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The Ubyssey Oct 12, 1967

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Array BCAS BLASTS DICTATOR HIGH  SCHOOLS
The B.C. Assembly of Students ended its second congress Monday after aiming a hefty kick at
Mgh school administrations.
At the annual congress held during the three-
day holiday weekend at UBC, the secondary schools'
struggle for autonomy was supported.
"We condemn the present system of close
censorship of high school newspapers and unilateral
attempts to shield students from ideas judged as
detrimental to their character," the congress resolved.
Delegates also supported autonomy in student
government.
A resolution seeking legal counsel about violations of the Federal Mails Act was passed after
reports of school administrations opening student
council mail and then not passing it on to students.
In an effort to encourage greater participation
of secondary school students, the congress tentatively scheduled next year's congress at Sentinel
Secondary School in West Vancouver.
It also plans a monthly newsletter to secondary
schools and an education corps.
The corps will present university life and
opportunities in post-secondary education to students.
It will encourage high school students to
further their .studies and assimilate and analyze
secondary school problems.
The BCAS further moved that:
• the provincial government relieve classroom
overcrowding by releasing capital for increased
teacher-training and school facilities;
• the education corps evaluate the school and
university counselling services;
• an evaluation of grading systems be made
and the possibility of a BCAS-sponsored grades
board of appeal investigated;
• the provincial government resist attempts
to exclude teachers from local school boards.
Vancouver's withdrawal of Georgia Straight's
business licence "without proper legal recourse to
the courts ..." was condemed by the congress.
January was proclaimed as BCAS Education
Action Month.
The program includes presentation of a brief
listing BCAS priorities to MLA's and an extensive
public  education program.
The congress urged the formation of independent college councils like Selkirk to promote
regional college plans.
The provincial government should assume
financial responsibility for initial development and
construction of regional colleges, BCAS recommended.
Elected president of BCAS was Rhyse Phillips,
20, a third year arts student at the University of
Victoria.
— george hollo photo
UBC's FORESTERS  took  it  upon   themselves  to  help   in   the
construction of the library bell tower, Wednesday. Original
plans called for concrete as the building material, but the
Twiggs revamped the plans, believing Wood is Good.
il>       f 'MtH&EW',
Wt&\?& ■" i.~~->.
So what of it?
By MIKE FINLAY
"Everybody has their problems."
This was the terse reaction of acting UBC president
Dean Walter Gage, Wednesday, when asked about crises
facing the university library.
"We have never lived in luxury, but the library
situation now is becoming laughable," said acting librarian Inglis Bell.
In an earlier Ubyssey story, Bell said that book and
study space in the library will be totally gone by 1969,
that capital funds for building are nil, and that the grant
for buying books will be gone by early 1968.
UBC's library does not compare well with many
other university libraries, Bell said Wednesday.
"The University of Toronto has just been granted
$42 million for a new library complex," he said.
Bell said that the university was well aware of the
problems   facing  the   library.
"We'll see what can be done," Gage said.
SENATE CANDIDATES
SPEAK-BROCK-NOON
Vol. XLIXX, No. 10
VANCOUVER, B.C., THUR
224-3916
Ambulance corps
for university?
By HEW GWYNNE
A Ubyssey suggestion could result in a full-
time student-operated ambulance service for the
university.
The suggestion, backed this week by Dr.
Duncan McPherson, assistant director of the UBC
trauma research unit, involves a corps of 24
students trained to operate a new ambulance
service.
The idea follows a request by Canadian Medical Association which led to McPherson designing a new, versatile ambulance. He calls it "a
hospital on wheels."
The suggestion was made to Macpherson by
this reporter on Monday.
UBC does not have a fully-equipped ambulance. If one is needed, it must be sent to the
campus from Vancouver. A UBC student waited
20 minutes for an ambulance after a campus
traffic mishap last month.
"We are considering the idea," said UBC acting president Dean Walter Gage. Gage said he
will consult with Medicine Dean McCreary about
the purchase of the ambulance for UBC. McCreary is out of town until Oct. 16.
Gage was hesitant about the idea of manning
the ambulance with students.
"It's a matter of reliability and availability",
he said.
"We would have to screen all applicants
carefully for reliability with such an important
project."
St. John Ambulance Association have the first
vehicle in service and are reportedly very pleased
with it.
A spokesman for a downtown ambulance
company said his company pays about $15,000
for a new ambulance. The price of McPherson's
ambulance is $5,500.
Standard equipment for the ambulance includes devices for civil disaster and rugged terrain rescue. There is also a hydraulic kit capable
of prying apart four tons of metal in case of serious car accidents.
Some of the other features include a nylon
rope, a shovel, an axe, electric lanterns, wrecking bars and a hacksaw. The ambulance is capable of carrying four stretcher cases and two
sitting patients at once.
Rescue and first aid training with the ambulance could be done with St. John's and the UBC
medical school, McPherson said.
Preference would be given to resident students who would be closest for any emergency,
he said.
McPherson said the ambulance could also
be used as a standby vehicle at UBC sports
events. It could also serve for transporting
patients to and from Wesbrook Hospital.
Although one company now has a monopoly
on ambulance service around Vancouver, no
law prohibits someone else from starting another service, said McPherson.
There would be additional advantages for
students who undertake the training, McPherson
said. It could develop into a separate brigade
of St. John Ambulance on campus, and it would
equip students as professional first aid people for
summer work.
HEAVY DUTY RESCUE AMBULANCE ... may be bought by UBC. Page 2
THE      U BYSSEY
Thursday, October  12,  1967
SETTLE NOTHING
4"**^   *v
Jews-Arabs rehash war
The Arab-Israeli conflict sparked anew
Tuesday as four so-called experts on the war
tackled the issue in debate.
Dr. Jean Maruani of the chemistry department, Prof. Rene Goldman of Asian Studies,
Prof. Jean-Louis Delanoy of sociology, and
Gabor Mate, arts 4, presented both sides of the
conflict, but reached no conclusions.
Delanoy said dialogue between the Arabs
and Israelis can only take place when the former
have accepted the existence of Israel.
"It is now a fact that there are two million
people with a dynamic economy in Israel," he
said.
"They have made the land productive by
work and collective farming.
"Politically, Israel is a creation of the United
West Van blonde is
queen of education
An ex-cheerleader from West Vancouver
has been named queen of the education undergraduate society.
Barb Dee, an 18 year
old freshette, will enter
the homecoming queen
competition.
An avid skater and
drag race fan, Miss Dee
said she was amazed at
the free atmosphere she
has encountered since
she enrolled in elementary education.
A former student at
Sentinel    secondary
school,    she    has    light
grey eyes, shoulder length blonde hair, and is
five feet and seven inches tall.
DEE
Nations. It has a democratic regime, unlike the
dictatorial systems of the Arabs."
If the Arabs refuse to recognize Israel, he
said, there can be no talks to resolve the
situation.
There were many injustices in the creation
of Israel, said Delanoy, but history is made up
of injustices.
Goldman said that the state of Israel was
not an artificial state.
"There was never an Arab state of Palestine," he said. "There had been Jewish settlements there for some time.
"The Jewish pioneers abandoned their comfortable lives in Europe and America to establish their own homeland with hard work."
He said 500,000 Israelis managed to beat
back the modern Arab army—an army first
equipped by Britain and then the Soviets.
Mate disagreed with everything Goldman
said.
The basis of the crisis was that to create the
state of Israel, an Arab country had to be taken
forcefully, Mate said.
"Palestine was not an empty country," he
said. "The Zionists relied on the protection of
the British Empire, without which there would
not have been a Jewish state."
The alleged overwhelming force of the
Arabs is false, said Mate. In 1948, the total
Arabs armies had 47,000 men; the total Jewish
army, 80,000.
Israel consistently refused UN demands to
claim some responsibility for the refugee problem, he said.
"Israel's aims are clear when you see that
it is now settling the Arab territory it gained
in the June war."
Maruani said he agreed with the arguments
of both Mate and Goldman. He said both arguments were examples of using facts to prove
one side which is chosen by the debator for
other reasons.
A bank
is a bank
is a bankbank.
Except TheRoyal
Were
a
people bank.
Come on in. You'll see what we mean.
ROYAL BANK
We're approachable.
Campus gov't probe
Student, faculty, and alumni representatives will discuss the problems of university government Friday noon
in Brock lounge.
The panel will be moderated by former Vancouver
Sun education reporter John Arnett.
Panelists include AMS president Shaun Sullivan, arts
undergraduate society president Stan Persky, law professor Charles Bourne, faculty committee chairman, and
alumni committee chairman Sholto Hebenton.
BACK-T0-THE-
B00KS
EYEWEAR
Don't let poor
eyesight hinder
your progress.
If You need
new glasses,
bring your
eye physician's
prescription to
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Opening Concerts
This Sunday, Oct. 15 at 2:30 P.M.
and Monday, Oct. 16 at 8:30 P.M.
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
APPEARING WITH  THE   ORCHESTRA
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One  of   the   great   violinists   in   the   world   today   playing
WALTON'S VIOLIN   CONCERTO
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12 Monday Evening Concerts
Alfredo Conpoli. Bony Tnckwell. Vladimir Ashtena_y, Sheila Marts,
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Byron Jmh, Dfetfried Bauer, Gina Bachouer. Pierino Gamba, Uto Ughi,
Jacqueline du Pre. Simon Streatfeild. Stephen Bishop, Donald Bell
WORLD PREMIERE of commissioned work by Gincntera
VANCOUVER PREMIERE of "Bebhaoar's Feast" fay Walton
Tickets: $is, $22.50, $27.50, $35, $45
VANCOUVER TICKET CENTRE
630 HAMILTON STREET 7683-3255 Thursday, October   12,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
— kurt hilger photo
THE SOUND TUNNEL offered a good excuse Tuesday for hundreds of drenched lunch eaters
to  come out of the  rain.   But even  so,  dancing space was at a premium on a first-come-
first-serve   basis   forcing   late  comers   to   listen outside.
SAYS POLL
Medieval methods
yield booze bind
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Antiquities Reporter
Bottoms up, grads, but keep an eye on that toooze licence
posted on the wall.
It took a graduate student association executive two hours
of running around to get it.
A separate banquet licence is required for every function in
the Thea Koerner graduate centre at which liquor is served.
Bruce Fraser, president of the graduate student association,
Wednesday called the arrangement a great nuisance.
"But there's no way out of it," he said.
Fraser outlined the current procedure for obtaining a liquor
licence:
1. Get permission form from grad centre office and have it
signed by the chairman, graduate student centre management
committee, Dr. K. C. Mann.
2. Get application forms from a liquor control board store.
3. Take these and permission form to university RCMP.
They keep signed form and one copy of LCB application.
4. Return approved application to the same LCB store, pay
the fee and receive the licence.
5. Return licence to grad centre office the day before function. It must be posted at the function.
University regulations, Fraser said, prohibit drinking on
campus.
"They're making an exception in our case," he said. "And
even if they changed their minds, the LOB wouldn't give us a
long-term licence. They would require us to have a bonded stockroom."
The grad centre would also have to hire a full-time bartender
and manager if drinking any time were permitted, he said.
"But the real trouble lies in Victoria,'' Fraser said. "Colonel
MoGugan (chairman of the LCB) is very conservative."
A licence costs $1 for beer and wine and $2 for liquor.
There are at least two functions a week sponsored by the
graduate student association for which licences must be obtained.
They are a beer garden on Friday afternoons and a graduate
club night every Saturday.
City "hypocritical"
suspending Straight
^^_^ _^ |               *          1 CM   !______)        1 |           Vancouver   student   and   labor   representatives   have
W^^M^mm        Kill ICQ         !____. 1__0 m%        lfl_ft_P^C ^   blasted the City of Vancouver for suspending the Georgia
"      ^^^^»        *_*■■ ■■mii.f.       MkW^kWW*        lUIIW^ |   straight's business licence.
If           At a meeting at the Fisherman's  Hall,  Alma  Mater
the building, is 110 feet by 45               I believe the space in SUB |   Society  president   Shaun - Sullivan   said:   "There   is   some-
feet with 5,000 square feet.                presently planned for bowl- I   thing  wrong  with  a  system  of law  that  gives   a  minor
The Ubyssey has decided to          ing alleys should be used for bureaucrat   the   power   to   suspend   the   publication  of   a
extend the poll to give more newspaper."
students a chance to vote.                   Simon   Fraser   University   student   council   member
Fill in the blank and de Dave Yorke attacked licence inspector Milt Harrell's action
liver to The Ubyssey, Brock           in su,?P?nd*g the PaPer'« "cence.
Hall "The Georgia Straight raises a lot of important issues
.,   such as Vietnam, housing, and civil liberties," he said.
^___________________________ g            Two  hundred  persons  heard  labor  leader  Bob   Clair
aim             I                         |f                •       I I r* _r* -8   accuse  tne  city  01  being  hypocritical  in  suspending the
MX   hlQQClyf OOOfj   DlCFCP  l<_    Llfj[ 1   Straight's licence but allowing various lurid tabloids  to
*"WW/    \^«_/1_/t-f   piUWC   IJ    W_L_fV_./ I   be sold at newsstands.
