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The Ubyssey Sep 11, 1979

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Array ^^ Village people
smash Calgary/15
Hacks 'find' $70,000 extra
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXII, No. 1
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September 11.1979
228-2301
After a year of telling campus
clubs and committees that it had no
money to give them, the Alma
Mater Society has discovered that it
has $70,000 to spare.
"The levels of services were not
as good as they could have been last
year because of being tight with the
budget," said AMS finance director
Len Clarke. "They were tight, but
they went a little too far."
Cutbacks on clubs' budgets and
committees underspending their
budgets accounts for $30,000 of the
surplus, he said.
The remaining $40,000 of the
surplus was due to an increase in investment income, said former
finance director Glenn Wong.
"The surplus was due to an increase in investment income and in
the various committees of SRA and
SAC not spending what they were
allocated."
He added that although there was
a surplus last year, there had been
budget deficits in the previous
years. "There comes a time," he
said, "when you can't keep dipping
into the operating fund."
Clarke also said that part of the
surplus was due to an outmoded
method of recording expenditures
throughout the year.
So part of the $70,000 will likely
be used to purchase a new computer
to keep track of expenditures so
that the clubs can spend all of the
money allocated to them, he said.
"It may sound funny," said
Clarke, "but we want to replace our
Philips accounting computer with a
newer, better type so that we can
spend more money."
The new system would ensure
that student committees would not
underspend their budgets as they
did last year, he added.
"If a committee or a group asks
for funds, we should ensure that
they get what they budgeted for.
After all, we're not a corporation
out to make a profit from providing
student services."
This year's AMS budget will attempt to reach a balance between
expenditures and revenues, said
Clarke. The increased revenue from
the AMS fee increase will be balanced by increased budgets for clubs
and committees.
Pit beer $1
AMS fills up
— ross burnett photo
GOING THROUGH THE MOTIONS, mime artists mimic shocked reaction of two Russian literature students
who have just heard from the registrar that a computer error has enrolled them in animal husbandry, that their student loan has been mailed to Pango-Pango, that their political science professor is a member of the John Birch
Society and that their residence roommate is a flatulent trumpet player with halitosis and the heartbreak of
psoriasis. Silent show entertained students outside SUB Monday and pleased watching professors, most of
whom like their students to keep quiet and go through the motions without causing a fuss.
Bucks spenf fo siop rape
also in the planning stages at Place
Vanier, senior house advisor Kevin
Rush said Monday.
One reason for UBC housing and
See page 2: NIGHT
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
UBC is spending $100,000 this
year in an all-out war on sexual harassment against women.
A project to upgrade existing security which began last summer at
Totem Park and Place Vanier residences will improve lighting, reduce
dark or 'hiding' areas and construct
a new pathway into the centre of
Place Vanier, said Al Hutchinson,
UBC's director of traffic and
security.
But there is some skepticism
about the possible effectiveness of
the program.
"Those are all measures that will
help the situation, but the problem
is deeper than lighting. It's going to
help but it is not the solution," said
women's committee member Kate
Andrew.
Hutchinson said that in the six
years he was employed as a member
of the RCMP at UBC there was only one report of rape on campus.
Andrew said the RCMP reported
that two rapes occurred 18 months
ago, for a total of three rapes in the
last two years.
"Part of the low crime rate on
campus is due to the fact that the
lines of bureaucracy and communication are confused," said Andrew.
Compared to crime rates in other
parts of the Lower Mainland,
UBC's incidents of rape and other
sex crimes are low, said Hutchinson.
"There's a need to be careful but
not to be paranoid," he said.
Other ways to improve the security on campus will include chain
locks on doors in residence rooms
and basement windows of Place
Vanider and Totem Park.
Hutchinson also plans to arrange
a series of talks for women residents
that will explain what protection is
available to women on campus.
"We would like to meet with
students in an effort to educate
them with respect to the steps that
they can take to protect
themselves," said Hutchinson.
Rape awareness  programs  are
By KEVIN FINNEGAN
Crying in your beer is going to
cost you more this year.
Beer prices in the Pit have risen
from 85 cents to $1 a token after the
student administrative commission
acted on a recommendation by
social centre manager Graham
Smythe.
The increase caused confusion
last week when the price bounced
around for several days. The increase went into effect Wednesday,
was dropped on Thursday, and was
re-instituted at 2:30 Friday afternoon as a result of what SAC chairman Don Tolson called a "lack of
communication." The SAC constitution requires that minutes be
posted for 24 hours before they can
be acted upon.
"It was a constitutional error,
something I forgot to tell Graham
Smythe about," Tolson said.
Student representative assembly
member Valgeet Johl started a peti-
tion to stop the increase but was
unable to get the 15 SRA members'
signatures necessary to rescind the
SAC motion. The motion, and the
price increase, could be defeated at
the next SRA meeting on Sept. 19,
but it is unlikely that it will be, said
Johl.
"The petition was circulated
because people want discussion. It
was not disagreeing with the increase," said Johl.
Smythe defended the increase
saying: "The cost of beer went up
because the cost of beer and draft to
me increased. There's been a wage
increase to staff and the price of
supplies has increased."
The wholesale price of beer from
the breweries increased seven per
cent in late August. Pit staff wages
have also been raised seven per
cent.
Smythe said an SRA attempt to
overturn the increase would be
 See page 2: SUDS
Student asks for sex change
By GLEN SANFORD
Looking a gift horse straight in the mouth, John
McKendy turned down the opportunity everybody
dreams about.
The fourth-year arts student discovered Friday that
he had been assigned to a women's quad in Walter
Gage residence, but only after much inner conflict did
he decide to inform the housing department and
change rooms.
"I sat in my quad for a while deciding whether or
not I should tell someone," McKendy says. "This is
the opportunity everybody dreams about, but I could
see it wouldn't work out."
McKendy was given top priority when he re-applied
this year and began to move in on Sept. 1.
"Nobody else was there so I began moving in my
stereo and other heavy stuff," he said. "When I came
back the next Friday there was still nobody there."
McKendy said he finally met one of his quadmates
and could not help but notice that she was of the opposite sex. But his conscience forced him to inform the
housing department, he said.
"During the first two weeks the honeymoon
would've been great," McKendy said. "But after that
it would've gone nuts."
McKendy says if he hadn't informed anyone about
the situation, no one would ever have found out.
McKendy also pointed out that the women in the
quad didn't seem to mind a man in their midst.
One of the women even said: "A guy in my quad
wouldn't phase me a bit."
McKendy says he was given a new room after he informed the housing administration of the situation. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11,1979
In anti-rape effort
Night buses, lighting to be used
From page 1
security's increased awareness of
the need for better security arose
from a rape and attempted rape
that took place in Totem Park and
Place Vanier, said Rush.
Hutchinson said he hopes the
presence of a female RCMP officer
on campus and three female members on the traffic and security patrol will make the women on campus feel easier about reporting
problems of sexual harassment.
There will also be a night bus program that will transport women
from the Main Library to Place
Vanier, Totem Park or B-lot, said
Hutchinson, The program will
begin in October.
Improved outdoor lighting and
the clearing of shrubbery near the
residences will hopefully discourage
peeping Toms, flashers and panty
thieves, Pat Buchannon, Totem
Park senior house advisor, said
Monday.
"If there are prowlers or peeping
Toms they will be seen," he said.
Night residence attendants have
also been outfitted with two-way
radios and a new key policy has
been introduced in Place Vanier
providing new door locks if keys are
lost.
"We're also proposing a buddy
system in the co-ed house where
men and women will be travelling
together on campus at night," said
Kevin Rush, senior house advisor
for Place Vanier.
Residents will be encouraged not
to   let   delivery   people   into   the
houses at night, said Rush.
"I'm really satisfied with the program," he/added.
The recommendations for the security improvements were made by
a residence committee that explored
new possibilities for improvements,
said Buchannon.
"We look at the physical layout
of the residences and after going
around them we made our recommendations," he said.
k
KICKING OUT THE JAMS for benefit of students queuing outside Brock
Hall during registration last week are musically-inclined UBC faculty
members who donated time and talent to make hours fly by. Professors Ig-
— ross burnett photo
nazio Coarsepore (suet sculpture studies), George Tirebiter (statis physics)
and Buck Turgidson (political silence) are well-known as members of
popular combo, E Max Band.
The $100,000 provided for improvements came from UBC's
board of governors, said Hutchinson.
"There was a need for this,"
he said.
Suds prices
variablef
probe finds
From page 1
"very poor business, a very
uneducated approach to the issue."
While single tokens cost $1, the
discount for bulk sales drops the
price to 95 cents. Tolson estimated
about 90 per cent of the Pit's
business is in bulk sales.
A survey of other beer prices at
and around UBC showed a large
range in the cost of bottled brew.
The cafeteria in the old administration building still charges 75 cents
for beer bought with a meal. The
graduate student centre charges 85
cents, but you have to be a graduate
student to get in. At the faculty club
bottled beer is $1 and a faculty
member must sign for it. Jerry's
Cove, a neighborhood pub on
Fourth Avenue, and the Fraser
Arms, a beer parlor on Marine
Drive, charge $1.10 per bottle.
Other recommendations from
Smythe passed by SAC include the
sale of hard liquor in the Pit during
the evening and the sale of beer and
wine at the Pit's noon hour coffee
house.
THE FRASER ARMS
_
FBAiifl
The Best Live Rock club in town,
featuring the best Canadian and U.S.
rock bands. Open Monday thru
Saturday evenings.
WEDNESDAY
*  LADIES NITE *
* MALE DANCERS *
in the FRASER ARMS HOTEL sends a hearty
welcome to U.B.C. students and we look
forward to seeing you in our new
Neighbourhood pub with its high booths and cosy
intimate atmosphere. SPECIAL TUESDAY NITE feature
Amateurs' Night
J.PBEANS
A swinging disco with
the latest in disco boogie.
Open Friday and Saturday.
Sett Off luc& fox, tie
/4n«n4,
L@0 Tuesday, September 11,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Students will get less f er mere
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
For the second consecutive year,
B.C. Hydro will offer students less
bus service for more money.
Student bus passes will cost at
least $1 more a month than last
year, while Hydro cuts 42 trips a
day out of its Vancouver schedule.
Hydro spokeswoman Sandra
Smith said the hike is due to
"general increases that we have to
pass on to bus users" and claimed
the cutbacks were the result of
scheduling adjustments.
The government corporation last
year increased bus fares from 35
cents to 50 cents and made similar
cutbacks to bus routes.
In addition to the increase by
Hydro, the UBC Alma Mater Society is tacking on an increase of 25
cents to the 75 cents per pass they
already receive, bringing the total
cost of the passes from $16.75 to
$18 per month.
AMS external affairs officer
Valgeet Johl said she was disappointed with the increases, especial
ly since services are being cut back.
She said bus passes now represent
less of a saving because they are
over-priced and offer insufficient
services.
"Last year, you were making
money on the passes if you rode it
seven days a week, twice a day, but
now you might even lose money.
It's also unfortunate it has to happen in peak ridership times."
Johl and other members of the
AMS external affairs committee
presented a brief to Vancouver city
council this summer asking them to
protest the cutbacks.
Council protested the cutbacks,
and although their objections did
not prevent the route slashes,
Hydro has finally acted on a request
to provide direct service to UBC
from Richmond and North Vancouver.
But Johl said the extra routes
would have been better used by putting more buses on some of the
busier routes which were cut back.
imJ^**"
^hoo****-
She said those routes include the
UBC-lOth Avenue, Fourth Avenue
and MacDonald routes.
The bus pass system has been in
effect on the Lower Mainland for a
year and is now established as a permanent program after last year's
trial run.
Passes were first offered at UBC
last fall at a cost of $46 for a two
and a half month pass. Hydro
spokesman Dave Robertson said
the corporation was happy with the
program's success.
Leadership
conference
short cash
Question: when is a student leadership conference not a student
leadership conference?
Answer: When student leaders
get involved.
GETTING HER NAME on very own door is Karen Sherabina winner of
door prize (get it? get it? Those jocks are just chockfull of boffs, ain't they)
at Saturday's football game at Thunderbird Stadium. Keenly-interested
onlookers are Len Clarke, AMS director of finance holding door with se-
— peter menyasz photo
cond runner-up in Brian Short look-alike contest, and UBC board of governors member Bruce Armstrong. Police were later called to escort unidenti-
field vagrant in right of picture from stadium.
Costly thugs scare off gym concert acts
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
Overpricing of security services
could sound a death knell for evening concerts at UBC's War
Memorial gym.
Concerts organizer Meral Aydin
said demands by the engineering
undergraduate society and the
rugby club that they provide all
security and "set-up and takedown" arrangements at gym concerts is scaring off big-time Vancouver promoters.
