Canadian class structure, but rather bear the
characteristics of the middle
and upper income class of
society," Rabonovitch said in
the report.
The survey was carried out
by interviewing 7,657 students at 46 English speaking
Canadian universities and
colleges.
BRAIN DRAIN
The report also contains
figures on the Canadian brain
drain.
Eighteen per cent of all
students going into graduate
studies said they intended to
leave the country.
Of these, 75 per cent were
bound for the United States.
Eight per cent of those intending to leave said they
did not plan to come back
and another 35 per cent were
undecided.
In a survey of the sources
of student income, the report
says 25 per cent of the income comes from summer
jobs.
Twenty-six per cent of the
income comes from the family—21 per cent directly and
five, per cent in the form of
loans.
B.C. STUDENTS
B.C. students collect the
third lowest rate of financial
aid (other than parental) in
Canada with $145 a year.
They come out three dollars over the national scholarship average of $5. This
compares with $78 for Saskatchewan and $104 for New
Brunswick.
But B.C. students collect an
average of only $17 a year
from bursaries compared with
a national average of $144.
They are more financially
independent of their parents,
however, than students in any
other province.
The average B.C. student
receives $193 from his parents compared with the high
of $550 given to the English
speaking Quebecer.
B.C. students save more
from summer earnings than
any other provincial  group.
Nearest contenders are
Manitoba with $399 and New
Brunswick with $385.
B.C. leads with $80 in average part time student earnings, and comes second highest in investment with $27.
B.C. born students like
home, according to the report.
Ninety-seven per cent of
B.C. students study in their
province compared with about
91 per cent for Alberta, 90
per cent for Ontario, and 87
per cent for Manitoba.
B.C. students are third
lowest in room and board,
with an average cost of $371
per student.
The big French-speaking
universities of Montreal, Laval and Sherbrooke didn't
take part in the CUS study
because they conducted their
own in 1963.
The 100-page report cost
$38,000 to prepare. Most of
the money was spent for computer time.
COUNTRY - WESTERN
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copy of the booklet that tells the
story. Or write General Telephone
& Electronics, 730 Third Avenue,
New York, N.Y. 10017.
GTE
GENERAL TELEPHONE & ELECTRONICS
730 THIRD AVE .N.Y. 10017 ■ GT&E SUBSIDIARIES: General Telephone Operating Co.. in 33 slates • GT&E Laboiatones ■ GT&E International -General Telephone Directory Co. - Automatic Electric ■ Lenkiin Electric ■ Sylvania Electric Friday, March 18, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page   15
powell  hargrave  photos
HUSTLING RUGBY BIRDS took 2-1  lead in World Cup series by beating U. of Cal. Golden
Bears 12-8 at Varsity Stadium. Final game of four match series is 2 p.m. Saturday here.
Birds beat Bears 12-8,
take 2-1 series edge
By DOUG MOSER
The rugby Birds downed the
strong University of California
Golden Bears 12-8 in an exciting, hard-fought World Cup
contest in Varsity Stadium
Thursday afternoon.
The Birds now have two
wins and one loss in the four-
game series. The final game
goes at 1 p.m. Saturday in
Varsity Stadium.
In the first half, the smaller
Birds were able to maintain
possession of the ball and keep
the Bears on the defensive.
Mike Cartmel opened the
scoring Birds' with a 45-yard
Gaul trophy
goes to goalie
as top athlete
Hockey Thunderbirds Ken
Broderick was presented the
Bobby Gaul Memorial Trophy
Wednesday.
Broderick received the trophy, emblematic of UBC's
most outstanding athlete, at
the Big Block Club's annual
awards banquet at Canyon
Gardens.
It was the first time a hockey player has won the award.
Broderick, 24, has played
goal for the Birds since 1962
and has also played for Canada's national team in two
World championships and in
the 1964 Olympic Games at
Innsbruck,   Austria.
Broderick, a native of Toronto, graduated from Ryerson
Institute of Technology with a
bachelor's degree in business
administration in  1961.
He joined the Birds the following year.
Broderick graduates this
spring with a bachelor of physical education (recreation)
degree.
penalty goal from near the
tniuchline.
j "inutes later, Bob Sandi-
-• ids streaked down the sidelines after a fine three-quarter movement out of a mid-
field Iocs-" scrum.
T" f£""kled just inches
.he    .    Jline   and   Tom
FraL.e,   2oV .-wing   closely   up
beL,. i.   oi<"__ed the ball off the
deck to score.
Scrum-half Stu Scholefield
cleared the ball out of a loose
scrum and Gary Rowles fended
off would-be tacklers to take
it to the goal line. He was stopped short in a loose scrum.
Bill Gray got possession in
the ruck and carried the ball
over for a try.
