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The Ubyssey Oct 5, 1984

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Array  Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 5, 1984
1984/85 BUDGET FOR THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Introduction
The Alma Mater Society of U.B.C. is a large and diverse operation providing a comprehensive array of student
services. The Society is run as a non-profit operation where revenues derived from fees and business centres are
totally channelled into subsidies for your multi-faceted service organizations and student government.
As part of the A.M.S.'s student services mandate, it has become one of the largest single employers on campus
of U.B.C. students. The responsibility of fair remuneration and equitable working conditions is not taken lightly by
the A.M.S. and we have the highest standards on campus.
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Balance Sheet
April 30, 1984
(With comparative figures for 1983)
Each year the A.M.S. collects a $32 fee from all full-time U.B.C. student.* $15 is earmarked for capital projects
such as SUB expansion, daycare, athletic facilities, etc. Students can examine the current SUB construction in progress and will soon see progress on the daycare centre and athletics complex. Of the remaining $17 fee, $4.50 is used
for U.B.C.'s ever-expanding Intramurals Sports Programme. The A.M.S. uses the $12.50 balance to assist in running all of its direct operations.
In the 1983/84 fiscal year A.M.S. business operations returned the equivalent of almost $20 per student in earned wages. We returned an additional equivalent of over $25 per student in student services subsidies. The combined
return this year will be almost $49 per student. The ability to run an organization as large as the A.M.S. in a fashion
where we are able to return so much to our constituents has placed the A.M.S. in a position envied by student
societies across Canada.
'Exclusive of pool and varsity athletics.
ASSETS
Current assets:
Cash and term deposits
Accounts receivable:
Publications advertising
Sundry accounts and advances (Schedule 1)
Accrued interest (Schedule 2)
Inventories
Loans to subsidiary organizations,
current portion (Note 2)
Prepaid expenses
Total current assets
Investments, at cost (market value — $59,550;
1983 - $122,657) (Schedule 2)
Total current assets and investments
Loans to subsidiary organizations, non-current
portion (Note 2)
Art Collection
Total general funds assets
Buildings, at cost less depreciation:
Student Union Building
Winter Sports Centre (Note 3)
Whistler Cabin (Note 6)
Aquatic Centre (Note 4)
Total student facilities assets
Cost
$3,619,625
1,507,247
234,480
1,007,472
~6,368,824
Accumulated
depreciation
1,296,000
1,245,000
162,900
123,050
2^826^950
1984
$   993,198
33,123
70,602
22,792
109,925
32,193
1,138
1,262,971
59,775
1,322,746
95,778
401,600
1,820,124
2,323,625
262,247
71,580
884,422
3,541,874
$5,361,998
GENERAL FUNDS
1983
543,694
LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS
39,826
47,658
37,532
103,500
115,000
7,013
1984
James B. Hollis
Director of Finance
1983
894,223
124,631
1,018,854
130,396
104,663
Current liabilities:
Accounts payable and accrued charges
Due to clubs and societies (Schedule 3)
Total current liabilities
Special purpose reserves and provisions
(Schedule 5)
Total current liabilities and reserves
• Retained income, per accompanying statement
Contributed surplus — Art Collection
Total general funds liabilities and surplus
$   326,175
154,415
480,590
806,260
343,295
217,341
560,636
457,685
1,286,850
131,674
401,600
1,018,321
130,929
104,663
1,820,124
1,253,913
1,253,913
STUDENT FACILITIES
2,404,625
337,247
89,580
906,422
3,737, 874
4,991,787
Loan from General F"nd (Note 2)
Equity in buildings (Schedule 7)
Total student facilities liabilities and equity
Commitments (Note 5).
Subsequent event (Note 6).
4,193
3,537,681
3,541,874
$5,361,998
121,618
3,616,256
3,737,874
4,991,787
See accompanying notes to financial statements.
Revenue
Fees
Investment
Building
Games Room
Copy Centre
Subcetea
Vending
Pit Pub
Gallery Lounge
A.M.S. Temporary Personnel Services
Summer Film Series
Total Revenue
Non-Discretionary Expenses
A.M.S. Bursary Fund
C-PAC Reserve
Investment Reserve
Intramurals Reserve
Registration Photos
Art Fund
Management Reserve
Total Non-discretionary Expenses
Revenue Subtotal
Less: Constitutional Margin 5%
Total Discretionary Revenue
Discretionary Expenses
Students' Council
External Affairs
Student Administrative Commission
Whistler Cabin
Art Gallery Programs
Job Link
Programmes
Ombudsoffice
Speakeasy
Volunteer Connections
Womens' Centre
Business Office
CITR Radio
Ubyssey
Inside U.B.C.
Summer Ubyssey
Total Discretionary Expenses
A.M.S. BUDGET - REVENUE
Net Surplus (Deficit)
1984/85 Budget
774,800.00
70,000.00
2,025.00
106,575.00
34,031.00
10,800.00
20,900.00
87,700.00
5,100.00
2,000.00
2,041.00
$1,115,972.00
2,500.00
361,300.00
7,000.00
109,000.00
5,600.00
1,500.00
12,750.00
$   499,650.00
$   616,322.00
-30,816.00
$   585,506.00
66,176.00
6,197.00
33,365.00
33,980.00
1,275.00
11,845.00
28,561.00
1,300.00
2,900.00
980.00
4,580.00
244,000.00
73,879.00
62,823.00
6,515.00
7,045.00
$   585,421.00
$ 85.00
Schedule 10 THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Publications — Year ended April 30, 1984 (With comparative figures for 1983)
Expenditure: 1984 1983
Administrative $     54,296 51,208
Salaries and benefits (Summer) 3,222 25,760
Bad debts 3,485 6,597
Distribution 7,696 6,376
Sales commissions 21,867 23,951
Special professional services 329 130
Printing 145,328 149,373
Photography 1,534 1,891
Mailing 999 1,296
Honoraria 1,500 1,902
Telephone 3,382 2,339
CUP membership fees and conference 18,325 16,719
Stationery and supplies 1,126 2,282
Staff meals 2,382 1,821
Sundry 639 411
Student handbook (Inside) 28,629 49,333
Revenue:
Government grant
Display advertising:
A.M.S.
Local
National
Classified advertising
Subscriptions
Student Handbook (Inside)
Constituency publications
Excess of expenditure over revenue
294,739
16,552
118,918
27,106
6,289
298
38,318
3,609
341,389
18,140
211,090
83,649
97,125
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure
Year ended April 30, 1984      (With comparative figures for 1983)
Revenue:
Student fees
Aquatic Centre levies
Grad class fees
Graduate Students'
Association levies
Undergraduate Societies
fee levies
Investment income
Business operations, net (Schedule 8)
Used Bookstore
Sundry
Non-discretionary allocations:
Aquatic Centre
Grad class fees
Graduate Students' Association
Intramural fees
Undergraduate Societies fee
levies, including special levies
Registration photos
S.U.B. Art Fund
Capital projects acquisition
reserve
Management reserve
Repair and replacement reserve
Discretionary allocations:
Interest — special purpose
reserves and provisions
(Schedule 5)
Expenditure:
Student government (Schedule 9)
Publications (Schedule 10)
Excess of revenue over expenditure
See accompanying notes to financial statements.
1984
$   761,053
123,531
28,048
1983
294,311
118,132
26,692
4,000
3,957
95,950
73,043
54,968
2,128
2,031
1,144,752
75,489
95,764
12,043
1,377
627,765
$   123,531
28,048
4,000
106,018
118,132
26,692
3,957
36,220
95,950
5,627
1,500
75,489
5,585
1,500
360,025
12,752
7,305
744,756
12,613
9,576
289,764
275,602
83,649
399,996
40,000
359,996
359,251
338,001
32,500
206,501
97,125
305,501
303,626
1,875
Schedule 9 THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Schedule of Student Government Expenses
(With comparative figures for 1983)      Year ended April 30. 1984
Student government expense:                                                                     1984 1983
Council:
Constituency aid                                                                               $          600 472
General                                                                                                     75,992 50,583
Job Link                                                                                                     1,355 -
External affairs                                                                                          6,829 7,206
Student leadership                                                                                   4,217 926
Handicapped Access Committee                                                           5,000 —
Great Trek Committee                                                                               - 5,939
S.A.C.
Travel grants
Special projects
General
Election
Art gallery
Whistler Cabin management
Service organizations:
CITR Radio
Speakeasy
Volunteer Connections
Women's committee
Summer Films Series
Ombuds office
93,993
4,710
1,515
14,745
3,708
1,092
33,187
65,126
5,365
2,713
11,084
11,160
1,382
14,017
58,957
75,519
3,103
937
3,406
(1,295)
1,533
45,721
38,799
2,729
3,562
502
3,153
19,373
Programs:
132,947
Coordinator
23,611
Concerts
5,773
General
354
Orientation
44,803
Speakers
(737)
Special events
244,264
80,203
32,777
(1,082)
264
2,770
4,997
2,723
48,745
26,739
4,932
429
727
1,129
12,953
42,449
46,909
Total student government expense
$   275,602
206,501 Friday, October 5, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
x e& of the satfve fr°m Ottaw
Canadian ^ d lbe
OTTAWA       hesUckim-
ageandtheweuo ro.
Mach^e ^e stacks °Brian
mises.Ledbyagr c
^°ne" have promised a nevv
thehuge
-211
** desired
do what
r,-», nilpv savs the Tories passed
both^ ^ did norup°tSXnce to prove they
L   tUr"   «* 2e different than the Uberals.
BeS ni, While the opposition ben-
Beth 0%warn*    ^Conservativesstrongly op-
and *£3££ ^^2°S
CF?Uc?t,0n^:
^Schf«-Bert,6u
seats       -      e
^WeVhavepro
Canada.
But the party has little new to
offer students.
Students seeking a change
from the Liberal approach to
education — which included a
steady decline in the amount of
money   pumped   into   post-
secondary institutions, student
aid and student job-training
programmes — will be disappointed when they examine
what the Tories have pledged.
According to a Canadian
Federation of Students questionnaire sent to each of the
three major parties, the Conser
She says lobby groups like
CFS must play watchdog over
the government to ensure the
Conservatives make good on
their promises.
Although the Tories reached
the top of the electoral heap by
promising a fresh approach,
their policy on university funding is anything but original.
Prime minister Brian
Mulroney   has  dug  up  the
Bm C-12 retroactively. This bill
cuTfederal transfer payments by
$378 million in two years. Now
that they are in government
however! they say they will not
make up for the loss.
llIf,-,-f,  , . .   , ,,   nave    a   clear   education
I thmk ,t s hypocritical,"   policy, but was keen on in-
^^f'     ••   ,   r,  T Creasine    ^search    and
She is also critical of the Tory development and expanding
party s   youth  job   creation high technology training
schemes, calling the wording of "I  believe there are two
the plans "hazy." types    of   training-
Jo^  WiSe   Zl0T cr"ic
f°nd to Hugh/s'T l° res"
Je,r ^uth poSl10ns. about
th/September 7/""^ after
During the Conservative
leadership convention in
June 1983, Mulroney did not
u"""    a   clear   ed
ha
'They are so hazy they could
post-
..^u.^.^u^wmu   secondary    training    and
 ,   —-       „     .      >     be low-paying slave jobs and   secondary      "  '
former Liberal government's   thev wnnlH nnt mppt thP ppoHc  ^,.>.-__.u_
original EPF proposal from
1977, blown off the dust and
called it his own. The '77 EPF
act differs from the current
state of funding in two ways: to
oe low-paying slave jobs and   secondary training " he said
they would not meet the needs  during the convention  "then
of the large pail: of the popula-  there's the re-training dimen
tion. Mulroney needs to create sion. The man who's lost his
permanent jobs." job, he's going to have to be
The prime minister says he re-trained, because you can't
will create youth jobs by en- keep a man on '     ■ -   -
- state oi lunuuig a. iwu w«,a. ^ win create youtn jods Dy en- keep a man on the dole from
e day the provinces are no longer couraging employers to hire the time he's 38 to the „w
-consulted about changes to the  and    train    young    neonle he\ fis » me
young   people he's 65."
:7:jiiMAmAAi-
Iliillll^^
37 ■Bi 7};AA7A. XilPXXXX *XiX:
education policy
vative promises to students Include:
• on-going funding for the
basic operating costs of universities and colleges through the
Established Programmes Financing Act;
• a return to the 1977
federal-provincial funding
agreement which called for a
forum on post-secondary
education between the two
levels of government;
• a $285 million job creation
scheme for unemployed youth;
• no change in the Canada
student loans programme except when the recession ends at
which time the Tories intend to
remove the exemption order exempting jobless student from
paying prime rates on their
loans;
• twice as much money to
research and development in
their first term of office or more
than 2.5 per cent of the gross
national product; and
• a new era in federal-
provincial co-operation.
With the exception of youth
unemployment, politicians did
not welcome student issues in
the campaign. Only the New
Democrats agreed to a national debate on these issues,
act, and as a result of the
passage of Bill C-12 last year,
EPF is now under the six and
five restraint programme.
According to the Canadian
Association of University
Teachers, funding under EPF
has steadily deteriorated as both
the federal and provincial
governments cut education
budgets and blame each other
for the shortfall.
One example of a province
which has not been passing on
federal money intended for
education is British Columbia.
According to the CAUT
Bulletin, the B.C. government
cut university funding by 24 per
cent this year, while pocketing
funding increases from the
federal government.
The only province to match
federal funding last year was
Manitoba.
Caught in the middle of
federal-provincial bickering are
students and a financially strapped education system.
Mulroney thinks increased
cooperation and discussion between the feds and the provinces
will alleviate this problem and
that his government will not
have to resort to strong-arm tactics such as tied-funding.
through tax credits and wage
subsidies. But the party plans
to spend $285 million on
youth job creation, well
below the NDP and the
Liberals, who pledged $1.5
and $1 billion respectively.
Sam Hughes, Canadian
Chamber of Commerce
president, says the Conservatives should adopt the best
points of all the job plans.
These include Liberal leader
John Turner's First Chance
program, which would provide first-time jobs to 17 to
21 year-olds, and NDP
leader Ed Broadbent's plan
to give up to $10,000 to
young people wanting to
start their own businesses.
