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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 10, 1975

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Array UEL proposal fades away
By SUE VOHANKA
A senior provincial government
official told The Ubyssey
Thursday he doesn't think the
$35 million luxury housing
development proposed for the
University Endowment Lands will
go ahead.
Norm Pearson, deputy minister
for the department of lands,
forests and water resources, which
is responsible for the UEL, said
the government is amending the
land use code to prevent
demolition of existing UEL
buildings without a permit.
"The point is that it is highly
. unlikely   that   any   development
would occur in accordance with
the code as it stands," Pearson
said in a telephone interview from
Victoria.
"If a developer wanted to
propose a development of greater
density (than already exists) he
would have to go to a public
hearing," Pearson said.
He said" the chances of existing
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—peter cummings photo
CRUMMY POINT GREY WEATHER, the norm for UBC at this time of year, has finally descended op
campus for its lengthy annual stay. Wet and gloomy atmosphere is appropriate for students who are finally
waking up to fact that books willhave to be cracked for upcoming mid terms.
Bookstore profits set aside
By SUE VOHANKA
UBC bookstore profits are held
in a reserve fund instead of being
used to lower textbook prices,
administration vice-president
William White said Thursday.
White, also university bursar,
said in an interview the bookstore
reserve fund totalled $158,000 at
the end of the last fiscal year.
He said the bookstore made a
$120,000 profit last year and a
$38,000 profit the year before.
"The year before last they
came out of an accumulated
deficit position and moved into
creation of a slight reserve.
"The reserve is strictly held
aside for development and
improvement of bookstore
facilities," White said.
Erich Vogt, vice-president
responsible for student and
faculty affairs, said Thursday he
thinks it would be "sound policy"
for bookstore surpluses to
eventually be used to subsidize
high textbook prices.
"In the long run, if one has a
stable {bookstore) operation, any
surplus from other areas would go
to reducing the prices of
textbooks.   As   an   individual,   I
think that would be a sound
policy," Vogt said.
Both Vogt and White
emphasized that student services
such as the bookstore and food
services are not viewed as
profit-making operations.
"Where you cat) identify your
users" (the service) should be
self-financing," White said. "The
bookstore     has     always     been
operated on a self-financing
basis."
Vogt said profits made through
student services are never placed
in the university's general budget.
"But there are times when
university money has to go to
student services," Vogt added.
Vogt said he may ask the
standing   presidential   committee
See   PF   7:   300KSTORE
UBC illiteracy issue
'could end with exam'
By MARCUS GEE
An entrance exam would help
eliminate UBC's student illiteracy
problem, English department head
Robert Jordan said Thursday.
Jordan said an entrance exam.,
as proposed by UBC senator John
Dennison in a notice of motion to
senate Wednesday, would . keep
poor English users out of the
university. He said those that
failed the exam because of a low
level of literacy could be
channelled to other institutions
for professional English
instruction.
Until an entrance exam is
established the 30 special remedial
sections are capable of teaching
English though this should not be
the university's job, he said.
"It (re mem dial language
instruction) is enormously costly
and has a lot . of negative
repercussions on the university."
Jordan said both Simon Fraser
University and the University of
Victoria have some form of
entrance exam and the students
they reject sometimes come to
UBC.
See   page   6:    REMEDIAL
buildings being torn down and
replaced with another
development are "extremely
remote" because the economic
return would be "extremely
marginal."
"In other words, I don't think
anything is going to happen," he
said.
"To get a proposal that would
be economically viable, (the
developer) would have to go
before a public hearing."
And in a letter to UBC
administration president Doug
Kenny, Pearson said, "the
proposed development does not
fit the land use code.".
The proposal, by LRS
development enterprises, would
displace 179 residents of low- to
medium-rental housing in an area
bounded by Dalhousie, Toronto,
Allison and Acadia Roads.
Tenants in the area have
opposed the project since they
learned of it in mid-September,
Jane Corcoran, a spokeswoman
for the UEL Tenants Society, has
said tenants would be unable to
find comparable accommodation
elsewhere in Vancouver for similar
rents.