I'll               '__#___                                 • 1           '^ne susPension was upheld Friday by a B.C. Supreme
pOftlCUlCltly QOOU lOfVQmDIfQS I   Court decision rejecting an application by the newspaper
*   ~ 1   f°r a"1 injunction to lift the ban.
UBC could be a vampire's paradise. g           The Straight is planning to publish on the University
A record total of 2,058 pints of blood was collected last 1   of B.C. endowment lands,
week in the UBC blood drive. g           Dan McLeod, editor of the suspended newspaper, said
Co-ordinator John Ritchie said this year's total was only ||   the move is being considered  as an  attempt to sidestep
58 over last year's total of 2,000 pints but was still a record. ^   the license suspension.
Nurses won first place in the inter-faculty competition with ',           Copies   of   the   newspaper   would   be   distributed   by
35 per cent of their faculty giving blood. mail to  all parts  of- B.C.,  including Vancouver,  McLeod
Forestry ran  a  close  second in the  competition, with  32 '    said,
per cent of foresters turning out, while 20 per cent of agriculture He said as far as he knew it would be legal to mail
students and engineers proferred arms. out the paper from an office in the university area.
St. Andrew's, with 69 per cent of students donating, lost "Campbell  hasn't   tried   to   control   the   Royal   Mail.
the  most  blood  among  the  residences. At least not yet,"  said McLeod  .
The campus turnout averaged  11 per cent. -          ,                 .,,,..„ S! „
Students want a swimming
pool in their new Student Union
Building.
Most voters in a Ubyssey poll
to pick a new use for a room
now slated for bowling picked
a swimming pool.
But Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan said
Wednesday the idea is all wet.
"We're hoping the administration will cover Empire
Pool and let us have use of it
in two years," Sullivan said.
He said the administration is
thinking about a new pool adjacent to the winter sports
centre.
Tied for second in the SUB
sweepstakes were pleas for a
sauna bath and a day care centre for children.
Other students desire a pub,
commercial theatre, squash
courts and giant sandbox.
The room, in the basement of ; <~w~'
TMUmSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions ore
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press service*
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242; editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loe.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-524.
OCTOBER 12, 1967
Macs plan...
Ex-president John Macdonald's long-hidden scheme
for a residential college at UBC was a commendable
attempt at combatting mediocrity in university education.
The $1.5 million plan, as revealed in Friday's
Ubyssey, was to be a complete community of scholars.
The main features of this community were to be small
classes, a small staff-student ratio, teaching by tutorials
and seminars, and freedom from examinations.
The project was shelved in 1964 after the Ford
Foundation turned down Macdonald's request for a
grant.
There was nothing new about what Macdonald
proposed. The features of the college were, as the president pointed out in his letter to the American foundation, simply the results of experiments in higher education carried out "during the first half of this century."
What was most significant in Macdonald's proposal
was what it said about education as currently practised
at UBC.
The proposal constituted a condemnation of the whole
system of pre-specialist undergraduate education at this
university. This system, Macdonald said, was not merely
bad — it was "a burial ground for talent."
In line with this view, he emphasized to the foundation that his residential college was not to become a
ghetto for an intellectual elite.
The main aim of developing a new style of education
in a separate residential college was to provide a model
for a revamping of the whole university.
Macdonald's aim was a large one as he made clear
in his letter to the Ford Foundation:
"We are confident that if our experiment is successful we can change the character of college education at
this university and can provide a useful model for
others."
A worthy project. Its instant death can mean only
one thing: reform of our abysmal system of undergrad
education is a low, low priority for the men who govern
UBC.
... Hare's job
The only thing wrong with John Macdonald's plan
to resurrect undergraduate education at UBC is that it
never happened.
It is bewildering that the project was tossed aside
after a single attempt at finding capital — from an American foundation — was unsuccessful.
We cannot believe that the astute men who compose
UBC's board of governors are incapable of finding $1.5
million to salvage an undergraduate program which a
UBC president says is killing the potential of the university's students.
Macdonald's unfulfilled vision is a challenge for incoming president Kenneth Hare. Undergraduate education must become Hare's number one priority.
It won't be easy. Hare will be faced with an established set of priorities in which quality of education
doesn't matter.
What does matter to UBC's board of governors is
more lavish buildings, more new graduate programs,
more research projects. It is this imperialistic drive
toward bigness that produces the very mediocrity
Macdonald condemned.
Hare must talk business to the board of governors
and ask them whether we can afford to run an educational program that is a "burial ground for talent."
.    EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City  Stuart Cray
News   Susan Gransby
Managing   Murray McMillan
Photo  Kurt Hilger
Associate .... Al Birnie, Kirsten Emmott
Senior „  Pat Hrushowy
Sports Mike Jessen
Wire  Charlotte Hair*
Pag* Friday Judy Bing
Ass't. City   Boni Lm
The droll drooling: troll on whom
the belle told strolled amid the fold
and took his toll. You've grot green
blood, cried Jeannie Fetish, as brother Irving bristled at Ann Arky,
who waved a toothbrush. James
Barber   padded   about   critically   in
his monk's robe, mumbling about
happiness being warm puppies and
hot pussies. Repent, said Jade
Eden, while a sober-faced Steve
Jackson refused to be licked by the
liquor laws. As the shouts and
screams dwindled to a gentle din,
in and out staggered Norman Gidney, Susan Gordon, Pred Cawsey,
Al Donald, Jane Kennon, Frank
Flynn, Scott Macrae, Paul Knox,
Terry Corriveau, Nigel Thursfield,
Hew Gynne, Nick Rundell, Richard
Baer  and   Mark   DeCoursey.
Mike Finlay deftly Gaged the situation, while Irene Wasilewski
branched out, getting to the roots
of the problem. So did Bo Hansen.
Bob Banno, Mike Fitzgerald and
Pio Uran were good sports as they
jockeyed for space in the jock shop.
Weak photographers stumbling in
the darkroom included Chris Blake,
Bob Brown, George Hollo, Lawrence
Woodd  and  Derreck Wlebb.
NEWS ITEfl-
HEAVY TRRFFIC
ON UBC CRMPUS
AND YOU WANT to sue because when you were driving down Marine at 8 a.m. you stopped
to   let a   pedestrian  cross  the   rood—but   1,536 drivers  behind  you  didn't?"
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
TVo kudo'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The Greek word "kudos",
found in bad English style as
a quite unnecessary synonym
for "fame, renown, glory," is
singular, not plural: there is no
such thing as a kudo. It is deplorable that a college newspaper should use it with plural
significance and, in an article
criticizing professors of English, with singular infelicity.
6. B. RIDDEHOUGH
dept. of classics
Watched
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I am being watched.
Somebody, a so-called friend,
has been spreading information connecting me and a certain illegal substance, a plant
from Mexico. He apparently
phoned a local hot line program and described me perfectly, in every detail but my
name.
And he said that if anyone
wanted to know name, address,
etc., they could phone him up
and he would inform. Thanks,
friend.
Of course, I feel shaken. I
realize the narcotics squad
could conceivably arrive at my
house at any moment and rip
the place to shreds looking for
evil substances.
They won't find any. But
that doesn't ease things much.
Supposing I ever did feel an
inclination towards importing some of this evil stuff
into my house — the danger
still lurks. They have my name,
forever, in their book of
doom. And probably all my
friends, acquaintances, and so
forth.
So with the police threatening to knock on my door at
any hour, and do awful things
to me and my house for possession of a substance that
now is generally accepted to
be harmless, what am I to
think?
First, this "friend", whoever he may be, I hope he is
proud of himself. He has
violated a human bond of
friendship, taken advantage
of a system.
The  society  this  person   is
working for is dehumanized to
such an extent that it tracks
down its members indiscriminately, regardless of any other
facts about them. If you possess evil materials, you are
evil. Certain substances are
evil. And that is the only fact.
Before, I felt disturbed about
marijuana busts, but I thought
this was a reasonable society
which would eventually see the
error of its ways. But now,
when it has suddenly hit me,
I feel the terror of being persecuted and watched, for actions which are nobody's business but my own.
I realize this society is no
better than totalitarian. The
person on the radio menioned
my long hair, and my wealthy
and "broken-hearted" family.
That was the final condemnation.
Like a communist in Russia
who rebels and is punished, I
have rebelled against the established order and now I
may experience the police
early in the morning or late
at night, or any time.
I know the narks are everywhere. There are supposedly
four in arts 1. Is a trusted
friend one? It is horrible, so
horrible, that I cannot lead
my life as I see fit. Now I can
trust no-one.
NAME WITHHELD
Morons ?
Editor. The Ubyssey:
In reply to Miss Kirsten
Emmott's article centered on
my letter of Sept. 28, I would
like to point out the following.
I did not say that the alternative proposed was the best
solution to the situation. I did
not say that a fee increase
would inevitably follow the
hiring of more faculty. I did
not refer to students as an
apathetic mass of morons.
(Perhaps this is the view Miss
Emmott holds of her fellow
students?)
TONY WARREN
dept. of microbiology
'Not  national'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
1) Argument: CUS is a "national" student union. It is our
duty as conscientious citizen-
students to support it.
Reply: CUS has no effective
Quebec representation. The
only possible way to regain a
truly national outlook is to convince Quebec to rejoin. The
only possible way to do this is
massive decentralization. Meanwhile, calling CUS "national"
is a dangerous mockery.
(2) Argument: CUS lobbyists
were instrumental in gaining
student loans and tax-deduct-
able fees.
Reply: Any pressure group,
even if well-organized (which
CUS is not), has only a potential of partial influence on government policy. On these items,
CUS has not fully utilized any
potential it may have.
(3) Argument: If we don't
like CUS as now set up, we
should stay in and try to change
it at the next "national" con-*
Reply: This would be a valid
argument if not for the following considerations:
a) UBC is committed to
coughing up some $13,000 if ^
our delegation merely attends
the next Congress. We're locked
in, in a nice tight legal bundle.
This policy was decided at the
Congress, so we can withdraw
now—but not then. «..
ib) The nature of student government involves transient personnel. There is little continuity. Every year the same problems come up, with little personal past awareness to aid in
resolving them. CUS is one of
these continuing problems.
c) We must stop shirking our
duties. Leaving a major problem to next year's council and
next year's students (ad infin-'
itum) is a blatant abdication of
our responsibilities to this
year's people.
Only by challenging the CUS
status quo now, can we hope to
initiate effective decentralized
programs and have sufficient
funds to enable their administration.
(4)  Argument:   UBC's withdrawal will  sound  the death*
knell of CUS.
Reply: Why pump over $10,-
000 worth of adrenaline into a
dying duck ?
MIKE COLEMAN,
law 3. Thursday, October 12,   1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
AMS budget battered by heavy
criticism, passes first reading
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
After an hour of debate Tuesday night, council passed its first reading of this year's Alma
Mater Society budget.
Approval of the $478,000 budget, came on a
vote of 11 to six with one abstention — medicine
president John Cairns.
It was criticized by university clubs chairman Mike Coleman, arts president Stan Persky
and Cairns.
Their complaints centered on treasurer Dave
Hoye's decision last month to freeze funds of the
arts undergraduate society and not to give them
a budget.
Cairns also asked why only $7,000 of the gross
budget goes to the undergraduate societies.
"The allocations are not fair," Cairns said.
"We've got on our backs this huge expense
of the Student Union Building.
"I find it extremely hard to justify to the students the expenditures of this society when the
only relevant programs are carried on by the
undergraduate societies."
Hoye and agriculture president Gene Zab-
awa defended the present method of budget
allocations.
"This council is a society and its books have
to be balanced," Zabawa said.
20   profs  show
for Vietnam meet
Twenty faculty members turned up for the
first general meeting of the University Teacher's   Committee   on  Vietnam   Tuesday.
Sociology and anthropology prof. Bill Willmott chaired the meeting in Bu. 100.
The main topic under consideration was the
International Days of Protest rally to be held
Oct. 21.
The rally is being co-ordinated by 40 representatives of such organizations as trade unions,
political parties and peace church and student
groups.
The committee decided to mail a flyer on
the rally to sympathetic faculty members.
"There's not enough money to give enough
to all the undergraduate societies," Hoye said.
"The action is at the undergraduate level but
not at the undergraduate society level. The great
pity in this budget is that we have no money for
any new or stimulating programs."
Arts president Persky called the budget inhuman.
"The budget makes no requirement for
humanizing student government," Persky said.
"You have made it impossible for arts to put
out any publications," he told Hoye.
Hoye read a letter he received June 8 from
the arts council asking for a $10,000 grant from
the AMS. The money would have been used for
arts publications, The Moon and the Vancouver
Review of Books, symposia, free dances and
speakers.
"We're putting up $150,000 a year and arts
students don't feel they're getting much in the
way of tangible returns," Persky said.
Hoye said that arts had received a $400 grant
from the finance committee in August to cover
costs of the anti-calendar. He said he was told
that arts would rent their assigned 1,100 lockers
to cover the rest of the cost.
The final cost of the anti-calendar was
$1,649.90. Technically, arts has a budget deficit
of more than $1,200 but since the AMS is responsible for all debts incurred by its subsidiary
organizations its bills will have to ibe paid by
the AMS, Hoye said.