Hughes says while he
usually opposed deficit
financing, something must
be done about the spectre of
youth unemployment.
More than half a million
youths are out-of-work, according to Statistics Canada.
The Metro Toronto Social
Planning Council released a
detailed study that showed
that in fact more than
750,000 young people are not
working.
Officials contacted in the
<?
"While the party brass in
Ottawa may have its education line down pat, some prominent Tories are unaware
such a policy exists.
Recently-elected Conservative MP Stewart Mclnnes,
who beat out former cabinet
minister Gerald Regan in
Halifax, confesses his party
"has no specific policy about
education."
It will be up to the new
youth minister Andree
Champagn, to raise the
awareness of her cabinet colleagues on youth and education issues.
CFS's Olley says Mulroney
has not addressed under-
funding or other education
issues as well as her lobby
group would like, but she has,
still not passed judgement oru
the new government.
"They have time on their
side," she says. "They don't
have to fulfill all their promises    in    the    first    six
months." „
Canadian youth as well
will be watching to see how
many promises are fulfilled
and if the Tory tide holds any
new hops for jobs or education. THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 5,1984
Please . . . please, enter the room of horrors, SUB 241k, with your ghostly tale.
The fiends and ghouls who compromise The Ubyssey's haunted staff request you
sacrifice a short, ghostly story to the Ubyssey's ghost story contest. Prizes will be
awarded ... a generous dinner for two at Fogg and Suds restaurant for the winner
— and the story will be published in, you guessed, The Ubyssey's Oct. 30 Halloween issue. The fiendish tale's first line must be "I couldn't find my car in B-Lot,"
and the story must include mention of six laboratory rats, the Main Library stacks,
George Pedersen, the Armouries, cinammon buns and must take place within UBC
and its endowment lands. Applications must be shorter than 2,000 words, typed on
a 70 space line and tripled spaced. They must appear at SUB 241k before Friday,
Oct. 26 at 4 p.m. The contest is open to the entire university community, excluding
Ubyssey staffers.
"A select, ghoulish Ubyssey committee will judge entrants. (A second prize of
$10 value will be awarded and a third prize, dinner with the Ubyssey staff on press
night, will be considered if the applicant is appropriate.)"
Calculated Genius
BA-55
• Operates in three modes: financial, cash flow
and statistical.
• Tilt-top styling makes the big 8-digit LCD
display even easier to read.
• Constant Memory™ feature allows the calculator
to retain stored data even when the power is
switched off.
• 32-step programmability and 5 constant memories.
• APD™ Automatic Power Down.
• Comes with handy problem-solving guidebook and
quick reference booklet. Friday, October 5, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Totem Park:
Worth the good
and bad extras?
By DEBBIE LO
It's ten o'clock Sunday morning.
Time to wake up and face
overcooked seafood quiche, prepackaged danishes and too-strong
juice in a paper cup at Totem Park
brunch. But first to brush your
teeth you walk down the long beer
reeking corridor (reminding you
last night was Saturday night), and
into the communal bathroom to
greet six other people with a muffled hello, because you have morning
breath.
Welcome to Totem Park UBC.
Former Totem Park residents
are often baffled at why so many
first and second year students
prefer the dorm lifestyle to living
off campus but Totem continues to
fill with naive young faces.
Beth Hinchliffe, arts 2 explains
her choice of Totem. "You meet
so many more people and you can
get involved in residence activities
here."
Hinchliffe says she would feel
isolated living off campus.
Residence is convenient because it is
close to classes and work in the
Totem cafeteria, she adds.
Barbara Brindza, arts 2 and
from Toronto, says she decided to
live on campus because she didn't
know anyone in Vancouver.
"I wanted to meet people so that
I'd have a support system among
my fellow students," Brindza says.
Brindza, like many other first
year students, was curious about
residence lifestyle and wanted to experience it for herself, she says.
The cost of Totem Park residence
(which comes in a package deal for
room and board) is not cheap —
$2,670.56 ($5.23 per day) for a double room and $2,873.84 ($6.07 per
day) for a single room. All students
pay $6.30 per day for food. First
year students must share a room.
The rates are the same for Place
Vanier, also a first and second year
residence. Gage Towers residence is
$1,652.86 for the school year, and
Gage lowrise is $1,713.36 per school
year.
Totem Park houses 1,129 people
currently. There are vacancies for
54 women and a waiting list of 916
men to get into Totem Park or
Place Vanier, says residence administrator Bob Frampton. Place
Vanier contains 928 people, Gage
contains 1,289 people and Acadia
Park residence, which offers family
housing contains 395 families of
three or more members, he says.
The room fee of $160 for a double and $190 for a single room for a
space of 4.4m x 3.1m and 2.2 x
3.2m respectively you can call your
own, is not expensive, claims student housing director Mary Flores.
According to survey done by the
off campus housing office in 1981,
— ed ho photo
THE GREEN SETTING OF TOTEM PARK, indoors and outdoors, is a place where students jog, make friends,
play football, eat, sleep, drink beer, and study.
STuDY Time!
the average price of a room in a
shared house started at $250, says
Flores.
On a quick check at the off campus housing notice board most of
the ads for furnished one bedroom
apartments close to UBC started at
$250 per month.
But many postings for a room in
a shared house or apartment within
walking distance to UBC came to
less than $200 per month. One
room in a shared house was advertised for $155 per month including
utilities and was located at Tenth
and MacDonald, close to UBC.
Flores adds there are other advantages to staying on campus
besides convenience, such as access
to a weight room and free educational workshops there. A recent
workshop was on "Contraception
and being prepared."
Students stay three years on
average in student housing — this
includes those who transfer to Gage
Towers residence, Flores says. Gage
is tailored to third and fourth year
students rather than first years and
does not include board. Students
live in "quads" of six people who
share a kitchen and have their own
rooms.
Cost is not the only issue when
considering residence. According to
a 1983 survey on resident satisfaction done by the housing department, one of the biggest complaints
was the lack of privacy and the
noise.
Garth Mowatt, science 3, agrees.
"On some weeknights after quiet
hours (11 p.m.) I find it hard to
sleep because some people are up
playing frisbee in the hall."
Although Tish Howie, arts 2, has
met many people in residence, she
says the reverse problem now occurs for her.
"Sometimes people are inconsiderate and you have to learn to
put up with the noise, especially on
weekends when studying or sleeping."
And sharing a room with a person who has a lover can lead to uncomfortable moments or nights
spent in the lounge.
Floor advisor Mark East, arts 3,
says on weeknights it is unusual if
he receives even one complaint,
although on weekends complaints
increase to three or four per night.
Paid advisors are placed in each
of the buildings in Totem and are
responsible for enforcing housing's
rules by acting as liasons between
housing and residents.
A more recent source of
dissatisfaction is housing's new
alcohol policies. This year the housing office banned beer nights on
weeknights and moved them to be
held on alternate Fridays, the night
house "mixers" traditionally took
place. Flores claims this change was
mostly the result of a group of
students from Nootka and Dene
houses complaining about noisy
drunks returning to their rooms
after beer nights.
Flores says "Housing was not
limiting the freedom of students
because it was just acting as a
municipal licensing authority, and
was enforcing the laws like the
bylaws of any town."
One of the 4.2 m x 3.2 m "homes"
for half of Totem's residents.
Many students in residence do
not agree with this infringement on
their rights as responsible adults to
hold organized parties.
"I don't like them telling me
what time to go to bed," says Garth
Mowat, science 3.
Some of the changes in the 1984
residence alcohol policy are that no
parties of any kind are allowed
from Sunday to Thursday night, all
residence wide parties must hire
trained bartenders, and no organized drinking games of any kind are
allowed at organized residence
social events.
Brian Hashimoto, Totem Park
Residence Association president,
says "As a person who attends beer
nights I liked them on Wednesday
nights because it gave me a break in
the middle of the week."
Another major complaint about
residence is bad food. Most
students rate the food as being
"okay" because at least a choice of
starchy entrees is always available.
"When served, the pork chops
are just soaking in grease," complains Darcy Mowat, arts 2.
Mowat and many others describe
the food as bland. He says he
realizes residence must cater to
many people with different tastes.
Other students complain of the continual repetition of the same dishes.
And there are little things like the
soft-boiled eggs that always come
hard-boiled, or the removal of
mugs this year so you have to drink
your coffee out of a paper cup.
"Food is the second most talked
about topic," says Christine Samson, food services director.
Samson says each student is
charged $192 per month for food —
54 per cent actually goes towards
food, 35 per cent goes to salaries,
and 11 per cent for everything else
such as utilities, china and repairs.
For many, 46 per cent or $88.32
per month is a steep price for the
luxury of not having to cook and
wash dishes. Students pay a flat rate
for their meals whether they eat
every meal or not.
And anyone who misses a meal
cannot let a non-resident eat on
their meal pass. Students can be
taken to residence court and even
kicked out for this "offense".
Samson says a cash system to pay
for what you eat would probably be
the fairest although students like
having the freedom to take extra
portions, and major renovations
would have to be done to the
cafeteria to implement a cash
system.
And so Totem Park has its loud
and subtle qualities, some beneficial
to a serious student and others to be
avoided. By the way, the scrambled
eggs are made from real eggs.
If you want to save money, you
can live cheaper off campus. If you
don't want to cook, ride the bus,
shop, wash dishes, and want to
meet people and can handle the
noise and distractions that go along
with it so that you can have a "total
university experience", you'll have
to cough up the bucks. And plug
your nose on Sunday morning. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 5, 1984
Torture always abhorrent
By GINNY AULIN
We have a responsibility to protect people from political persecution and physical torture, the Vancouver Amnesty International office manager said Wednesday.
Margaret Morgan told 20 people
in SUB 212 AI works to release
prisoners of conscience from detention "or to obtain something better
for them." AI defines prisoners of
conscience as people arrested for
non-violent beliefs.
In response to arguments saying
people have no right ot interfere in
other countries' affairs, Morgan
said, "One hundred years ago people said 'Slavery is an abomination
and we are going to stop it' and
Canadians worked to do so and this
UBC flack hired
UBC has hired a community relations director to tell the community
about UBC.
Margaret Nevin will head the new
community relations department of
the administration, formerly called
information services.
David McMillan, vice president
of development and community
relations who hired Nevin, said he
made the appointment so UBC can
tell the B.C. community UBC's importance as a world class university.
"Let's recognize reality. We need
to turn to outside sources for funding and it's a competitive
market," he said. "I think its important that the university put its
best face forward."
Nevin, who is to take office next
week, was Liberal minister Marc
Lalonde's communications advisor
when Lalonde was federal finance
minister. She also has a Carleton
University journalism degree and a
masters degree in communications
from Sorbonne University in Paris.
Ooops
The Oct. 2 Ubyssey story Publicity for Loto UBC tickets lacking said
the Alma Mater Society's lottery offers prizes of $1,115 each. However
the tuition prize is actually $1,450.
AMS external affairs coordinator
Nancy Bradshaw also said there
were numerous other misquotes in
the story.
NEED A QUICK
COURSE ON:
Intro to computer
Lotus/Symphony
D. Base ll/lll . . .etc
Call Us First
THE
AHSWER
your computer centre.
(604)688 5434
resulted in a better society." We are
each other's keepers and must do
something about countries where
torture and disappearances are apparently acceptable, Morgan said.
Morgan said at the time AI
adopted Andrei Sakharov he was
detained by the Russian government and denied heart medicine.
"After Amnesty intervened he
was given heart medicine and this
could have made the difference between his life and his death. He is
still being detained," Morgan added.
f EARN *
512,000
PER MONTH
IN YOUR SPARE
TIME
Then come and
spend a little of it at
FELUNI'S
GREAT
SANDWICHES,
FABULOUS
CHEESECAKES,
CAPPUCCINOS,
ESPRESSOS,
NANAIMO BARS
Located at the back of the Village
on Campus
MMM
During Prisoners of Conscience
week, Oct. 14-20, AI will publicize
the many prisoners of conscience
needing to be helped.
Morgan said, "There is special
emphasis being placed on women in
the world this year . . . women
silenced."
Morgan said the death penalty is
important to Amnesty.
Morgan added, "Amnesty is opposed to the death penalty, period.
It is not up to debate, it is not up to
argument."
YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO ATTEND THE
UBC OFFKE fiND
COMPUTER EOCJiPMENT SHOW
Wednesday October 10 and Thursday October 11, 1984,
9:00 a.m. — 5:00 p.m.
Ballroom, second floor, Student Union Building
Don't miss this opportunity to view
the latest equipment from UBC's suppliers.
Student Special
GET TANKED
FLOTATION TANKS
Telephone: 738-6211
THE BODHI TREE "°n*y *lC«
vaggelis e. fragiadakis presents
MIKIS THE0D0RAKIS IN CONCERT
"It was as if Zorba himself were conducting."
Newsweek
". . . tuneful, simple, direct, almost thunderous, (in
its) momentum — an impossible to resist."
Time Magazine
"Listeners' emotions spilled over."
Newsweek
"His classical works . . . are highly regarded in musical
circles. His popular songs are sung throughout Greece
. . . and his film scores for "Zorba the Greek" and "Z"
have made him internationally famous."
New Yorker
"They screamed and whistled . . . with him all the way
to Athens to crown him the new King of Greece."
Los Angeles Times
TUESDAY • OCTOBER 9 • 8:30 P.M.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
VANCOUVER, B.C.
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ALL VTC/CBO OUTLETS,
INFORMATION CENTRES IN MAJOR MALLS. ALL LOWER
MAINLAND EATONS AND WOODWARDS,
AMS TICKET OFFICE VBC.
CHARGE BY PHONE: (604)280-4444
Friday Nights on CBC Stereo,
embark on a surreal journey to
the realm of dreams and danger.
To the point where reality meets
fantasy and truth touches illusion.
Vanishing Point-it's the point of no return.
VANISHING *
A series of startling radio plays. Fridays at Midnight.