In the second half, the Birds
were thrown back on the defensive. Bear's Don Sinclair
booted over a penalty goal and
converted Jim Boise' try on a
blocked kick to make the score
9-8.
Rowles again carried nearly
to the goal line and then passed off to forward Brian Cornwall who raced the final 10
yards.
But the Birds are not out of
the woods yet.
They must win or tie again
Saturday in the final game.
Should the Bears win they
will each .have won two games.
In that event, the winner of
the World Cup is based on total
points and the Bears lead in
points 32-26.
Take in gymkhana,
it's a killing affair
More than 80 sports cars
and sedans will crash and
burn on Sunday at the UBC
sports car club's spririg gymkhana.
The B.C. championship
event starts at 9 a.m. at Park
Royal Shopping Centre,
West Vancouver, behind
Eaton's.
Experts and bubble-gum-
mers are eligible to tackle
the two parking-lot courses,
which involve driving around
a bunch of pylons quicker
than Triumphs, if that's possible.
MAKE YOUR
WEEKEND
~ RESERVATION
EARLY
Type of  Car
24 Hour Day
Weekends
Acadian
Chevy II
$5.00 & 5c
$12.00 &  5c
Valiant
Comet
$6.00 & 5c
$14.00 & 5c
Parisienne
Galaxy
Impala
Mustang
$8.00 & 5c
$18.00  & 5c
Save up to 40% on Special overnight rate. Any car in
our fleet — $5 & 5c per mile.
You Pay Only For The Gas You Use
BUDGET RENT-A-CAR
New Location 1058 Alberni
Phone 685-0536
We bend an ear to undergraduate money
problems of all kinds, from setting, up a savings
account, to budgeting, to discussing your financial
future. Any time we can be of help . . .
ROYAL BANK
NORTH
WeMern £pcrtiH$ (joo4^
LTD.
3715 W. 10th Avenue
10th at Alma
..   \sCt„
TENNIS
GOLF
1966 SLAZENGER TENNIS RACKETS from $7.50 to $20.00
SLAZENGER TENNIS BALLS _  _    $2.25 per tin
SLAZENGER Tournament Practice Balls -_. 48c each
SLAZENGER, SPALDING & McGREGOR GOLF CLUBS
ALL GOLF ACCESSORIES
OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT
SLEEPING BAGS - GROUND SHEETS
PACK SACKS AND PACK BOARDS
SOON IN STOCK - HIKING BOOTS
AIR MATTRESSES
WE   CARRY   A   FULL   RANGE   OF   FISHING   SUPPLIES Page  16
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, March 18, 1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Ubyssey capps debate
DEBATING  UNION
L'il Abner Should Be Prime
Minister—Ubyssey vs. Engineers Bu. 217 noon.
DEBATING  UNION
Intra-mural semi-finals: Resolved That Prostitution
Should Be Legalized. Zeta Psi
vs. AIESEC — Br. Ext. 362.
Delta Gamma vs. Acadia Camp
— Brock stage room Monday
noon.
SCM
Death of God Series—Prof.
Wm. Nicholls speaks on Christian Atheism Monday noon Bu.
100.
• •      •
ARTS US
General meeting noon Bu.
106. New executive, constitution, seminar.
• *      •
CLASSICS CLUB
M|eet 8:00. Speaker: Roy
Darcus Greek Alphabets' link
with Civilization at Prof. Guthrie's home.
• •      •
LSM
Important general meeting
Monday noon Bu. Ext. 2250.
Punctuality   is   a  virtue.
• •      •
UBC RADIO
Prof. Wm. Wilmott and Rev.
Jack Shaver answer student's
questions on UBC radio's open
line program. Student Forum
Monday evening 8:30-10:30 CA
4-3245.
• •      •
ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
French day noon in IH. Film
and coffee.
• *      •
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK
Speaker from Salvation
Army—Attempted Suicides.
• •      •
UN CLUB
General meeting Monday
noon in IH. All please attend.
• •      •
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP   SOC
Miss Ann Leith of Science
Division will speak in room
863, library at noon.
• •      •
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Prof. Staughton Lynd., outspoken critic of U.S. foreign
policy and one of the biggest
thorns in Pres. Johnson's side
speaks in Aud. noon. 35 cents.
• •      •
VCF
Dr. Bert Cameron speaks at
noon in Ang. 110 on Christian
Morality.
• •      •
PRE-LAW  SOC
Meeting Tuesday noon Bu.
221. Guest speaker: Bob Cruise
—Don't  Take Law.
NEWMAN CLUB
Coffee and refreshments
served March 20 at 11:15 and
12:15 a.m.
GAMMA  DELTA
Elections noon in Bu. 2201.
UNIVERSITY
QUAKER   GROUP
Meeting for worship Sunday
11 a.m. in Bu. Penthouse.