"I think the way arts handled the money in
regard to the anti-calendar was money well
spent. I think this warrants another grant," Coleman said.
The budget will now go back to the budget
committee for possible changes and return for
final approval at next week's council meeting
Oct. 17.
Cominco  gives
Four UBC undergraduates have won $1,600
scholarships from Cominco Ltd.
They are Brian Edwards, science 3; Brian
Hagan, applied science 3; William Hocking,
science 3; and Gary Schinkel, applied science 3.
Each receives $800 a year for two years.
IMPATIENT!
phone the Friar for
Delivery. 224-0833
PIZZA
CHICKEN
FISH & CHIPS
SPAGHETTI
CHILI
HAMBURGERS
OTHER BURGERS
BEEFEATERS
BEVERAGES
SANDWICHES
If you want more
Dine inside at 4423 W. 10th
We Believe In Quality
NOTICE TO '68 GRADS
Your FREE Grad Photos
Now Being Taken
Mobile Studio Locations
Oct. 2 to 13
Education Bldg.
Oct. 16 to 30
Huts by Brock
Arts Students Anytime
Hours — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointment Needed — No Cost
(This Service is Covered by Your GRAD FEE)
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10th & Burrard
736-0261
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
COMMERCE^
^ECONOMICS
MATHEMATICS -H
^STATISTICS
RELATED DISCIPLINES
The Public Service of Canada
needs graduates for a development program  in
areas such as  Financial  Management
Management & Systems Analysis
Organization & Methods
Personnel  Administration
Trade Agreements
General Administration
Examination to be held at 7 p.m.;
Tues., Oct. 17, 1967
in Room 106, Buchanan Bldg.,
Vancouver, B.C.
No applications needed.
For exam exemptions or more
details, get our booklet from your
university placement office or
contact the appropriate office of
the Public Service Commission
of Canada.
STUDENT SPECIALS!
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OFFICIAL
NOTICE
GRADUATE  STUDENT  ASSOCIATION
FALL GENERAL MEETING
Thursday
October 26,1967
12:45  p.m.
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
LOWER LOUNGE
SPECIAL BUSINESS:
CENTRE EXPANSION
FEE INCREASE
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DOWNTOWN Page 6
THE     U BYSSEY
Thursday, October  12,  1967
IDiAS AT LARGE
By DAVE SUZUKI and
TONY  WARREN
Dept. of Microbiology
The Ubyssey of October 5
carried an article by Miss Kirsten Emmott entitled "Some
profs show promise." The article gives us cause for concern,
because we expect candidates
for student senate positions to
be able to present reasoned,
thoughtful arguments without
being pompous and dogmatic.
Miss Emmott's article indicates
clearly that she lacks this
ability. Our reasons for thinking so are discussed here, together with our views on the
situation.
What criteria does Miss Emmott employ to reach the conclusion that Warren" has the
wrong ideas"?
The statement that "upper
year classes are not crowded
with loafers" implies that either
many students are motivated
by courses taken in earlier
years or that many are eliminated by the upper years.
We feel the latter is more likely
and it is precisely this attrition that we suggest may be
avoided by entrance exams. It
is absurd to bemoan the fact
that exams would only "deny
education to another sector of
the people," when this sector
is not capable of coping with
the education.
Which authorities is Miss
Emmott quoting when she says
that "everybody knows exams
are no measure of a person's
ability"? To which ability and
to what kind of exams is she
referring? We feel that exams
can be constructed which do
permit a critical evaluation of
reasoning capacity as well as of
factual knowledge.
Miss Emmott writes that an
entrance exam is only "a measure of desperation." We feel
that the situation is desperate
and that hundreds of students
suffer an inferior education for
reasons which can be partially
eliminated by student selection.
In addition, Miss Emmott re
marks that "the number of students can be regulated by the
usual admission procedures."
But such procedures rely on
high school records which are
based ultimately on examination (which vary from school
to school and which have already been dismissed as meaningless). Miss Emmott asks
"why should students have to
pay for more profs"? Has Miss
Emmott paused to consider that
the public pays, too, and that
it can be asked, also why should
the public go on paying to
educate students who do not
have the ability? We favor the
concept of a university education for all who have the ability
for it, a more realistic concept
than that of a university education for all. This is not to be
construed as indicating that we
do not favor the idea of some
form of advanced education for
all.
Dr. Chitty is one of the university's outstanding teachers.
However, present student enrolment and faculty teaching
loads preclude the application
of his methods to first and
second year courses, or even
to many upper year courses.
It is apparent that in her
article Miss Emmott evaded the
Soggy, too
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
Thrusting wildly out of the
Plonk-Puce bushes early today,
a 200-man squad of puce blorg
dentists gained final refills.
"It was hard — not to say
soggy — but we managed to,
in a manner of speaking, come
through," a spokesman for the
dentists told reporters.
Authorities in this stinking
island mud-hole said not only
were they not responsible but
also they lost a package of
chiclets.
FUN WORKING IN EUROPE
GUARANTEED JOBS ABROAD! Get paid, travel, meet people.
Summer and year 'round jobs for young people 17 to 40. For
illustrated magazine with complete details and applications
send $1.00 to The International Student Information Service (ISIS),
133, rue Hotel des Monnaies, Brussels 6, Belgium.
I
"EXODUS
RETREAT
INTO THE WORLD"
Friday. Oct. 13, 7 p.m. to
Sunday, Oct. 15, 2 p.m.
AT
LAKE SAMISH, WASHINGTON (Near Bellingham)
FRIDAY NIGHT FEATURE FILM: "THE ISLAND"
Guest Leader. Pastor Hershie, U. of Wash.
Discussion Text: '^Exodus into the World"
Total cost: $8.00
Phone: 228-8220  or  224-1614  for   information
. concerning rides, etc.
Sponsored by the LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
basic issue originally raised —
can education be improved by
raising the standards required
of students? Our answer is in
the affirmative. However, we
admit that this is but one possible solution. Unlike Miss
Emmott, however, we are deeply concerned for the talented
people who deserve the" best
education possible.
FREDERIC WOOD STUDIO
Canadian Premiere of a New British Comedy
LITTLE MALCOLM
AND HIS STRUGGLE AGAINST THE EUNUCHS
by David Halliwell
October 12-21     —    8:30 p.m.
STUDENTS: 75c ADULTS: $1.50
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre
Room 207 or 228-2678
MAIDS 50c
MAKERS $2
Friday, Oct. 13
Seeds   of Time
Coastmen
• t
Saturday, Oct. 14
French  Hand  Laundry
Coastmen
LIGHT    SHOW    STROBE    DANCE
RETINAL CIRCUS
1024 DAVIE 9 P.M.-2 A.M.
indian
ragas
ai
akbar
khan
Renowned Musician and Brother-in-Law of Ravi Shankar
Ali Akbar, sarode; Mahapurush Misra, tabla; Ashish Khan, tamboura
Presented  by Special  Events
Friday, Oct. 13
Auditorium 7:30 p.m.
Students $1.50
Adults $2.50
Tickets at A.M.S.
or at Door Change
of luck
at Undercut
/ MM Mi     M Mm/i IV Mm
Vol. 42 beers at least
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER  12,  1967
No. 139
Undercut swings again
Satisfy yourself,
let it all hang out
The time has once more rolled around when we Friendly
Foresters invite all of you ragged-out UBC students to join
with us as we partake of our pleasures at the most unique
bash of the entire university year.
Yes,   the   time  to   let   down
Or*"
"AFTER WHAT I SAW last year, I'm not going to miss Undercut '67 for anything," says Snoopy
as he gets his wagon ready to transport its valuable cargo to the Showmart Building.
Foresters pulverize all competition,
Undercut offered as compensation
This week is Forestry Week
and the whole campus is shuddering in awe   at    the mighty
, strength of the tree men.
The university muttered a
prayer of thanks and heaved a
sigh of relief when the Faculty
of Forestry up and migrated
south. to their new fortress of
this year.
To a man, those hordes of
feeble individuals were grateful that they could now retire
. into their quiet, secluded and
apathetic burrows without perpetually being called to action
by their energetic, out-going
and diligent leaders, the Foresters.
However, their false security
and miserable existence was not
long to last.
The Foresters were quick to
realize  that,   in  their  absence,
the    university    campus    was
•v mouldering into apathetic ruin.
Without hesitation, FORESTRY WEEK was organized,
events were scheduled and
challenges issued.
But what happened?
Surely since last year the
weaker and dependent faculties
could not already have sunk
into such a despairing state?
*« The Foresters used to have at
least some competition in previous years from such mediocrity as the Engineers and the
Sciencemen; but now even that
has become a matter for concern and even ridicule.
A brief summary of the events
and the results shows how depressing the situation has become. Perhaps, though, the
Foresters are looking at the
matter with the wrong perspective.
Perhaps they are unduly discrediting the rest of the university and are not quite recognizing their own strength and supremacy.
We do not really know the
answer but it has to be one or
the other.
Anyway, the following schedule tells all.
TUESDAY:
SNOWSHOE RACE
(Main Mall)
4.  Engineers
1. Forestry A
2. Forestry B
3. Home Ec.
DOUBLE BUCKING
1. Forestry
2. Science
3. Engineers
WEDNESDAY:
A demonstration of leadership and ingenuity by erection of the Bell Tower in
front of the Main Library.
MORAL — Don't waste
money in superfluous construction.
THURSDAY:
BURLING
(Library Pool)
1. Forestry A
2. Forestry B
3.   Forestry C
LADIES' BOOM STICK
RACE
(Library Pool)
1. Home Ec.
2. Nurses
FRIDAY:
LOG RACE
(Main Mall)
1. Forestry
2. Engineers
BOAT RACE
(Main Mall)
1.  Forestry
All others were disqualified
for cheating in an effort to
catch up . . .
The Foresters wish to extend
their thanks to all their challengers and their sympathy to
all those who failed to make
the grade.
They realize now that no one
can match their standards in
any field and apologize for their
recent neglect of their dependants.
As some compensation for the
smashing defeats inflicted, the
Foresters extend a cordial welcome to all University of B.C.
students with AMS cards to attend the fabulous annual blast
at the PNE Showmart Building.
Everyone must swallow their
pride and their booze and let
loose at the magnificant UNDERCUT.
Tickets available at the AMS
or at the Forest Club Office on
the basement floor of the new
MacMillan Building.
your hair and really enjoy
yourselves is upon us again. Forget all your inhibitions and relieve those old frustrations in
the good time-tested way! Come
and join us at our annual wing-
ding. The UNDERCUT is swinging your way again.
Grab your date and a couple
of crocks of your favorite "oil"
and become part of the throng
of people who will be swinging
to the music of your favorite
band, HANK THE HOBO &
HIS HILLBILLIES.
We were again fortunate to
acquire the services of this
showstopping entourage of artists for your listening, dancing, staggering and crawling
pleasure.
The scene of all this action is
the Pacific National Exhibition
Showmart Building. Things will
get under way at 8 p.m. and
the smash will wind up when
everyone staggers out or is carried out at 1 a.m.
The Undercut is by tradition
the most successful dance on the
UBC social schedule.
The dress is hard-times and so
is the action.
Act as you feel like acting
and say what you bloody well
feel like saying.
Nobody will even remember
your being there, let alone what
the hell you were doing or saying. After all everyone will be
enjoying themselves to their
capacity and then some.
From all the fun and frolic
comes the catch phrase of the
Undercut . . . ANYTHING AND
EVERYTHING GOES.
For those of you who need
to cut your oil with something
sweet (weak-bloods and Arts-
men) we Foresters will have
Hanks of "schweppervescence"
for your convenience.
It was noted in the past that
Artsy types drink mixer
straight. Whatever its use it will
be available at a small cost per
serving as is usual.
Everyone pickup your ticket at the AMS office or from
any friendly Forester at the
minimal cost of $4.00 per couple.
At least one member of the
couple must be the holder of a
current AMS card.
Grab your gunny sacks, grubby clothes, dates and crocks of
tonic and head for the PNE
Showmart Building on lucky
Friday, October 13th, at 8 p.m.
That's TOMORROW NIGHT.
See you there !!!!!!!!!
EUS.
The Plank is NOT
published by The Ubyssey. It is a product of
the Forestry Undergraduate Soc iety
which is solely responsible for its content. Page 2
THE     PLANK
Thursday, October  12,  1967
THE PLANK
Published annually by the Forest Club of UBC with the help of a
few cases of beer, lots of goodwill and a little sweat.
Editor: T. Lewis
Contributors: Pete Ashton, Frank Gregory, Bill Motyka, Chris Motyka,
Derrek Webb, Jim  Whyte,  Dan  McCallum.
The assistance and helpful advice of Murray McMillan of The Ubyssey
staff is gratefully acknowledged.
OCTOBER 12, 1967
"Wood is Good?"
— The Uncertain Forester, 1966
Neanderthals ?
I may be wrong, for my knowledge of history is
certainly not at par with that of our esteemed UBYSSEY
editor, but it seems to me that Neanderthals were characterized by long shaggy hair and thick flat foreheads.