JS^lfc
<«C**  CBC STEREO 105.7 FM
'-m*00' Friday, October 5, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
In a Chinese box
even being
heard is a
challenge for
Taiwan's
dissidents
By
ROBBY
ROBERTSON
The painting's image is arresting: one of the
gloomy underground walkways common in Taipei
with a single grinning, slightly distorted man looming at one corner. Scrawled in red across the painting are the words "if you want to keep me
underground, I can play the game."
The intentions of the artist are unclear, but the
painting, displayed at a recent Taipei public art exhibition, brings to mind the fledling underground
Taiwanese Independent Movement.
Taidu supporters claim the KMT is just another
outside force dominating Taiwan, and that relevant
numbers of Taiwanese are excluded from important
decision making bodies.
Because of "temporary" provisions adopted awaiting the
KMT's dream of ruling the mainland, 85 percent of Legislative
Assembly members are not elected by the people. More than 70
percent of the federal government remains mainland-born.
The KMT claims Taidu is "set on the overthrow of the Chinese
government," and continues to imprison and deport dissidents
through the extra-constitutional martial law. Tight control remains on the Taiwanese press — a record 22 "non-partisan"
political magazines were banned this June and July. Even the
term Taidu was outlawed during last December's elections, indicating the practical diffuculties of Taidu as a potential mass
movement.
In short, Taidu has become an idea most Taiwanese find either
too subversive, or too tied to seemingly impossible political
reforms to be practical.
To those on Taiwan brave enough to have an opinion, the
sweeping claims of human rights and self-determination
associated with Taidu have given way to pragmatic jockeying for
political power by "non-partisan candidates." These candidates,
unable to speak publicly about reform of Taiwan's martial law,
lobby for increasing the 15 percent of legislative assembly seats
open to local election, and debate specific policies which dodge
the central issue.
Walking the narrow line painted by the KMT, they seek to increase Taiwanese influence in Taiwan's government bit by bit.
I met no one admitting to be a Taidu supporter in three months
on Taiwan, but I did meet people willing to talk about the idea. In
one conversation with a group of intellectuals, a translator of
mainland books says he thinks economic growth will continue to
divert dissent and alleviate pressure for reform.
"As long as economic growth continues at the rate it is, I don't
think the movement will be able to get the number of supporters it
needs," says Rastin, who prefers to use a pseudonym. Government statistics indicate Taiwan's gross national product has increased seven percent annually over the past 10 years.
MASSIVE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT rises up behind an unregulated housingarea in downtown
Taipei.
— robby robertson photo
SEE NO EVIL, hear no evil, have no teeth: these Taiwanese children speak no Mandarin, the language of the government of Taiwan.
Rastin admits the government feels both local and international
pressure to reform martial law, but denies it will eventually be
forced into the move.
"The KMT has already started talking quietly about retaking
the mainland, but has not changed its policy," says Rastin. Opening the legislative assembly to local elections (since the government can't return to the mainland for elections) would undercut
the KMT's claims to the mainland, the cornerstone of both its
mandate and the martial law.
The KMT maintains these claims to avoid a critical loss of face
in the struggle it still carries on for the mandate to rule China. The
KMT's continued insistence reveals a growing generation gap between the old, with bitter memories of communists, and the
young, who know only what they are told about the mainland.
"The younger generation is not concerned with the mainland,"
says Rastin. "They want to live a good life here on Taiwan;
however, we do feel cut off from our culture."
Another member of the conversation, a Taipei doctor who supports non-partisan candidates, brashly says the decline of Taidu
"in one of the great accomplishments of the KMT."
Like many great political theorists living under despotic
emperors, frustrated by his inability to influence government
policy, Doc speaks passionately and eloquently for his countrymen.
He brings up the Kaohsiung Incident, a human rights
demonstration in the south Taiwan city in 1979 which resulted in
the arrest of many Taiwanese dissidents. The topic still brings a
hush over the group, even though we are in private.
The rally was surrounded by riot police, who would not let the
demonstrators enter or leave the scene. Later, violence broke out
among some unidentified demonstrators and the riot police.
Virtually all speakers at the rally were imprisoned, although
they repeatedly preached non-violence. A single speaker previously unknown to the organizers suggested overturning the riot
trucks, according to a tape of the rally. The tape was not allowed
as evidence for the speaker, and the stranger alone was not prosecuted.
The riot has been used by the KMT and the pro-KMT press as
proof that Taidu advocates violent overthrow of the government.
Doc, citing "intimate sources close to the situation," says those
who instigated the violence were planted by the KMT to discredit
the movement.
The Kaohsiung Incident gave the KMT the excuse it needed to
quell the growing movement, and since then periodic arrests,
harassment and control of the press have kept a tight lid on martial law reform.
In 1980, two non-partisan politicians were arrested for
"spreading sedition." In 1981, a professor living on Taiwan was
found dead the day after he was questioned by authorities. The
death was ruled accidental, but a U.S. medical expert on the scene
concluded it was murder, says Amnesty International, an international human rights group which has won a Nobel peace prize.
Taiwanese are aware of incidents such as this, so it is unsurprising that most of them have an aversion to politics. The Chinese,
as in the past, show a strong inclination to avoid challengeing
authority, and they readily place trust in their leaders.
And many Taiwanese still feel a deep cultural bond to China.
They await a future chance, however remote, to reunite with the
mainland.
Those who do voice unsanctioned opinions, like Doc, may only
make trouble for themselves, and find they are powerless against
the well-maintained power base of the KMT.
In the United States and Canada, several organizations promote international awareness of the Taiwanese situation, and
pressure the KMT from abroad. Inside Taiwan, this activism is
hard to find.
Wherever the largely unarticulated public interest lies, Taidu,
once a fresh image of hope for a more democratic Taiwanese
future, now lies quiet, quelled under the heavy brush of a
kuomintang censor.
#. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 5, 1984
New plans needed
By ROBERT BEYNON
The board of governors told the
daycare committee it should revise
its plans for new daycare facilities
before the committee returns to the
board to approve the project.
Board chair David MacLean said
Thursday a system to finance
daycare's maintenance is required
and the board must consider its
priorities before it allows the committee to attract off-campus funding.
"If we get $100,000 for this project we probably won't get that
$100,000 for another (campus) project," MacLean said.
MacLean added the maintenance
costs of the project could prove to
be a heavy burden to parents who
support daycare in the future if a
maintenance funding program is
not worked out now.
Dave Frank, student board
representative and daycare committee member, said money could be
solicited for the program without
hurting other campus programs and
a maintenance program can be
worked out.
He added the university had at
least some responsibility for the
maintenance of the structure considering numerous faculties including education and nursing use
UBC daycare for educational purposes.
Neil Risebrough, vice president
student affairs, said the project's
costs could be cut but due to the
nature of the project and Canadian
laws regarding daycares the cost per
square foot could not be cut to $35,
from the $60 proposed.
Risebrough added the entire project requires no funding from the
board because the daycare committee expects to raise funds from the
Alma Mater Society's Capital Pro
jects and Acquistions Committee,
UBC's alumni and other groups.
The proposed daycare would
handle 186 children and would be
located in Acadia Park. It would
cost $1.2 to $1.5 million.
It would replace the present
Acadia Park daycare constructed of
1940s army huts. UBC spent
$200,000 in renovations there in
1983 to meet fire standards.
The committee will ask the board
to accept the project at its next
meeting.
UBC president George Pedersen
told the board the reduction in student attendance this year means
UBC lost $1.3 million in expected
tuition revenue. "It's something the
board will have to deal with,"
Pedersen said.
Paper seized
MONTREAL (CUP) —The
Catholic-run administration at
Marianopolis College has seized all
copies of the student newspaper,
The Paper, because of a statement
on Pope John Paul II.
The issue featured a full-cover
photo of the Pope. An article
printed on his robe read: "As a
comfy, well-fed clergyman, the
Pope is singularly unqualified to
comment on unemployment, marriage or drugs."
Another long article on the page
was complimentary to the pontiff.
An hour after the newspaper appeared on the stands, student services employees swept through the
school, taking away students'
copies and fishing copies out of garbage cans.
An administrator told Sheila
Khan, one of the Paper editors, that
the article "cut deep into the heart
of what many of us believe."
Aapan \Jverdead
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JAPANESE   LANGUAGE   CLASS:
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INTRODUCTION   OF   ENGLISH
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^lcome to the real world.
Are you a non-business grad looking for a career?
Then think about Procter & Gamble — one of the most successful packaged
goods developers and marketers in the world, with international operations
in over twenty countries.
In Canada, more than two thousand people work for Procter & Gamble. An
efficient core of men and women in all areas of technical and business management lead the Company. These are the people who have made household
names of such consumer products as Ivory, Crest, Tide and Pampers, just to
name a few.
Procter & Gamble is actively searching for graduates from every discipline,
who demonstrate innovation, leadership, interpersonal skills and a drive for
excellence. We value these qualities more than a specialized education.
Procter & Gamble offers you early responsibility, high visibility and direct
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You'll be welcomed to the organization with an individualized on-the-job
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We promote only from within the company. That means your success is up
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Think about us.
Your Placement Office has detailed information or you can write to us care of:
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Toronto M5W 1C5 Friday, October 5, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Pagef
Student loan applications down
!•
By STUART COLCLEUGH
B.C. students did not even bother
applying for loans this year.
Applications are down at all three
universities and UBC loan applications dropped the most, 23 per cent,
UBC financial aid officer Byron
Hender said Wednesday.
Simon Fraser University loan applications dropped 20 per cent from
last year, SFU financial aid officer
David Crawford said.
At the University of Victoria applicants will probably decline less
but "I anticipate that they will be
down by eight to nine per cent,
from 2400 last year to 2200 this
year," said Nels Granewall, UVic
financial aid officer.
Granewall said the reduction in
applicants did not surprise him
because tuition fees and related
costs of education in BC are rising.
"I question the sanity of anyone
taking on the huge debt involved in
a student loan. . .it is as much as
6000 a year for some students," he
said.
Granewall added the provincial
government eased its loan eligibility
requirements this year to soften the
blow of student grants' elimination.
Grants are available in every Canadian province except B.C.
Donna Morgan, Canadian
Federation of Students pacific
chair, questioned the Social Credit
government's priorities in giving
grants to corporations but not to
students.
"They (the government) tell us
it's a dog eat dog world out there
and then they go and give Dynatech
(a Vancouver computer company)
$20 million in incentive grants when
the entire student aid program cost
*
PUZZLED POPE PROMOTER proposed to poke picky professors profusely.
— rory a. photo
Council to discuss CFS membership vote
By DAVE STODDART
Student councibvoted to hold an
open forum next Wednesday and
discuss possible Canadian Federation of Students membership.
The forum will begin at 6:30 p.m.
and council will vote at 8:00 p.m.
After considerable deliberation
on the issue, council voted to take a
stand on CFS, but not until it has
student input.
Arts representative Duncan
Stewart said putting off a decision
is unacceptable. "We could keep
getting more informed forever and
ever and ever. We have to take a
stand."
Finance director James Hollis
said, "To sit on the fence is to
neglect our responsibility as elected
representatives. As leaders we
should give the students direction."
Council decided, however,
students should be aware of both
the pros and cons of joining CFS.
The AMS will organize pro and con
Council Briefs
committees and allocate to each a
$2,000 campaign budget.
Board of governors representative Don Holubitsky said student
awareness on the issue is important.
"We have to make them aware of
both sides of this thing," Holubitsky said. "Perhaps we could devote
an entire edition of The Ubyssey to
the issue."
Council selected a five member
committee to begin searching for a
new AMS general manager. Council anticipates the new general
manager will earn approximately
$35,000 per year, significantly less
than current manager Charles Redden's $73,000 salary.
Council will spend approximately
$1400 to recarpet the AMS executive offices, conference room
and hallways.
Duncan Stewart opposed the
move because it showed council's
priorities are mixed up. "I don't see
how we can spend money on new
carpets and velvet chairs when there
are .so many more important things
we could be considering," he said.
24 million last year," Morgan said.
She said CFS is conducting a
survey to find student's feelings on
this and other issues.
Education ministry spokesperson
Dick Melville said the economic
slump is the main reason the drop in
loan applications occured.
He said, "Enrolment is down
26 per cent at UVic this year
and that is pretty well reflected in
the reduction in loan applications."
There is no connection between
declining loan applications and the
government's decision to eliminate
student grants, he said. "I cannot
believe the lack of $900 (the average
amount of student grants last year)
stops anyone from attending
university."
"Students have to invest in their
own future," Melville said, denying
the provincial government was
under any obligation, implicit or
other wise, to allocate federally
supplied education money for student grants.
"That is a myth perpetuated by
Ottawa. . .not one cent" is required
to be spent on financial help for
students, he said.
Gage wants beer
By PATTI FLATHER
Students presented a petition
demanding reinstatement of midweek beer nights to UBC's housing
director Wednesday.
The student who presented the
989 signature petition to Mary
Flores said housing's formation of
the Akohol Policy Review Committee to hear complaints is a definite
victory for residents attributable to
the pietition.
Bruce Hamersley, Gage community council vice president external, said 76 per cent of Gage
residents signed the petitions in
response to new housing rules for
organized parties, which included a
Sunday to Thursday ban on parties,
and an earlier time for liquor sales
to end.
Hamersley said Flores "was quite
receptive and seemed very impressed by it (the presentation)." He
added the review committee meets
Oct. 18 and the GCC, along with
advisory staff, residence administration, and housing and
maintenance staff, will be present.
"What will end up happening
depends on how convincing we can
be to this committee," Hamersley
said.
Hamersley said weekends at Gage
have been unmanageable since
Wednesday beer nights were banned.
"The weekends around here are
just going nuts. There's been a lot
more   out   of   control   parties."
Hamersley added there were as
many as 10 floor parties two
Fridays ago. He said a mid-week
function would help blow off
steam.
But Gage residents will not support Totem Park and Place Vanier
residents who face the same housing
rules. Hamersley said Gage does
not have the underage drinking problem of the other residences since
all Gage residents must be 19.
"Our objective would be to have
separate policies for Gage," he
said.
Meanwhile Totem Park has tried
partitioning events into alcoholic
and non-alcoholic sections. But only seven people stayed in the no
alcohol section last Friday while
many people in a huge lineup for
the other section were refused admittance. The RCMP was eventually called to clear people.