She said they are wary of the gym
because the EUS and the rugby club
charge more than commercial concert security firms, making large
concerts at UBC financially unattractive.
"The staffing of concerts remains a large problem with a large
problem with the companies," said
Aydin.
Ed Mint, owner of Isle of Man
productions, claims the clubs
charge 20 to 30 per cent more than
anyone else and have less experience.
"Their price is a bit high, said
Mint. We're in the business of
holding concerts, not sponsoring interest groups at UBC."
But Alma Mater Society president Brian Short said the promoters
are getting a good deal and have no
reason to complain.
He said the War Memorial gym is
"damn cheap" to rent and the costs
of security, set-up and take-down
are a little higher to off-set the low
price of the gym rental and make a
reasonable package price.
But Aydin said many promoters
already put on extra security to protect   their   performers   and   their
equipment. Hiring additional
students causes expensive duplication of services, she says.
EUS president Russ Kinghorn
said hiring the engineers and the
rugby club is essential to gym concerts in order to protect the facility
properly. He claims outside agencies would not do so adequately.
"I maintain that the job of
assessing the difference in the facility would not be assessed properly
by outside security groups."
He also denies the EUS prices are
out of line with commercial operations.
"I'd challenge any outside security group to provide our manpower
for our price," said Kinghorn.
Rugby club spokesman John
Olesen also said the promoters were
"getting a good deal."
U. of Sask.plans to build reactor
SASKATOON (CUP) —
Students at the University of
Saskatchewan at Saskatoon may
soon have good reason to worry
about a nuclear "China syndrome"
on their campus.
The university will be the site of a
Slowpoke-2 nuclear reactor in 1980,
according to the Saskatchewan
Research Council.
The $2.5 million reactor will be
used to reduce raw uranium ore into
yellow cake uranium, which is a
concentrated, low-radiation emitting form or uranium.
The production of yellow cake
will lead to production of radioactive waste materials, according to
the Research Council. The waste
material will be temporarily contain-
'Mow we den evr gay apparel'
TORONTO (ZNS) — Santa Claus, always merry, can now be gay too in
Quebec.
The gay magazine Body Politic reports that the Association of Santa
Clauses in Quebec has officially reversed its policy of banning gays from
the job of being Kris Kringle in local department stores during the
Christmas season.
The policy change came after last year's anti-gay bias triggered a
discrimination complaint to Quebec's human rights commission. Now Santa Claus Association president Henri Paquet is whistling a different tune.
ed at the university before it is taken
away for disposal by Amok Corporation, the first contractor signed
up by the council.
The reactor project is not merely
for scientific investigation but will
serve as a service to industry, with
the council expecting to receive 40
per cent of the province's ore
analysis business, according to the
Financial Post. Currently Saskatchewan has no major ore analysis
industry.
While the main focus of the project is commercial, Research Council officials stated they hoped that
university researchers will have access to the reactor.
Construction is to begin immediately, with a completion target
date set for July 1, 1980. However
uranium mining in Saskatchewan
has become a controversial issue in
the past two years and protests
against the reactor are likely.
He added that if outside groups
were allowed to do the set-up, takedown or security at War Memorial
Gym concerts, they might not prevent damages to the building and
cause gym officials to cancel all further concerts.
But Aydin said she has drawn up
a new contract for all future concerts which makes the promoter
liable for any and all damages incurred in the gym.
And she added that concert
organizers will likely not be interested in hiring students for
security since they are now responsible for the damages.
The main advantage to the new
contract is damages that occur in
the gym will not be paid for by the
promoters — who are better financially set up to handle the costs, said
Aydin.
Despite the dispute over War
Memorial concerts, the AMS has
already successfully arranged a
number of concerts in both the SUB
auditorium and the SUB ballroom.
A series of noon hour concerts
featuring artists such as Blue Northern and the Powder Blues band
will begin Wednesday with
Malcolm Tomlinson.
The UBC student representative
assembly originally passed a motion
to provide $2,000 for a fall leadership conference, but is now able to
support the conference only in principle, Alma Mater Society president
st*    Brian Short said Monday.
The conference merry-go-round
began at the June 6 SRA meeting
when a resolution was passed giving
Camp Elphinstone its funding.
At a subsequent meeting in
August, a group of SRA representatives passed a resolution rescinding
the motion supporting the conference.
SRA arts representative Bob Staley said he was opposed to the conference because of its agenda and its
informal setting.
"Meeting (administration president Doug) Kenny and other members of the administration in an informal, natural setting doesn't let
the students find out what he's really like," he said.
"You can only find out what administration members are like in
their offices, when they actually
have to deal with student
problems."
Staley said little time was given in
the original agenda for criticism of
the administration. "Only an hour
and 15 minutes had been allocated
to discussing the university administration, senate, and board of governors," he said.
At the last SRA meeting, a motion was passed giving the conference support in principle, but a motion could not be passed reallocating funding.
Short said all those opposed to
the conference had the opportunity
to be at the SRA meeting in June
that passed the resolution supporting the conference.
"A number of those reps who
voted against supporting the leadership conference were outside the
meeting room until the vote came
up," said Short.
/r
8ISaDlKllllllPIIII NKHIp:
CAiX3AR1P (CVP) —. What happens to school spirit between
Frosh Week and Sennuda Shorts tOtf became a burning issue to the
University «f €>%Rhr m^ibtosmaapt*
So the senlttedeeWed to take a page bom the federal government
and set up a five-member task force to investigate spirit on campus.
"We're not looking at manufacturing spirit," explained Bruce.
Ramsay, president of the Student Legislative Assembly and task
force member. He said the task force will look at apathy on campus
and concentrate on discovering ways and means of encouraging
spirit.
Task force chairman Brian Norford says he hopes to investigate
claims that spirit is high among some faculties and low in others and
to see how serious the discrepancies are. He also wants to compare
the U of Cs spirit with that of other universitiesand determine how
other campuses are dealing with the crucial situation. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11,1979
Welcome
suckers
Welcome to the ship of fools.
UBC students are being taken as financial suckers
— hook, line and sinker.
First, the administration took advantage of Our
absence over the summer to raise our tuition fees for
next year by 10 per cent. We, of course, were not
around to have any say.
Now, administration president Doug Kenny is telling
us we should be pleased with the sneak preview of our
increased educational costs. Simon Fraser University
president George Pedersen says he thinks students
have no right to complain about the new expense.
Whose side are they on?
We can't be expected to float through the year on
inadequate student aid, high student unemployment
and sky-high costs of living. Our only recourse is to
stop flailing and put up a fight.
We've got to lobby for better student aid programs,
and complain to campus powerheads. Let our discontent be known — it's our last chance to change the
smug Seventies.
Meanwhile, our own student government, the student representative assembly, reports a $70,000
surplus from last year's budget. Their money is flowing now, buy why was it only trickling last year?
Something smells fishy.
Len Clarke, the director of finance, says the level of
student services wasn't as good as it could have been.
Clubs didn't keep track of funds and expenditures, so
the coins just kept piling up. Finance now wants to
buy a new accounting machine to ensure there are no
more snafus. Isn't there an old adage — poor
carpenters blame their tools?
We need a new crew
It's all systems go here in deadline city. The
dedicated moles are out of hibernation, the insane
hours have already started and front-page story fervor
is flourishing.
But there's only one problem. We need a crew.
We need reporters, photographers, cartoonists,
sports writers and reviewers and writers for Page Friday, our weekly feature, arts and review section.
If you .want to contribute, drop in any day of the
week at noon and we'll give you the rundown.
We're in SUB room 241K. We can help you learn to
write well, enjoy good parties and participate in some
fiery, educational discussions.
You don't need a trench coat, fedora, cigar or shorthand skills — just a mind and a pen. And if you don't
have time for regular contributions, there are still ways
for you to voice your views.
If you feel strongly about an issue and want to make
a straight-from-the-horse's mouth rebuttal or retort,
then write an opinion feature to the editor.
If you're disgruntled with events on campus, or
don't like something you've read in our paper, let us
know. Write a letter.
We need you.
Letters
Don't blame Americans, says English rep
On March 30, 1979, the final edition of the Ubyssey for the 1978-79
academic year printed a full-page
article, purporting lo be largely
based upon an interview with me,
headed Americanization: the '60s
problem still threatens Canadian
universities. I have, on behalf of
the Association of Canadian
University Teachers of English,
given a good deal of time in the last
12 months or so to the problem of
Canadians holding PhDs in
English who lack satisfactory
employment and I am grateful for
publicity of my efforts and those of
my committee.
Nevertheless, I regret the way in
which the work of my committee
was treated in Tom Hawthorn's article; specifically I object to certain
things ascribed to me which I simply did not say, and to certain others
taken out of context and
thoroughly distorted.
Let me give some examples. (I
should perhaps interpose that
although it is now some time since
that article came out, the points I
shall make were noted down as
soon as I had read the article, which
appeared very shortly after the interview.)
In the first column, Tom
Hawthorn writes that "tenure was
given to mostly-American professors employed in Canada in the
1960's and, while often not
qualified to receive tenure, they are
currently depriving Canadian
graduates from entering the tenure
stream." At one point in the interview I remarked that tenure had
been, in my view, given too readily
in the sixties. I said nothing to suggest that American academics
working in Canada had benefited
from this any more than any other
group. I did not suggest it, and I do
not think it.
In the third column, Tom
Hawthorn quotes me as saying "the
American insistance (sic)." on
specialization is harmful, it's anti-
education (sic)." This is a nice example of distortion by transfer of
context. I stressed to Tom
Hawthorn that I thought it quite
unfair to attribute ill motives to
some departments which had hired
predominantly from America; I
pointed out that we all have our
biases; I said that I am aware that in
my own case, in spite of having lived mostly outside England for the
last 20 years, my perspective is
nevertheless English.
As an example, I cited my feeling
that American academics tend to be
over-concerned with specialization.
So, I gave an example of a bias of
which I am aware in myself; it was
taken completely out of context,
turned into a straightforwardly
anti-American remark, and into a
comment on the current situation at
UBC to boot.
At the conclusion of his article
Tom Hawthorn writes "Canadian
graduate students will, as Rudrum
says, have to wait until all the
Americans now teaching retire
before finding a niche in Canadian
university teaching positions."
What I said was that I did not see
much likelihood of many tenure-
stream positions opening up until
the nineties when my own genera
tion retires. I did not use the word
"American" in that sentence.
I pointed out to Tom Hawthorn
that although I myself am a Canadian citizen I came to this country
as an immigrant. If there is a problem of "foreign domination" in
Canadian universities then I am as
much part of that problem as any
other faculty member who came
here from elsewhere. Just as I have
no wish to be the victim of a witch
hunt against academics of English
origin, I have no desire at all to be
associated with a witch hunt against
academics of American origin.
As an individual, I resented the
way in which I was misrepresented
in that article, knowing quite well
that American friends of mine
would be distressed by it. As chair
man of a committee concerned with
a serious problem, I resent it equally, since that problem cannot be
solved by sensationalism, but only
by the cooperation of all those who
are at present teaching in our
universities.
Alan Rudrum
chairman of committee
on professional concerns
ACUTE
Learn in your car, eat in the nude
Enough of this messing around.
Swan Wooster wants to spend $12
million on displacing a pile of sand
that is sure to fall down anyway.
Let's get some real displacement
happening that could be of genuine
benefit to the university.
First, let's put the classroom
building out in B-lot. It'd save a lot
of time and probably wouldn't cost
$12 million if we could get a good
price on skyhooks. The new administration building could be put in
some dark hole where its incredible
ugliness could be hidden.
The student union building, with
its massive fortress-like walls would
be very nice on Wreck Beach. The
sight of it alone would scare the hell
out of any erosion that came along
and it would make a pretty centrepiece for the other two concrete
blocks down there. Pleasant surroundings for the Pit, too.
But the most promising displacement would be that of the university year. If winter session was April
to November, students could enjoy
the peace and loveliness this campus
offers during the summer. After all,
when you're only working 15 or so
hours a week you want it to be good
weather for those dozens of leisure
hours.
Winter would also be a good time
to be working to save up for the
summer session. There's less competition for jobs and there's the seasonal Christmas job market to tap.
Also, the weather's lousy then, so
that's the time you want to be at the
grindstone 40 hours a week.
I'm not against the utter rape and
devastation of a fine natural beach
at great cost in money and effort —
I just believe there are more sensible
things to do with all that heavy
equipment that Swan Wooster is
desperately trying to find a use for.