Thus Mr. Stoffman has been seeing Neanderthals where
they aren't, and what's more important, newspapermen
where Neanderthals reign.
Mr. Stoffman has told us that neither himself nor
his staff is prepared to accept any direction from AMS
Council with regard to the content of the paper. Furthermore, any attempts by councillors to improve the UBYSSEY are "totally unacceptable."
I ask you, Mr. Stoffman, whose papet is the UBYSSEY? At present it seems to belong to a group whose
only interest in journalism is to expound the weird and
perverse thoughts in the guise of humanism.
I ask you again, Mr. Stoffman, who are the true
humanists? Are they the people with flowers in their
hair and kaleidoscopes in their brains? I say no. The
seat of humanism lies in the people who work to raise
our technology to such a level of affluence that programs
such as Arts I may exist.
Come on, Mr. Stoffman. We've had enough of this
Arts Undergraduate Newsletter reporting. Let's see
something representative of ALL of the students on
campus.
Reflections
It is rathe* disconcerting and confusing to become a
fourth year student.
What happened to all our classes?
We no longer have that slight guilty conscience
when we sit in the Cecil over a beer or more because in
fact we are no longer missing classes. The time is our
own to use as we wish.
But surely it cannot be that easy. Maybe we deserve
it? We have ground our way through three years of this:
supported vacant heads over thread-bare right elbows,
the faithful a fifth with their wrists aching as they
gouge out five-ply carbon-copy notes while the other
four-fifths are diversely occupied in the Ponderosa, the
education lounge or just haven't made it today.
Yes, it has been tough. We have spent multitudinous
hours studying bedroom zoology, enjoying beer-parlor
hydrology, calculating the genetic patterns set up by last
night's planting and seeding or sweating through a period
of 28-day mensuration.
But what a shock to be cut from 28 or 30 hours to
14 or 16 hours a week of scheduled lecutres and labs.
It is only the beginning of the year but much time will
be wasted before we learn how to use it to our best
advantage.
Why on earth did they not give us credit for more
common sense and maturity in earlier years?
Doors are opening—if only very slowly and slightly.
If you are brilliant you can now take some courses of
your own choice, but it's hard, even then it's hard.
If you are not brilliant you do not stand a chance,
no matter how hard you try, how much you may have
improved or how much increased personal benefit you
may derive. Your own judgement of where your interests lie is not respected and you cannot argue your
case.
Marks. Nothing else is of any consequence. A first
class student is given full credit for the third year spring
camp when he never even left the cabin owing to an
unfortunate accident, whereas a mere second class stu-
. dent is not allowed three days; off, although it costs him
over $100 a day, unless he makes up those days before
he graduates.
Such a decision generates ill-feeling.
The attitude students now take is that it is no good
asking for special consideration because they already
know the answer.
We do a lot of complaining — it must be a part of
university training — and it's only the complaints and
refusals which become broadcasted.
However we have made it to fourth year and
at last the future looks bright. We have broken out of
high school and finally made it to university. We have
a badly-needed new building and some badly-needed
new staff.
All we lack now is communication, co-operation,
consideration and respect.
"IS HE IN CHARGE of this year's paper drive for the Salvation Army?" "God only knows."
f^K
£<^t?|»fl-"
m?y£
EDITOR, THE PLANK,
It is hard to believe that after
investing $4.6 million dollars in
the new MacMillan building the
University is loath, if not only
super-slow, to construct a few
hundred feet of sidewalks to enable students to get from the
new building to the centre of
campus.
At the present time transferring from the MacMillan building elsewhere is a matter of life
and death. Death lurks in many
deep mudholes and sewer trenches dug out by construction crews
and left open for an unreasonable period of time.
If Joe Student survives and
makes it to some other part of
campus he is plastered with mud
to the knees or even higher. And
the monsoon season has only
just begun.
In addition a mere hundred
feet of walk leading to B lot
would certainly help to keep the
lawn on Agronomy Road from
becoming first a mud hole and
later a death trap for commuting
students.
Would you believe that on
Tuesday the elegant inner courtyard of the new building was in
places under five inches of
water. What kind of control does
this university exercise over its
contractors ? Very little, I would
say.
TJPTOMYKNEES
DEAN'S MESSAGE
BY  J. A. F.  GARDNER
Forestry outlook good
Forestry and Agriculture
have moved into their new
quarters in the H. R. MacMillan
building.
It is named for Dr. H. R. MacMillan, the first Chief Forester
of British Columbia.
Because Dr. MacMillan has
been a great friend of this faculty for many years and has
assisted it and its students in
many tangible ways, we are delighted the University chose to
name our new home after him.
The new H. R. MacMillan
building provides for the first
time since Forestry instruction
began here forty-five years ago,
facilities specifically designed
for Forestry education.
It acknowledges the great
and growing necessity of wise
management of our forest and
land resources.
It recognizes the interdependence of Forestry and Agriculture.
Here, we hope, will graduate
the future managers, planners,
and policy-makers who will help
resolve the perplexing problems
arising from conflicting demands
on forest and land resources.
Here will be educated a growing number of research scientists
urgently needed to solve the
problems we face in ensuring
optimum growth, protection, use
and regeneration of our forest
heritage.
Now that the annual squeeze
play is over and we no longer
have to fit into the old Forestry
and Geological building with the
geographers and geologists, it is
hoped that an increasing number
of high school graduates will
choose forestry for further study
so we may take full advantage
of the new facilities and meet
the growing need of our country
for professional foresters and
forest scientists.
Looking ahead, there is every
indication the strong demand for
forestry graduates will continue
and will increase.
The current extensive expansion of the pulp and paper industry will necessitate greatly
intensified and improved forest
management in our province,
which has approximately one-
third of the pulpwood inventory
of Canada.
Furthermore, projection of demand for wood for fibre, lumber
and plywood indicate still greater expansions in the future.
The demands on our forests
for recreation and non-extractive
uses are also growing very rapidly and these cannot foe denied
Until recently the main concern
of forest administrators has been
with the assessment of the resource and the most economical
harvest.
Now new attitudes and policies are plainly necessary and
the professional forester today
may be involved in a number of
activities associated with the
multiple use concept such as recreation, watershed, fish and wildlife, and grazing management.
The possibilities for conflicts
of interest in policy, and operations are considerable and many
graduate foresters skilled in forest resources management will
be required to assist in their
resolution and management.
Already forestry graduates
play an important role in parks
management and many more will
be required for this activity in
the next decade as our park sys-»
tern grows to meet the demand.
Among, the great variety of
other employment possibilities
for forestry graduates, perhaps
the most acute shortage of suitable graduates is in the field of
wood science and technology.
The wood using industries
offer good career opportunities
in research, development, production, distribution, sales and,
after experience, senior admini-*
stration to those graduates with
an understanding of the physics,
mechanics and chemistry of
wood.
Unfortunately, very few have
chosen to specialize in this field.
Many forestry graduates with
post-graduate training are needed now for research and teaching.
In the next five years, the
Canada Department of Forestry *
hopes to recruit several hundreds
for research in various fields of
forestry and forest products
across the nation.
Also, virtually every forestry
faculty in North America Is
searching for staff but there is a
great shortage of adequately educated teachers.
Forestry and wood science offers education and training in*
the application of science to the
wise management and use of our
most important renewably resource leading to a great variety
of challenging employment
opportunities within our own
borders. Thursday, October 12,  1967
THE    PLANK
Page 3
SHE CAME, we saw, she conquered. Thus is Denise Sexton. Denise will be representing both
Forestry and home-ec in the Homecoming Queen Contest. Although she is only a little shorter
than a peler block Denise is charming, enthusiastic and above all wholesomely Genuine.
We're proud to have you Denise.
IN NEW BUILDING
New faces enter new scene
After many frustrating years
of waiting, the Faculty of Forestry has moved into a new building.
The old forestry and geology
building, considered as a temporary structure away back in
1923, is now the home of geology
and geography and will serve
this new function probably for
many years.
The H. R. MacMillan Building
was built over a period of 20
months at a cost of $4.6 million.
Although graduate student facilities are poor and study space
for undergraduates is limited,
the new building does 6ffer many
advantages over the old.
The most important is the
Forestry — Agriculture Branch
Library which replaces the old,
over-crowded and loosely-run
forestry reading room.
Because of the hard work of
* dean J. A. F. Gardner, several
badly needed new faculty members have been added to the
staff.
Connor Boyd is particularly
interested in systems analysis
and will work on problems of
optimizing harvesting operations.
He will lecture in the second
year logging course and in a
graduate course, forestry 572,
"An introduction to dynamic
programming."
He recieved his B.Sc in forestry from Edinburgh and his M.Sc
from the University of New
Brunswick in 1963. He is presently working on a Ph.D from
McGill in civil engineering and
applied mechanics.
In particular he is looking into the basic problems of operating tractive vehicles on unprepared surfaces, encountered in
woods operations.
Dr. T. C. Brayshaw, who has
worked in the taxonomy field for
the Canada Department of Forestry for 10 years has taken
over the dendrology course from
Dr. B. G. Griffith, who retired
from active lecturing last spring.
Though not a forester, having
received his PhD. in botany from
UBC in 1957, Dr. Brayshaw's
work has always been allied
with forestry.
The second edition of the
handbook, "Native Trees of Canada" has been prepared by him
and will be published in the near
future.
Dr. David Haley has joined the
faculty to take the fourth year
course and a graduate course in
forest economics. He received his
PhD. from UBC and has since
taught economics at the university of Toronto. However it appears he has seen the light and
returned to God's Country.
Dr. Mullick is working at UBC
under a special arrangement
negotiated between the Faculty
and the Canada Department of
Foresty by which he is both a
research scientist of the federal
department and an assistant professor.
He will teach a graduate
course and also give lectures on
the biochemical basis of genetics
in Dr. O. Sziklai's forest genetics
course. He received his doctorate
last year from UBC having completed his thesis on the biochemical genetics of anthocyanins in
barley.
He is presently engaged in research dealing with the balsam
woolly aphid problem. He wishes
to answer such questions as how
balsams and other  conifers de-
INTERNATIONAL MEET
Loggers learn
at festival
The Centennial Festival of Forestry was much mote this
summer than the Loggers' Sports events and equipment displays at the Pacific National Exhibition.
With financial support from the Canada department of
forestry and the forest industries of B.C., 32 under-graduate
and graduate students from sixteen countries on the Pacific
rim were brought to B.C. to study our harvesting methods
and forestry practises.
Delegates to the forestry congress came from Canada (UBC,
the University pf New Brunswick, the University of Toronto,
Laval University), the U.S.
Washington State University,
Oregon State University and the
University of California at Berkeley), Mexico, Costa Rica,
Colombia, Argentina, Chile,
Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, the
Philippines, Thailand, India,
Pakistan, Australia and New
Zealand.
Delegates were also invited
from the U.S.S.R., China and
North Korea but they declined
to attend.
On the first day of the congress a day of lectures by noted
men of government, industry
and education was held. The
next three days were spent on
Vancouver Island as guests of
MacMillan and Bloedel, S.
Madill Co. and the B.C. Forest
Service.
Typical coastal logging methods were observed and the
production of lumber, plywood
and pulp and paper were examined. As guests of the B.C.
Forest Service the delegates
visited the Cowichan Lake experiment station where the
forest genetics work of Dr. Alan
Orr-Ewing was highlighted. The
Duncan Forestry was also toured.
A one-day trip was taken to
Williams Logging at Spuzzum
in the Fraser Canyon where, in
conjunction with Skagit Equipment Co., experimental grapple
yarding was toeing tested out.
The new method cuts down
the number of men working on
a logging side by about 50 per
cent by removing two or three
chokermen, a hooker and a
chaser.
After viewing the PNE parade
on Saturday, the delegates
travelled to Prince George
where the impact of the new
pulp mills and of integration of
the .forest industries was examined. One day was spent on
the woods operations of North-
wood Pulp Ltd.  on their Pulp
Harvesting Area   and   on   Tree
Farm Licence No. 30.
Reforestation was stressed
and visits were made to areas
scarified to promote natural
regeneration and to areas that
had been planted with white
spruce grown at the new B.C.
Forest Service nursery at Red
Rock, south of Prince George.
On the following day the
group toured Prince George
Pulp and Paper Co.'s mill in
the morning and in the afternoon Lloyd Bros. Logging Ltd.
logging operations and sawmill.
This company is one which in
the near future, if not already,
will experience more and more
difficulty in obtaining timber as
competition for stumpage from
the several large pulp company
complexes for the small size
timber this company utilizes becomes stiffer.
The morning of the final day
of the congress was devoted to
a wind-up seminar on the impressions  of the  students.
The most frequently used
word in this seminar was "fabulous." The three American students were most impressed by
the willingness of the B.C. loggers to innovate, try out and
rapidly implement new methods
and equipment as they become
available.
The mobile steel spar has
virtually eliminated the use of
spar trees in B.C., yet the wooden spar is still the most commonly used method in Oregon.
The Asian delegates were
especially impressed with the
degree of mechanization both
in the woods and in the mills.
Other delegates were particularly interested and surprised
with the extensive safety programs implemented by all
phases of the B.C. Forest Industry.