Pearson's letter to Kenny was
Holiday
When you get back from your
Thanksgiving vacation (or sober
up, come down, wake up . . .) and
return to UBC Tuesday, don't be
surprised if you can't find your
favorite student newspaper.
We planned it that way.
The Ubyssey, put out by a
bunch of " hard working, hard
drinking, incredibly insane and
unpaid volunteers, will take a
holiday Tuesday.
But don't worry. We'll be back
Thursday.
written in response to a Sept. 26
letter to resources minister Bob
Williams in which Kenny
expressed "deep concern" about
the LRS proposal.
In his letter, which was
released Thursday, Kenny told
Williams: "The majority of the
occupants of the existing (UEL)
buildings . . . are UBC students
and members of our faculty and
non-academic staff.
"It is unlikely that many of
these people would be able to
afford the rentals that might be
anticipated for the new units."
Kenny pointed out to Williams
that over the last few years
students have found it
increasingly difficult to find
housing.
"Rising university enrolments
have coincided with a diminution
of the available low-rental housing
stock to produce an annual crisis,
which is particularly difficult for
married students and their
families.
"Any development that would
exacerbate this trend is to be
deplored," he said in his letter.
The letter continued: "It seems
to me that any developer who
demolishes useable low-cost
housing has a moral obligation to
include in his new development
suitable replacement
accommodation at rents which
can be afforded by those
displaced."
Kenny also said in the letter he
hoped Williams would "bear in
mind the best interests of the
university community the
endowment lands were originally
intended to serve."
LRS president Dinos Lambrou
"was unavailable for comment
Thursday.
LRS~ was responsible for the
controversial Plaza International
complex in North Vancouver.
—matt king photo
FORKING OVER BUCKS that the administration will store away in its
coffers, Susan North, arts 2, shells out $15.45 for books, including $9
for one measly 3/4-inch thick grammar book as administration
discovers wonders pf capitalism. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10, iy73
After crisis centre nixed
Rape report termed 'superficial'
0AIH
CORKY'S
By HEATHER WALKER
A report which calls a rape
crisis centre at UBC unnecessary is
"superficial," Alma Mater Society
acting co-ordinator Lake Sagaris
said Wednesday.
"1 think the two women who
did the report lacked experience
and knowledge of UBC," Sagaris
said.
Robijn Gould and Susan
Kirkpatrick prepared the report,
after spending three weeks this
summer researching the feasibility
of a rape crisis centre at UBC on a
Careers 75 grant.
The report claims that a rape
crisis centre on campus would
only duplicate existing services,
including the women's office, the
dean of Women's office,
university health services,
Speakeasy and the office of
student services. It also mentions
Rape     Relief,     a     downtown
organization   which   operates   24
hours a day.
But .Sagaris said most of these
services are not adequate because
they usually close by 5 p.m.
"Speakeasy and the women's
office could be open later but
they are run by volunteers and
they can't stay much later than 8
or 9 at night," she said.
Sagaris was criticial of health
services which she said has no
special procedure for helping a
raped woman.
Although Sagaris agreed that
Rape Relief is an excellent
. organization, she said it was too
far away to help university
women who would still have to
get there after being raped. Rape
Relief is located at 7th and
Granville.
"It might not be possible to
operate a 24-hour rape crisis
centre," Sagaris said.
Instead, she suggested that:
be
be
the
• the university should fund a
self-defense program which would
be    available    to    all   women   on
campus throughout the year;
• lighting     on     campus
improved;        ' /
• information     meetings
conducted     throughout
campus;
• and the university should set
up and fund a rape crisis
counselling phone list.
This list would consist of
women "trained to deal with rape
situations in as positiye,
supportive and effective way as
possible," Sagaris said.
The women would be on call
different nights of the week, and
would pick up any woman who
had been raped, talk to her, arid -
take her anywhere she might want
to go (RCMP, medical services,
etc.) and help her if she wanted to
take the case to court, she said.