Joe Schlobotnik
alchemy 7
THE UBYSSEY
September 11, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
Brad and Ruby had fallen down a long, dark hole, chasing rabbitish Tom Hawthorn as he ran furiously shouting "We're late!" It had piqued their curiosity,
especially when he was joined by equally rabbitish Heather Conn, chased by satyrish Peter Menyasz. ("That's satirist, you drunk," he said to Verne
McDonald.) Paul and Ruby fell and fell. "There's so many doubles here," they said to Ralph Maurer and Marcus Gee as the two old men looked up startled
from the ledge they had fallen asleep on. "There's the Kevins, Griffin and Finnegan. And the Wheelwrights, Julie and Geof. And as for Kate Andrew and Sally
Thorne, you can hardly tell them apart!" More bodies floated by. Vic Bonderoff, Glen Sanford and Baz McConnell waved silently as they moved past. Brad and
Ruby began to wonder if they were really falling. Then they saw Len Clarke and Bob Staley and knew they were on their way down. They landed with a thump
on Keith Baldry. But they had not reached bottom yet. A massive crowd of Pauls, Wilson and Von Matt, were waiting to double them yet again. Gary and
Yvette were there, too.   And a word to the wise Pooftah — the first PF meeting is at 12:30. Tuesday, September 11,1979
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 5
Nobody wants to believe it —
sexual assault exists at UBC
By SALLY THORNE
and KATE ANDREW
It seems a shame that with the
fresh beginning of a new term on
campus an article on sexual assault
and rape at UBC has to be written.
However the situation on campus
right now is most unfortunate.
About a month ago, two women
were sexually assaulted in the Main
Library; at the end of last term, one
rape and at least one other attempted rape occurred in Totem Park
and Place Vanier residences. Other
incidents might well have occurred
— these are merely the reported
cases.
The problem of rape and sexual
assault on this campus is a real
threat to the social and educational
freedom of women students. This
does not mean that you should
NEVER talk to strangers, walk
alone at night or go into Main
which women students must be particularly aware.
A concentrated population of
young women, many of whom are
away from home and eager to meet
people and have fun, is a natural attraction for any potential attacker.
The stresses and tensions of university life can also prove an excessively heavy burden for many; this in
turn can lead to aggressive acts as a
vent to their feelings.
In addition, the geographical
vastness of this campus is yet
another hazard. There are many
heavily treed and poorly-lit areas at
UBC which make it a perfect site
for a romantic walk on a starlit
night but also make a lone woman
vulnerable to rape, flashing or sexual assault.
The two miles of University Endowment Land woods which people
must traverse to get from campus to
Library. But on the other hand,
don't dismiss this article as
something that only concerns that
'other' woman. This article deals
with things that are relevant to
everyone.
We hope that you won't need to
use any of the suggestions we're offering but you have no guarantee
that it won't happen to you.
What constitutes rape? What
does sexual assault mean? For the
purpose of this article — and in
general terms — rape is quite simply: sexual intercourse without consent. That covers the whole spectrum from the mythical rapist who
jumps out of the bushes on a dark
night and attacks a female passerby
(and yes they may be mythical but
they do exist), to a husband, lover
or date who pushes beyond the fine
line to "get what he wants" while
ignoring what you say and feel.
Both are rapists. Despite what most
people think, rape is not a crime of
passion. Studies clearly indicate
that the major motive for rape is
anger, hostility and aggression —
not passion or an unsatisfied sex
drive.
Rape is the most brutal form of
harassment which women face.
There is an enormously wide range
of tactics which can fall under the
general heading of sexual assault, in
its more physical manifestations,
and sexual harassment in its more
subtle but none-the-less annoying
form. Flashers, derogatory comments, bathroom intruders, peeping
toms, gropers and wandering hands
are all forms of sexual harassment
or assault. We aren't talking about
normal flirtation or dialogue between men and women. Sex and flirtation are normal, fun and healthy
— we all know that — but only in
the right circumstances. By right
circumstances we mean when both
parties enter into the relationship
or encounter voluntarily and with
enthusiasm.
The problems outlined above are
ones which women and men must
recognize — they affect humanity
universally. The community which
develops around any university
creates   particular   situations   of
the real world mean that you either
wait for a bus, trek out to 'B' lot or
hitchhike — all of which increase
the chances of attack. If you choose
never to venture into the outside
world and hibernate in Main or
Sedgewick Library instead in
valiant pursuit of that much desired
first class, you too can face certain
risks. Flashers, and exhibitionists
have long been known to frequent
the hallowed halls of the
university's quiet libraries.
The most important measure to
prevent sexual assault, rape or
harassment is probably awareness
of the problem. The intent of all the
posters, books, leaflets and articles
like this are to make more and more
women take the time to think about
the things they do to increase the
risk of attack, and the things they
could or would do in the event of an
attack.
Although many of us feel uncomfortable about discussing or considering such a possibility, the mental rehearsals, increase the chance
of acting sensibly in an emergency.
Once the situation occurs, there's
no time to think it through and
fully explore the alternatives.
Intensive rape and assault
awareness programs such as
women's self defence, Wendo and
feminist karate concentrate on
women's preparation to act immediately when a dangerous situation arises. They teach women to
use their strength and their wits to
thwart an attacker. Physical
resistance is only one of the possible
ways of handling an attack but if it
is the best one, you'd better know
how to do it well.
There are many factors that increase the risk of placing yourself iii
a dangerous situation.
Awareness of the risks does not
mean women should limit their lives
to avoid all unsafe activities. But if
you choose a lifestyle that includes
particulary hazardous situations
you ought to be conscious of the
specific risks involved.
Use your common sense and
observation skills to notice exit
routes from cars or buildings; know
where help can be obtained. Pay attention to your hunches. If someone is making you feel uncomfortable, get away from him.
Beware of being friendly to
strangers. Many rapists have approached their victims by asking for
a light or directions. Use all your
assertive skills. Don't be afraid of
creating a scene; don't be afraid of
saying No and meaning it.
The most effective time to resist a
potential attacker is right at the
beginning.  By yelling  "get away
from me, you creep!" you'll draw
attention to him immediately and
effectively prevent him from easily
continuing with an attack.
It is important to remember that
most attackers get a charge out of
intimidating women. The less you
appear intimidated, the less likely
he is to seek you out as a victim.
Prevention of assault and rape
also means being in control of your
bating and social situations. If you
want can lead to self-hatred and
depression. You owe it to yourself
to wait until you feel good about
the relationship and sex is a mutual
agreement.
Having read this far, you probably have some general ideas
about what to do if someone does
approach or threaten you. Here are
a few suggestions for action if you
become a victim:
• Report    any   instance   of
Let him call you a prude or a
cock-teaser. Don't fall for the line
about male biological urges. He
doesn't need sex any more
than you do.
don't want to have sexual relations
with anyone, you have the right to
refuse. A person who intends to
coerce you to have sex will play on
all your guilts and fears to prevent
your refusals. Let him call you a
prude or a cock-teaser. Don't fall
for the line about male biological
urges. He doesn't need sex any
more than you do. Sex is not a good
way to prove your love. If he loved
you he would never pressure you into something that made you feel uncomfortable.
Lots of women on campus are
away from home for the first time
and are prime candidates for
pressure to have sex. Don't believe
that "everyone is doing it." A sexual experience that you don't really
harassment, assault or intimidation
— it can help prevent someone else
from suffering the way you did.
Rape Relief, which serves Vancouver with a 24-hour crisis line,
provides support for anyone who
has been raped, assaulted or harassed. Don't be afraid to call them
(Crisis Line 732-1613). On campus,
a central reporting service has been
set up at the women's students office, 228-2415.
Although personal counselling is
available through the office, the
reporting line is for reports, not for
crisis counselling. Reports are important because the more incidents
reported, the better the statistics are
for bringing about badly-needed
changes.
• Report incidents to the local
detachment of the RCMP. This is
necessary if you want to take legal
action, ask for protection or list
your concern with them. If you do
choose to call the police, be
prepared to have a skeptic answer
your call. If you have any problems
dealing with the police Rape Relief
can help you.
Information about rape and
assault is always available from the
women's centre, SUB 130, just inside the north door of the building.
The women's committee also
organizes self-defence workshops.
Contact them for further information.
If you want to help weaken this
campus problem, the Coalition for
a Safe Campus and the women's
committee are eager to have new
members. Information on both
groups can be obtained at the UBC
women's centre.
Oh yes, above all have a pleasant
year.
Sally Thorne and Kate Andrew
are members of UBC's women's
committee. Perspectives is a column of opinion and analysis open
to all members of the university
community. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11,1979
Tween classes
TODAY
SPEAKEASY
Organizational meeting for previous volunteers,
noon, SUB 215.
POTTERY CLUB
Executive meeting, noon, SUB 251.
THURSDAY
MEN'S ICE HOCKEY TEAM
Organizational meeting for all newcomers, noon.
War Memorial gym room 25.
BAHA'I CLUB
Organizational meeting for Baha'i's on campus, noon, SUB 113.
AIKIOO CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
MONDAY
UBC FENCING CLUB
Important executive meeting, 7:30 p.m., gym E.
Welcome to Tween Classes/The Ubyssey's ,
very own free and exclusive bulletin board.
Tween Classes are open to all members of the
university community, but differ from Hot
Flashes in one important way. We decide which
Hot Flashes to run, but every Tween Classes
submission is published.
If you or your club has something to tell the
university, get it off your chest through The
Ubyssey. Just drop by our offices in SUB 241K
and find out which of our services are best
suited for your needs. We might appear to be a
bunch of crabby ogres, but you would be to if
you had to sit in the northeast corner of the second floor of this building for twelve hours a
day. Put up with us. You aren't about to find a
whole lot of things on this campus that are free.
The Ubyssey publishes Tuesday, Thursday
and Friday and the deadline for Tween
Classes is at noon the day before publication.
And remember, for some reason understandable only to teeny little bureaucrats with
glasses, noon at UBC is really 12:30 p.m., not
twelve hours before or after midnight. Don't be
fooled.
Even if you don't have an immediate event
you want to publicize, drop by and let us know
what you are up to, especially if there's a good
photo possibility.
And keep those cards and letters coming.
Talk about
getting hot
No, it doesn't mean we're going
through menopause.
A Hot Flash is just The Ubyssey's
unique way of informing the
university community about really
big campus events. If you've got a
particularly interesting speaker,
event, exhibit, or vegetable, come
to The Ubyssey offices in SUB
241K and fill out one of our very
bureaucratic forms.
You'll find that Hot Flashes are
bright, informative, witty and off-
Hot flashes
the-cuff, just the kind of thing to
attract legions of eager students to
your event. But we get piles of submissions, s.o make sure you explore
other avenues of publicity. Or ask
for the rejection slips. They make
fascinating wall paper for your
Place Vanier hovel.
If we say there's no room, write
us a letter about your event. And
with a letter, you get your name in
the paper. Looks good on resumes.
Speakeasy
Rape, suicide, alcoholism, lost
love, loneliness and just the simple
inability to cope are some of
the problems Speakeasy can help
you with.
Speakeasy is UBC's information
and crisis centre on the SUB main
floor and they're looking for people
to help and to help them.
If you're interested, go on up to
Speakeasy desk opposite the information and candy stand in SUB or
call the Speakeasy information line
at 228-3777. They're registering
people now for their training session for new volunteers taking
place Sept. 21-23.
If your interest is more urgent,
the crisis line is 228-3700.
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
ARE INTERESTED IN YOU
Welcome back! On September 18, we are having a
social for all coaches, managers and interested
players. It will be an excellent opportunity for
everyone to meet the newcomers as well as to chat
with old friends. This function will be held from 7:00
p.m. in SUB Room 212. Refreshments will be
served.
FOR
ATHLETIC FOOTWEAR
SPORTS CLOTHING
RACQUETS
SWIMWEAR
X-C & DOWNHILL SKIS
SKI RENTALS
228-0414
Lower Mall
SUB
"Across from
The Pit"
NOTICE
TO ALL CLUBS
Club's Day will be Sept. 20 and 21. If you will be
participating in this event please have a representative from your club contact the clubs commissioner in SUB 246 by Friday, Sept. 14.
WE NEED PEOPLE
for
THE KEG CAESAR'S
GOOD TIMES!
The Keg Caesar's, at Hornby and
Dunsmuir, needs energetic, young-thinking
people to fill a variety of service roles in the
months ahead. Servers of food and liquor,
cooks, hosts/hostesses. If you believe in
the spirit of The Keg, you could have a
future with us. Interviews Wednesdays
1:30-4 p.m. at The Keg Caesar's.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial t- 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 1W5
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices for ice
skates, hockev, soccer, jogging and racquet
sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
11 — For Sale — Private	
MICROSCOPE FOR SALE. Carl Zeiss standard 14.
A-1 condition. Phone 437-4103. 324-7725 after 4
p.m.