However the one most impressive part of the congress
was that so many people of the
industry, government and the
university could work so well
together to organize such a comprehensive look at forestry in
B.C. in only ten days.
H. R. MacMillan Building
CONTINUED
fend themselves against insects,
mechanical and microbial injury,
how insect enzymes cause hypertrophy, how callus formation Is
initiated and why the balsam
woolly aphid attacks only the
genus Abies.
Mullick wants to answer these
questions on the molecular level.
To date the compounds anthocy-
anidin and 1 e u c o a n thocyanin
have been isolated and found to
be an integral part of a tree's defence mechanism.
Bart Van de Kamp received
his B.S.F. here in 1964 and is
just now completing his PhD. at
Aberdeen.
His thesis is "The Biology of
Peridermium pini — an Autoeci-
ous Rust of Scot's Pine."
Van der Kamp will join the
faculty in early December and
will lecture in forest pathology
next spring.
Jack Walters was appointed
director of the UBC research
forest at Haney last spring after
serving as acting director for the
preceeding year.
He was research forester at
Haney from 1956 until 1966 and
is well known in forestry circles
for his work on container planting, particularly for his "planting gun." Page 4
THE    PLANK
Thursday, October  12,   1967
FORESTERS CONVENTION WILL be held at noon today. Due to overcrowding, the proceedings will be conducted in front of the main library. (Reserved seats will be available for
artsie-fartsies and  frosh   on  the fourth floor.)
READ AND RETCH
Humor department
Powerful mowers
present   problems
Power driven rotary lawn mowers are a boon to the shiftless suburbanites whose lawns are full of dandelions, buckthorn
and other weeds too tall for the reel type conventional grass
cutters.
The Rotary mower, however,
is not an unmixed blessing.
Unseen rocks and sticks, to
say nothing of unburied bones,
will raise hell with  the blade.
So will nail, bits of wire and
other metal debris.
But these problems fade into
insignificance when compared
with the unhappy result of running this type of mower over
newly-deposited dog shit.
Until you have had your shoes
shined with pulverized dog shit
you cannot appreciate the extent
of the problem.
Now cat shit, to be sure, smells
worse, but cats as everyone
knows are more careful to cover
up their waste than are dogs.
Moreover, cats do not shit as
much as dogs, unless you have a
very small dog or a very large
cat.
There are a number of approaches to the problem of animal excreta and the Rotary
Mower, but unfortunately, no
real solution.
First, of course, you can try
to keep dogs and cats away from
your lawn.
The only effective method of
doing this is to buy a dog bigger
than any other in the neighborhood and train him to chase
other dogs off your grass and
also to shit on the neighbour's
lawn.
There are obvious drawbacks
to this method of combatting the
problem.
First, there is always the
chance tha one of your neighbours will get a cow and will
train it to deposit cow shit on
your lawn.
It has been estimated that a
rotary mower operating at 3450
rpm can hurl a normal cow paddy as high as your second storey
window in addition to spreading
it over an area of 500 square
feet.
Second, building a fence is a
possible solution but is expensive.
It is, in addition, no good unless you can train your wife and
children to keep the gate shut,
and too, some dogs will jump
fences, even when full of shit.
There are various commercial
preparations sold mostly to evil-
minded old ladies, which are
supposed to stop dogs from
screwing lady dogs on your front
stoop, pissing on your shrubs,
and shitting on your lawn.
These chemicals are worthless
since it is second nature for dogs
to screw and piss.
A dog's philosophy of life is,
"Anything you can't eat or screw
—piss on it."
Even if these preparations did
work they would not solve the
basic problems created by the
rotary power mower. This leaves
three other possible solution.:
1. Let the goddamned weeds
grow.
2. Move into an apartment
and use the mower as a fan.
3. Wear brown shoes when
mowing the lawn and associate
only with people who either
don't mind the smell of dog shit
or who are too damned polite to
mention it to you.
MORE RETCHED HUMOR
A man applied for a job at the local sawmill and claimed
that blindfolded he could tell any piece of wood .........
so they blindfolded him and he was going along fine naming,
the woods they waved at him.
The well-endowed girl asked
the bartender for a Martooni"
and was served. She had a second and a third. Then the bartender asked if she cared for
another. "I don't like Martoonis
—they give me heartburn," she
answered. And the bartender
countered with, "For your information, lady, the name's not
Martoonis but Martini, and you
haven't got heartburn, your left
knocker's in the ashtray."
He called his Plymouth the
Mayflower . . . because many a
little puritan came across in it.
•      •      •
An Englishman came to America for the first time and was
taken to see his first baseball
game. The first man up hit a
single and dashed madly to first
base. The next man up hit a
short double.
The man on first ran swiftly
to   third,  and the  double-hitter
nearly broke his neck making it
to second. The third man up was
purposely walked to fill the
bases, and he sauntered lazily to
first. The Englishman said, "Why
does he walk so slowly while
the others ran so fast?" His
friend replied, "Because he's got
four balls." The Englishman
thought for moment and
mused, "By Jove, that WOULD
slow him down a bit, wouldn't
it?"
He got on a very crowded
street car and grabbed a strap
for the long trip to the suburbs.
Beans for lunch had him under
great pressure and finally a big
"sneaker" became imperative to
release his visceral tension, followed by such an obvious effluvium that he nearly panicked.
Then, trying to be nonchalant,
he asked the man sitting by the
window, "Do you have a newspaper ?" And the man answered,
"No, but I'll grab a hand full of
leaves of the next tree as we
pass."
•      •      •
A certain senator had to go
to New York for a meeting, and
he wanted to take along some
Washington female companionship. He invited the girl he'd,
been drooling over for a long
time, and when she acted like
she might not be entirely opposed to the idea, he waxed
eloquent. "I have senatorial immunity," he pleaded, "so you
needed be afraid of the Mann
Act."
She giggled. "Afraid of it, she
cried, "why Senator, I just
LOVE it!"
A great way to get rid of fleas
is to take a bath in sand and
then rub down with alcohol.
The fleas get drunk and kill
each other throwing rocks.
Then the boss who just had
the secretary on his lap, came
out of the office and held his
finger under the man's nose.
The applicant said, "This one
confuses me a little . . . it's
either a pisselm or a piece of
pussy willow . . ."
• •     •
An American and an Englishman were discussing the relative merits of poets of their
respective homelands in the
pub.
Just then the Yank spotted
a guy walking down the road
after putting in a ten-hour shift
in the local coalmine and said
to his drinking partner, "Longfellow would say of this, 'Over
ithe hill and down the road,
There come a man whose legs
are bowed'."
"Not bad," said the limey,
"but Shakespeare would have
said, 'Forsooth, what manner of
man is this, Who carries his
balls in parenthesis'."
• •    •
A man was asked to give a
speech at a. Lions Club meeting.
After much thought he decided
to talk about sex.
When he returned home his
wife asked him what he talked
about. He didn't wan't to confess to his topic so he said he
talked about his flying days.
The next day his wife ran
into the wife of one of the
members. "That must have been
quite a speech your husband
gave   last   night.   He   must   be
quite an authority."
"Oh, I don't know," the wife
replied, "He's only done it
twice. The first time he lost his
hat and the second time he got
sick to his stomach."
• •     •
He was bragging about his
new sports car, "This model
has a top speed of 180 mph.
and will stop on a dime."
"Then what."
"A small putty knife emerges
and scrapes you gently off the
windshield."
• •     •
Secretary: "Your wife wants
to kiss you over the phone."
Boss: "Take the message,
I'll get it from you later."
A cop waved a co-ed over to
the curb and complained, "Miss,
why have you no red light on
the rear of your car ?"
"Officer," she answered angrily, "it's not that kind of car."
• •      •
Girls are like newspapers:
They have forms; they always
have the last word; back numbers are not in demand; they
have great influence; you can't
believe everything they say; they
are thinner than they used to be-
they get along by advertising;
and every man should have his
own and not try to borrow his
neighbours.
• •      •
Daffynition: Lover's leap —
the jump between twin beds. Thursday, October  12,   1967
Th E      UBYSSEY
Page 11
IN  THE  RUNNING
Senate statements stated
Chicken glands a la calcium
international award recipe
Following are the platform
statements of the candidates
for the position of student senator.
Nine candidates are running
for ihe four vacant offices.
These candidates did not
submit platform statements to
The Ubyssey:
Ian Worley, grad studies,
Mark Waldman, grad studies,
and Ray Larsen, arts 4.
Abramson
I believe the role of Student
Senators is to communicate
feelings of the student body to
the other Senators. Policy
changes such as housing, curriculum evaluation, and Faculty evaluation, should be
brought about through the
system, rather than by its
destruction. When you choose
a Senator, ensure that you do
not choose another step away
from the public. Choose wisely
— project responsibility to the
public and rebuild its confidence in us!
ARNOLD ABRAMSON
law 3
Emmott
The duty of a student senator is to protest strongly
against any move away from
effective student representation in university government,
to support all policies which
will bring about real democracy, and to co-operate responsibly on all issues which
do neither.
I will demand an end to
senate secrecy, a review of
compulsory courses and the
exam system, and a continuiiig
policy of enlarging real student voice in university affairs.
KIRSTEN EMMOTT
science 4
Pregnancy,
pill confab
lure nurses
A UBC course in obstetrical
nursing has lured more than
150 ladies with lamps from all
over the northwest.
The nurses, from Alberta,
Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Oregon, Washington and B.C., will
participate in the course today and Friday.
Organized by UBC faculty
of medicine and ' Vancouver
General Hospital at the Christmas Seal Auditorium, the
course deals with recent developments in fields of pregnancy and childbirth. It is
sponsored by the Registered
Nurses Association of B.C.
Special emphasis will be
laid on the rehabilitation of
unwed mothers and the
nurse's role in community
birth control education.
Guest speaker is Dr. R. J.
, Pion from the university of
Washington.
Co-ordinators are Dr. F. E.
Bryans and Dr. A. D. daman,
both from the department of
obstetrics and gynaecology at
UBC.
afe
What we lack in voting
power, (students will hold
four of the Senate seats),
we must make up in ability to
persuade the existing Senate
members that students are responsible enough to have a
voice in their own affairs. This
is the only way to insure
greater student participation in
the administration of the future.
I feel I can effectively represent the majority of students'
opinion to the administration
and general public.
Vote Responsibility — Vote
Hallat.
KEN HALLAT
comm. 3
To accept the responsibility
of the position of senator of
this university is a serious
undertaking. If I am elected,
I am willing and quite capable
of representing the student
body with:
1. creative and positive participation in the decision and
policy making process of the
Senate;
2. responsible action aiming at democratization of the
university government;
3. intelligent discussions and
actions to get more library and
housing facilities.
HUGH MADDIN
comm. 3
"What will four students,
among perhaps 80 Senate members accomplish? I think not
very much." So said ex-president Macdonald. A vote for me
is a rejection of such illusory
democracy and a demand for
an effective student role in
university government.
Also, I will voice student
demands for such reforms as
the abolishment of compulsory
language requirements, a revision of the entire system of
examinations, and an end to
secret Senate meetings.
GABOR MATE
arts 4
As students on Senate, persuasiveness not votes will determine our success. My efforts
will be for a more imaginative approach to UBC's problems.
I am concerned with the
stagnated curriculum, with
the outdated approach to prerequisites, and with the lack
of sympathy given the student
viewpoint.
I have no illusions about
this position, but I feel it is
a real step towards student
participation in the administration of this University.
BRIAN WALLACE
law 3
McMaster   senate   reps
threaten   to   withdraw
HAMILTON (CUP) — While most student councils are agitating for seats on senates and boards of governors, grad students
at McMaster University are threatening to withdraw from senate
and administrative committees.
Graduate student society president Don Posluns' proposed
withdrawal from participating in "any decision-making or committee proceedings which are not open or are without representative participation."
He opposed the practice of holding closed sessions of committees and other boards because it is undemocratic.
Since most committees are completely closed and non-representative, almost total withdrawal would result from Posluns'
declaration.
The motion has been tabled pending more concrete information on the rules of procedure of the committees.
FOOTBALL
Simon Fraser—U.B.C,
EMPIRE STADIUM
MONDAY, OCT. 16-8 P.M.
Student Tickets
$2.50 Reserved Tickets for $1.00
LAST CHANCE TO BUY AT REDUCED RATE
up to Friday, Oct.  13 at 1  p.m.
U.B.C. Athletic Office
Thousands of chicken glands have enabled the head of
UBC's physiology department to win an international award
for achievement in medicine.
Dr. Harold Copp will receive the Gairdner foundation
award Nov. 17 in Toronto with nine other scientists from four
countries.
Six years ago, he discovered calcitonin, a calcium regulating hormone found in the ultimo-branchial glands of birds, fish
and reptiles.
Scientists hope it may prove useful in controlling the weakening of bones in old age.
This summer Copp had a team of student "ultimo^branchial
pluckers" at two large poultry processing plants collecting
thousands of chicken glands, a rich source of the hormone.
Copp's research, reported to be originally greeted with
polite scepticism by his colleagues, is now widely accepted and
has opened up a new field in endocrinology.
CAMPUS CLASSIC
The natural shoulder suite, patterned or plain,
but definitely vested.