"Improving the lighting is not
the   situation,"
a   spokeswoman
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
Lethe bar relocation to require
constant change-of-name act
The Lethe, SUB's
problem-plagued hard liquor
outlet, will have to go through a
constant change of name act
before it can reopen on the
second floor of the building.
Don Towers, the architect who
designed the UBC aquatic centre,
said Thursday: "The only way to
have a bar on the second floor (of
SUB) without increasing fire exits
is by calling it a meeting place
with a dual purpose — meeting
room and watering hole."
Towers met Thursday with*
AMS secretary Ellen Paul and
SUB manager Graeme Vance to
discuss tentative plans of
converting SUB rooms 213 and
215 to a part-time student lounge.
He said the two rooms Will
meet the provincial fire marshal's
fire exit requirements if the
rooms' occupancy rates are
maintained at the present 60
persons.
However, Towers said: "if we
call it a cabaret or lounge we'll cut
our own throats."
"We'll have to maintain rooms
213 and 215 at the daytime
'meeting room status' to avoid the
Enrolment
rises in
1975-76
Enrolment   at   UBC  has  risen
this year by 3.8 per cent over last
year's     recorrl     enrolment,,
according  to  figures released by
the registrar's office.
Enrolment this year stands at
22,898 full-time students, up
from 853 from last year.
The figures are not complete
and final figures are expected to
show an enrolment of more than
23,000 students when graduate
students and students in special
programs who registered late are
included.
The faculties of education,
agriculture, _arts, applied science,
commerce and law all had
increased enrolment.
Registration in the faculty of
graduate studies fell while
enrolment in the faculties of
science, pharmaceutical sciences,
forestry and dentistry remained
nearly the same.
The faculty of arts, which has
the highest enrolment of all UBC
faculties, gained 306 students for
a total of 5,578.
marshal demanding extra fire
exits," he said. The lounge could
only.be operated on a part-time
basis during the evening, Towers
said.
The Lethe operated last year in
room 101, which was judged too
small and unsafe because it had no
fire exits or windows.
Paul is currently looking into
the costs of converting the two
rooms into a part-time lounge.
duthie
books
Parent Effectiveness Training
by Thomas Gordon $5,95
The Hawkline Monster
by Richard Brautigan $3.50
More Joy Of Sex by Alex Comfort $6.95
919 Robson        684-4496       670 Seymour 685-3627
Paperbackcellar   681-8713       1050 W. Pender 688-7434
4560 W. 10th      224-7012       Arbutus Village Square   266-0525
going to. help
Marion Barling,
from the women's office, said
She said rapes have taken place
in areas with better lighting, and
they do not always happen at
night.
"I've been working on this (the
rape crisis centre) for a long time
and I don't feel we're getting
anywhere," Barling said.
international
women's
year
at ubc
more October events
October 16, thursday, on campus
Feminism and the Evolution of Awareness
One of the early members of the American women's Liberation
Movement,   Dr.   Diana   Alstad,   speaks   about  the   new   Feminist
• Awareness, the search for new roles and the need for new patterns of
communication between men and women. U.B.C. SUB Art Gallery,
12:30-2:30 p.m.
also on October 16, downtown
Women, Men and Children
Three families with different lifestyles discuss the myths and
possibilities of their roles, present and future. Vancouver Public
Library, 750 Burrard St., Auditorium, 12:00 to 1:30 p.m.
October 23 to november 27, downtown
Women Working to Make Things Better
Six Thursday talks by prominent women who are working to bring
about change for women in all areas of society: Rosemary Brown; Dr.
Dorothy Smith, associate professor of sociology at U.B.C; Gene
.Errington, Coordinator of the Status of Womens Office: Sue Findlay,
Director of Women's Programs; Secretary of State: Phyllis Young,
Minister of Consumer Affairs; Dr. Pauline Jewett.
VANCOUVER PUBLIC LIBRARY
750 Burrard St. Room 301
12:10-1:00 p.m.
For more information on these and other consciousness-raising
events to come, Call U.B.C. Information Services, 228-3131, and ask
for a brochure.