20 — Housing	
RETIRED ELEMENTARY teacher needs pleasant
home in exchange for sec./typist, tutoring.
Modern, active, driver's license. 6854S867.
30 — Jobs
40 — Messages
SINCERE. REFINED grad student, of Scottish origin, 24, 5'10", wishes to meet mature, attractive, single female student 20-25, preferably in
Arts, Commerce or Education who is a good conversationalist and a non-smoker, for outings and
companionship. 968-3406.
70 — Services
PART-TIME
TRUCK
DRIVERS
wanted for moving and
storage. Afternoons, evenings, Saturdays, Sundays
and Holidays.
734-5535
Ask for Bob
KALEIDOSCOPE
BOUTIQUE
Affordable Fashions
New Phone No.
224-2421
4454 West 10th Avenue
READING SKILLS, reading comprehension, retention and speed. Plus note-taking/study techniques. 1 day course. Ideal for students. 266-6119.
85 - TYPING	
SECRETARIAL SERVICES. Theses, manuscripts
and resumes professionally and efficiently typed.
References. Phone 594-9383-
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and
accurate. Experienced typist. Phone Gordon, 873-8032.
MEDICAL OFFICE
Part-time receptionist position in
Vancouver physician's office.
Approx. 20-30 hrs. per week,
mainly mornings. Send resume
to: 812 Millbank, Vancouver,
B.C., V5Z 3Z4.
THE NATIONAL TESTING CENTRE is seeking a
highly motivated student with an interest in
business or law to serve as national co-ordinator
for its LSAT and GMAT Review courses across
Canada. The part-time position offers an excellent
opportunity for substantial income. For further information call 689-9000.
BABYSITTING. 6 and 9 year olds, light housework,
four afternoons, 2:30-6:00 p.m., near 46th Ave.
and Granville St. Mother accompanied by child
welcome. $4.00 per hour. 684-9872.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
To Sell -
Buy —
Inform Tuesday, September 11,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Nude beach
is under assault
By PETER MENYASZ
m^      ^Bo I
lo nudes is good nudes!"
has always been the battle cry of the Vancouver parks board.
And the plan proposed by Swan
Wooster Engineering Co. to control cliff
erosion on Wreck Beach might solve the
parks board's problem and drive nude
sunbathers off the beach.
The $12 million proposal calls for
measures to prevent further erosion of the
sandy cliffs in the vicinity of Towers
Beach as well as
pedestrian paths, park- mmWmmmUmWmm
ing lots and viewpoints.
Environmentalist
groups such as the
Sierra Club are actively
opposing the project
on the grounds that the
proposal is not in the
best interests of the
beach or its users.
"The Sierra Club
has taken the position
for years that the.beach
should be kept
natural," says
Rosemary Fox, chairwoman of the club's
Vancouver chapter.
"It's one of the last natural beaches
left, and this proposal is going to destroy
the natural quality of the beach."
Ken Downey, a representative of Swan
Wooster, says an effort has to be made to
keep the cliffs and beach from further
deterioration.
"We could actually lose Marine Drive
again," he said. Early in the university's
history, a section of Marine Drive collapsed after a severe rainfall.
Downey says people are responsible for
a large part of the damage to the cliffs,
and the $12 million proposal will help protect the cliffs from further damage by its
users.
"There will be depressed trails so that
people will not want to get out of them.
Fences with barbed wire don't work."
The deterioration of the cliffs does not
yet present any threat to the university
buildings nearby. The Museum of Anthropology will likely not be in danger for
over 100 years say   erosion experts, and
People are responsible
for a large part
of the damage
to the cliffs — Downey
Cecil Green Park is still outside the danger
range. The only structure in imminent
danger is a second world war bunker that
is almost ready to topple from the edge of
the cliffs.
Chuck Connaghan, UBC vice-president
of administrative services, stresses that the
report by Swan Wooster is not a "take it
or leave it" proposal.
The joint committee of university and
Vancouver parks board representatives
that ordered the report intended to bring
forward the proposal for public input,
Connaghan said.
"We thought we would go to the public
and say 'here's a concept.' Tell us what
you think about it."
But the environmentalists are certain of
what the public response will be.
"The kind of fuss there has been in the
past indicates that the public wants Wreck
Beach left natural," says Fox.
know where the money to finance the project will be found.
"We knew all along that anything over
$1 million would be a problem for the
university. We don't have $12 million sitting around to put into the project."
"Twelve million dollars is a lot of
money," says Fraser. "It's more likely a
provincial government responsibility
rather than a Vancouver parks board
responsibility."
The decision on Wreck Beach could
ultimately rest in the hands of the provincial government. A highly-placed university source says that the beach area might
She adds that anti-
nudist sentiments
could play some part in
the political struggle
surrounding implementation of the project.
"The proposal could
be supported by people
who are opposd to that
sort of use of the
beach," she says.
Parks board commissioner Russ Fraser
said it is illegal to sunbathe nude on a public
beach, and that it is important for people to
obey such rules.
"But we're not in the enforcement
business — we'e in the parks business,"
he said.
Fraser pooh-poohed the suggestion that
the Wreck Beach proposal was designed
to drive nudists away from the beach.
"I don't think anyone would spend $12
million to get rid of the nudists."
Connaghan   admits   that   he  doesn't
The fuss in the past
says that the public
wants Wreck Beach
natural — Fox
soon become the responsibility of the
Greater Vancouver Regional District.
But a GVRD representative was quick
to point out that this would only come
about if the provincial government agreed
to turn over control of the forested areas
of the University Endownment Lands to
the GVRD.
Sounds like a raw deal. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11,1979
While you were away ...
—Hutch turns in badge, prof takes test
THE MANY MOODS of Doug Kenny, distinguished scholar of
psychology and university administration president, are displayed
as he wrestles with frustration-alleviating Nurd for the edification
of the few readers of deceased Vancouver daily, the Courier.
-jim bauman photo
Plastic toy won two falls out of three but Kenny vows he will carry
on fight by attempting to stretch student finances to frustration
limit. It's easy once you've had the practice.
A former RCMP officer is UBC's
new traffic stickler and parking
sticker checker.
Alan Hutchinson, formerly in
charge of the endowment lands
RCMP detachment, is now campus
traffic and security director. Hutchinson, 42, leaves behind 22 years
of granting liquor licenses and local
law enforcement with the RCMP to
enforce traffic and parking regulations approved by UBC's board of
governors.
The director assumed his new
duties May 14, when Dave Hannah
retired after 15 years with the
university.
Is Julius
Kane able?
Julius Kane, a UBC professor
charged with seyen criminal offences in connection with allegedly
misusing public funds and university facilities for his personal purpose, was tested by three
psychiatrists in August to determine
if he is mentally fit to stand trial.
The psychiatrists will report their
findings at a preliminary hearing into Kane's case next January.
If found competent, he will stand
trial by jury on May 6, 1980, according to a Crown counsel.
Kane has said he will defend
himself if his case proceeds to trial.
He is charged with four counts of
theft, two counts of fraud and one
count of attempted fraud.
The Crown alleges that Kane used a National Research Council
grant to employ two assistants to
See page 20: JUST
The
Canadian Bank
Bank of Montreal
WELCOME TO UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
The two "Campus Branches" of the Bank of Montreal take great pleasure
in welcoming new and returning students to U.B.C.
We figure it this way: if we can be of help to you while you're a student, you'll stick with us after
graduation—when we can be of even greater assistance.
So, come see us for advice on handling money. We can show you a few things that Economics 201 doesn't cover:
how to save with a True Savings Account, how to cheque with a True Chequing Account, how to budget to make the most
of your money, how to avoid running short. And we can discuss loans too.
There's a Bank of Montreal nearby. Drop in, anytime. We want you to get your money's worth.
Start with
the bank
you'll stay with.
STUDENT UNION BUILDING BRANCH - STUART CLARK, MANAGER
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING BRANCH - GEORGE PEIRSON, MANAGER Tuesday, September 11,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
tm9i
*3
*.N
^
10%
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
While university students were scraping
together enough money this summer to get
back to school, the province's universities
were busy making it harder for them to come
back.
Tuition fees will go up at all three B.C.
universities — 10 per cent at UBC and 8.3 per
cent at Simon Fraser University and the
University of Victoria. UVic's increase was
effective immediately, but UBC and SFU
hikes will not take effect until May, 1980.
The universities cited financial need as the
reason for the increases, although student
tuition only makes up a small portion of their
budgets. SFU and UBC spokesmen defend
the increases claiming that announcing them
a year in advance is "more fair to students."
"I think students should be pleased they're
not faced with an immediate hike in tuition,"
said UBC administration president Doug
Kenny.
no solution
Tuition hikes
problem for
university
He said the increase was necessary because
the student contribution to the university
budget had fallen below 10 per cent. But
Kenny added the UBC board of governors is
always "cautious" about making decisions
on student tuition as it is "one of the thorniest problems of university financing."
UBC's announcement of the increase did
not come until June, despite a promise by
Kenny that the decision would be made while
students were on campus. But after he made
the promise, the provincial Socred govern-
PAY
FEES
IHERE.
0
JC
ment called an election and Kenny said it
would be impossible to decide on fees until
the board knew the amount the post-election
government would throw into university coffers.
So UBC and SFU waited, but the election
had no bearing on this year's provincial contribution because the increases will not take
effect until next year.
SFU president George Pedersen wanted his
board of governors to announce a tuition
hike for January, but they decided to defer
the increase.
"We are now going into the fall with an
unbalanced budget. We will have to draw on
our surpluses. It was my recommendation we
start in January, but the board decided to
delay it until May."
Pedersen says he feels students have no
right to complain because he thinks B.C.'s
tuition fees are about the lowest in Canada.
But students are complaining about the increases and about the way the decisions were
made.
Valgeet Johl, UBC Alma Mater Society external affairs officer, said she is unhappy and
angry about the way the decision was made.
"The AMS isn't too pleased. It's an unprecedented decision. They announced it
without knowing what their budget would
be. It was done during the summer and we
were given no time to give our views," she
said.
Johl accused Kenny of betraying students
by breaking his promise to them.
"The promise became passing words when
the heat was off."
Johl charged that the board is not taking
into account the inadequacy of current student aid programs, the high rate of student
unemployment, and the escalating cost of living when making its tuition decision.
"The budget is not expanding for
students," said Johl.
She predicted the board will use this year's
decision as a precedent for yearly tuition
hikes tied to the increases in provincial grants
to the university. Such a scheme has already
been recommended to all B.C. universities by
the Universities Council of B.C.
But Kenny said he is opposed to the plan
because "tuition doesn't always have to be
co-ordinated with government grants."
See page 18: DON'T Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11,1979
jSfeS-J** ■
STUDENTS AT BROCK HALL LOOK FORWARD TO HIGHER LINE-UPS
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Eve. and Holidays 732-9898
Also Garages, Basements, Yards
CLEAN-UPS
Bahai
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Thursday, Sept. 13
SUB rm. 113
12:30-1:30
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Hair cutting for
men and women
At the Company we
believe in quality,
allowing 45 minutes for
that quality to be
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Our products are the
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You may obtain this
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for an appointment or
dropping into our salon
Mon.-Sat., 9:30-6 and
Thurs. 9:30-9.
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Serving all
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If you're part of the UBC scene, you should know
about us.
We're a full-service credit union, located right on
campus in University Village. We're here to serve
the financial needs of everyone who studies,
teaches or works at UBC.
We offer the con
venience you're looking for in day-to-day
finances. Plus helpful
advice, if you need it.
Our range of money
services includes:
daily interest savings,
chequing, term deposits, personal
loans, line-of-credit,
mortgages, RRSPs
and RHOSPs, insurance and much more.
Come and talk to
us. We're right in your
neighbourhood!
Your Campus Credit Union
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2150 Western Parkway
Tel: 224-2364
ivUI
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Hours: 10-5 Tuesday to Thursday
10-6 Friday
10-1 Saturday Tuesday, September 11,1979
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 11
The newsroom was filled with the noise of the
usual chaos of a dozen
reporters trying to beat
deadline when a copy of
The Memo was dropped
on every desk.
Most reporters shoved it
aside in their haste,
mistaking it for one of the
dozens issued in the past
weeks by the paper's
management.
But this memo was different. It spelled the crib
death of a kicking but
defeated daily newspaper
— and the start of a campaign by the paper's
management to place
blame for the failure
elsewhere.
Newspaper's don't die
very gracefully, especially
those that go of unnatural
causes. The Courier didn't
even have the decency to
die outright. It first was
put into an unexpected
coma, and then just as
rapidly folded.
Most of the paper's staffers felt cheated, but were
unsure where to direct
their justifiably blind
outrage. These people suddenly discovered that their
careers had abruptly hit
brick walls and were
panicking at the prospect
of trying to get their old
jobs back.