Brian Hashimoto, Totem Park
Residents Association president,
said a survey has been sent to
Totem residents asking their views
on Friday beer nights and on the
partitioning to let underage
students attend.
Hashimoto said 1200 surveys
were sent out and 70 per cent of the
300 returned prefer to alternate the
days of alcoholic and non-alcoholic
events.
Totem is not circulating a petition requesting beer nights be
reinstated on Wednesdays.
Grads deadlocked
By PATTI FLATHER
The Graduate Student's Society
and the university adminsitration
are at an impasse regarding the
Graduate Student Centre's fate.
GSS coordinator, John Dafoe,
said "We'd like to sit down and
work out a concrete solution to the
impasse we seem to have reached."
The major problem is "working out
a structure where the lines of
authority are clearly delineated, he
said.
The administration took control
of the centre in May. It cited a large
deficit and union problems as the
reasons for breaking a 1982 agreement which had transferred centre
control to the GSS.
Dafoe said the GSS would be
happy to give the administration
mote control over the centre's food
and beverage operations, which
UBC Food Services catered last
summer. But he added "The society
needs a certain amount of control
over the way the centre is used."
Dafoe said another problem is
the administration's inflexible view
of a president's ad hoc committee
on the centre. Dafoe said the committee report is vague and the
university is not willing to negotiate
on ambiguities.
The GSS sent a letter recently to
the president's office indicating a
desire for negotiations but the
university is stalling, he added.
But Dafoe said the deficit is not
the major issue now and there is
common ground between the two
sides. "We both appear willing to
deal with the deficit in the long
term."  The  GSS  agrees  with the
See Page 17: DEBT
Bill mad at Pat
"Bill Bennett was mad enough to
eat a can of Slazengers when he
heard that science and communications minister Pat McGeer had
quietly arranged to have the four
grass courts from Vancouver Lawn
Tennis Club transplanted on the
UBC campus," a Vancouver Sun
columnist said Wednesday.
In his daily column Denny Boyd
said Bennett thinks it inappropriate
that McGeer should arrange for the
courts to be placed at UBC when
the university is cutting back and
discussing laying faculty off.
He said Bennett said he was looking forward to playing on the
courts, which cost $80,000 to install.
Boyd added Maclean's
magazine, which first published the
story, wrote an apology in its Oct. 8
issue. "Dr. McGeer did not
authorize payment from UBC for
the purchase of tennis courts and
was not in a position to do so," the
apology said.
Boyd said in an interview" he
heard about Bennett's comments
from a "very dependable secondhand source." Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday,
&1-A8W
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
Sometimes an opening act will
upstage the main show. This happened Saturday night when
Gwinyai and Sukutai opened for
Themba Tana and the regrouped
Uhuru, an African hi-life band.
Themba Tana should stick by his
other group, African Heritage, with
the much acclaimed Sal Ferreras.
Themba Tana & Uhuru plus
Gwinyai & Sukutai
at "New" York Theatre
Gwinyai & Sukutai, a marimba
band from Seattle are back again.
Their last performance here was
also their first, at the Vancouver
Folk Festival where audiences
inflamed with the music invaded
the stage to dance with Gwinyai &
Sukutai.
At the "New" York Theatre, the
response was very similar. They
played more than two starting with Ingaboo which means to
want something very much.
"Something you know you will
never have" said one of the leaders
of the band.
Gwinyai and Sukutai Marimba
Ensemble perform dances, songs,
and music from the Shona people
of Zimbabwe — a country which
only recently won independence.
The band's name means to be
strong and keep on (keeping on).
And part of that philosophy includes keeping the audience in high
gear.
"If  people   don't   get   up   and
dance, the music is not good" said
Lora Leu leader of Sukutai during
an interview at the Folk Fest. The
Shona people believe that if you can
walk you can dance, and if you
can talk you can sing.
To inspire the crowd at the York
Theatre the ensemble's second
choice was a special dance: high
energy, arms flinging, hips gyrating
close to the floor, stomping, hollering, and whistling on a small stage
crowded by seven marimbas.
"Now you know what you can
do when someone comes down to
get you to dance," said one of the
dancers.
And that is exactly what they did
during the next piece. They came
off the stage and literally bridged
the ground between performer and
audience.
Unlike western culture the Shona
people also bridge children with
adults. "We don't separate children
from our life," said Lora Leu. One
of the members, a young girl was
small enough to need a plastic carton to stand on to reach her instrument. Ten year old Tendai started
playing as early as one and a half
years of age. He played the lead in a
song named for him, Tendai. And
later with two other boys, he did a
bit of break dancing while the little
girl moved her hips in the sensual
Shona style.
Intense eye contact between the
musicians and dancers is also common Shona style. This is not surprising  in   a  society  where  music
By JODY FINDLAY
If you have not been in Gastown
recently you may be interested in
knowing the newly refurbished
Savoy is the scene of a battle of the
bands between alternative Vancouver artists. The CITR sponsored
competition replaces the now
defunct hot air show in The Pit that
ended last year. Monday's show
was a semi-final match between
three relatively unknown Vancouver bands.
Procedures For Approval opened
the show and played a quick 45
minute set. Procedures provided a
fairly choesive show, although their
delivery was lacking. The most
memorable aspect of their new
wave set was the line in a song,
"We're gonna get  hot."  As  the
band lacked anv interesting appeal,
one sincerely hopes they do.
The next band up was Red Herring. As their name implies, this
band tries to lead its audience down
an unusual, unbeaten track with its
music. Their lead singer, Enrico
Renz, has a voice reminiscent of Ig-
gy Pop (drifting off towards Klaus
Nomi's at times) and a singing style
similar to Lene Lovich. His unique
style combined with Red Herring's
odd instrumentation, gives the
group a sound that defies comparison.
Renz excited the audience into a
near frenzy with his wild dancing on
stage. But what he was singing
about was largelly a mystery to the
crowd with the exception of the
tune Taste Test. This song pitted
plays a prominent role. Their music
expresses and communicates
anything from routine tasks to
sacred functions.
Gwinyai and Sukutai managed
successfully to communicate their
joy of keeping on through music
which tells people to move.
By SARAH CHESTERMAN
Robert Benton, author of
Kramer vs. Kramer, has another
winner on his hands as Writer-
Director of Places In The Heart.
Places in the Heart,
Written and directed by
Robert Benton
At the Dunbar Theatre
The tale of a broken family, set in
the grassroots of a Texas farming
country in 1935, has an equally
toned-down Sally Field as heroine.
With a cast as natural as the windblown cotton fields themselves, the
result is an incredibly real and
human saga that wrenches the
heart. And it keeps us on the edges
of our seats with its unpredictable
twists of plot — quite an accomplishment for an unpretentious
film whose main theme is love.
The scene is smalltown Texas in
the Depression; Edna Spalding (Sally Field) must suddenly face, unaid-
.w; $*« Jtfr 9 -v
Vacating the stage for Themba
Tana and Uhuru, Gwinyai and
Sukutai joined the crowds on the
floor. But when they left the stage,
half the audience left the theatre,
and not even the candy which
members of Uhuru handed around
helped keep the energy level up.
HEART. . .throbs a thread of love
Coca-Cola with Pepsi, leaving the
listener to decide which is the best?
But this is not to infer the band did
not have plenty to say. The band's
song writers, Renz and guitarist
Steve Nikleva, are learned university grads with somewhat complex
messages to convey. Their message
is fused with an excellent and innovative style of music (especially
the sound form Nikleva's old B.B.
King-like Gibson 335 guitar) that
shows this band holds promise for
the future.
The last band, Beau Monde,
formerly known as the Panic, led by
singer Nick Herbert, exploded into
the light and provided interesting
competition for Red Herring. Beau
Monde, with their lyrics of long lost
love, draws strong comparison to
England's Tears for Fears.
Herbert's voice entertained the
crowd, sounding somewhat like a
cross between U2's Bono and Cy
Curnin of the Fixx.
But Beau Monde failed to ignite
the dancers in the crowd (or vice
versa) until the last few of their
songs. However the band is no
longer doing cover versions and
holds much promise in a more commercial sense than Red Herring.
So who is the winner you ask?
Out of the three bands, separated
by eight points out of 150, Red Herring emerged as victor, narrowly
beating Beau Monde for second.
Next week catch Bill of Rights in
competition with the band Flunks
at the Savoy, No. 6 Powell in
Gastown.
ed, the task of raising two children
and a farm, upon the accidental
murder of her husband. From the
moment her sister offers Edna her
steadfast support, we feel the
closeness between people that runs
like a current throughout the film.
Despite Edna's naivety outside
the range of the home fires, she's
got gumption. She is not letting
anyone break up her family nor
relieve her of her farm. She's so
determined and earnest that we care
desperately that she succeeds.
Enter Moses (Danny Glover), a
big, likeable black man hired to
re\ive the cotton plantation; and
Mr. Wills (John Malkovich), the independent blind man, whom Edna
takes in as a border to pay back her
husband's debt. The seeds are sown
as the five must adjust to living as a
family.
Together the new "family" —
five underdogs — must brave all the
negative forces that are hurled their
way: a tornado, debts to be paid
back, hardships of harvesting cotton, a terrifying visit from the Klu
Klux Klan. We are drawn helplessly
into their plight.
As the plot rapidly unfolds, the
love and caring develops between
each of the characters, and we are
treated to delicious moments of
tenderness that make us laugh and
cry.
When Moses befriends little
Frank by showing Frank his
rabbit's foot, the same disarming
humour and honesty which charms
Frank, charms us. When Edna must
punish Frank with a whipping, we
feel her pain as Frank looks at her
with big brown eyes and explains
solemnly how his father "did it",
and how many whippings he would
have received for that offense. We
see Mr. Wills' underlying warmth
when Edna's daugther slips her
hand through his as they listen outside the room where Frank is being
whipped.
The film is full of these gems —
warm, loving moments that open
our hearts to their characters while
avoiding any cliches. The result is a
development of character and plot
which is beautifully balanced and
rather unique.
The cast, playing beautifully off
each other to create constant electricity, subtly create a mixed variety
of people all related to each other is
as many different ways. Malkovich,
an interesting actor with unusual intensity, rivets us as he gradually
turns his hard shell inside out to
reveal his true caring. Glover's success lies in his very simplicity, as he
gives his portrayal of Moses as a
raw human being who reacts from
the gut. The children, played by
Yankton Watton and Gennie
James, are refreshing changes from
the ail-American brats with which
we are so familiar. Natural and innocent, they are like the movie itself
in that they aren't striving for any
big effect, and thus achieve exactly
that.
Sally Field emerges triumphant,
her total determination and
vulnerability combining with an inner strength that guides every action. Intense as always, she magically pulls us closer to her, so that we
experience her traumas with her.
Warm and human, she epitomizes
the love that links them all together.
The film is about strength of
love, which carries its characters
through the hardships of living —
without cinematic cliches.
Everything but the basic raw human
feelings and emotions is stripped
away, and we're left with a look at
real life. Robert Benton certainly
knows human beings.
Places in the Heart is recalled from
Benton's childhood and serves as a
personal tribute to the people of the
town of Waxahachie, Texas, where
four generations of Benton's family
were born, raised and died. ictober5, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
BURGESS
Roch Carrier, the winner of the
Grand Prix de la Ville de Montreal,
is, alongside Michel Tremblay, one
of Canada's most popular and
widely read French Canadian
novelists. With the publication of
the La Guerr, Yes Sir! trilogy, he
launched himself securely into the
foie front of progressive Canadian
literature.
Lad> With Chains,
Bv Roch Carrier,
Translated by Sheila Fischman,
IS I pages, $8.95
Virginie, a young, naive woman
from Quebec City, succumbs to the
charms of Victor, a common,
vapid, religious soldier who enjoys
dancing and conversation. Following the nuptial ceremony, Victor,
the quintessential frontiersman,
treks into the wilder
cabin for his bride.
jp&I^H^f^^S^ *     "<-'^.Xv^;
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
Imagine going to a farce and really relishing the laughs because there
aren't enough of them.
Season's Greetings is structured
like a farce and has a lot of potentially funny moments but the only
really hilarious part is at the end of
the first act. Otherwise, the play is
slow paced and the cast do not seem
to throw themselves fully into it.
There are some good bits including the finale to the first act
where Clive (David Jarvis) and
Belinda    (Pamela    Raven)    create
Season's Greetings
by Alan Ayckbourn
directed by Antony Holland
at Studio 58
until Oct. 28
some needed havoc. Also, Tim
Healy, as Harvey, did an amusing
job playing a belligerent and slightly
insane ex-cop. Some of the funniest
moments come from his cynicism
and misinterpretation.
As with other Ayckbourn plays,
including The Norman Conquests
trilogy and Bedroom Farce, the
situation revolves around a group
of people related by blood, marriage, and acquaintance who are
brought together on a specific occasion, this one being Christmas from
the eve to Dec. 27th.
All four couples in the play are
on shaky ground.
Phyliis (Shawne Davidson), is an
alcoholic and her husband, Bernard
(Brodie Davidson), is a not particularly good doctor. Belinda and
Neville (Rupert Lindsay) have little
liking for each other after eight
years of marriage.
Eddie (Tim Battle) is a middle
class failure at business; and his
pregnant wife, Pattie (Lisa Randall)
is left to cope with their children as
well as Eddie Clive, a novelist,
is a recent acquaintance of Rachel
(Ruby Montgomery), a middle aged
woman very insecure about her sexual feelings towards Clive.
All of these couples have explored their roles but you can't fit
eight complete characters into a two
hour play. Ayckbourn allows each
pair their one deep conversation but
these are neither particularly funny
nor particularly revealing.
Alan Ayckbourn has written
some very funny comedies but he
attempts to take a more serious approach with this play. Unfortunately, the seriousness takes away from
the comedy but the play still doesn't
leave one absorbed by its substance.
It might have been funnier with a
quicker paced production but
Season's Greetings fails as a great
farce.
The following July Virginie gives
birth to a son who dies because of
Victor's stupidity during an arduous winter journey to the cabin.