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Canadian Folk Society Production—folk dancing, Philippines, Denmark, Germany, Ireland. Sunday, 2 p.m. at St.
Mark's  College.
EL   CIRCULO
Mr. Yglesiar of the Spanish
Dept. speaks on his native
province Cataluna at noon.
Everyone welcome.
•      •      •
CHINESE   VARSITY   CLUB
General meeting Monday
noon Bu. 205. Elections of next
year's executive.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day. $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Please bring or send to Publications Office, Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publication* office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST — SET OF SOCIOLOGY 301
notes in red binder. Phone J. Eck-
ardt,   260-9280.     Reward.        	
LOST — SMALL, BROWN CASE
containing all my Identification.
Finder please phone Lucy, CA 4-
9009.  .
MISSING FROM OUTSIDE CHEM.
424 during Chem. 230 lab. March
16 p.m. — Girl's dark grey carryall bag; notes urgently needed'.
L'lease call 224-0720 after 6 or return to Publications Office, Brock
Hall.
LOST — PAIR OF GOOD PIF.LD
boots, Tues., opp. Fort Camp,
l'lease phone  Wayne,   224-9880.
I'K. IILACK K'lD GLOVES WASH-
room liuch. Tues. Finder call Joy
AM   1-2718.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Motorbike & Scooter Insurance,
also from $17.00 up. Ted Elliott,
224-6707.
WEST   VAN  EX-GRADS   '62   to   '64
2nd    Gleneagles    knockout.    Apr.    2.
Tickets Kim's Drugs, Park Royal.
WANT TO LEARN TO RIDE
horseback? Then come out to Willows Stables, 7226 Balaclava. (S.
of Marine Drive) or phone 266-
4219    for    information. 	
JEWS SWEETS SOMETHING TER-
rible happened and it just didn't
turn out so we . . . A.J.J.T.L.C.M.
A.R.L.L.P.T. '__
GO ! GO ! GO ! DANCE SATURDAY
Nite Brock Hall 9-1. Big Boss
Sound of "Sound Unlimited" 75c
per person Go ! It's for The Heart
Fund. __^_
STEVE     AND     AL,    DRIVING    AN
Olds, challenge Jeff Slack's Sport
Fury to a drag or road race al a
time and place convenient to the
challenged. Phone Steve for arrangements.
DON'T FORGET THE MARPOLE
Bargain Mart. (Rummage Sale).
An opportunity to buy clothing
and household articles at real
low prices. March 21-25, Pearson
Hospital, 59th, 1 Block West' of
Cambie.
Wanted
15
TUTOR FOR CHEMISTRY 101.
Needed desparately phone 266-2420
after   six.
WANTED — SKI BOOTS O^-IO),
poles and skis (app. 195 cm.). 876-
9740.
Travel Opportunities
16
AMS CHARTERED FLIGHT: ONE
Way London to Vancouver. Leaves
Aug. 13. Only $200. Call Ken RE
3-8988.
Automobiles For Sale
21
1957 CHEV. ENGINE, PERFECT
and 1955 Olds 88, power stearing,
power brakes, fully automatic.
Phone BR 7-8476.
FOR SALE: LADIES' STEAMER
trunk and 1958 Vauxhall Surjer,
both articles in excellent condition.    Phone RE 8-5211 after 6 p.m.
1964 FORD GAL. 500 CONVT., 390
Auto. P.S. P.B. etc. Asking J2700,
as new.    Phone 433-6072 after 6 "pm
1961 MG-A FOR SALE. EXCEL-
lent condition. New racing tires.
Low mileage 24,000. Phone 263-
3580  after 6.
1952 MARK VII JAGUAR, 3.5 LITRI-
Overhead Cams. Engine & Body
excellent, leather Walnut interior.
$400.   Robert   RE   3-8765.
1958     VAUXHALL,      VERY     GOOD
-   condition,   must   sell   immediately.
Phone  731-3405' leave  message 'for
Sara.
FOR SALE: GREAT CONDITION —
1955   Consul.   Seat   belts,   radio,   pull-
ma-nized,   City   tested. .74,000   true
milage.   $250.00.    Call   Rin   AM   3-
3478.
1965 DATSUN 1,500 SPORTCAR
13,000 miles. Phone : 731-9544
evenings.
Orchestras
35
THE   VANCOUVER   DIMENSIONS.
Now     available     for     engagements
phone   "Tom"   261-6705   "Jim"   261-
7435.
Scandals
39A
105 MPH ON GRANVILLE BRIDGE?
Women? $250 playing pool and
Kamikaze?   SURE   RANDY   SURE
SANDALS:
THE  BLIND   OWL
2057   A   West   4th   Avenue
Typing
43
TYPING 25c PAGE or $1.95 HR.
West End 685-5539 eves. CairftUs
pickup and delivery. $1.00 for sifovt
papers.	