What they needed most
was a place to direct the
anger they felt. It was
financier Gordon Byrn
who was offered up by
Courier oWner Robin
Lecky as the sacrificial
lamb for the wrath of
scorned reporters.
What the Courier staff
was told, often at the same
time as were members of
the other media, was that
Byrn was at fault for the
daily's death because he
was unwilling to spend his
family fortune to keep the
paper afloat.
The hostility directed
towards him among the
reporters was intense.
Some seriously discussed
throwing rocks through
his window,
Placing Byrn in the position of villain — as the
man responsible for the
paper's death — alleviated
the problem of the anger
of the staff members, who
had been hired away from
other jobs and then
betrayed by the very same
people who had promised
that the paper would survive for at least 12 months.
But a Ubyssey investigation into the short four-
week life of The Daily
Courier reveals it was poor
management of the paper
by Lecky that doomed the
staff.
While Byrn has taken
the brunt of the blame for
the paper's demise, industry sources indicate
that he had little grasp of
the newspaper business
and as little responsibility
for the Courier's death.
The   much-heralded
Courier death not accidental
£     DRAS
CAUGHT
two FtR£Si
<$tf£u
l*U>
"financial conditions" he
is reported to have required before he was willing to invest his money
now appear to have been
totally unrealistic for
anyone with the remotest
knowledge of printing and
publishing.
College Printers, the
Kitsilano shop located
across the street from the
paper's office, was
ordered by Byrn to purchase a larger and more
complex printing press and
to move to a larger location, expenditures which
are currently unfeasible
for the shop.
The other Lecky statement which was accepted
blindly by the other
newspapers was that the
newspaper finally closed
its doors for good because
creditors forced him to do
so.
But that seems highly
unlikely considering Lecky
owns about 40 per cent of
the shares in College
Printers, which was the
major creditor.
And many involved in
the industry say Lecky
himself decided to end his
romantic adventure with
The Courier to rid- himself
of the prohibitively expen
sive salaries he was paying
to columnists signed to
lucrative personal contracts.
But Lecky appears to
have run into a few
economic problems of his
own with the "dead-stop"
Courier.
"He lost at least
$140,000 easily in the
fiasco," said one source
close to The Courier. "But
the real kicker is that he's
probably going to lose
some of his shares in College because of his debts. I
think he maneouvered
himself just a little too far
on this one."
Your non-stop Courier stopped making news mjmm
/!mS&S6«i6SS558*^*iVw^
KasS^Swrwi: ■
/ifcwiffifirM
See the student. See the student register.
See the student line up for course cards.
See the student line up to pay fees.
See the student line up to eat.
See the student line up for the bus.
ill*  Irainmo
See the professor.
Watch him teach.
See the professor arrive with no lecture notes.
See the professor teach off the top of
his head.
The fart that he is hald should indirate
By now you probably have the impression
that UBC is a long succession of upturned
palms waiting for grease. After the tuition
fee payment, AMS fee payment, parking
sticker payment, bus pass payment, dry
cleaning for a summer's worth of dirty
laundry, a book-buying spree, stomach
pump insurance (for those living in
residence), laying in a good supply of
steaks and lobsters (if you live off-campus),
and paying the first month's rent on your
luxury penthouse apartment, you'll be happy to know that this primer is absolutely
free. Actually, we wanted to charge for it,
but we had a change of heart. Of course, if
you feel guilty about reading the primer
without having paid for it, we are always
open to contributions. Anyway, this primer
offers serious information on the hazards
of university life (or a reasonable facsimile
thereof). And if you like, you can mail your
contribution to SUB 241K by campus mail.
HAllcocK/uWSiPI
See the woman student.
She thinks she can be an equal at UBC.
But some faculties don't want her mind.
And some professors expect certain favors.
The campus isn't even safe enough for a
lonplv latf night wallf I"
fri
i
K
M
Ubytsey primer graphics by Heather Conn, Kula and Dave Hancock.
i j   i  >  / Page 14
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11,1979
Sun, and other fables
Physical improvements, new appointments and special events
dominated the sports news at UBC
during the summer months.
The saga of the stadium lights
continued to unfold, With completion now optimistically scheduled
for late October. An internal communication breakdown at physical
plant delayed installation of a
transformer for two months, and a
manufacturer's error resulted in
five poles of the wrong size being
shipped from Calgary. The proper
standards should arrive within three
weeks, and the athletic office hopes
to schedule the last football game of
the season as a Friday night match.
The lighting system will consist
entirely of conventional lights for
the time being, giving a uniform illumination of 50 foot candles.
When the new Vortek system
presently under development by the
department of physics is ready, it
wilt be installed to supplement the
conventional system. It is estimated
eight Vortek lights could light the
entire Montreal Olympic stadium.
Two new playing fields and a loggers' sport area are to be installed
on the south campus adjacent to
16th Avenue, but neither project
will be completed immediately. The
playing fields have been logged and
are presently being cleared, but no
further work will be done until
Sports
screened
three recently constructed fields are
tested. The three new fields are built
with an underground watering, fertilizing and drainage system and the
athletic department wants to ensure
the system can withstand the winter
monsoons before completing the
two latest fields. Because the prime
growing season was missed last spring, the three completed fields will
not be playable until February of
1980.
The loggers' sports area will be
installed in a fenced-in area adjacent to the new fields as soon as the
forestry department finds the funds
for a burling pond, axe-throwing
area, and equipment for whatever
else loggers do in their spare time.
Funding for the fields has come
from both the federal winter works
program and the provincial labour
intensive program.
Another physical improvement
that should appear soon is an 18
station fitness circuit on and around
Maclnnes field, next to SUB. The
$6,500 circuit will be jointly funded
by the housing department and the
athletic office, who hope to have it
completed within a month.
War Memorial Gym is now accessible by wheelchair after $20,000
of modifications were completed to
accommodate the Canadian
wheelchair games this summer.
Permanent ramps were installed to
in Pit
allow access to' the gym floor and
showers, while several portable
ramps are available for special occasions.
About $2,500 of the cost was a
gift from former graduating classes,
and was part of a $6,000 contribution from the president's committee
on the needs of the handicapped.
There were a number of staff
changes over the summer that affected sports. Sandy Silver was appointed as women's volleyball
coach, Jack Pomfret as women's
basketball coach and Craig
Delahunt as men's Wrestling coach.
In addition, Ron Mattison was appointed trainer.
National and international attention was focused on UBC during
two special sporting events held
here this summer. The Canadian
wheelchair games drew athletes
from all 10 provinces and the North
West Territories, with Ontario
finishing first and B.C. second. The
women's field hockey world championships took place on the south
campus fields during late August.
Holland defeated West Germany
3-1 in the final, with 11th ranked
United States shocking everyone by
finishing third. Canada was ranked
ninth and finished eighth,
eliminating almost all possibility of
qualifying for the 1980 Olympics.
SkJBllS
One Way
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TORONTO
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189.00
MONTREAL
104.50
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WINNIPEG
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Fares do not include Canadian Departure Tax.
For further details
Canadian Universities
^    Travel Service
A Limited
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Want to watch a televised soccer
game in which the play-by-play announcer doesn't think Vancouver is
a village?
Pit patrons will have a chance to
do just that as Ray Harris is returning this year with an expanded
schedule of televised UBC sporting
events.
Each Tuesday night this year
Harris will show an athletic event
filmed the previous weekend. The
Pit is purchasing a large screen for
the showings.
The shows, which will cover a variety of sports in both men's and
women's athletics, start each Tuesday evening at 7:15 and will run for
90 to 150 minutes. The first game,
to be shown tonight, will be last
Saturday's football game between
UBC and the University of Calgary.
Recreation U.B.C. Classes -
Class                                                 Day                                   Time                               Place
Fall 1979
No. of
weeks          Starting Date
Disco Dance
- learn the latest steps
with Keith 9 Lorraine
Jazz Dance
Mon. & Wed.
Thurs.
Thurs.
12:16-1:00 p.m.
1:00-1:46 p.m.
7:00-8:30 p.m.
2:30-1:30 p.m.
Party Room —
Party Room —
Gym E
Gym E
SUB
SUB
12
12
Sept. 17
Sept. 20
Sept. 20
Dyna-Fit
- exercise to popular music
Mon. Wed. ft Fri.
6:30-7:30 p.m.
Gym B West
Sept. 17
Gymnastics
Mon. Wed. Fri.
& Sun.
7:00-9:00 p.m.
Gym G
12
Sept. 17
Karate
Wed.
Sun.
7:00-9:00 p.m.
10:30-12:30 p.m.
Gym E
Gym E
12
Sept. 20
Faculty and Staff
Exercise Class
Mon. Wed. & Fri.
12:30-1:06 p.m.
Gym E
All term
Oct. 1
Modern Dance
- Janice LeBlond is back
Tues. & Thurs.
Wed.
1:30-3:00 p.m.
7:00-9:00
Room 206 Armoury
Room 208 Armoury
12
Sept. 18
Women's Self Defence
Tues.
7:00-9:00 p.m.
Gym E
12
Sept. 18
Yoga
Mon. & Wed.
4:30-6:00 p.m.
Room 211-213
10
Oct. 1
Tennis
- for beginners
Mon. Tues.
Wed. & Fri.
12:30-1:16
Armoury
10
Oct. 1
Badminton
- for beginners
Mon. & Thurs.
11:30 a.m.-12:16
War Memorial
Gym
10
Oct. 1
Ice Skating
- basic and elementary
figure skating
Tues. Wed. & Fri.
11:46 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Winter Sports
10
Oct. 1
Register at Room 203, War Memorial Gymnasium.
Specials
ENTER OUR FREE CONTEST —
IGUESS THE TOTAL AMOUNT OF MONEY IN THE BOWLJ
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
CHARGEX
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5754 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
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B.C. HYDRO
COLLECTIONS Tuesday, September 11,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Tories threaten UBC sports
REGINA (CUP) — All inter-varsity
athletics competition in western Canada
might be suspended as a protest against
federal government cutbacks on athletic
funding.
The former Liberal government promised
to subsidize travel costs for inter-varsity
athletic programs, said Neil Sherlock, president of the Great Plains Athletics Conference. Former cabinet minister lona Cam-
pagnolo promised a grant of $500,000, he
said.
But Steve Paproski, Conservative fitness
and recreation minister, has reduced the
grant to $290,000.
Sherlock said a suspension of inter-varsity
athletics could occur as early as the 1980-81
season.
Under the original Liberal government
promise, the grant was to be shared among
the conference, the Canada West University
Athletic Association and the Atlantic University Conference.
GPAC and CWUAA would have received
$350,000, with the AUAC getting the remaining $150,000. If the Tory grant is split up in
the same proportion, as is expected, the two
western conferences will receive $200,000,
less than 60 per cent of the amount originally
promised.
UBC is a member of the western association.
Following simultaneous meetings Sept. 7 in
Winnipeg and Vancouver, the GPAC and
CWUAA decided to abandon plans for the
interlocking tournament schedule planned
for this year. This will leave all 11 western
universities with large holes in their competition schedule.
The interlocking schedule would have provided a single round robin tournament between the nine hockey teams in the two con-
SPORTS
ferences and exhibition games between the
basketball teams.
In addition, fully interlocking tournaments
were planned for sports in which either conference has fewer than three teams. These
tournaments would send the two best teams
. in each sport to the national championships.
It is currently possible for teams to be sent •
to the national championships without prior
competition within the conference.
Protests have been sent to Paproski by
both the GPAC and CWUAA. The matter is
also on the agenda of a meeting of western
Canadian university presidents scheduled for
later this month.
Villagers
dump 'Saurs
— pater manyasz photo
UNIQUE NEW EXCUSE for crashing registration week lineups doesn't work for Dave Negrin as he is wrestled to
the ground by two home ec students attempting same trick in different uniform. Football players used similar excuse, claiming they played three games before school began, including 38-14 win over Calgary.
Jog your lethargy at UBC
Does the accompanying graphic
remind you of someone? Like
yourself?
In that case, you should find out
about UBC intramurals.
Armed with a healthy budget
after last spring's referendum, the
intramural program starts this Friday with the first of their weekly
jogs and continues throughout the
school year with regular leagues and
special events in the women's,
men's and co-rec schedules.
The run on Friday starts at noon
on Machines field behind SUB and
is open to anybody who figures they
can make it three kilometres.
Other September events include a
jog each Friday noon, the men's
swim meet on Sept. 18 and 19, the
women's novelty swim meet on
Sept. 27, the first week of co-rec
volleyball on Sept. 20 and of
women's volleyball on Sept. 25, as
well as the men's tennis tournament
on Sept. 22 and 23 and the golf
tournament on Sept. 29. The latter
three events require pre-registration
at the intramurals office in room
210, War Memorial Gym.