Distraught and bereft by the child's
death, Virginie refuses to forgive
her husband, hence the impetus for
the novel's poignant tension. Contending with the hardship of living
in the Quebec wildnerness, attempting to reconcile herself to the
death, she makes her husband's life
a misery.
She plots to murder Victor by
poisoning him; his death will be his
nemesis and her revenge. After concocting the lethal liquor, Virginie,
needing the sacrament of confession visits a priest who justifiably
refuses to absolve her sins. He has
her arrested. In the surprising conclusion, her obsession disappears
and she returns to the wildnerness
to lead a life of duty and fidelity.
Lady With Chains transcends the
Quebecois preoccupation with
French-English antagonism and the
need for caricatured realism. Carrier's vision is more epic in scope
than his earlier novels: the immense
tyranny of Nature, the suffocating
embrace of Roman Catholicism,
man's need to revenge the torturous
afflictions of daily life. These intertwined concepts push the French-
Canadian novel into the eighties.
The stream of consciousness is a
point of view allowing the reader to
experience the claustrophobic atmosphere of the wilderness,
Virginie's angst and anger, and her
obsessive attitude to death and
revenge.
At times the metamorphic tone
frustrates the reader: the throes of
winter set againth the child's death;
the resurrection of Christ, spring
and Virginie; the cabin and forest
representing Virginie's dungeon.
But is the reader supposed to see the
child as sacrificial lamb, the thermos as chalice bearing the blood of
Christ the Saviour, and Victor's appearance before the court as the
resurrection of the dead?
Carrier infuses his novel with the
concept of meta-fiction — a story
within a story. Virginie's remembrance of a childhood tale of a lady
poisoning her husband and his
subequent death establishes the format for Victor's demise.
lici^-iini^i^iiiiii
By KEVIN ANNETT
We have all heard of Klaus Barbie, former Gestapo chief of Lyons,
France, who oversaw the torture
and execution of Resistance fighters
during World War II, and who is
presently awaiting trial as a war
criminal.
The Belarus Secret
by John Loflus
Penguin 1984
What has been less well publicized are Barbie's intimate connections with the CIA after the war's
end. The Belarus Secret documents
this connection in detail, and in the
process uncovers a sordid tale that
shatters the myth that World War II
was a war against Nazism.
At the end of the war, the intelligence agencies of the US,
British and French governments
systematically recruited hundreds
of Nazis, including SS leaders and
Gestapo torturers like Barbie, provided them with new identities, and
smuggled them out of Germany.
These butchers were then put to
work in spy operations against the
Soviet Union. The aim was to use
the old Nazi intelligence networks
to infiltrate the east European
regimes and gather information
from the other side of the Iron Curtain .
Some were employed by western
propaganda agencies like Radio
Liberty and the Voice of America.
Others, like Barbie, were used
elsewhere in the world in activities
they were masters at: murder,
counter-insurgency, torture.
The Americans used Barbie to
combat peasant guerilla movements
in Bolivia. Naturally, all these not-
so-ex-Nazis were given effective immunity from prosecution by the
Nuremburg Tribunal, and were
carefully protected for decades.
The Russians tended to shoot
Nazis, but they too used them after
1945, particularly in south-eastern
Europe to man the civil service and
security forces of the "Peoples
Democracies". Ironically, the Russians employed these fascists while
at the same time executing Soviet
soldiers repatriated from German
POW camps on the grounds that
they must have collaborated to have
survived the Nazi prisons!
Yet it was the American State
Department that harvested the biggest crop of Brownshirts.
Many of these war criminals are
still at work for the U.S. government, extolling the virtues of the
"free world" over Radio Liberty
airwaves or spying on popular
movements (and students) around
the globe.
It makes you wonder why 48
million people died. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 5, 1984
The drive for CFS members: you win some...
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian Federation of Students has
won a landslide victory in a Brandon University referendum on joining CFS.
The Wednesday vote on CFS
passed by 85 per cent, with 12 per
cent of students voting. "The only
larger majority I know was Emily
Carr (College of Fine Arts) which
had 98 per cent voting to join
CFS," said Dave Plummer, CFS
fieldworker.
"Anything over 65 per cent is a
moral victory," he added.
There was no campaign at BU
but some pamphlets appeared on
campus prior to the vote warning of
the "universal evils of
communism." BU has been a prospective member of CFS for three
years. A full referendum a year and
a half ago on joining failed.
CFS victory means full-time
students will now pay $4 per year,
and part-time, about $2.
But the federation will have a
harder time at the University of
Calgary where graduate students
will vote Oct.  10 on CFS. Robert
Gordon, grad society spokesperson,
said graduate students are concerned about the financial burden which
membership in CFS is placing on
the union. The U of C graduate
students have been members for
more than two years and, according
to Gordon, pay about $10,000 per
year in membership fees and travel
costs to general meetings.
"We felt it was necessary to
reconsider our position. We are not
so concerned with the incompetence
of the organizaion as we are with
the burden it is placing on us."
Although no organized "no"
campaign has surfaced, the
graduate student union printed
leaflets outlining the pros and cons
of staying in the federation. It also
set up rooms allowing students to
organize either a "yes" or "no"
campaign, but no one showed up.
Gordon said the vote, which will
take place at a graduate students
general meeting and needs 50
students to reach quorum, could
swing either way.
"1 don't think there's a strong
feeling one way or another," he
said. But I would say it makes good
financial sense to pull out and good
political sense to stay in."
Two other membership referenda
were scheduled for October, but
one has been postponed and the
other cancelled.
Mount Royal College in Calgary
will hold a referendum in
November, says Dave Linsley, student union vice-president external.
He says CFS will likely lose because
colleges in Alberta, including
Mount Royal, are more interested
in participating in the Alberta Colleges and Technical Institute Student Executive Council, an
organization similar to CFS's provincial wings.
The Nova Scotia College of Art
and Design has decided not to hold
a pull-out referendum because the
student union has reaffirmed its
support for the federation.
"We're a small institution which
means we can pull out because we
feel we've been undermined by
large institutions or we can stay and
build solidarity between the smaller
schools," says Earl Miller, student
union vice-president. "We've
decided to stay in and help out, instead of jumping the ship."
The  UBC Alma Mater Society
and graduate students society vote
on CFS in November.
And you lose some
LONDON, Ont. (CUP) — The
Ontario Federation of Students has
broken its official ties with
Canada's national student lobby
group, leaving national student
leaders worried about their
organization's future.
"The hastiness of a decision like
this is dangerous," said Beth Olley,
Canadian Federation of Students
chair, at the Sept. 22 to 23 conference of the Canadian Federation
of Students-Ontario/Ontario
Federation of Students.
"A national organization
without Ontario will go down the
tubes," Olley said.
Although the move means
students in Ontario can now focus
their efforts solely on provincial
concerns, Olley said it will weaken
CFS and might prompt other provinces to pull out.
But many conference delegates
said the move was necessary to
simplify the organization's structure and constitution.
"If we're both strangling each
other with by-laws, we'll never
reach   our   full   potential,"   said
Monika Turner, CFS-O/OFS chair.
The Ontario Federation will simply
become OFS when the change occurs — the CFS-O name will be
dropped from the title.
Turner said the move is not
"anti-CFS" but an attempt by Ontario students to recognize the problems facing their own organization
and the national group.
"It's no secret that CFS is
undergoing financial difficulties,"
Turner added. The national federation currently has a $65,000
deficit.
"(But) I think what OFS is saying
is 'let us do provincial development
growth, and that way CFS can
benefit'."
The decision to end ties means
the provincial organization will likely be more appealing to some institutions, such as the University of
Toronto, Brock, Laurier and Windsor universities, Turner said.
Other conference delegates,
however, said the decision
represents a clear motion of non-
confidence in the national student
federation.
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Phone 228-4244
Open Monday-Friday 10:30-2, 3:30-5 p.m. Friday, October 5,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Anna Wyman:
demands excellence
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
"Hello, I'm looking for Anna
Wyman."
"So am I," says a slim man at the
door to the Gateway Theatre, "I'm
one of her dancers." Inside the
theatre the company sets up for
rehearsal of their inaugural performance. A small dark haired woman
directs the movement on stage.
"I'll be with you in a moment,"
she points me to the lower balcony.
I sit in the semi darkness nervous
in the quiet atmosphere, wondering
what to ask the famous dance
choreographer Anna Wyman. But
the fear was needless — Wyman
converses easily and likes to give interviews.
Anna Wyman Dance Theatre
at the Gateway Theatre
270-6500
"I don't have messages or
stories," she begins. "I have themes
and abstractions. I create from
any situation: going to the symphony and hearing a piece that I
love or find so totally foreign that it
affects me as a choreographer. I
love people."
Wyman expresses what she sees
in her dances.
"I love space, lines, abstraction.
I like architecture because it feeds
me with movement." A trip to New
York inspired a dance containing
different boxes which, like
buildings, also housed people.
"New York is missing the sky, the
city is all silver, I didn't see her
darkness. So I had all these different boxes, each box showing a
different part of the body."
Another dance was inspired in a
bathroom in Ottawa after an advisory councils of dance in Canada,
conference. "I noticed the multiple
images in the mirror" she says,
gesturing in front of an imaginary
mirror. "The images appeared
mechanical and I wanted to use
something mechanical like a bicycle."
She says to research the idea properly she found someone who collected and repaired old bicycles and
he kindly gave her one of his antique bikes. Bicycles is a wonderfully
graphic dance performed almost entirely in silhouette. The piece has
only its own locomotion for music.
"It's fascinating and scary to be a
choreographer. Strange how things
come to you: something happens
which gives birth to a dance and like
a child the dance has to learn to
walk, it has to mature.
Choreography is full of excitement
and worry."
Wyman really admires dancers.
She is working on a new piece examining what happens in a day of a
dancer. "A dancer is always in
pain. The day starts with stretching.
Stretching for a dancer is like a
body yawn. A class follows, and
then rehearsal," she says animatedly, "sometimes it works and
sometimes it doesn't."
Wyman says there are many happenings in a day, such as frustrations with each other, the frustrations with one's body when it
doesn't quite do what is asked of it.
She adds that she tries to put all
those emotions in the dance.
"Dancers can make poetry with
their bodies. They train for years
like other professionals. The dancer
is a special creature, it is like a
Stradivarius...emotion above everything else."
Stradivarius are a special make
of violins which exhibit optimum
characteristics for tone and
response. Like dancers for Wyman,
the Stradivarius lose their tone
unless they are used.
Dance to Wyman is entertainment and beauty. "Dance involves
all of the art forms. I think it is a
way of life, a part of our society
and awareness which dates back to
the begining of humanity."
Wyman believes the first thing
people did was dance and that people continue to dance in their everyday lives.
"We dance daily — someone
reaching up to a shelf or bending to
pick something up or stirring
around while cooking — all that is
not considered dance. But on a
stage performed by a dancer it
becomes dance," Wyman explains.
"Dance is an art form on stage
because it is stylized."
Wyman's dances have now
become more technical, she says.
-Charlie fidelman-
photos
The improvisation and experimental dance were done in her first 10
years. "We're in our second decade
now, and doing different things and
going different places: creating
works, showing what we're doing
all over the world and returning to
perform at home."
Wyman feels difficulty extending
her dance to new performances.
"Each dance is a starting over and
since what you have to work with is
broader each time, the more you do
the more difficult it becomes."
The Wyman dancers work hard,
training eight hours per day six days
a week. "The end result is this"
says Wyman looking towards the
stage where four dancers warm up.
"I'm considered difficult to work
with because I'm a great demander.
But I feel that is the only way you
can get on. It's a vulnerable thing
dealing with people, with their
minds and their bodies." She says
sometimes she thinks she asks too
much but then realizes it's the only
way to get anywhere.
I left Anna Wyman and the
Gateway Theatre thinking of the
similarities between her approach to
art and the filmmaker Ingmar
Bergman's approach. He too fused
his life with his work, the more he
created on film the more he had to
create with. Similarity Wyman adds
to her repertoire of working
materials with each dance, created
from her life.
Bergman loves his actors for
their courage and intensity. Anna
Wyman loves her dancers for their
beauty and strength, for the
perseverence she demands of them
to keep body and mind fit and
psychologically healthy.
It is the empathy between the
choreographer and the dancers, the
director and the actors which
enhances the creativity of both. Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 5, 1984
Fly CFS
In mid November, students will be called to vote on
whether UBC should become full members of the Canadian Federation of Students. The only problem with this
is that few students know what CFS does or stands for.
CFS representatives haven't helped this situation
much. They delayed a referendum last spring to buy
time to develop understanding of CFS among students,
but only this week has the campaign committee finally
convened.
Our AMS has been almost equally detached. It has
granted funding for both a yes and no campaign, and
boldly decided to whether the AMS should support the
CFS in grand ambiguous style.
Despite the ethereal nature of almost all debate thus
far regarding CFS, the organization does have
something to offer students for its $7.50 annual fee.
In a time when more and more officials in Ottawa
(and B.C.) seem to be forgetting the value of higher
education to Canada's future, CFS lends unity to an
otherwise ineffectual national student body.
CFS also provides a unique nationally-oriented
research group and information bank for education
issues. Without this, sound analysis of the current crisis
in education can only suffer. Students and only
students can articulate the concerns of higher education, and CFS is the vehicle for this lobbying.
CFS offers cut-rate travel fares through the Travel
Cuts office, discount cards to local businesses, and
guest lecturers. Some may say that UBC can receive
many of these services while maintaining a prospective
membership, but this selfish leeching on the limping
movement is insupportable.
CFS needs an infusion, and a leap of faith by UBC in
November would give it that. The leadership and impact
of CFS depends on a national mandate from students,
and the strength CFS could gain from national student
support is worth it. P.S. Attend student council's CFS
forum Wednesday, 6:30 in council chambers.
Happy Thanksgiving
you turkeys
Letters
UBC cutting TA communications channels
Is our university a fair employer?
No. The activities the university's
administration has been carrying
out surrounding the Teaching
Assistants Union do not allow
another conclusion.
The university's administration
and the T.A. Union signed a contract last spring. In the contract the
T.A. Union bargained away a mandatory meeting between the T.A.'s
and their union. This meeting has
proven  in  the past  to  the T.A.