STUDENTS — TYPING DONE IN
my home. Essays, reports, etc.
Mrs. II. V. (Rae) Chambers. Phone
AL   5-9493.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Teachers      51A
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 46
(SECHELT)
This District is located on the
Sunshine Coast, about one and a half
hours from downtown Vancouver,
via the government car ferry from
Horseshoe Bay.
There are. a few vacancies anticipated   for   September,   1966,   and   inquiries   are   invited.     Some   of   the
positions  may  include:
SECONDARY:
Maths and; Science
Occupational
Boys' Physical Education
Home  Economics
Commercial  subjects
ELEMENTARY:
Kindergarten
Primary
Intermediate
Special consideration will be given
to  teachers   qualified  in   Music,   Art,
Physical  Education.
Representatives will be on hand to
interview applicants on March 16th,
17th and 18th, in the Office of Student Services on the U.B.C. Campus.
Anyone unable to come for interview may contact the Secretary-
Treasurer, School District No. 46
(Sechelt), Box 220, Gibsons, B.C.,
or   telephone   886-2141   (collect).
Help Wanted
51
YOU CAN EARN NEXT TERM'S
Fees by selling advertising for The
Ubyssey. This is an excellent opportunity for several ambitious
students to gain sales experience
and to earn worthwhile commissions. Work to start early next
September. If interested apply to
A. Vince, Manager of Student Publications, Brock Hall. (Afternoons
only.)
Music
63
GUITAR   INSTRUCTION   IN   FIN-
ger style,  jazz,   popular,   and   semi-
classical.   Bill   Lepine,   CA   8-8101.
TENOR  SAX.,   $140.   Phone   224-9845
Dave RM.  3.
FOR SALE
MISCELLANEOUS
7.
"PROMETHEUS" VOL II NO. 3—
Now available at Book Store. No.
A retrospective look at the U'BC
Teach-in & the Berkeley Student
Strike. Also authors Wayne Cannon, Wm. McCarthy, Henry Rosenthal,   Walter   Young,   R.   Riley
and   Dahren,   etc.
RENTALS   &   REAL ESTATE
Room & Board
82
ROOM  AND   BOARD   ON   CAM.PL'S
Fraternity.   PhPonp  224-9790.
HOUSE, MAY - SEPT. 1 BDRM.
Gas Ht., El. Stv., & Wt., Lge. Lt.,
Nr. Bus. 20 min. to town, (car)
YV   8-0138. ^^
83
Furn. Houses and Apts.
GIRL WANTED SHARE SPACIOUS
West End Apt. Own bedroom, very
reasonable. Ph. 684-9648 Evenings
Apr.   1.
SENIOR GRAD STUDENT AND
mother, abstainers will give good
care and pay rent for furn. house
approx. May 15 to Aug. 31. 683-
1551.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
WANTED UNFURNISHED TWO
Bedroom Suite $90 • $100. Phone
738-0114.
THERE'S ONLY ONE
A£S£AT®A04T
Desert Boots and Desert Khan Oxfords
are available everywhere they sell only
good shoes. Ask for them.
$15.95
Suggested.  Retail
by
Clojsk
5
of  England
MR. FLETCHER
in attendance at
4564 West 10th Avenue
224-7922
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Assistant Co-ordinator:
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of Ass't. Co-ordinator. Applicants should apply in
writing to the Co-ordinator-Elect, A.M.S. Office, Brock
Hall. All applications must be accompanied by an
elegibility form. Applications will close on March 24,
1966.
Brock Management Committee:
Applications are now toeing accepted for positions on
the Brock Management Committee. They should be
sent to the Co-ordinator-Elect, A.M.S. Office, Brock
Hall. Applications must toe submitted by March 24,
1966.
Chairmen Needed:
Applications are now being received for chairmanship
of the following committees:
Brock Art Manager
Open House Chairman
Student Court Chief Justice
Totem Editor
Leadership  Conference Chairman
College Shop Manager
Academic Activities Committee
All  applications  shall  be  in  writing  and   shall be
addressed to the Secretary (Box 54). Eligibility forms are
available in the Secretary's office (S. Brock).
Applications must be submitted toy 4:00 p.m.
March 24, 1966.
Academic Symposium Chairman:
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of chairman for 1966-67. Write to ACADEMIC SYMPOSIUM COMMITTEE box No. 2 Brock Hall.
CUS IX Seminar:
Aug. 28 to Sept. 4 at Waterloo University (Ontario).
Topic: Identity and Anxiety: Crisis in the Student
Generation. Application forms in AMS office and
CUS office. Deadline for Applications Thursday,
March 24. 8 delegates. Costs paid by the Can. Union
of Students.
Seminar will consist of a discussion of the political,
psychological, and institutional causes of student unrest and identity problems.
Anyone may apply.

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