Any UBC student is eligible to
enter intramural events, and no particular affiliation is needed for
group events, as long as the proper
number of people can be found for
the sport involved.
Intramural director Nestor Korchinsky said the money from the
referendum would be used to create
a new curling league, an expanded
bowling program, more referees
and publicity, and a reduction in
registration fees.
By PAUL WILSON
Shortly after the Whitecaps put
the village of Vancouver on the
North American sports map, the
UBC Thunderbirds did their bit in a
winning Vancouver weekend by demolishing the University of Calgary
Dinosaurs 38-14 at Thunderbird
Stadium.
The game proved two things for
the 'Birds. They are once again the
team td beat in western Canada and
they have a talented replacement
WESTERN INTERCOLLEGIATE
FOOTBALL CONFERENCE
Standings
GP
W
L   Pts.
UBC T'Birds         3
2
1       4
Alberta Bears        2
2
0        4
Sask. Huskies        1
1
0       2
Manitoba Bisons   2
0
2       0
Calgary D'saurs     2
0
2       0
for 1978 all-star quarterback Dan
Smith.
Greg Clarkson, who served as
backup to Smith last season, led a
surprisingly well-balanced attack
against Calgary netting nearly 500
yards in total offense.
The hapless Dinos had less luck.
Their quarterbacking combination
of Greg Vavra and Paul Colborne
managed only 208 yards in Saturday's driving rain. In the rushing
department the Dinos finished the
game at minus 11 yards thanks to a
number of quarterback sacks by the
strong UBC defensive unit.
"Our team was just terrible out
there," said Calgary coach Mike
Lashuk Saturday. "We are not a
very good football team at this
point and UBC is. But I didn't
think we'd be this bad."
The 'Birds put a lot of points on
the board early in the game. Clarkson threw a 27-yard pass to 'Bird
end Barry Muis for their first touchdown. UBC scored again in the first
quarter when Clarkson threw a
16-yard strike to sure-handed Chris
Davies for their second major.
The rout seemed assured midway
through the second quarter after
Kevin Konar punted a single and
'Bird place-kicker Ken Munro
booted a 32-yard field goal to make
the score 18-0.
However the Dinos were intent
on making the game a little more interesting before half time. Starting
from their own eight-yard line Calgary marched 102 yards downfield
in 11 plays to score their first touchdown when Dino back Nairne
Douglas dove across from the two-
yard line.
Three plays later Calgary defensive back Jamie Armstead intercepted a poorly thrown Clarkson pass
to put the Dinos in scoring position
on the 'Birds' 42-yard line.
The Dinos scored on the next
play when, in a poor defensive
move, UBC back Mark Beecroft attempted to intercept a long pass to
Calgary star receiver Darcy Krogh.
He missed the ball and the man
leaving Krogh to score Calgary's second major on a 42-yard pass and
run play. This left the score at the
half at 18-14 and gave the 'Birds a
few things to ponder in the dressing
room.
The second half, though, belonged exclusively to the 'Birds.
Ken Munro was successful on
two field goal attempts from the 16-
and the 29-yard lines. In the third
quarter, Davies was again on the receiving end of a Clarkson touchdown pass from 16 yards out*.
UBC's scoring was rounded out in
the fourth quarter when Clarkson
again threw for a touchdown
against the frustrated Dino defence.
Evan Jones went over for the major
on a 14-yard pass and run play.
Offensively the 'Birds played
their best game this season.
"We've played two bad games
this year but now I think we're going," said Clarkson after the game.
"In Saskatoon we ran and ran but
that just made it easier for their
defence. This is three-down football
so you've got to throw."
The 'Birds were soundly beaten
by the University of Saskatchewan
28-6 in their second game of the
season, Sept. 1. They narrowly defeated the Manitoba Bisons 18-11 in
their season opener Aug. 27 at Empire Stadium.
The 'Birds have next weekend off
before they meet the University of
Alberta Golden Bears Sept. 22 in
Edmonton. The Bears trounced
Calgary Aug. 31 in Calgary by a
score of 40-27. The game will be
difficult but the 'Birds have gained
a lot of confidence this week.
Gathering the Clan
As the UBC football season unfolds, more attention is being focused on
the October 19 Shrum Bowl pitting the T'Birds against the Simon Fraser
Clansmen at Empire Stadium.
Last season, some 13,000 fans were on hand to see the 'Birds defeat the
Clan 22-14 in a game that was in doubt until the final gun had sounded.
Proceeds from next month's game, like last year, will go to the United
Way. The game will be played under Canadian rules.
UBC athletic director R.J. Phillips stated that although there is no
sound contractual agreement for later years, the possibility of a continuing
series does exist. A basketball game between the two universities is scheduled for early in the new year. Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11,1979
DAL GRAUER
MEMORIAL LECTURES
AMORY LOVINS
By training a physicist, by practice a conservationist, Amory Lovins is a full-time
British representative of Friends of the Earth, Inc., an American-based non-profit
conservation lobbying group. Concentrating on energy and resource strategy,
Mr. Lovins has been a consultant to several United Nations agencies, the
Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, the Science Council
of Canada, Petro-Canada, the U.S. Department of Energy and many other
organizations in several countries. He is author of several books, including Soft
Energy Paths: Toward a Durable Peace.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 8:00 p.m.
Robson Square Media Centre
'Soft Energy Paths: Economics, Finance and the
Supply of Energy'
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 8:15 p.m.
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, 2
(Vancouver Institute Lecture)
'Soft Energy Paths'
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 12:30 p.m.
Buchanan 106
'Energy Policy: How to Enjoy the Inevitable'
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
STARTING
DATES:
TEAM TRYOUTS
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
1979-80
Badminton
Thurs., Sept. 136:30-9:30 p.m.
Gym A
Basketball
Mon., Sept. 17 4:30-6:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Cross Country
Tues., Sept. 17 4:30 p.m.
Meet in Memorial Gym
Curling
Thurs., Oct. 11 5:00-7:00 p.m.
Winter Sports Centre
Fencing
Mon., Oct. 1 7:00-10:00 p.m.
GymE
Field Hockey
Wed., Sept. 5 to Fri., Sept. 7 3:30-5:30 p
Mon., Sept. 10 to Fri., Sept. 144:30-6:30
m.               McGregor Field
p.m.           McGregor Field
Golf
T.B.A. Check at Athletic Office.
Gymnastics
Thurs., Sept. 13 12:30-2:00 p.m.
GymG
Ice Hockey
Tues., Sept. 11 5:00-6:15 p.m.
Winter Sports Centre
Rowing
Thurs., Sept. 13 12:30 p.m.
Sat., Sept. 159:00 a.m.-12:00 noon
Meet at the Memorial Gym
Vancouver Rowing Club
Sailing
Mid-Sept., first meeting of UBC Sailing Club                            T.B.A.
Skiing
Tues., Sept. 11 — 4:30 p.m.
Gym A
Soccer '
Tues., Sept. 11 12:30-2:00 p.m.
P.E. Centre Field
Squash
Tues., Sept. 18 5:00-6:30 p.m.
Winter Sports Centre
Swimming
and Diving
Thurs., Sept. 13 12:30 noon
Aquatic Centre Classroom
Tennis
Wed., Sept. 124:30-6:30 p.m.
and Mon., Wed., Thurs. to Sept. 27
Thunderbird Park
Tennis Courts
I Track & Field
Tues., Sept. 11 — 4:30 p.m.
Meet in Memorial Gym
1 Volleyball
Mon., Sept. 17 7:30-10:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
1 Cheerleaders
Thurs., Sept. 13 — 12:30 p.m.        Meet in Memorial Gym, Room 208
New U.B.C. Services
from Seabus and Richmond
Two new U.B.C. services are scheduled to
begin September 10. They will operate on
weekday mornings while U.B.C. is in session
and follow the routing as indicated.
es *ei*us~u.Biif j
CORNWALL
4TH AVENUE        |A
JST VJATERFRPNt
*3r SJATIOM
*^
Vancouver.
m
•*&
^.
&
%».70THAVEUIIE
—u
S£A    ISLAND
«BeiD6ER»T
ALoseeeiDfiE.
S!
RICHMOND   *^^03Kcl
The 85 SEABUS-U.B.C. route departs from Granville
Waterfront Station at 7:50 am and 8:50 am. These
departures are timed to connect with Seabus.
Regular stops will be made downtown,then non-stop
between Burrard Bridge and U.B.C.
The RICHMONDU.B.C. route departs from Cook and
No. 3 Road in Richmond at 7:35 am and 8:35 am.
Regular stops will be made in Richmond,then nonstop between Oak Bridge and U.B.C.
B.C. HYDRO TRANSIT 0^±
PACK
to CLASS
In a quality day pack from
The Pack and Boots Shop
■VML
DAY PACK I       DAY PACK II
(front opening)
Custom made in U.S.A. for the Pack
and Boots Shop. Heavy, waterproof
Parapac nylon with padded shoulder
straps and waist strap.
PACK&
BOOTS SHOP
3425   WEST   BROADWAY,   Tel.   738-3128
710 YATES MALL VICTORIA 383-2144   . Tuesday, September 11,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page17
A.M.S. BUDGET 1979 - I960
Statement of A.M.S. Fee revenue and expenditures related to the A.M.S. Fees
REVENUE (Notes 1 Et 21
Undergraduate Students
Full Time: 16,150 x $39 $629,850.00
Part Time: 2850 x (2.67 units x $4 per unit! 30,438.00
— additional pool levy 2850 x $2 5,700.00
Graduate Students
Full Time: 2016 x $39
Part Time: 1085 x (2.67 units x $4 per unit)
— additional pool levy 1085 x $2
Total Student Fee Revenue
Non-discretionary allocation from A.M.S. Fees
Student Union Building Repayment {Note 31
Full Time 18,165 x $16
Aquatic Centre Fee Levy
Full Time students: 18,165 x $5
Part Time students: 3935 x $2
Men's and Women's Athletic Association
(Note 41
Full Time students: 18,165 x 7
Part Time students: 3935 x ($4 x 2.6 units
x20.5%)
Intramurals Reserve Fund (Note 5)
Full Time students: 18.166 x $1.50
Part Time students: 3936 x ($4 x 2.6 units
x 4.4% I
* See Special Allocation Schedule
Student Union Building An Fund
- By Law II 5lixl
$272,476.00
90,825.00
7,870.00
127,155.00
8389.42
27,247.60
1,800.66
1.500
i.00
78,585.00
11,587.80
2,170.00
92,342.80
758,330.80
Total Non-discretionary Allocations
Total A.M.S. Discretionary Fees
Notes on revenue and expenditure related to the collection of A.M.S. fees.
1. Projected Student Numbers are from Dr. Tetlow, of the Institute of Analysis Ef Planning, calculation
for the 79-80 Term.
2. Average number of units per Part Time students based on summary of A.M.S. fees prepared by John
Lomax of U.B.C. Finance Department.
3. Amount applied to SUB building loan is based on the number of Full Time students x $15.
4. MAA. and W.A.A. funds allocation from Part Time students based on percentage of MAA   and
W.A.A. fees over total A.M.S   Fees ($7/$34  x   = 20.5%).
5. Intramurals funds allocation from  Part Time students based on percentage of total A.M.S.  Fee
!$1.50'$34  ^ 4 4%!
$537,262.58
$221,067.42
Notes to A.M.S. (Budgeted) Expenditures
CONSTITUTIONAL MARGIN
Specified in By-law18-1, purpose is to allow a buffer in the overall budget increase of any miscalculations or unanticipated expenses arise.
SUB MANAGEMENT CURRENT FUND
Specified in By-law 11-6 (viii) purpose is to assure sufficient funds to maintain SUB. The previous constitution specified 50c per student as a
minimum amount. Present constitution declaims this fund be the first call on the funds of the Society.
REGISTRATION PHOTOGRAPHS
As per long standing agreemen between AMS and Administration.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
These are net subsidy figures; a detailed breakdown for each of the areas are available from the office of the Director of Finance, Room 258
SUB.
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Cost of operations of the AMS Business Office and Printshop. Does not include bookings or Publications Office. A detailed breakdown is
available.
PUBLICATIONS SUBSIDY
Cost of operating the Publications Office including administrative cost of producing Insight and the Ubyssey.