Union's most effective way of communicating its existence and function to all T.A.'s.
In exchange for the compulsory
meeting the T.A. Union regained a
clause which allows it to send a
"mutually agreeable" information
sheet to all prospective T.A.'s.
To have the letter ready for the
mailing of the registration package
in early summer the T.A. Union
presented a milder version of the
letter that had been agreed to by the
university's administration two
years ago. The administration rejected the letter saying that their interpretation of exactly the same
language had changed and they
could not accept the new milder version of the information sheet.
The administration also made a
counter-draft covertly encouraging
T.A.'s not to join their union.
The letter went through mediation and grievance procedures and
Student aid program doesn Jt aid
Your article entitled "B.C. Has
Worst Student Aid Program"
(Sept. 28) clearly outlines the totally
unacceptable state of the student
aid program currently in existence
in B.C. Having been an
undergraduate student in New
Brunswick, Alberta, and British
Columbia, I fell compelled to support your comments and insightful
points whole-heartedly.
The purpose of this letter is to
drive home the long term implications of this inept and irresponsible
student aid program.
First, only those students of upper middle and upper class families
will have fair opportunity for post-
secondary education. Second,
future generations living within the
interior  of  the  province  will  be
THE UBYSSEY
October 5, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
News and on-campus editor: Robert Beynon. Anti-Toronto Sun city editor: Patti Flather. Page Friday editor: Charlie Fidelman. Contributing editors: Stephen Wisenthal (Theatre Critic), Victor Wong
(Vander Zapper analyst), Robby Robertson (special China correspondent), Debbi Lo (on location in the
wilds of Totem). Other contributors: Rory Allen (photography), Dave Stoddart (special council motives
observer/analyst), Ginny Aulin (international correspondent), Stuart Colcleigh (advice to the lovelorn),
Kevin Annett (special war correspondent), Sarah Chesterman (Hollywood gossip columnist}, Jody
Findlayson (music), A. R. Burgess (books). Tweens editor: inapplicable.     ^
drastically limited in accessibility to
university. Third and lastly are the
personal debts many students will
incur over the course of their
studies.
Reasonable estimates suggest that
many students will owe between
$20,000 and $22,000 in student
loans to the provincial and federal
governments upon completion of
their degree.
In essence, the provincial government is directly responsible for
students having to borrow such
large sums of loan money due to the
unavailability of grant money. The
end result will be hundreds of
university and college students having to pay back loans that are impossible for any young adult starting out in the work force to pay.
As the saying goes — 'You can't
get blood from a rock' — good luck
in collecting, Socreds!
Anthony Fenton
unclassified 5
is scheduled for arbitration in early
November.
By making meetings non-
compulsory and stalling the information letter the administration has
effectively cut the communication
channels between the T.A. Union
and the T.A.'s.
To this we have to add that an official UBC administration's
publication, the UBC Reports of
September 19 has a summary of an
article which perceives and
describes T.A. unions across
Canada as "psycho-sociological"
problems to be dealt with.
The original report accuses T.A.
unions of making such radical
demands as "protection against
discrimination,    retribution,    and
harassment for political, social or
sexual reasons." The article also invites, indirectly, anti-collective
bargaining graduate students to be
less inept and to mobilize against
the unions.
Is it fair labor practice to cut
communication channels between a
union and its widely dispersed prospective membership? Is it a fair
labor practice to promote the view
that the rights to collective bargaining and unionization are problems?
These are not fair labor practices.
These are the type of labor practices
which the UBC administration is
using.
Horacio de la Cueva
T.A.U. president
Pitching in sets example
There's no doubt that there is more litter around here than there
used to be, and even if the reason is the reduction in Physical Plant
clean-up staff, we have to remember that it's students who drop the
litter in the first place.
UBC president George Pedersen has asked me if students might be
willing tc organize and participate in a Clean-Up Day. I think it's a
good idea: we'd get the place clean for a little while, and maybe
students who drop litter would take note of the efforts of their peers,
and begin to take some pride in keeping the campus nice.
Unfortunately, there has not been much support for the idea from
students council members, and without active participation, no project can succeed.
Would the people who write letters to The Ubyssey be prepared to
volunteer their time and energy, and most important, their values, to
a project like this?
My phone number is 228-3972. Please give me a call if you'd like to
do something about it.
Margaret Copping
Alma Mater Society president Friday, October 5, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Stewart defends external affairs criticism
My remarks concerning Nancy
Bradshaw and student council's attitudes towards the upcoming
Canadian Federation of Students
referendum seem to be creating a
multitude of false impressions.
Many people are leaping on my
back with loud cries of hatred,
demanding to know why I said that
Nancy was trying to hurt the CFS or
slow down the referendum. At no
time in my interview with Robert
Beynon did I suggest that Nancy
was anti-CFS (CFS launches
membership campaign at UBC,
Oct. 2), all I was pointing out were
two opinions of mine.
First, that because Nancy Bradshaw, in her role as coordinator of
external affairs, has decided not to
support any particular side of the
CFS question, that the CFS
organising has been a little slower
than we thought it would be.
Since CFS was expecting either
the external affairs coordinator or
student council to start a campaign
it did not start organising out here
earlier, because we thought that on-
campus groups would do that for
us. The interview was given as a
response to the earlier Ubyssey
editorial that accused the CFS of
being both slow and disorganised. I
was simply explaining why we were
a little bit late of the mark.
Secondly, I was expressing my
opinion, as a member of student
council as well as a council-
appointed representative on
Nancy's committee, the external affairs  committee,  that   I  felt  that
Nancy was elected as the voice of
students, and as such should be taking a definite stand on CFS. I think
that all student politicians are accountable and responsible to the
student population, and to persist
in the evasive action that seems so
popular this year is wrong.
Nancy Bradshaw is an excellent
executive member and has done
many good things for students. She
should use here good judgement on
CFS, and tell us what she thinks.
The reason that I am so opposed
to the idea of non-committed
representatives can be plainly seen
in the CFS article (Oct. 2) that
seems to have occasioned so much
controversy. To quote, "Bradshaw
says 'she does support the referendum'..." and, "...the AMS could
do   a   better  job   supoorting  the
students than CFS..."
It is obvious that neither of these
statements is non-biased. Within a
paragraph she states her own opinion twice. If she doesn't wish to
take a stand then she shouldn't be
expressing her opinions.
Duncan Stewart
Alma Mater Society
arts representative
Bravo, AMS thinking of CFS stance
Impartiality essential
Unlike The Ubyssey, I understand the meaning of impartiality.
I am refering to the editorial you
wrote ("Decisions", Sept. 28)
criticizing me for setting up "Yes
CFS" and "No CFS" committees.
As I have a bias on this issue, I
feel that setting up two sides is the
fairest way to present the entire picture to students, who then can
make up their own minds.
I probably have more information on the Canadian Federation
of Students than anyone else on
campus, and sharing it with interested students to help publicize it
seemed to be the most reasonable
approach of disseminating it.
Although I do not appreciate
criticism, I welcome constructive
suggestions and help for the CFS
referendum.
In response to Duncan Stewart's
comments that I was elected to take
a stand on CFS and have not done
so, is a grossly inaccurate point of
view. 1 was elected to provide a full
picture to all students, and not a
narrow selective viewpoint.
Also, I believe that if individual
council members feel strongly
about CFS one way or another,
they can be much more productive
on a pro or con CFS committee,
than simply stating their opinions.
This is the reason I have not urged council as a single body to state
one point of view. If you would like
to participate on a pro or con CFS
committee or you just want more
information, feel free to contact me
in SUB 250 or call 228-2050.
Nancy Bradshaw
Alma Mater Society
coordinator of
external affairs
Much to its credit the Alma
Mater Society Council voted last
night to take a position on the upcoming Canadian Federation of
Students referendum. Next
Wednesday at 6:30 p.m., you may
attend and voice your feelings as
well as observe how your representatives vote.
On behalf of the Graduate Student Society, I argue that the CFS is
demonstrating a capability to effectively make the student's voice
heard at all levels.
An example of this is its response
to the Federal Commission on the
Economic Union and Development
Prospects for Canada (The MacDonald Commission), a copy of
which can be obtained from the
CFS or from myself at 224-7242.
For graduates at all levels, it is clear
. . . and don't you say it's not . . .
Your Tuesday article commenting on the Canadian Federation of
Students referendum, with numerous quotations from a prospective politician and professional windbag Duncan Stewart, was in particularly poor
taste ("CFS launches membership campaign at UBC", Oct. 2).
Editorials are usually kept for the inner pages and not banner headlines.
The role played by Nancy Bradshaw, that of an objective source to a free
and unbiased exchange of information, is the role expected of a responsible
and representative official of a democratic government.
It is a sign of moral courage to let such a referendum stand by the merit
of the issues and the credibility of argument, governed by the participation
of the students themselves, and not on the baselessness of the politics of the
few, Mr. Stewart, The Ubyssey and others.
It is a reminder of the subtlety of the world to realize that criticism is
cheap when coming from certain quarters, and that cheap criticism does
not govern the political life of this univeristy.
Patrick Bruskiewich
science 5
that the course which the socioeconomic development of Canada
takes is crucial.
In a carefully researched and
reasoned critique, the CFS argues
against "quick fixes", examples of
which abound at UBC—lotteries,
fund-raising for special education
and the like — as well as
overdependence upon one solution,
i.e. "high tech". It argues for a
comprehensive approach which includes those who have been
neglected by the traditional education system as well as those who
benefit from it.
This brief outlines the concerns
women, international students, the
disabled and others have in regards
their educational development. In
short, it demonstrates how the CFS
is evolving into a network which involves all students for all reasons.
The task which we face as
students is to ensure that UBC helps
to strengthen this network. There
are those who fear being swamped
by the colleges. But the alternative
is to concentrate power in the
universities, thereby, diminshing
the ability of the CFS to act as a
true medium for the exchange of
ideas and resources.
The GSS will be suggesting that,
if "he referendum passes, a
resource centre be established at
UBC incorporating much of this expanded research and development
capability.
The key to effective participation
is the quality of representation that
is provided. It is unfortunate that
last night the AMS council seemed
unable to choose a representative to
the provincial executive of the CFS
without turning it into a farce. It is
clear that a strengthened CFS
would pose a formidable obstacle to
the provincial government's plans.
Frank Frigon
AMS graduate representative
SUB squeezed
This is to inform you that we and
a number of our colleagues have of
late experienced difficulty obtaining
appropriate seating in the SUBWAY cafeteria.
This difficulty seems to be attributable largely to the fact that
certain sections of the cafeteria remain closed during busy (as well as
quiet) periods of the day and evening. The large, boothed area on the
left side of the cafeteria is an example of such a section.
Although we do appreicate the
need to coordinate staff flow with
customer volume, we wish to stress
that several associates and ourselves
have repeatedly been inconvenieced
by a lack of seating in the cafeteria.
As a result, we are becoming increasingly reluctant to patronize
your facility.
Please recall, that your mandate
is to serve the needs of the student
body, rather than the desires of the
cafeteria staff.
Patricia Hanna
Erika Davis
1-2550 York Ave., Vancouver
SHEEP . . . you can see them too on relaxing staff retreats.
Attention
KATHY GILES
JANE MAIR
CORRAINE LAVALLEE
RENATE BOERNER
LAIRD SWANSON
BETSY GOLDBERG
FRANK POLILLO
PAUL MacDOUGALL
PAULINE SHUM
RICH FOREMAN
RUBY MAEKAWA
VICKI WONG
ANN SEELY
JEFF KEIRCK
BRENT LEDGER
LARRY McCALLUM
VAL GOODFELLOW
GORDON CLARK
And anyone else interested in The Ubyssey.
We want you! We need you!
Stop by sometime soon
and get the story off your life,
The Ubyssey particularly needs news and feature writers, but since The Ubyssey is your paper, your interests are our
interests. Make your studies relevant!
Join The Ubyssey today!
P.S. — Today is the last day for staffers to sign up for the national conf erence in Halifax over Christmas. Screenings for the conference
will be Wednesday at 12:30. Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 5, 1984
Woman shut out of job
SUDBURY (CUP)—One member
of the student council at Laurentian
University, which refused to hire a
woman as head of the student
security service, says the decision
would have been different if the
candidate had been a man.
Barry Schmidl, student council
president, said the council's refusal
to ratify an executive decision to
hire Sandra Wuroien was influenced by the firing of a woman security
officer last year.
"The after-effects are still lingering," he said.
In the fall of 1983, then security
head Richard Lafreniere fired
Marlene Mcintosh because he did
not want to hire women as security
staff. The council later passed a
motion requiring a guaranteed
number of women to work during
large campus events.
When the hiring committee made
up of four student council executives presented their choice to
council, many student councillors
were stunned. A call for a seconder
oh the motion to ratify Wuroien
drew a reluctant response.
Dan Fife, vice president services,
spoke out against the motion. His
was the dissenting vote on the hiring
committee.
"I don't believe she is the best
qualified," he said.
Other council members echoed
his opinion, asking "Who is this
girl?" and "Who else applied?"
Some council members demanded to know the extent of Wuroien's
experience with student security,
the role of the security head and hiring procedures. The executives on
the hiring committee replied that
they had interviewed seven applicants and finally chose Woroien
by a three to one vote.
"I felt the best person was Sandra," said Schmidl. "Sex had
nothing to do with our recommendation."
Schmidl added: "The job is not
just being a bouncer."
Council resoundingly defeated
the motion to ratify Woroien and
passed another motion to bring the
three top candidates for an "in
camera" session with council. At an
October meeting, council will interview Wuroien, candidate Glen
Kivikangas and James Ceccetto, a
former council member who resigned his position as men's commissioner to apply for the job of security head.
Schmidl said he was angry with
council for rejecting the executive's
recommendation. "Quite frankly, I
can't see how people would suggest
his position such as (the grill session) if they had any familiarity
with personnel procedures."
Council member Dave Loan
denied that sexism was the reason
for the decision to reject Wuroien.
"I won't rubber stamp something
without knowing the qualifications
(of the person)," he said. "I might
have been a little happier knowing
more about her."