SEE THEM AT
RICHARDS & FARISH LTD.
786 Granville
and THE COLLEGE SHOP LTD.
802 Granville
for all of your clothing requirements Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 12,  1967
Collection
comes to
By NIGEL THURSFIELD
A collection of nineteenth
and early twentieth century
English literature valued up to
$250,000 was given to UBC because its donor didn't want it
to be split up.
Reginald Norman Colbeck, a
retired English bookseller arrived at UBC with the books,
Wednesday.
In addition to the collection
of 50,000 items weighing over
8 tons, Colbeck's stock from
his bookshop has been bought
and is to be circulated among
UBC, University of Victoria
and Simon Fraser University.
The donor said his greatest
wish was that his collection
would not be split up. He resisted offers from the British
Museum to buy books missing
from their own collection, and
negotiated with Dr. W. E. Fredeman of UBC's English department to bring it intact to UBC.
British capital gains taxes
dispelled any ideas of selling
the collection in England, he
said.
The Colbeck Collection includes the work of 485 major
and minor authors, and is expected to attract many scholars
to the campus.
Colbeck left school at 18.
After working in the library
of the British Museum for a
year, he entered an apprentice-
FORMAL
AND
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sales
Tuxedos, tails, whit, dln-
n.r   |ack«ts,   morning
coats .  . . complete size
range.
We   also   make   made-to-
measure suits.
(Sweaters by Hyde - Park)
10%   U.B.C.   Discount.
McCUISH F0W«VV«A*
Mon.-Sat. 9:00 to 5:30
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
TIME
The longest word
in the language?
By letter count, the longest
word may be pneumonoultra-
microscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
a rare lung disease. You won't
find it in Webster's New World
Dictionary, College Edition. But
you will find more useful information about words than in any
other desk dictionary.
Take the word time. In addition to its derivation and an
illustration showing U.S. time
zones, you'll find 48 clear definitions of the different meanings of time and 27 idiomatic
uses, such as time of one's life.
In sum, everything you want to
know about time.
This dictionary is approved
and used by more than 1000
colleges and universities. Isq't
it time you owned one? Only
$5.95 for 1760 pages;      $6.95
thumb-indexed.
. At Your Bookstore
THE WORLD PUBLISHING CO.
Cleveland and New York
■»♦*_?■
^J"a<°n about*
intact,
UBC
Africa talks highlight coming week at UBC
ship at a London bookshop. He
started trading under his own
name in 1928, enlarging his
private collection to its present
size.
Africa is highlighted this week at UBC.
In a series of noon hour lectures presented
by the African students association, speakers
will discuss the problems of modern Africa.
Today's speaker is Abi Jones, from Sierre
Leone, whose topic is the crisis of leadership
in  Africa.  On Friday,  Francis Tsikayi will
speak on education in Africa.
Both lectures will be in International
House.
An African Night Dance, also to be held
in International House will conclude the week.
The dance, Friday at 8:30 p.m. features the
Trinidad Moonlighters Steel Band.
"General Foods
offers you more than
just Jell-Q"
This young GF Researcher symbolizes the challenge
General Foods offers all its people — the challenge
to develop a needed product (to fill the bowl, or cup,
or glass) and sell it at a profit. The Canadian housewife has more time to enjoy today's living thanks in part
to a group of dedicated young men at GF who have
devoted much time and thought to creating products
to fill her needs — nutritious products which are quick
and simple to prepare, are reasonably-priced, and
taste wonderful.
Here's the story of one recently-developed new
product: Market studies show that almost 50% of all
Canadians do not take the time to eat a regular breakfast. To improve this situation, food scientists at General
Foods developed a dry mix which when added to a
glass of milk provides the nutrition of a normal breakfast.
Here was a quality product, created to fill a real
need. With the support of GF advertising and GF merchandising know-how, almost everyone is now familiar
with Minute Breakfast. No matter how time-pressed,
anyone can spare half a minute to prepare it. And it
will help keep them going all day long.
An objective which calls for the creation of new
products each year obviously offers a stimulating and
mind-stretching challenge — one which
can be met only by exceptional people
with a wide range of talents. If you like
challenges, you too can enjoy . . .
A career with a future from General Foods
Interesting opportunities await you in our Operations,
Finance and Marketing areas. A General Foods recruiting
team will visit your university on:
OCT.  30,  31  - NOV. 1, 2
See your placement office. Thursday, October  12,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
■•#v?
VOTE RIGGED'
Vietnamese "shenanigans" ensure
"stable" Saigon administration
Reprinted from ihe National Guardian
NEW YORK (UPS) — The "free" elections
scheduled in South Vietnam Sept. 3 will be a
fraud.
Voting will probably take place in only 5,564
out of 16,340 hamlets and villages. The other
areas are regarded as too "insecure" for balloting — that is, they are under the influence of the
national liberation front.
The new constitution bars as candidates "per-
' sons working directly or indirectly for communism . . . and pro-communist neutralism." The
interpretataion of this provision, and others like
it, is left to the whim of a violently anti-communist and anti-neutralist military junta.
"The Americans came to see me and they
tell me that they want a free election," said
Air Vice Marshall Nguyen Cao Ky. "I promise
that I'll give them one, and they smile. They say
they believe me, and then I smile."
Ky made the statement June 17 as he was
campaigning for the presidency of South Vietnam
in violation of an election law which stipulated
that campaigning could not begin until Aug. 1.
The liberal establishment in the U.S. has become critical in recent weeks because the elections have lost even a vague appearance of legitimacy.
The carefully chosen civilian candidates have
been intimidated and harassed iby the military
government. When a unified military ticket —
headed by Lt. Gen. Nguyen Van Thieu, with Ky
in second place — was agreed upon, the generals
refused to appear before the certifying committee of the Constituent Assembly as other
candidates were required to do.
Instead they dispatched secret police chief
Brig. Gen Nguyen Ngoc Loan with an armed
guard to the asembly chember to insure that
the military ticket was certified by the deputies.
Newspapers have been censured and several
suspended by "offenses against the public welfare."
Ky has threatened to overthrow any opposition ticket which won by "trickery", and drew
up plans for the junta to stay in power in any
case through a "military affairs committee."
For months the New York Times has argued
that the elections are not being carried out in
"good faith". It has warned the Johnson administration that it might be "unable to persuade
large segments of domestic and world opinion
that Saigon's experiment in democracy was
valid" because of the charges of rigging and other
abuses.
New York senator Robert Kennedy complained that the "strongest argument (for being in
Vietnam) was that America wanted free elections,
and North Vietnam didn't. That argument is
gone now."
Viet morale high, says NLF rep
MONTREAL (CUP) — The
following is an interview with
Ly Van Sau, one of the three
student representatives of the
student wing of the National
Liberation Front of Vietnam,
who are currently tuoring Quebec. The interview was conducted in IFrench by Denis
Racine of Le Sainte-Marie,
member paper of la Presse
Etudiante Nationale.
Racine: Have you personally fought gun in hand against
American soldiers?
Ly Van Sau: Yes, certainly.
We carry on the fight in military, political, economic and
cultural spheres, that is,
wherever the American attack
is felt. Because the Americans
are trying to implant their
whole way of life on us.
Racine: You receive aid from
China and Russia. Do you fear
that after the Americans leave,
you will be subjugated by these
two countries?
Ly Van Sau: Not at all. Can
ada furnishes much aid to the
USA and I don't believe the
USA will become dependents
of Canada because of it.
Racine: Who else do you receive aid from aside from
Russia and China?
Ly Van Sau: We receive
blood (of which we have great
need), medical supplies and
money from students the world
over.
Racine: What are your methods of action?
Ly Van Sau: Apart from
simple demonstrations in the
streets we publish forty newspapers and we have an underground radio which broadcasts
in all languages spoken in Vietnam.
Racine: Does American information on Vietnam conform
to the facts?
Ly Van Sau: For the most
part it is false, the truth is
hidden. They claim the aggression comes from the north to
the south, that we are com
munists when we have in our
ranks people of all political
and religious beliefs. But the
truth is stronger than falsehood, and it will come forth
in the end. The Americans are
now forced to admit their difficulties in Vietnam.
Racine: What do you think
of the attitude of the English
students at Sir George Williams University? (The NLF
was shouted down and booed
there.)
Ly Van Sau: We think that
those responsible were in a
minority and, despite wha^ The"
Georgian says on the subject,
we will always consider Sir
George Williams an honorable
institution.
Racine: How is the morale
of the troops on the NFL and
the Vietnamese peasants?
Ly Van Sau: It is higher
than the highest New York
skyscraper!
FOREIGN SERVICE
An opportunity for graduates in all disciplines to represent Canada in
international diplomacy and trade promotion.
Positions with the Department
of Trade and Commerce or
the  Department  of External
Affairs.
All applicants must write
examination to be held at 7 p.m.,
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1967
in  Room   106,  Buchanan Bldg.,
Vancouver, B.C.
No application needed.
For more details get our booklet from your University Placement Office or contact the appropriate office of the P*ublic Service Commission of Canada.
Exam scrapped
SAIGON, South Vietnam
(UPS) — Several hundred students walked out of the entrance examination for the
University of Saigon medical
school today to protest what
they called rigging of the Sept.
3 presidential election.
Leaders of several student
organizations have called for
a march to the headquarters
of the constituent assembly,
which will convene to review
complaints of fraud and illegal attempts to influence the
electorate. The charges are
directed at the winning ticket
of lieutenant-general Nguyen
Van Thieu, the chief of state,
and air vice-marshal Nguyen
Cao Ky, the premier.
Police officials said that they
would not permit the march
and were prepared to make
widespread arrests.
^ Demonstrations by university students in the capital led
directly to the fall of two
civilian governments during
the period of instability between the overthrow of president Ngo Dinh Diem in November 1963, and the accession
of the military junta in June,
1965.
The latest student protest
took place at three centers
where 4,000 students were
taking the examination for 300
vacancies in the medical school.
Shortly after the examination began, South Vietnamese
sources said, the demonstration
organizers arose in the classrooms and began denouncing
president-elect Thieu and vice-
president-elect Ky.
Other students added their
voices, apparently by arrangement, sweeping papers off
desks and tearing them up.
Then the protesters swept out
of the examination centers.
The gesure may have cost
them the chance to gain coveted places in the medical school.
Government sources were
cool to the demonstrators' demand that the examination be
re-scheduled for them after the
assembly acts on the legality
of the election.
Eight of the 10 civilian nominees for the presidency have
filed formal protests.
1.4IW4.M
RENTAL & SALES
* 2,500   GARMENTS   TO
CHOOSE FROM
* Full Dress (Toils)
* Morning Coats
* Directors' Coats
* White and Coloured Coats
* Shirts and  Accessories
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
(Downstairs)
623 Howe 688-2481
THE VILLAGE CAFE |
"Where Friends Meet and Dine
| WE NOW |
-       SERVE PIZZA |
■ Vi Block East "
I of Memorial Gym ■
at 5778 University Blvd. ■
■ Phone  224-0640 I
D. W. GRIFFITH'S
INTOLERANCE
Begins
THE SILENT CLASSICS - SERIES 3
Oct. 16 -8:00 -Aud.
in
Cinema   16's  7th   Season
SERIES PASSES AT THE DOOR
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers,  rubbers and
umbrellas.
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10%  discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10TH - 738-9833 Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October  12,  1947
ApoJit talk
By MIKE JESSEN
Uby»«T Sports Editor
Two football teams which have showed no promise in their
games to date will trot onto Empire Stadium turf on Oct. 16 and
one of them should emerge victorious.
The teams I refer to are of course the UBC Thunderbirds
and the Simon Fraser Clansmen.
While crys of "Clobber the Clan" and "Simon Fraser was a
dropout" are echoed by UBC students, Birds' football coach Frank
Gnup knows that the hilltoppers will be tough.
And why shouldn't they be ? The Clansmen have tasted
victory once this year in three games tout our own grid squad
has still not combined for a win.
In their first game, SFU beat Pacific University 6-0 and since
then has proceeded to lose 19-14 to Central Washington State
College and 17-7 to Western Washington State.
Against admittedly tougher competition, the Birds have lost
9-0 to Manitoba, 43-13 to Willamette University, and 20-0 to
Southern Oregon College.
Neither the Birds nor the Clansmen have played an impressive game to date.
It seems that when the offense has a good game the defense
falls apart and vice versa.
Coach Lome Davies' much-touted Clansmen have shown
none of their pre-season promise. Quarterback Wayne Holm has
not playeed to his potential. The same is true with many of the
other team members.
Gnup's problem has been the loss of 12 players to graduation.
It takes time to train the freshmen who have stepped up to fill
the big, empty shoes.
But the pressure is on for this first-ever meeting between the
rival Vancouver universities. Clearly, the dinner of Monday
night's game will have reason to celebrate.
. The fans will not settle for a nothing-nothing tie. Perhaps
the teams will get together and give these fans their money's
worth for the first time this season.
The rugby game which opened the Thunderbird Stadium on
Saturday produced some interesting results.
Although the birds lost 14-3 to the B.C. Reps, three UBC
players have been named to the B.C. squad when they meet the
New Zealanjl All Blacks on Oct. 14 in Empire Stadium.