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Balance Sheet
March 31, 1979
(With comparative figures for 19W
ASSETS
CURRENT ASSETS
Cash
Accounts receivable:
Publications advertising
Sundry accounts and advances (Schedule 2)
Accrued interest (Schedule 91
Inventories
Prepaid expenses
Total current assets
Investments, at cost (market value - $476,822;
1978 - 9456,368) (Schedule 9)
Total current assets and investments
Loans to subsidiary organizations, non-current
portion (Schedule 7)
Office computer, at cost less depreciation of
*21,998 (1978 - $17,600)
Art Collection
Total general funds assets
Buildings, at cost less depreciation:
Student Union Building
Winter Sports Centre
Whistler cabin
Aquatic Centre
Cost
3.619,625
1,507,247
234,480
1,007,472
$6,368,824
1979
•    46,821
1,063,192
Accumulated
depreciation
891,000
2.728,625
870,000
637.247
72,900
161,580
13,050
994.422
1978
60,788
74.986
144,318
47.382
16,237
47,484
40,452
187,214
4S.583
15,629
388.571
480.417
286,382
459,261
1 «    i'
745,623
68,804
4,396
104,963
921,41
2,809,625
■ 712,247
179,580
385,258
1.846,950
INVESTMENT INCOME
Estimated total balance of reserve funds $231,545.00 x 8.02°-
Allocation of interests income
SUB Revenue
Social Cringe Area
Info Desk
Games Area
Games Anne*
SUB Vending
Pit
Building
including SUB Films L> Extraneous
Rentals
Listening Lounge
Administration
$18,569.90
118,569 901
$7,244.95
645.45
27,750.00
6,703.88
31,682.82
$4,000.00
83,200 00
i4.026.00l
(28,670.001
74,027.10
54,504.00        128,521.10
TOTAL DISCRETIONARY REVENUE $349,598.52
Notes on revenue and expenditures related to business operations.
INVESTMENT INCOME
Investment Income calculations are based on expected average balances of major accounts. All interest generated 'rom these reserve accounts will be allocated back into reserve funds as needed to replenish them. Expected average balances of major accounts based on
relatively large expenditures on furniture and renovations, as there has been no majcr expenditure as such ovei the las: 10 years. Interest rate
based on last year's average rate
SUB REVENUE — al! revenue is stated as net.
Revenue generated by Social Centre area does not reflect cost of Administration of the area; i.e.) record keeping, purchasing, payroll, etc
estimated cost is 20% of General Administration Budget.
Revenue generated by the Building does include the cost of Administration.
BUDGET A.M.S. EXPENDITURE 1979-1980
Constitutional! Margin
$349,598.52 x5% $17,479.93
By-Law 18 - 1
SUB Management (Current) Fund
By Law 11-5 (vii)
$.50 x 18,166 Full Time Students 9,082.50
$.05 per unit x 2 units x 3935 Part-time students 393.50
Registration Photographs
A.M.S. Card
Full Time students $18,165
Part Time students    3,935
22,100 x$.25 = 5,526
Student Government
S.R.A. — General
— Special
Code & By Laws Committee
C.R.U.D. — Committee to Recycle Useable Debris
External Affairs
S.H.A.C. — Student Housing Ef Access Committee
Women's Committee
T.A.S.C. — Teaching Er Academic Standards Committee
Programs — General
Programs — Speakers Sub-committee
Programs -  Concerts Sub-committee
Programs — Orientation/A.M.S. Week Sub-committee
—   Student  Leadership  Camp
S.A.C. — General
General Administration
Salaries & Benefits
Professional Services
Printshop (net)
Other
Equipment
Sundry
Publications Subsidy
Publication Admin.
Insight/Outlook (rev.)
Ubyssey
Special Committee & Special Organization Subsidies
— Speakeasy
— Art Gallery Programs
Total Expenditures
TOTAL DISCRETIONARY REVENUE
TOTAL EXPENSES
NET SURPLUS (DEFICIT)
1,345.00
9,000.00
8,988.00
8,445.00
$130,146.00
6.600.00
8.252.00
9,975.00
9.600.00
900.00
$33,248.00
11,580.001
13,529.75
$2,414.00
19,524.00
11,834.00
610.00
100.00
6,957.00
692.00
4,81.00
3,100.00
27,778.00
1,979.00
25,783.00
$165,473.00
$349711.48
$349,711.48
$349,598.52
349,711.48
Total student facilities assets
General Funds
Current liabilities:
Due to bank on current account
Accounts payable and accrued charges
Due to clubs aud societies (Schedule 3)
Total current liabilities
Special purpose reserves and provisions
(Schedule 8)
Total current liabilities and reserves
Retained income
Contributed surplus ■- Art Collection
Liabilities on and equity in buildings:
University of British Columbia, secured by
assignment of student fees at $15 per student year:
6Vi% debentures
Accrued interest
Bank loan (Note 3) i
Less loan recoverable from The U.B.C.
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
Bank demand loan, less cash in bank, secured by
assignment of Aquatic Centre fee levy of $5
per student year (Note 2)
To tot
Equity in buildings (Note 4|
Tool student facilities labilities
and equity
Contingent lability (Note 5),
LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS
4,521,874
* 5.585.066
$ -
258.954
94,227
353,181
476,248
829,429
129,100
104.663
1.063.192
♦6.686,086
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure
For the Year Ending March 31,1»»
(with comparative figures for 1878)
Revenue;
Student
Aquatic Centre levies
Grad class fees
Graduate Students' Association levies
Undergraduate Societies fee levies
Investment income
Sundries
1879
♦600,934
106,968
28.342
825
33,670
38,753
819
787,801
Non-discretionary affocations:
Student Union Building
*298,080
Aquatic Centre
106,968
Grad class fees
26,342
Graduate Students' Association
626
Undergraduate Societes fee levies.
including special levies
33.670
Registration photos
6.338
S.U.B. Art Fund
1.600
Discretionary allocations?
Interest — special purpose reserves
and provisions (Schedule 8)
expenditure (income! Wore I):
Campus activities and events
(Schedule 5)
Publications (Schedule 5)
Administrative and general
expenses (Schedule 1)
Student Union Building
operations (Schedule 6)
Excess tdeficiency) of revenue
over expenditure
See accompanying notes to financial statements.
472.414
238,387
39.763
196.634
308,100
106,500
26,599
31,002
6,066
t,S00
13.832
28.769
217.231
(70.614)
189.418
32.122
46,866
222,006
(64,3781
5,608,198
19,057
164,003
96,087
278,147
425.192
703,339
113,486
104,663
921,4
641.025
17.S83
!794,227
25.812
568.608
161.464
'161.464
820,039
227,964
227,964
-
452,420
" 1,272,469
3.414,251
5,608,198
1978
514.468
106,500
31.002
32,6i6
605
711,719
231J9S3
6,286
225,667
236,616
110,949) Page 18
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11,1979
Don't take a hike
From page 9
He said the approach is
dangerous, but admitted the board
may well decide to make a study of
the plan. Kenny says the university
is still desperately short of cash,
which is causing a "gradual erosion" of academic standards.
He blamed the shortage on the
provincial government.
"I feel we're still falling short in
terms of the academic needs of the
university. We're not getting
enough (money)."
Bruce Armstrong, student board
member, agreed with Kenny about
the need for more money and called
on student leaders to take a more4
"reasonable attitude" towards tuition increases and push for improvements in the student loan and
grant programs.
"We've got to take a more
reasonable attitude. We can't resist
all tuition fee increases. People get
turned off when they think you're
not being reasonable."
He said students should work
together with ' the university administration to push for better student aid, because' he says "ac-
cessability is not determined by tuition fees."
Armstrong said he was happy
with this year's increases and felt
the board has done all it can to improve aid programs. The costs of
housing, food and clothing are rising faster than tuition and by much
larger amounts, he said.
But Johl said she is concerned
that increases in student loans will
aggravate student debt.
"I'd hope it would be the grant
that would be increased," she added.
Johl said previous promises made
by the board about working to improve student aid have amounted to
nothing. She called on them to help
make student aid possible for
graduate students and part-time
students and to demand improvements in the efficiency and the
adequacy of the current programs.
The board originally pledged to
move on those issues after massive
student protests in the spring of
1977, when more than 1,200
students rallied at UBC to
demonstrate against proposed tuition increases of 25 to, 30 per cent.
The students stormed into a board
meeting later the same day and held •
yet another protest soon after at the
Queen Elizabeth theatre.
Although fee increases went
ahead anyway, discussions on tuition have not been the same since.
The National Union of Students
has adopted a plan to fight tuition
increases and spending cutbacks. A
brief presented at their annual convention last spring stated: "Tuition
costs have escalated to a level where
they alone represent a deterrent to
higher education. There can be no
doubt that a user-pay philosophy is
being partially implemented,
although no government has officially adopted such a policy. Ottawa must respond to the hardships
that tuition fee increases are causing."
NUS is planning to begin a na
tional series of campus meetings
this fall to inform students about
the problems of accessability and
cutbacks, which they hope will produce a "plan of action for the spring."
They are also planning meetings
with the new federal Conservative
government later this month to
discuss student aid.
Although UBC does not belong
to NUS, Johl said the AMS is planning discussions with both Kenny
and the education-minister Pat
McGeer. They are also preparing a
poster campaign, and hope to persuade the three B.C. university
presidents to present a united voice
working for student aid and against
education spending cutbacks and
tuition hikes.
"If we can get the presidents
behind us, we'll be fighting a
unified battle."
But she expressed doubt that the
SFU president would support the
plan as he has already expressed interest in an indexed yearly tuition
fee increase program.
Johl warns that students are
prepared to fight hard and long
against any hikes, including those
slated for this May.
"We're not going to let it settle
and accept it, we're going to fight
it."
With the demonstrations, hardships
and anger of 1977 still fresh in many
minds and the new concern over upcoming hikes weighing heavily upon
students, it is unlikely the issue will
fade soon.
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Open to all U.B.C. Students, Faculty and Staff
Tuesday, September 11 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Wednesday, September 12 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
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VISA Tuesday, September 11,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 19
The unemployment Ph.D.
By BILL TIELEMAN
Canadian University Press
OTTAWA — A Statistics
Canada survey has confirmed what
many people suspected for years —
women are consistently paid less
than their male counterparts, even
when they have obtained a post-
secondary education degree or certificate.
And the survey results will also
shock those who believe that their
bachelors degree will find them a
job in their field. Only 42 per cent
of the survey respondents with
bachelors' degrees said their current
jobs are directly related to their
university studies. Twenty per cent
of the degree holders said their jobs
actually had no relation at all to
their studies.
The StatsCan survey is probably
the most comprehensive examination of the Canadian post-
secondary education graduate situation ever done. The pollsters interviewed 29,609 students who in 1976
completed requirements for a
university degree or college diploma
or certificate. That's about one-
third of all Canadian graduates for
that year.
The StatsCan interviews took
place in June, 1978, about two
years after the graduates had completed their requirements. Some of
the survey's conclusions were:
• Women holding bachelor
degrees are being paid from $1,000
to $4,000 per year less than men
with the same degree in every field,
except fine and applied arts and the
humanities;
• Women with masters degrees,
except in the humanities fields, fare
even worse. The survey, which compared median rather than averaged
salaries to get a more accurate picture, found wage differences of
about $1,500 per year in
mathematics and physical sciences
up to a high of almost $7,000 per
year in the health profession field.
Differences in salary between men
and women with PhDs were similar
but because of the small number of
women with doctorates the survey
could not compile enough results
for any conclusions;
• There are more women with
degrees or certificates looking for
full-time work than men in almost
every field;
• Only 42 per cent of the bachelor
degree graduates feel their jobs are
directly  related  to  their  studies.
Broken down into fields, 65 per
cent of those in education got
directly related jobs at the top of
the scale while only 22 per cent of
humanities graduates found directly
related work.
• Sixty-five per cent of the country's college graduates did find
directly related jobs;
• Overall 83.5 per cent of 1976
post-secondary education graduates
had found full-time work. The top
job-finding fields iii university were
business management and commerce, health professions and
engineering and applied sciences,
with about 95 per cent of the
bachelor graduates employed by
June, 1978. At the colleges data processing and computer science programs are a ticket to sure-fire
employment, with more than 98 per
cent of those graduating in jobs
when the survey was taken. Other
fields with more than 90 per cent
employment include business
management and commerce,
secretarial arts and sciences,
medical and dental services and
engineering and related
technologies;
• A masters degree is worth about
38 per cent, or $5,000 to $6,000
more per year in salary than a
bachelors degree, but a PhD will
only garner the graduate an additional 5.5 per cent, or about $1,100,
more than the masters;
• Generally speaking, salaries increase with the number of years of
education completed; and,
• British Columbia is the most
popular place to work among
graduates, while Nova Scotia ranks
last. B.C. had a net gain in both college and university graduates but
N.S. had net losses in both.
Statistician Bob Cornish, who
compiled and analysed most of the
survey's results has some other
observations about the post-
secondary graduate situation.