None of the 12 women who sit on
council spoke out during the
debate.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 17
College denies wages
VANCOUVER(CUP)—Capilano College's faculty and administration still cannot reach
agreement in current contract
disputes.
The faculty association is adamant that its members' work load
not be increased and that no
member be laid off.
Faculty association negotiator
Gordon Wilson also said the administration is withholding
previously agreed upon wage increases for some of its members.
"Within the contract (collective
agreement) faculty members are entitled to step increases each year to a
maximum of 13 steps. What they
(the administration) have done is
withhold increases to those faculty
who are entitled to receive it,
because they argue it's a part of the
overall settlement," Wilson said.
He said the faculty's position,
based on legal advice, is that the administration should apply the step
increases. The administration is attempting to break the faculty
association by holding back on the
increments he said.
"I appreciate that it's a
negotiating tactic on their part to
harass and demoralize the faculty
anyway they can but it's one that
will only strengthen the faculty's
resolve," Wilson said.
He added if the two sides cannot
reach an agreement, the faculty
have several options, including
withholding services.
College principal Paul Gallagher
said the Compensation Stabilization commissioner will decide when
and if the step increase should be
paid. He said because the collective
agreement had expired it was no
longer up to the administration to
solve the problem.
Gallagher added staff or course
cutbacks could not be ruled out.
"Our revenue for this year is less
than that of last year, and our
revenue for the coming year is anticipated to be less than this year,
and we've got to solve that problem
somehow," he said.
The contract for the Capilano
College faculty association expired
last March and the two sides have
bargaining since then.
SFU violence on rise
BURNABY (CUP)—There is an increase in violence against women
this year at Simon Fraser University.
The SFU women's centre
reported several incidents of
violence and harassment during the
first month of the semester.
"These are attacks on women's
freedom and right to walk safely
around the university," women's
centre spokesperson Myra
McLaughlin said.
Two of the women involved gave
the centre permission to release
details of the incidents.
On September 16, a student walking in a park beside the campus was
verbally harassed, then followed by
a man with a dog. The man ran off
when the woman stopped a passing
jogger for help.
The afternoon of September 17 a
man attempted to rape a woman in
a SFU parking lot. She was able to
free herself and ran back to the
university.
Campus security and the RCMP
are investigating.
"It is interesting that all of the
concern is about attacks at night,
when both of these occured during
the daytime," McLaughlin said.
The SFU women's centre is planning a campaign to publicize the
situation and give women information on self-defence tactics and
crisis services.
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the delight of the customers, each Friday and Saturday evening dancers
perform their Dance Oriental.
UBC faculty signed a contract
this August which allowed for no
incremental step increases.
Debt growing
From page 9
report's suggestion to repay the
debt over 10 years, he said.
Dafoe said the GSS is now running the centre and raising money
with beer gardens and other functions. But the centre should receive
the summer Food Service revenues,
he said.
Neil Risebrough, administration
associate vice president student affairs, also said negotiations are at a
stand off but said the GSS has failed to reply to his request for a
meeting.
Risebrough said the administration has no interest in running the
centre.
"We don't want to have to pay
the bills," he said, adding union
problems with the GSS remain The
GSS hired students for the centre
while a union bartender was laid off
last spring. "The union is grieving
that action," Risebrough said.
Risebrough claimed the administration has not filled in
unclear spots in the report with its
own ideas.
Risebrough said the centre debt is
now $135,000 and increasing
because of interest.
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TAKE ACTION
OVERDRINKING
Canada 1+
/ like the taste of a cold beer on a hot day,
but I certainly don't think you have to get the gang
together with a couple of cases of beer just to celebrate
the fact you've had
a bit of exercise"
JOHN WOOD
OLYMPIC SILVER MEDAl LIS I
Health Santeet
and Welfare    Bien-etre social
Canada Canada Page 18
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 5, 1984
W6
<lU00ti
TODAY
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Pre-Med mixer, 7:30-12:30 p.m., SUB 207/209.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General conversation meeting, noon (12:30
p.m.), International house.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Empress Cup tournament game: Univ. of Regina
vs. Calgary Dinosaurs, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird
arena.
ASTRONOMY AND AEROSPACE CLUB
Meeting to plan field trip to Mars, object is to
survive the longest. Bring pencil, paper and ideas
to get there, 5:30 p.m.. Geophysics 143. 12"
telescope and films present,
DANCE HORIZONS
Registrations for membership in UBC's unique
dance ensemble, noon (12:30 p.m.I, SUB 216C,
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Gym nite, badminton, 7:30-10:30 p.m., Osborne
gym A.
TAOIST TAI CHI SOCIETY
Beginners class in Tai Chi, Taoist style, 12:30
p.m. (noon), Vancouver School of Theology
auditorium.
DANCE CLUB
Registration, practice, noon (12:30 p.m.), SUB
ballroom.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Bake sale, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., SUB concourse. Come and support the club.
CANADIAN FEDERATION OF STUDENTS
(CFS) - YES
Organizational meeting for referendum, noon,
SUB 260.
SATURDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Gym nite, all membes welcome. Badminton,
volleyball, and basketball, 8-11 p.m., Osborne
gym A.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Empress Cup tournament: Regina vs. UBC, 2
p.m., Thunderbird arena.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL
WIFL regular season game vs. Univ, of Saskatchewan Huskies, 2 p.m., Thunderbird stadium.
WATER POLO CLUB
Practice, 5 p.m., Aquatic centre.
SUNDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Sunday worship service, 10 a.m., SUB 212.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Empress Cup tournament, championship final, 2
p.m., Thunderbird arena.
ST. MARK'S COLLEGE
Panel discussion: The Impact of the Papal Visit,
8 p.m., St. Mark's College music room.
WATER POLO
Practice, 5 p.m., Aquatic centre.
MONDAY
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, et al
Holiday to give thanks to provincial government
who art in Victoria, all day. Classes cancelled.
Turkey scheduled.
TUESDAY
UBYSSEY
No    Ubyssey    today,    wait    till    Wednesday.
Deadline for Tweens, etc. for Wednesday, 12:45
p.m.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
J.K., till Thursday, 6:30 p.m., Brock hall 351.
UNDERCOVER UBC
General meeting and photo session #1. All interested  in  playing should  attend.   Photo fee.
New members welcome, noon, SUB 119.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meeting,   7   p.m.,   SUB   215.   New   members
welcome.
NDP. CLUB
General   meeting,    everyone   welcome,    noon
(12:30 p.m.}, SUB 215.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Stress   drop-in, noon, Buchanan penthouse.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration   for   fall   classes,   11:30   a.m.-2:30
p.m., SUB concourse.
No Tuesday
Tuesday is moving to
Wednesday.
Monday is now where Tuesday is.
And what was Monday is
now a holiday.
The Ubyssey staff also get
holidays, and the above is our
round about, indirect, vague,
and sly way of telling you your
favorite campus rag will not be
published next Tuesday. Gasp!
Because of the holiday
(Thank Givings for that), we
will not publish Tuesday. Instead, The Ubyssey staff will
toil away Tuesday so your copy
of the fourth estate will be
available Wednesday morning.
To
Graduating
Students:
If you're thinking about employment after graduation
and you're looking for something out of the ordinary, we
think you'll find this very worthwhile reading.
We're the largest consulting organization in the world,
and we're looking for new graduates to join our Vancouver office. Our hiring criteria are simple: we look for
outstanding performers, regardless of field of study. Our
specialty is management information systems so a
background in business or computer systems is helpful,
but by no means essential. Our most successful consultants come from a variety of academic disciplines.
What they have in common is intelligence, the ability to
do both technical and people-oriented work and, above
all, the desire to excel.
As you may expect, we ask a lot from our people. In fact,
if you're after a comfortable nine-to-five job, we're probably the last people you should consider.
But we think we have a lot to offer. Challenging and
varied work. Excellent career opportunities in the high-
growth field of management information systems. A
training programme that is the best of its kind anywhere.
And the satisfaction of belonging to a team of dynamic,
high-achieving professionals.
If you're interested, we suggest you attend our recruiting
presentation on October 18th in the Henry Angus
Building, Room 104 from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Or
have a look through our file in the Canada Employment
Centre on campus. If you're the kind of person we have
in mind, it could be time very well spent.
Arthur
Andersen
Applications must be submitted to the Canada Employment Centre
on campus by November 2, 1984.
WEDNESDAY
UBYSSEY
First  week's  edition   comes  out.   Hope  they
remember the Tweens this time.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Badminton nite, 4:30-6 p.m., Osborne gym A.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration  for  fail  classes,   12:30-2:30  p.m.,
SUB concourse.
WATER POLO CLUB
Practice, 10 p.m.. Aquatic centre.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
Elections,   meeting   of   new   executive,   12:30
(noon), SUB 211.
STAR COMEDY DEMOCRATS
Spell our group name backwards.
STUDENT DISCOUNTS AND
SAME DAY SERVICE
SAVE 20% &
SAME DAY SERVICE
AT THE.
LET US PREPARE YOU FOR THE
DEC. 1, 1984 LSAT
OR THE
OCT. 20, 1984 GMAT
• Each course consists of 20 hours instruction for only $175.
• Courses are tax deductible.
• Complete review of each section of
each test.
• Extensive home study materials.
• Your course may be repeated at no additional charge.
To register, call or write:
GMAT/LSAT
Preparation Courses
P.O. Box 597, Station "A"
Toronto   Ontario M5W 1G7
Edmonton (403I459-2659
Toronto (416)665-3377
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD -
ChOOSe ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
EYE LAB ■
MOn.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave
731-9112
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, ,60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.50; additional lines, ,70c Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Cfiarge Phone Orders over $ 10.00. Call 228-3977
COMING EVENTS
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
PROF. PETER LARKIN
Animal Resource Ecology
UBC
HOW SALMON FIND THEIR
WAY HOME
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building, Saturday, Oct. 6
at 8:15 p.m.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
YAMAHA L5-T4 street-trail motorcycle,
little used, $260, X3039 or 2779 for
messages.
STEREO. 2 Sansui speakers. Turntable.
Good condition. $250 obo. Must sell.
Catherine 733-1463.
FOR SALE: Brown couch, very good condition $30. 876-6357.
MUST SELL! Twin bed/headboard, stereo
cab., davenport couch, desk, legal file cab.,
tv stand, B&W TV for parts, folding chairs.
Great for students. 684-8070 eves.,
wkends.
20 - HOUSING
FOR RENT. 1-br. ground-level suite. New
home nr UBC. Furn. or unfurn.
$400/month utilities incl. 228-1078 after 7
p.m.
FURNISHED RMS. available on campus!
Reasonably priced rent including great big
meals prepared by our full-time cook.
Phone David Kelly at 224-9930 or drop by
the Deke House at 5765 Agronomy Rd.
HOUSEBOAT FOR RENT. Steveston. Lots
of room, self-cont. Unique. Non-smoker.
$400 util. incl. Call after 5. 271-4272.
ROOM AVAIL, in shared house main fir.,
10th Ave. & MacDonald near stores, bus,
laundry. Carpet, fireplace, $155 per mo. Ph.
736-0052, 5 in hse., utilities included.
SEEKING dog-loving "Chef" with sense of
humour to share West End apartment for
probable two months. $200 mo. Call
687-2549 after 5 p.m.
HOW ABOUT shared ownership in a home?
Look into owning a home with a friend or
friends. Conctact me for how it works. I
have prepared very workable details. Better
than renting. Good choice of 2 to 5 bdrm.
homes. Elizabeth Hopkins 943-5995. Block
Brothers Realty 943-7441.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS by Judith Alexander
graduate of Juilliard School of Music. Near
Cambie & 38th 731-8323.
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
30 - JOBS
THE EATERY RESTAURANT has part-time
openings for servers, bar helpers &■ bus
people. Apply at 3431 W. Broadway.
IBM WORD PROCESSOR operator required,
part-time work, flexible hours. Contact Law
Students' Association at 228-5257 or
263-4619 (eves.)
35 - LOST
PERSON WHO FOUND my small brown
leather purse in SUB cafe at 4:15 Monday
Oct. 1, please return. Sentimental value.
Lani 521-3024.
LOST. Keys on ring with blue tab. In vicinity
of SUB or WM Gym. Toyota & UBC keys.
Pis. phone 732-5256 or local 2033 Ken.
LOST OCT. 1st. Woman's red wool waist
length coat. Left in old Aud. cafeteria.
Please call 266-2824 reward.
LOST - SET OF keys on field outside
Osborne on Sunday Sept. 30. Please call
224-1780 if found.
LEFT BANK BOOK, cash & park card in
UBC bkstore Mon. Oct. 1 4:30 p.m. in
graphics files by financially strapped student. Honest person please call 685-1728
24 hrs. Reward.
WORD WEAVERS - word processing.
Student rates, fast turnaround, bilingual
5670 Yew St. at 41st 266-6814.
TYPING —  Fast, accurate, reasonable rates
734-8451
YOUR WORDS PROFESSIONALLY
TYPED - TO GO. Judith Filtness. 3206
W. 38th Ave., Van. 263-0351 (24 hrs). Fast
and reliable.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write, we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Student
rates $14/hr. Equation typing avail, ph
Jeeva 876-5333.
WORDPOWER
SERVICES
3737 W. 10th Ave (at Almal
Editing, writing
Word processing
Xerox copies
Mon-Fri 7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
Sat 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
222-2661
40 - MESSAGES
DOTS WORD PROCESSING offers reasonable rates for students for term papers,
essays & masters. 273-6008 eves.
TYPING with expertise. Excellent rates &
professional quality. University experience
with resumes, essays, term papers, etc.
Joan 299-4986.
TO THE D.G. pledges of 1984. You're the
greatest!! Love your actives.
CAROLYN, P.F. Will you marry me? RBW.
TO N. IN NURSING: You need help more
than I do. Please get it before it's too late! I
will always love you. Jeff.
TO ALL WHO WISH to contact me, and to
all who don't: Take note that I have moved.
I can be reached at 224-3623. Jeff Neiman,
Law 3.
YEAR AROUND EXPERT. Typing from
legible work. Essays, theses. 738-6829 10
a.m. - 9 p.m. King Edward bus rte.