Stewart Scholefield will play scrum half for the Reps while
Tom Fraine will play center and Don Crompton will be on
reserve.
Their excellent play in Saturday's game prompted their
selection.
Hoop contest aids
John Owen award
By BOB BANNO
The spirit of late UBC
trainer Johnny Owen was reborn Saturday night as two
National Basketball Association teams collided in an exhibition contest before 3,000
fans at War Memorial Gymnasium.
The St. Louis Hawks, led by
the devastating one-two punch
of 6'9" Zelmo Beaty and cat-
quick forward Joe Caldwell,
dumped the fledgling Seattle
Supersonics 139-116 in the
game dedicated to Owen.
The two established Hawk
stars poured in 75 points between them, center Beaty
scoring 41 points over the
weak Seattle pivots and Caldwell adding 34.
Beaty also snared a game-
high 24 rebounds.
Only former West Virginia
Ail-American Rod Thorn and
veteran Tom Meschery were
effective for Seattle coach Al
Bianchi's collection of retreads
and rookies.
They managed 21 and 19
points respectively.
Bianchi, desperately feeling
for a winning combination,
played almost all his charges
evenly while Hawk coach
Richie Guerin stuck mainly
with his big guns.
Besides Beaty and Caldwell,
guard Len Wilkens shone for
the Hawks. The former Pfo-
vidence University wizard
scored 14 points and amassed
an amazing 12 assists.
St. Louis, second in their
division last year, played minus
top rebounder Bill Bridges.
They took a 61-53 lead Ht
the half and simply outran
Seattle the rest of the way.
The game, sponsored by a
group of John Owen's friends,
was held to raise money for a
bursary fund named for the
long-time UBC trainer.
UBC freshman guard Ron
Thorsen, the superlative ball-
handler from San Jose, California via Prince George was
presented with the first annual John Owen Memorial
Bursary at half-time by fund
chairman   Harry  Franklin.
Thorsen's credentials are excellent.
The two-time B.C. high
school all-star has been touted
as the finest-ever prep school
guard in Canada. And, in a
telegram read to the crowd,
federal government cabinet
minister John Turner lauded
Thorsen's all around citizenship.
The physical education major will perform this year for
Norm Watt's Junior Varsity
hoop squad.
Grid Birds beat themselves
By MIKE FITZGERALD
ASHLAND, Oregon—"Well,
fellas, they didn't beat us,"
said Frank Gnup, UBC Thunderbird football coach. "We
beat ourselves."
Gravel voiced Gnup has his
moments and this was one of
them. He was boarding the bus
in Ashland, Oregon, after his
team had erred its way to a
20-0 defeat at the hands of
Southern Oregon College.
The Birds played exceptionally well on defense but the
offense kept moving toward
the goal line and when they
got there, a fumble or a penalty stopped them.
This was the story all night,
a well-played game marred by
mistakes at the wrong times.
Southern Oregon, led by
Danny Miles, the quarterback
who is rated the top small college passer in the U.S., moved
slowly on offense. It was only
Miles' flukey passes that got
their twenty points.
UBC started off with an interception by Dick Stein who
later received a serious shoulder separation. However, a
fumble finnished that piede
of luck quickly.
In the second quarter, Ron
Ritchie intercepted for UBC
again, Then the Birds, feeling
generous once more, kindly
handed it back to SOC. The
Red Raiders capitalized this
time and fullback Ron Williams bowled his way over
from the seven.
The third quarter was worse
as the offense dropped passes,
missed laterals and in one momentous play lost the ball and
twenty yards on a double reverse handoff or something
like that.
The fourth quarter was
much better as Gordon Hardy
went in at the helm and began
moving the ball in the air as
well as the ground.
Ron Sedgewick, a little
halfback who played a big
game, advanced the ball to the
fifteen on a great catch but
then the gears halted.
If   the    offense   didn't    do
SFU-UBC football tickets
still available for $1
Students have until Friday afternoon to pick up tickets for
the SFU-UBC football game for the reduced price of $1. from
the main  gym  office.
The grid contest, which will be played Oct. 16 in Empire
Stadium, will be preceded by publicity dance on Oct. 14.
The big block clulb and the booster club are sponsoring a
dance to be held in Brock on Saturday from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Dance tickets are available at Brock extension  155.
SPECIAL MEETING
FOR ALL
CLERICAL EMPLOYEES
EMPLOYED BY UBC
will be held at
ALMA HALL
BROADWAY and ALMA
WEDS., OCTOBER 18 -8 P.M.
COME ONE, COME ALL!    -
This meeting is sponsored by the University of British
Columbia Employees Union, Local 116, which represents more than 800 employees of the U.B.C. The
topic under discussion will be trade union organization
for white collar workers. There will be a question
and answer period.
President
R. BLACK
Treasurer
A. ELLIOTT
much, then the defense certainly did.
Led by Hal Stedham and'
Sam Kravenchuck, it repeatedly stopped SOC's backs and
gang tackled whenever a
bunch happened on the scene
together.
In one hilarious play, the
entire SOC offensive line moved to one side of the field
while Miles and the center
were left on the other side.
Naturally, he passed to the
center as nobody was watching him.
Then sneaky Miles thought
he could do it again. But
assistant coach Bill Reeske,
who is even sneakier, saw the'
trouble and pointed it out to
his eager line. Of course the
nation's leading quarterback
was promptly creamed.
This was the story then.
Perhaps the team had the SFU
game on its mind. At any rate,
as halfback Brenie Fandrich
put it, "Man, if we don't win
this one we might as well forget it."
Next Monday night, folks.
COMPACT
CONTACT
CONTACT UNS
vW f OS 5   <,;» :(!<:>*
LENSINE
Why carry around a whole
chemistry set full of potions
for wetting, cleaning and
soaking contact lenses?
Lensine is here! It's an all-
purpose solution for complete
lens care, made by the
Murine Company.
So what else is new?
Well, the removable
lens carrying case
on the bottom of
every bottle, that's
new, too. And it's
exclusive with
Lensine, the
solution for
all your contact
lens problems.
for contacts Thursday, October 12, 1967
BY PIO URAN
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
Thunderbird Stadium baptised
Workmen had to be saved
from muddy deaths. Cold UBC
cheerleaders ran around and
got wet. A towtruck waited
in case anybody's Continental
got stuck. Mr. Delamont and
his UBC band tried to break
the 100 decibel limit. And it
rained.
The event was the official
opening of UBC's brand spanking new $1.2 million Thunderbird Stadium.
The stadium is well named;
its basic design follows so completely the Thunderbird theme
that if UBC teams ever decide
to change their name they'll
have to build another stadium.
Pictures and news stories
cannot get across its true
beauty. The entrance level
concourse is so unstadium-like
that the concrete floors look
like they should be carpeted.
On the field a $5,000 scoreboard is a gift from the 1967
graduating class.
Even though the public address system used for the opening was a make-shift rig there
was none of the sound distortion usually found in stadiums.
No matter where you sit you
hear every word clearly.
Also, because of the angle
between roof and bleachers the
grandstand acts as a megaphone so that all cheering is
directed right to the field. Any
coach can tell you how easily
cheering can be converted into
points.
Unfortunately, the track will
not be finished until next year
so right now it looks like a
commando obstacle course
complete with bottomless mud
pits.
It was on the track that one
workman sunk to his hips and
had to be pulled out and another had to half crawl, half
swim to solid ground.
The playing field, constructed with Vancouver's predomi
nant weather in mind, is so
well drained that it remained
hard and solid even in Saturday's flood.
As UBC's director of athletics, R. J. Phillips, calmly
greeted guests and speakers
and showed them where to sit;
UBC's athletic business manager, D. L. Moore, rushed
around seeing that everything
was all right and looking for
Phillips.
Finally, after introductions,
addresses and remarks the
crowd of about 500 cheered as
AUlan McGavin from UBC's
board of governors, unveiled
the commerative plaque and
declared Thunderbird Stadium
officially open.
The program ended, doors
were unlocked and the public
allowed to examine the dressing rooms, broadcast booths,
wrestling room and (a UBC
alumni gift) the fully equipped
training room named after the
Jate John Owen, trainer of
UBC teams for almost 30 years.
Although the Birds' main
dressing rooms are at entrance
level, there are four smaller dressing rooms at field
level along with referee and
cheerleader rooms.
Visiting teams will dress and
emerge from one of the field
level rooms while the Birds
will dress in their main room
before game time and use a
field level room during the
game.
Through its beauty and the
new free admittance to home
games policy, the new Thunderbird stadium should foster
greater interest in sport at UBC
than ever before.
•%c
Rugby in the rain
opens new stadium
History repeated itself in part at UBC Saturday as our second
stadium was also opened with a rugby game.
On October 2, 1937, the rugby Thunderbirds played under
sunny skies before 3,000 people in a $40,000 stadium and lost
12-3 to "Hoy Cameron's rough and ready Rowers from Coal Harbor."
Last Saturday the rain almost took the color out of the team's
uniforms as the Thunderbirds Past and Present lost 14-3 to the
B.C. Reps before 500 fans in a $1.2 million stadium.
The game started out promising enough when UBC's Don
Crompton got a 25 yard penalty kick through and made the
score 3-0. But five minutes later Ted Hunt centered a drop kick
for the Reps and tied the score 3-3.
The first half played out evenly with the Birds missing wide
on two penalty kicks but doing a good job keeping the Reps
'busy defending their own goal.
Not having played for a few years must have made the Birds
Past a bit tired towards the end as the Reps started scoring with
ten minutes left and had the game, 14-3, by end time.
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1967-68
Effective September 29, 1967 to April 14, 1968
— george hollo photo
THE NEW THUNDERBIRD  STADIUM  was  officially  opened   on   Saturday   by  Allan   McGavin
(left), shown receiving a congratulatory handshake from UBC's chancellor, John Buchanan.
McGavin,  a  member of the  university's   Board  of Governors,  unveiled  the commemorative
plaque  for  the   $1.2   million   home   of  football,  rugby,  soccer  and  track.
TUESDAYS —
12:45.to.2:45 p.m.
WEDNESDAYS   —
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
FRIDAYS  —
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
SATURDAYS —
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
SUNDAYS   —
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
♦Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
November 10, 11, 24, 25.
December 1, 2.
January 12, 13, 26, 27.
February 23, 24.
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. —
For further information
Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
call 228-3197 or 224-3205
Officers In The Canadian Forces Enjoy Challenging Jobs
With The Excitement Of Travel and Responsibility, and
There May Be A Place For You Among Them
UNDER GRADS
May Qualify For Subsidized
University Training — Including:
• Tuition Fully Paid
0   Book Allowance
• $187 M. Salary
12  Mo.   Yr.   While   Attending   University
• Month  Paid  Holiday Annually
• Medical & Dental Care
0  An Assured Future
UNIVERSITY GRADS
May Qualify For :
0   Immediate Commissions
0   Excellent Pay
0   An Assured Future in a Unique and
Interesting Profession
0   Early Pension Benifits At Top Rates
Phone or Visit The
Canadian    Forces
Recruiting Center
547 Seymour St.
Vancouver
684-7341 Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October  12,  1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
AND ALL  THAT ROT
Lucky loggers burl  better per pond
FORESTRY
All faculties will get wet, at
the   forestry  (burling   contest,
today, noon, library pond.
CLUB CANADIEN
Daniel    Latouche    discusses
Why I am a Separatist, Friday,
noon, Bu. 102.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Organizational meeting Friday, noon, Bu. 232. All Demo-
lays and senior Demolays welcome.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau discusses What
Is Wrong with Canada, today,
3:30 p.m., Bu. lounge.
COLLEGE LIFE
Meeting tonight, 7:17, place
Vanier   common   lounge.   All
welcome.
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS
Meeting tonight, 7:17, Place
per lounge.
ECONOMICS SOC
All   students   interested   in
economics invited to a student
faculty social, tonight, 8 p.m.,
5760 Toronto.
SCIENCE US
All sciencemen requested to
attend forestry burling contest,
today, noon, library pond.
HENRI'S OWN CHICOUTIMI
KAZOO BAND
Meeting of souls tonight,  7
Foresters'  tower
sees saw-in week
The foresters rang in their
week with the erection of a
bell tower on the library lawn
Wednesday.
The tower constructed to
mark forestry week, cost $1.50
compared with a $150,000
donation to be spent on the
proposed official version.
Built of garbage can and a
few logs scrounged from a construction company, it is dedicated to the UBC students as a
permanent monument, said
Chris Anderson, forestry club
spokesman.
Today will see log burling
and broomstick running by the
home economic and nursing
students at noon in the library
pool.
Friday noon there will be a
log race and a "boat" race in
the main mall.
Festivities will be climaxed
by the "Undercut" dance, at
which the forestry candidate
for Homecoming Queen, Denise
Sexton, will be introduced.
p.m.,   4420   West   Sixth.   New
members   welcomed   to   hear
guest soloist Glenn Dreger on
spoons.
BIG BLOCK CLUB
Football dance with the Organization, Saturday,   8:30  to
midnight,  Brock  lounge.  Admission $1.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Free   lecture,   What Choice
Do You Have, today, noon, Bu.