Cornish says that after seeing the
survey he believes that for the
university student a masters degree
is the best investment to make. In
terms of cost effectiveness the
masters gives a student a higher
salary for the additional time spent
at university and also a better
chance at finding a related job, he
said.
Cornish said another observation
from the survey is the incidence of
masters degree holders "bumping"
See page 22: Ph.D.
The Class qf '76 discovers that
a university degree is not the
ticket to a job it once was
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THE    U BYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11,1979
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Just in case you missed it
From page 8
work on his private business enterprises.
Kane is currently employed by
the university as a zoology professor.
NUS fights
cut bocks
The National Union of Students
decided at their annual conference
to launch a campaign to inform
students of the effects of cutbacks
on university accessibility.
Delegates to the May conference
at UBC blamed tuition increases for
forcing students out of school and
making enrolment more difficult
for potential students.
The campaign will include a full
week of on-campus general
assemblies during the week of Nov.
5-12.
Other features of the conference
were the election of new central
committee members and a one-day
women's conference, the first in
NUS history.
Profs /om
receivers
It's not exactly a Battle of the
Networks, but instructors at Prince
George's College of New Caledonia
are mad as hell anyway.
They fear that transmissions of
vocational courses to six colleges in
B.C. and the Yukon are duplicating
their own courses, so the instructors
are planning a little interference.
Their complaint is scheduled to
be heard by an arbitration board in
November.
But the B.C. Institute of
Technology, which is responsible
for the broadcasts, is not giving up
so easily. They like their little
ratings war — and will try to delay
the hearings until the satellite TV
experiment ends in May.
Stay tuned for further
developments.
Gear's car
rolls on
UBC engineers got their energy in
gear and came up with a fuel-
efficient leader in a Detroit vehicle
competition.
Their newly-developed electric
car sparked a student victory Aug. 1
but made a poor showing in competition overall.
The UBC engineer-designed electric car placed first in the student innovation multiplier category of the
Student Competitions on Relevant
Engineering.
The car, which features
rechargeable lead-acid batteries,
won the contest prize for the best
cost to consumer.
Eight students worked full time
during the summer to prepare the
vehicle for competition. More than
100 mechanical and electrical
engineering students contributed
towards construction during its
three years of development.
For hermiis
and sleepers
And by the way, in case you were
working in Heart's Content Bay
during the summer, there were a
couple of elections.
The Tories narrowly missed getting a majority mandate federally,
while premier Bill Bennett lost in his
attempt to snatch defeat from the
jaws of victory.
There was plenty of joy in the
corporate board rooms just the
same. 'Nuff said.
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1-800-663-3381 Tuesday, September 11,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 21
Politico seeks truth
By BOB STALEY
Looking back objectively on the
events in student politics this past
summer isn't easy. By now, all the
personal and political alliances have
been formed, and it is these
alliances which will form the basis
of what this paper writes about student hacks over the next year.
The Ubyssey's decision to ignore
student politics over the summer
been wasted arguing about this
camp. It is a political issue on which
SRA is split evenly along political
lines. The question I pose to you is
this: Do you want $2,000 of your
student fees spent so that about 100
"student leaders," many of them
student hacks like myself, can
spend a weekend at camp
Elphinstone at your expense, rubbing shoulders with the alumni and
perspectives
was a positive one. It allowed SRA
(Student Representative Assembly-
student council) and SAC (Student
Administrative Commission-
bureaucrats) to make their mistakes
in peace, and hopefully enter
September much wiser, knowing
how not to do something.
In previous years, the infighting
within the AMS (Alma Mater Society) has been vicious, and this trend
the administration? Or, do you
want that money spent on better
concerts, quality films, improved
speakers programs, or something I
am too narrow-minded to think of?
At a similar camp sponsored by
Simon Fraser University a few years
ago, the highlight of the entire
weekend was when then SFU president Pauline Jewett got drunk. I
rest my case.
has not been reversed (NDP MP
Svend Robinson tells of his days as
a student hack at UBC this way:
"Campus politics is the most
vicious. If you can master it, you
can master anything."). So much of
the infighting that has occurred
over the summer can be related to
two issues: the student leadership
camp and a new AMS constitution.
The student leadership camp is
probably the most contentious of
the two issues. Hundreds of hours
(collectively) of student time has
What makes this issue most
frustrating is the insistence on the
part of some individuals to continually attempt to push this issue
through SRA. As we are currently
structured, a two-thirds vote of
SRA is needed to release funds for
the camp. Because SRA is so evenly
split on the issue, it is possible for
either "side" to achieve split on the
issue, it is possible for either "side"
to achieve a temporary majority,
but never the required two-thirds.
We waste time arguing about the
camp, and achieve nothing. At one
SRA meeting this summer, almost
the entire meeting was spent arguing about the camp, with people
crying, shouting, and being emotional, but with nothing resolved.
Other meetings have been almost as
bad.
If it were possible to remove the
above events from the context of
other AMS happenings, the society
would be in much better shape. Unfortunately, it is difficult for SRA
to move from bickering over the
student leadership camp, to discussing the everyday affairs to the society. Grudges are held. Tempers are
hot. Little is accomplished. To be
honest, I am amazed by the extent
to which that one issue is screwing
everyone up.
Underlying all the events that
have taken place over the summer
are the creeping efforts towards
adopting a new AMS constitution.
Without debating the merits of the
new constitution (there are few), I
am concerned not only with the efforts directed towards adopting a
new constitution, but with the attitude of those who propose it. The
sponsors of this constitution view it
as the cure-all for every ailment
from which the AMS suffers — the
world will change overnight as
apathy disappears and the AMS is
loved by 23,000 students. If this is a
paper monument, please pass the
matches. Not only is the constitution controversial, but the avenue
through which its sponsors view its
eventual adoption is contemptible
— a special general meeting of the
AMS for Oct 17, complete with a
live band to draw an audience.
Great. Nothing ends apathy quicker
than the Bee Gees. Next thing you
know they will be telling us that the
$3,000 for the band will be paid by
the administration. Stranger things
have been known to happen.
This brings us to my theory about
why the AMS is functioning so
poorly; the AMS is run by politicians. Granted, this view is not
novel, but it does explain many of
our problems. Were the society run
by bureaucrats, there would be no
controversy (also no imagination).
When politicians enter the scene
and play their games within what is
essentially a service organization,
things are bound to go wrong. And
they do. So, instead of promoting
concerts on campus and providing
for more student activities, we
argue about a student leadership
See page 22: POLITICOS
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by Tom Stoppard
SEPTEMBER 21-29
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Page 22
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11,1979
MA pays the rent
PhD wastes years
From page 19
those with bachelors out of jobs.
He found that 70 per cent of those
with masters degrees did not need
that level of education to meet the
job requirements. Consequently
employers with a choice between
applicants will pick the masters
graduate.
Those considering that a PhD
will get them a higher wage than a
masters should also remember that
the four years extra studies will
mean a wage loss of about $80,000,
Cornish says.
PhDs also have another problem
—   overeducation.   Cornish   says
Politicos
without
real class
From page 21
camp and waste our time working
on a new constitution.
Further compounding the problems facing the society is the
question of what a politician does
when there is nothing political to
argue about. Hacks, a breed unlike
all others, rely on personality
politics to survive issue droughts.
Whispering hacks spread the word:
"Did  you   know  that is
manipulating the director of
finance?". Fill in the blanks.
It is about time the student
population becomes concerned
about the real mess the AMS is in.
You elect student hacks, so you are
ultimately responsible for the problems they create. If you think, as I
do, that we should spend less time
working toward student leadership
camps and new constitutions, and
spend more time working on improvement of services to students,
let us know. If you disagree, let us
know. Whatever you do, let us
know. For once, let's have more
"real" students than "political"
students respond to a "political"
"Perspectives," such as this.
Let us know.
Bob Staley is arts rep to UBC's
student representative assembly.
Perspectives is a column of opinion
and analysis open to anyone in the
university community.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) — The
endless summer of discontent has
passed in this tiny island kingdom
and thousands of hairy puce blorgs
are returning from their regular
seasonal riots to the more peaceful
pursuits of standing around in
three-piece suits and trying to convince comely female hairy puce
blorgs that they are at different
stages of drunkedness.
"Cold fish that I am, I can appreciate the moves that my fellow
reichsbureaucrats made to make life
more desperate than ever," said
bored of slovenors student
reprehensible Glenn Trout.
Fellow reprehensible Bruce
Salmon agreed. "Life was pretty
easy the past four months but now
that there's enough people to oppress it's time to crack down on soft
living."
"Things have been pretty slack
around here," said Trout. "I hardly did a thing and I never paid more
than 85 cents a beer. But now things
are going to change."
employers are reluctant to hire someone who is overqualified for a
job and this has led to PhDs actually hiding their degree from an
employer to get hired.
Another part of the survey showed that SO per cent of those in the
humanities and social sciences expected to be able to find work in
their field, a completely unrealistic
dream, according to Cornish.
He says people should examine
the job situation in a field before
entering it if they hope to find work
related to their studies.
Cornish advises students to:
• Take summer or part-time work
in your field if possible in order to
learn what the job would be like
and make contacts for the future.
"I can't stress its importance
enough," he says.
• Take aptitude tests and get professional career guidance. "It's
worth every penny spent at the entrance level," he said.
• Look at trends in the business
world to get an idea where jobs
could lie in the future.
• Sell yourself to an employer,
going back a few times to convince
the employer you really do want the
job.
• Start looking for a job mid-way
through the year, when many
employers make decisions on hiring
later in the year.
• Finally, use all the information
available. The StatsCan survey, titled Employment of 1976 University
and College Graduates, can be obtained for free simply by writing to:
Statistics Canada, Education,
Science and Culture Division, Ottawa, Ont. K1A 0T6.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 23
A.M.S. CONCERTS
PRESENTS
WED. SEPT. 12
MALCOLM
TOMLINSON
WED. OCT. 3
ZINGO
WED. SEPT. 19
BLUE NORTHERN
WED. SEPT. 26
POWDER BLUES
LIVE
WED. OCT. 10
THE WADE BROTHERS
S.U.B. AUDITORIUM U.B.C.
12:30-1:30 p.m.
ADVANCE TICKETS AT A.M.S. BUSINESS OFFICE
PROCEEDS TO
C-FOX CHILDREN'S
HOSPITAL FUND
TICKETS-$1.00 Page 24 THEUBYSSEY Tuesday, September 11,1979
AMS
PRESENTS...
(An opportunity to view the collection in the relaxing atmosphere of a quiet
- AMS Art Collection  lounge.) Sept. 10 through Sept. 15 in S.U.B. Art Gallery 5:00 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.
Sept. 10 at SUB , Sept.   11 at Sedgewick and
— Wandering Minstrel Show sept. 12 at MacMiiian 12:30 p.m. — Free
  Guitarist    Sept. 11 in S.U.B. Conversation Pit      12:30 p.m. — Free
~— GameS Night     Sept. 11 in S.U.B. Games Room    7:30 p.m. — Free
Sept. 12 in S.U.B. Auditorium — 12:30 p.m.    $1.00
- Concert   (to be donated to the C-FOX Children's Hospital Fund
• "The CheaP Detective"    Sept. 12, 13, 14 & 15 in S.U.B. Auditorium    Wed., Thurs. &
   MOVie      Sun. 7 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m.    50* (to be donated to the United Way)
D      i (Meet your university President, Dean and Student Hacks)
  Barbeqiie     Sept. 13 on S.U.B. Plaza — 4:30 p.m. — $1.50
  AMS Dance     "Westside Feetwarmers"    Sept. 13 on S.U.B. Plaza — 7:30 p.m. — Free
  Pit Buffet    Sept. 14 in S.U.B. Pit — 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
  AMS/EUS DanCe   Sept. 14 in S.U.B.     Sept. 14 in S.U.B. Cafeteria — 8 p.m.
LOGO CONTEST
The AMS Orientation Committee is asking for your help to create a unique
and attractive logo to be used on all AAAS correspondence, projects, etc.
1st Prize — $30000 A TOTAL OF $80000
2nd Prize - $200 oo IN PRIZE MONEY
3 runners up of $100'°° each
CONTEST STARTS — Sept. 10/79 .„. .... .    . _.     _ .   ._ A..c - . ..     ..
r .   Winners will be announced at the Oct. 17 AMS General Meeting
CONTEST DEADLINE — OCT. 10/79
Pick up an application form in S.U.B. 238. the AMS business office
or around campus for details on criteria and technical requirements.
The Bus Pass System is now monthly
Buy one or all monthly passes in any combination     $18 PER MONTH
Now Available In the AMS Business Office as Follows: September Pass: until September 14/79
October Pass: until October 5/79
December Pass: until December 7/79
November Pass: until November 7/79
THE AMS IS YOU — MAKE IT WORK

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