Your shoes are trying
to tett you something.
Look at a pair you've lived with for a while and you'll see two things.
The heels have worn thin. ? -   > ■
The soles have become comfortably curved.
Your shoes are actually trying to become Roots®.
, Roots' slim heel and rocker sole are made for
the way you were born to walk, which helps _    .
make them wildly comfortable. ^    -—sa^  ~ ~°
And Roots are made in Toronto of top-grain        *•*.———
Canadian leather, which helps make them
beautiful.
Listen to" your shoes. Have a chat with your feet.
Then come see us and try a pair of Roots.
You'll find them (in more than a dozen styles)
onlyjn the Roots store
Hi
III
•1975. Don Michael Co.
"Be kind to feet. They outnumber people two to one.
Vancouver— 766 Robson Street.(Across from Eaton's) — (604) 689-9916
Victoria-1202 Wharf Street (Across from Bastion Square-) - (604) 3834811 Friday, October 10, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
CIA finger in right-wing dike
The Central Intelligence
Agency and RCMP have "very
close working relations," one of
the most outspoken critics of the
U.S. spy organization said
here Wednesday.
Phillip Agee, a former CIA
officer who has written a
controversial book about his work
for the agency, also told a UBC
audience the CIA has observers" in
Canada looking for "signs of left
wing political and economic
nationalism."
But he said he doesn't believe
the CIA is meddling in Canada's
economic and political system as
it is in third world nations.
And he disclaimed the idea
that the agency is involved in B.C.
labor disputes to deliberately
create economic chaos.
Agee. said he doesn't know
much   about   CIA's   involvement
AGEE . .. exposes CIA
with Canada because he spent his
career working in the Western
Hemisphere section of the CIA's
covert action division.
Canada, while geographically in
the Western Hemisphere, was
considered politically to be closer
to the Western Europe division,
and was handled by a different
group of officers and agents, he
said.
But Agee cited the case of a
Cuban who decided to defect to
the west when his plane landed at
Gander, Nfld.
Within hours, he said, he had
received a cable in Ecuador
detailing what the defector said in
Canada.
"He was just turned over
immediately to the CIA," Agee
said. "He was handed over for
debriefing."
Agee described his involvement
in buggings, forgeries and bribes in
Venezuela, Uruguay, Ecuador and
Mexico.
He told of money washing,
buying of police forces and acting
as private security agents for large
U.S. corporations.
And he described how, as he
was writing The- CIA Diary in
Paris, agency operatives loaned
him money to keep in contact
with him and find out where he
was staying.
Agee said he was initially
recruited through his campus
placement agency in 1956 to
participate in a "Junior Officer
Training program."
He said he hesitated for about
a year, but then applied and was
taken to CIA headquarters for
intensive training.
He said he was told of how the
communists use their skills to
infiltrate and subvert liberal
reforms and about the CIA's
responsibility in fighting the
communists.
At first he believed what he
was taught, he said.
After six months he was taken
to Camp Perry, a secret base in
Maryland, where advanced skills
were taught ~in a para-military
environment.
Included in the massive base
was a mock east European border
with high observation towers,
barbed wire fences and dogs.
His first posting was in
Venezuela, where he was given a
list of "all prospective Venezuelan
employees of the Creole
Petroleum Co."
Creole, he said, is associated
with Esso of New Jersey. He filed
the names to CIA headquarters,
where they were checked against a
world-wide list of left-wing and
communist individuals, and when
the information was returned to
Venezuela, the applicants who
were sufficiently right-wing were
hired.,
He said in Latin America CIA
crews had an assortment of
bugging and monitoring devices
including a Volkswagen van with
an exhaust vent (containing a
periscope) which' was used to
follow suspicious vehicles.
The CIA also bought out police
forces, to the extent of "buying
pens, pencils and filing cabinets"
'to equip their offices.
He said a front of detente was
maintained with known KGB (the
Soviet Union's version of the CIA)
agents.