102.
FOLK SONG SOC
General meeting today, noon,
Bu.   104.  New members welcome.
DEBATING UNION
Team tryouts, everyone
eligible. Apply AMS box 30,
before 4:30 p.m. today.
CIASP
Applications still being taken
for community work in Mexico
next summer. Information,
Brock ext. 354.
MARKETING CLUB
Dr.  Chapman of Fields department   store   discusses   his
experience  in  marketing,   today, noon, Ang. 207.
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Movie, Robin and the Seven
Hoods, today, noon, Ang. 110.
Admission 35 cents.
STUDENT WIVES
Those interested in playing
bridge and have not signed
already caU D. Ennik, 731-6920.
FINE ARTS
Dr. Arthur Porter discusses
Technology    and    Sensibility,
today, noon, Bu. 106.
SAILING  CLUB
Meeting for those interested
in sailing lessons, today, noon,
Bu. 106.
RAMBLERS ATHLETICS
Football    practice    Friday,
noon. Meet behind Brock, hut
B-9.
AFRICA WEEK
Abi Jones, a graduate student in sociology discusses
Crises of Leadership in Africa,
today, noon, IH.
WUS
Seminar on the university as
a    global   village,    Saturday,
at   St.   Marks.   Information  in
the WUS office, Brock 257.
ARTS COUNCIL
Poetry reading by San Francisco poet George Stanley, today, noon, Bu. 203. Stanley is
the Pacific Nation ambassador
to the State of Aleination.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Committee Appointments
Openings still exist on the following Student Administration Advisory Committees:
Traffic & Parking — 2 Students
Library — 2 Students
Housing — 1 Student
Letters of application should be addressed to Kim
Campbell, 2nd Vice President, A. M.S., mailbox number
53. Appointments will be made at a meeting of Students'
Council, Tuesday, October 17 at 7:00 p.m. Applicants
should appear at this meeting.
HAMSOC
General meeting today, noon,
Bu. 212.
LIBERAL CLUB
Meeting   today,   noon,    Bu.
202.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Dancing   today,   noon,   hut
L-5.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines. 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
tJNDERGROUND ROCK BANDS ARE
where it's at. For your next dance
Phone Magic Theatre.  685-1711.
KISS THE SKY AND DANCE TO
the Apollos, also the Young Generation, Sat., Oct. 14, Clinton Hall,
2605 E. Pender.
4-BIT  BROADS
and  Guys  —■  two  bucks,   this  week-
and   at    the    Retinal    Circus,    1024
Davie.  Light show,  Strobe Dance.
COUNTRY   JOE   IS   BACK
at the Retinal Circus with the Painted   Ship and  Papa   Bear's   Medicine
Show, October 20 - 21, $2.50.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
SAVE A DAUGHTER'S LIFE. DAD-
dy wants his staple gun, lost on
Club's Day. Return to Dance Club
Lounge.   Please!
LOST OPHTHALMOSCOPE HANDLE
in front of Woodward Library. Fln-
der  please  phone  224-5649.   Reward
REWARD. BI-FOCAL GLASSES IN
brown pigskin case. Lost Registration week on Campus. Gratitude.
Don,   2741523.
FOUND — MEN'S BLACK UMBREL-
la on UBC Express, Fri. afternoon.
Owner may claim at Publications
office.
DOST—SILVER RING WITH BLUE
stone in men's washroom, main
Lib. or Bu., inscription Templeton.
Finder  please   phone   Glen   2543845.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO TOOK
my dark brown suede jacket at the
Arts dance, please return same at
Publications   Office.
COUNTRY JOE HAS BEEN FOUND!
Retinal Circus has Joe, the Painted
Ship and Papa Bear's Medicine
Show,  October 20 - 21, $2.5T).
LOST — "HEMMI" SLIDERULE
last Wednesday, Oct. 4. Finder
please phone Al. at 261-7195. Reward.
Rides & Car Pools
14
GIRL WANTS RIDE TO 19th & OAK
M, Wk F or all nights after 7:15.
Phone 874-0645.
RIDE REQUIRED FROM CENTRAL
West Van. Can drive one day a
week if necessary. Phone Dave,
926-2377.
WISH TO SHARE DRIVING, PRE-
ferably for 9:30's. Live in vicinity
of Central Park.  Phone 434-0422.
RIDE WANTED 8:45 - 5 O'CLOCK
Mon. - Fri. Vicinity Dunbar and
King Ed. Phone Heather, RE 8-2407
after 5:30.
Special Notices
15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   298-5966.
SICK OF HAIRCUTS? GET YOUR
hair styled at the Upper Tenth Barber, 4574 W  10th Ave. 1 block from
gates.
GARY: WILL YOU PLEASE NOT
shoot flaming arrows In my door?
Arlene.
WATCH FOR THE BIG 3 FROM
Film Soc. November Is Movie
Month.
Automobile Parts
VARSITY DEMOLAY CLUB FIRST
meeting, 12:30 Friday, October 13th,
in Buchanan 232.
GSA WILL HOLD ITS GENERAL
meeting for fall on Thursday, October 26, 1967, at 12:45 p.m., in the
Lower Lounge of the Graduate Student Centre. Plans for Centre expansion and consequent fee increase
will be discussed.
COME TO "MARRIED STUDENTS'
Dance", "Green Park", Oct. 13,
8:30. "Live music". Bar. $2.00 a
couple at door,   327-1094.
C.O.T.C. PIPE BAND TONIGHT IN
Armouries at 7:30. All bandsmen
welcome.
COUNTRY JOE RETURNS
to the Retinal Circus with the Painted   Ship  and  Papa  Bear's  Medicine
Show,   October  20   -   21,   $2.50.
Travel Opportunities
16
TORONTO CHRISTMAS CHARTER
Limited capacity on modern Turbojet at inexpensive Student Rate.
Information 224-9841 or 731-5429, 4-
6 p.m.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE 8c MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1965 TR 4-A RED, TOP CONDITION.
Never raced. $1900.00 or >>est offer.
Phone after 6  p.m.  263-8227,  Frank.
1959 PORSCHE 1600, SILVER COUPE
healthy condition, 2250 Wesbrook,
224-9662.
 23
WRECKING 1957 AUSTIN HEALY.
Good motor, top, Tonneau, other
parts. Andy 688-4052.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles - Cars
Generators   -  Utility Units
New and Used
SPORT CARS
N        Motors        T
O S
R E
T       W
145 Robson H 688-1284
SUZUKI 80 MODEL K-10, VERY
good condition, $175.00. Firm, 224-
3853   after   6   p.m.	
1966 DUCATI 250 5 SPD. 30 H.P.
Excellent condition. Reworked engine. Chrome accessories. Dirt
cheap.  522-3135.	
GOING TO EUROPE — 1967 YAMA-
ha 60 cc, almost new, perfect
shape. Phone 738-4504.
1967 SUZUKI 250 cc. HUSTLER. 2000
miles, only six weeks old. A-l condition.   Carrier.   Phone   266-8031.
Miscellaneous
32
WHOLESALE  PRICES TO ALL UBC
students on trans, radios, tape recorders, record players, watches,
jewelery, etc., at THE DISCOUNT
HOUSE,   3235  West  Broadway,  Tel.
732-6811.	
WANTED THEATRE 120 TEXT-
books. Modern theatre practice and
the Living Stage. Phone Meg at
224-6547.
STATIONERY - ART SUPPLIES -
Gift & Party Shop. See Walter's
Stationery, 2910 Wt Broadway. Ph.
733-4516.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
TOM, I LOVE YOU. MEET ME IN
Aud.,   Nov.   9.   Please   say  yes   Mr.
Jones!	
WANTED — WILLING HELPERS
male or female, to work on Treas-
ure   Van.   Phone   Bev.,   261-5491.
DEAR GANG, DAVE HAS NO FIRST
hand information. Rosy doesn't
either. Trish and George aren't
talking.  What do I do now.	
E. ENGINEERS: THE AFOREMEN-
tioned object is now on display.
Seek and you shall find.	
DEAR CAT, I'M BALLOU WITH-
out you. Meet me in Aud., Oct. 26.
Signed,  Lee Marvin.	
BIRDS   50c
Birdwatchers, $2.00.  This weekend at
the Retinal  Circus,   1024  Davie.
THE  SCANDALOUS  COUNTRY JOE
r    eturns  to   the  Retinal  Circus  with
the Painted Ship  and Papa Bear's
Medicine   Show,    October   20    -    21,
$2.50.
Typewriter Repairs
39
ANDERSON  TYPEWRITER
SERVICE
TYPEWRITERS
ADDING  MACHINES
NEW    AND    RECONDITIONED
REPAIRS TO ALL MAKES
Free  Estimates        Reasonable  Rates
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
185  West   Broadway 879-7815
Across from Zephyr Motors
Service Centre
Typing
 40
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   ELEC-
tric.   Phone  228-8384  or 224-6129.
WILL TYPE  TERM ESSAYS
RE 1-2664 — MRS. SHARP^
ESSAY     TYPING.     REASONABLE
Rates.    Phone    683-2859   between   9
a.m. and 3 p.m.  Monday to Friday.
TYPING AT HOME VIC. PNE. 26c
per page. Supply own paper. No
phone calls if 'Sufficient time is not
given to complete. Phone 265-8863.
Ask for Rosle.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay  and  thesis  typist
Reasonable   Rates   —   TR.   4-9253
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female 51
HARASSED MOTHER OF FOUR
needs help — 8 hours per week
$1.25 per hour. Mrs. Kite, CA 4-1297
Help Wanted—Male 52
DRUMMER REQUIRED FOR TRIO.
Must be able to sing. Phone Jim
327-4546   after  6.
Male or Female
53
MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE
tutors required. Fourth year or
graduate, 736-6923, 4:30-6:30 p.m.,
except  Tuesday. 	
VANCOUVER CENTRAL RECREA-
tion Project of the Vancouver Parks
Board requires part-time staff to
lead adult and teen activities—Judo,
wrestling, gym; badminton; floor
hockey; gym; games; tumbling and
square dancing. Youth workers are
also needed. Phone 879-6011.
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
MUSIC THEORY, COMPOSITION,
piano and guitar lessons for beginners and advanced students. Tel.
681-2762,   West  End.	
GUITAR
Teachers   who   care   —  all  styles  —
Bill  Lewis   Music,   3645  W.   Broadway,  738-0033.
Special Classes
63
LEARN TO SKYDIVE FILMS
demonstrations. Licenced instructors. Tues., Oct. 10, 8:30 p.m. Buchanan  102.
Tutoring
64
HELP! MATH 120 AND CHEM. 110
Tutor desperately needed. Phone
Bob  277-3346 after  6:00  p.m.	
FOT. TUTORING IN 1st AND 2nd
year Chemistry, Math. & Physics,
also Logarithms and Sliderule. Call
263-4005.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
THE FINEST MEN'S HAIRSTYIdNG
at the Upper Tenth Barber. 4674 W.
10th   Avenue.   1   block  from   gates.
LOOKING
For clean, used, guaranteed appliances.
Also  complete  repair service  for all
makes and models.
McIVER Appliances Ltd.
3215 W  Broadway—738-7181	
15-SPEED BICYCLE, '67 MODEL.
Call Bruce, 224-9864, Room 564, after  6:00 p.m.
BIRD CALLS
Your student telephone directory is
available at end of month. Buy pre-
sale tickets now for 76 cents from
Bookstore or Publications Office. After   publication   price  will  be   $1.00.
NEED AN AMP? NEVER-USED
Tenco Amplifier for sale. Cheap.
224-7697.	
SIZE TWELVE, FULL LENGTH
formal; quality winter coat, size
12.   Maureen.   224-4780   after   five.
FOR SADE: OLDISH PORTABLE
Singer sewing machine, good condi-
tion,  $20. Call Ann Taylor, 228-8550.
GOLF CLUBS, 1964 WILSON STAFF
2-9 Irons. Ex. cond., $75. Phone
Ross,  266-6503 after 6.
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Busy B Books, 146 W. Hastings.
681-4931.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
  81
ROOM ON CAMPUS TO RENT.
Girl grad. student. Ph. 224-6357 after 4:00.
GRAD STUDENT WANTS GIRL TO
share furnished apartment near
4th and Alma. Transportation available. Contact Anne, 228-3856 or
922-1085.
ROOMS ON CAMPUS CLOSE TO
meal services, 2250 Wesbrook Cres.,
224-9662.	
ONE STUDENT TO SHARE ROOM
in large house with all facilities.-
Phone 224-4788.
FOR RENT — LARGE ROOM FOR
one female student to share. Some
home privileges, two blks to bus,
$38.00. Phone 224-5801.
MALE STUDENT, SINGLE ROOM,
kit. priv., use frig, bath. Main
floor.   Non-smoker,   $40.   733-8778.
Room & Board
82
NEAR UBC. TWO MALE STUDENTS
to share very large nice room.
Good  meals,   table  tennis.  738-2305.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS,
5745 Aerronomy Road, Ph. 224-9667
after six.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
NEEDED MALE STUDENT TO
stare apartment in Marpole area.
Phone Dennis 261-0085 after six.
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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