80 - TUTORING
ENGLISH 100 INSTRUCTOR will
exchange English tutoring for
assistance in translating written
Chinese. 224-4568.
October Special
10% Discount
on 8 pages or more.
Fast, accurate Typing
Competitive Rates
Call 734-8561
eves, or weekends
85 - TYPING
90 - WANTED
WORD PROCESSING $1.50/PG (DS)
CRWR major - Winona Kent 438-6449
located in south Burnaby.
TYPING. Essays & Resumes. Also Transcription from cassette. Spelling corrected.
Layout on resumes optional. 733-3676.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II, reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   All
jobs, year around student rates, on King
Edward route. 879-5108.
WANTED TO BUY. Portable electric typewriter in good condition. Call Diana
738-6087.
99 - MISCELLANEOUS
SEXUALITY ASSESSMENT
Sophisticated   psychological   test   provides a twelve page comprehensive and
unique profile of 36 distinct components
of your sexuality. Send $7.00 to:
SEXPROFILE
207 - 810 W. Broadway
Vancouver, B.C. V5Z 4C9 Thursday, October 5, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 19
Autochromes: Color photography comes of
age: a collection of some early color prints,
until Oct. 7, Presentation House, 333 Chesterfield Ave., N. Van., 986-1351.
Director's choice: Mixed media exhibit
selected by retiring Vancouver Art Director
Luke Rombout, until Oct. 28, Vancouver Art
Gallery, 750 Hornby St., 682-5621.
Jiri Kolar — Poetry of Vision, Poetry of Silence: Collages by internationally-known
Czech artist, until Oct. 21, Vancouver Art
Gallery.
Brancusi — The Sculptor as Photographer: 50 silver prints by this great figure in the
development of modern art, until Oct. 21,
Vancouver Art Gallery.
Bob Steele, So Far. . .: Retrospective of this
important Vancouver photographer and
Drawer, Sept. 19-Oct. 21, Burnaby Art
Gallery, 6344 Gilpin St., 291-9441.
The Clifford E. Lee Collection of Inuit Wall-
Hangings, until Oct. 13, UBC Fine Arts
Gallery. 228-2759.
Three decades of ceramics made in the
David Lambert studio, Cartwright street
Gallery, Granville Isle.
Art Talk-Gail Scott: "Ideology, Feminism
and Language," Oct. 15 Contemporary Art
Gallery, 555 Hamilton St.
Rock and Roll/Neil Wedman: Original
musical ambience employed using taped
tracks enhance the atmosphere to these
peculiar artworks handing in the space. Opens
Tues. Oct. 2, until Oct. 27. Contemporary Art
Gallery, 555 Hamilton St., 687-1345.
Margaret Randall/Photographs from
Nicaragua: An exhibition of 62 black and
white photographs documenting life in
Nicaragua from 1979 to 1983. Shows personal
life amongst an atmosphere of political strife.
Showing until Nov. 4, Presentation House,
333C Chesterfield Ave., N. Van. 986-1351.
Bill Bissett/Fires in the Tempul: B.C.
Federation of Writers is sponsoring a poetry
reading to celebrate Bisset's Retrospective Exhibition, Oct. 31, 8:00 p.m., Vancouver Art
Gallery, fourth floor. $3.00 admission.
David Lambert/Vancouver's First Potter:
Exhibition of ceramics including mass produced pots as well as-one-of-a-kind pieces and
prints. Showing until Nov. 3, Cartwright St.
Gallery, 1411 Cartwright St., Granville Island.
Studio Pottery: Where Is It Going?: A
series of three lectures focusing on contemporary studio potteries around the world.
Vancouver studios, Oct. 9, Oriental studios,
Oct. 16, European Studios, Oct. 23. All at
Emily Carr College of Art and Design, Rm.
230. Fee $2.00 per lecture.
Vancouver Sketch Club: A popular juried
exhibition containing new works. Oct. 9-20.
Park Royal, South Mall. Vancouver Art
Gallery: Exhibition tours available to public
10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Tues. to Fri. Admission $2.00, free on Tues.
Carnegie Centre (401 Main Street,
665-2220): Brush paintings by Johnny Chong
and his son, John-Boy. Both artists will
demonstrate their technique on rice paper.
Oct. 7-19, 7:30 p.m.
Centre Culturel Colombien (795 W. 16th
Ave., 874-9105): Paintings by Pamela Holl
Hunt, who approaches her work with francophone symbolism. Her exhibit opens Oct.
11 at 8:00 p.m.
Chinese Cultural Centre (50 E. Pender St.,
687-0729): Exhibition of Chinese-Canadian
Visual Art, featuring works of more than 30
artists. Some items will be on sale to raise
money for the completion of the centre's
Multipurpose Hall. Excellent chance to pick
up trimmings for your domicile. Oct. 28 opening.
Presentation House (333 Chesterfield Ave.,
N. Van., 986-1351): "Deliberations: arranged
images in photography" with 31 pieces by
various North American artists. You won't
find anything like these on our news pages.
Oct. 11-Nov. 4, 7:30-10:00 p.m.
Surrey Art Gallery (13750-88th Ave., Surrey, 596-1515): Painting, sculpture, and collage works by Patricia Kushner. Most works
are inspired by views and impressions of
various cities. Walk through to the sound of
original music by Hildegaard Westerkamp.
Oct. 4-28, 9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Vancouver East Cultural Centre (1895
Venables St., 254-9578): "Movimento con
Rubato", paintings in mixed media by Jean
Higinbotham. See what one woman can do
with ink, oilsticks, acrylics, and pastels. Sept.
16-Oct. 20, 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
SUBfilms (SUB auditorium, 228-3697):
Tender Mercies, Oct. 4-7, Fri. and Sat. 7 and
9:30 p.m., Thurs. and Sun. 7 p.m.
Cinema 16 (Box 35 SUB UBC, Vancouver
B.C. V6T-1W5, 228-3698): The Girls, Oct. 9,
6:30 and 8:30 p.m.
Pacific Cinematheque (1155 W. Georgia
St., Au Rythme de mon Coeur, Oct. 5-6, 7:30
p.m.; La Quarantaine, Oct. 5-6, 9:30 p.m.;
The Night of the Shooting Stars, Oct. 10, 7:30
p.m.; Last Year at Marienbad, Oct. 11, 7:30
and 9:30 p.m.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th Ave. and
Commercial Drive, 253-5455): High
Society/Kiss Me Kate, Oct. 5, 7:30/9:30
p.m.; My Favorite Year/Victor Victoria, Oct.
6, 7:30/9:15 p.m.; Adam's Rib/Pat and Mike,
Oct. 7, 7:30/9:25 p.m.; A Day at the Races/At
the Circus, Oct. 8, 7:30/9:30 p.m.; Lust for
Life/The Bad and the Beautiful, Oct. 9,
7:15/9:30 p.m.; Gigi/Seven Brides for Seven
Brothers, Oct. 10, 7:15/9:20 p.m.; Little
Women/The Women, Oct. 11, 7:013/9:10
p.m.
Vancouver Women in Focus Society
(Suite 204-456 W. Broadway, 872-2250): 70
minute programme of films by women directors, Oct. 5, 8:00 p.m.; Under the Volcano
7:15, 9:30 p.m., Ridge Theatre 16th and Arbutus, 738-6311.
Patricia Fraser. Known for its inventive and
broad range of repertoire, "dynamic and high-
energy dancing". Oct. 26 & 27 8:30 p.m.
Tickets are $7 students, Vancouver East
Cultural centre.
The Anna Wyman Dance Theatre performs
an inaugural evening of contemporary dance,
Oct. 5, 8:00 p.m. at the Gateway. Tickets
available at VTC outlets.
Hmc
The  Terror  of   Quebec  Modern   Dance:
Paul-Andre Fortier, "new wave"
choreographer, winner of the Chalmers award
for choreography, makes his Vancouver
debut with Fortier Danse Creation company.
His work has been described as being
"grotesque, provocative, shocking and
thoroughly original". Oct. 12 & 13, 8:00 p.m.,
SFU Theatre.
Dancemakers — A Cause For Special
Celebration: James Kudelka and Karen
Jamieson Rimmer choreographers, under the
artistic   direction   of   Carol   Anderson   and
Campus Sounds
Benefit    Concert    featuring:    Alexandra
Browning, Soprano, Paul Douglas, flute, Eric
Wilson,   cello,   accompanied   on   piano   by:
Phillip Tillotson and Gaye Alcock, Oct   16,
8:00 p.m. Recital Hall, Music Building.
Clubbing Around Town
Banda   Dahki:   Brazilian   music,   Oct.   5-6,
Waves:   boogie,   rock,  comedy,  jazz,  Oct.
12-13.  The Classical Joint, 231  Carrall St.,
689-0667.
Vancouver   New   Music   1984-85   season's
opening concert under guest composer John
Adams, avante garde minimalist music, Oct.
6,  at the Vancouver  East  Cultural  Centre,
254-9578.
NOTE:  Messenjah and Asiyha concert in
SUB Ballroom is cancelled.
FOREIGN SERVICE
EXAM PREP SEMINARS
Offered CANADA-WIDE: SEPT. 22-OCT. 12
SllO.oo (Tax Deductible)
Small Classes       Personal Attention
Experienced Instructor
For Information, Registration Package
CALL TOLL-FREE
MON. - FRI.   10:00 - 5:00 E D T
1-800-267-8289      1-800-267-2931
Alta., Sask., Ont., Que., N.S.,
Man.. N.W. Ont., N.B., P.E.I., Nfld.
B.C. (I 12-800-)
Ottawa/Hull Residents only: 232-3497
Our Special Student Fares are low...
Our Dollar Strong...
mLONDON
Depart from: HALIFAX, MONTREAL
OTTAWA, EDMONTON VANCOUVER
contact your local TRAVEL CUTS office for details
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
Student Union Building  University of British Columbia
604224 2344
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
1516 Duranleau Street
604 687-6033
,*••   ,-^/\/tr.   '.A*   '
+,
''+./ Am A   ■■■+ /     -k
.. '•.
'*   LovE
t
r..-    <82
m A
xQuicheS X
'   //■%                     at
'/ A,         SCXJP / SALAD
// ~              QUICHE
Ya      $5.95
f,               Everyday
xO
■/+,/                     from
/ ,,              5:30 - 7:30
/>
t      ,/m^      < at Ihe back of the Village )
A
Y/Y/y/y
%
H^gLm
kinko's copies
5706 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T1K6
.       (604) 222-1688
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
STUDENT ASSOCIATION
GENERAL MEETING
Oct. 9th, 12:30 p.m. Buch. B 221
Agenda:
1) Course selection/cuts
2) Now available: I.R. sweatshirts
Grad Dinner tickets
Seminar Schedule
FRIENDS OF CHAMBER MUSIC
SPECIAL LIMITED OFFER
SIX CONCERTS (Series one)
$45 Value Only $10.00
Prauge String Quartet     (Czechoslovakia) Oct. 9'84
Melos String Quartet
Hagen String Quartet
Berlin Octet
Borodin Quartet
Rogeri Trio
(West Germany)
(Austria)
(East Germany)
(Russia)
(U.S.A.)
Nov. 13'84
Feb. 26 '85
March 12'85
April 2 '85
April 30 '85
THREE CONCERTS (Series two)
$36 Value Only $5.00
Audubon String Quartet (U.S.A) Oct. 16 '84
Muir String Quartet        (U.S.A.) Jan. 15'85
Panocha String
Quartet                           (Czechoslovakia) March 19'85
AVAILABLE A.M.S. BOX OFFICE ONLY!!
\
51k
CECIL
HOTEL
VANCOUVER B.C.
Good to October 31,1984
Present your student card for this special offer. Page 20
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 5, 1984
KSTORE
5>SCqEQTLER
present
SMEDTLER
TECHNICAL INFORMATION DAY
Wednesday, OCT. 10th
0
0
Come & meet 2 STAEDTLER EXPERTS to answer your questions on
STAEDTLER TECHNICAL INFORMATION DAY.
SAVE up to 55%OFF on FEATURED SALE items
LOOK AT WHAT WE HAVE FOR YOU!
Pro Set Pen Set 700 PS7
First 30 ORDERS of Pro Set Pen set receive 1 FREE Compass Set worth $22.0(
Sugg. Ret. $98.00 Special $58.95 SAVE 40%
TUNGSTEN 3 Pen Set
Sugg. Ret. $95.00
TUNGSTEN 4 Pen Set
Sugg. Ret. $120.00
TUNGSTEN 7 Pen Set
Sugg. Ret. $210.00
TUNGSTEN 9 Pen Set
Sugg. Ret. $250.00
Special $42.95
Special $53.95
Special $89.95
Special $129.95
SAVE 55% OFF
SAVE 55% OFF
SAVE 57% OFF
SAVE 48% OFF
Lettering Pen Sets with
vinyl  Case
Sugg. Ret. $60.00
Special $35.95
sP
ifr
Electric Erasing Machine
Sugg. Ret. $89.95
Special $62.95
Lettering Pen Sets without
Case
Sugg. Ret. $50.00
Special $29.95
Mars Graphic Studio Box with 60 Markers
Sugg. Ret. $134.95
Special $79.95
SAVE 40% OFF
Enter the Staedtler Design
Contest '84
Your strokes of Genius could win
you CASH PRIZES totalling over
$3,000.00 __„_ Ssi«Eim*R .     .
marsgrcph/c
Ultrasonic Cleaner
Sugg. Ret. S 159.95
Special $111.95
Portopal Drafting Table 31 "x42"
Sugg. Ret. $149.00
Special $89.95
32"x48" Drafting Table also available.
S*
ifc
tfS
m
O**
Drafting Board with Parallel Straight Edge 18"x24"
Sugg. Ret. $58.95    Special $34.95    SAVE 40% OFF
23"x31" & 20"x26" Drafting Boards also available
Rono Drafting Table
Sugg. Ret. $209.00    Special $124.95   SAVE 40% OFF
32"x42" Drafting Table also available. Rono Drafting Table shown here
Rainchecks will be issued if paid in full on Staedtler Day.
ONE DAY ONLY! Don't miss it!
»swEuri£« WmlgrophlC 300C
SUS BOOKSTORE
228-4741

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