"One of my jobs while in the
CIA was to cultivate KGB
officers," he said. "We'd, play
chess and drink vodka and that
sort of thing."
But in one instance, he said, he
was able to get co-operation from
the local police force and
telephone engineers (by bribing
them) to bug a Soviet official's
apartment.
Upstairs in the same apartment
block was Agee's secretary and a
"big Samsonite case" with lead
aprons, antennas and switches to
turn the bugs in the Russian's bed,
sofa and walls on and off.
More seriously, Agee cited the
CIA's expensive efforts to win ■
support for U.S.-style. trade
unions, concerned more about
wages, hours and working
conditions, than with-
overthrowing   right-wing  regimes.
Millions of dollars have been
pumped into rightist trade union
organizations in South America
and he said, millions more are
pouring into Portugal to prevent
the communists from taking over.
Agee said his initial gung-ho
enthusiasm for the CIA dropped
as he worked in the late '50s.and
early '60s and he saw who the
agency was supporting and
representing.
He said the CIA was supporting
the military administration in
Uruguay, "the most corrupt place
you could possibly imagine."
"I had joined a sort of political
police organization," he said. The
CIA was "working around the
world night and day plugging
holes in the political dam."
He said finally he decided to
leave when he was assigned to
Mexico, to publicly act as U.S.
liaison person with the Olympic
Games and privately gather
information and recruit new
agents for the CIA.
He said his job was "to destroy
the Olympics," but he did not
give examples to support his
statement.
In Pans to write the book, he
said he was befriended by a man
and woman who appeared
suspicious, so he didn't tell them
where he lived.
He ran out of money and had
to sell his typewriter to eat, he
said. But his new friends willingly
bought him a typewriter to help
him out.
Gov't bill 146 defended
By GREGG THOMPSON
Provincial legislation forcing
four striking unions back to work
is the best method of dealing with
B.C.'s critieial labor-management
situation, two UBC professors
claimed Thursday.
Stuart Jamieson, an economics
professor and industrial relations
expert, said in an interview that
inflation, a general "economic
slump and lack of federal
leadership have led to a "hopeless
over-all situation which has
prompted a breakdown in the free
collective bargaining process."
He ■ said the labor code
introduced by the NDP
government in 1973 eliminated
compulsory arbitration . in labor
disputes and was meant to
minimize government intervention
in the bargaining process.
But the time has come for the
government to act in the best
interests of society at large, he
said.
"The government has had to
step in and say 'no more free
collective bargaining' at least for
the time being.
"But I would gather from the
title of the act that it is intended
as a stop-gap measure; it implies a
continuation of bargaining," he
said.
"It is not as extreme as
previous labor legislation
introduced under previous
governments."
The .government's bill 146,
passed by the legislature Tuesday,
ordered an end to labor disputes
in the forest, food, propane gas
delivery industries and B.C.
Railway; and established a 90-day
cooling-off period during which
further bargaining is ordered.
Jamieson said he thinks a
continuation of strike action after
the 90-day period is unlikelyand
that settlements can be reached in
that period.
"But if nothing is solved in the
interim period and resistance to
settlement continues, then we can
expect provision for more
government intervention,"
Jamieson said.
Mark Thompson, associate
professor of commerce and
business     administration    agreed
with Jamieson that "the legislation
is likely to produce results.
He claimed the U.S.
Taft-Hartley Act is a piece of
labor legislation that has been
used with a high percentage of
success in solving
labor-management disputes.
It works on the same principle
as bill 146 in that it allows a
certain length of time (80 days)
for the disputing parties to "cool
down" and come to terms.
"The Taft-Hartley Act has
been applied on at least 50
occasions and the usual outcome
has been settlement of the
dispute, if not during the 80 days,
then shortly afterward, said
Thompson.
"Occasionally there have been
resumptions of strikes but that
has not usually been the case," he
said.
"We must remember that
strikes are the only weapon that
the unions have and that to
interfere with their right to do so
represents an aberration of their
civil "liberties, but in this case
there was no alternative," he said.
He took the gift, although he
noticed he seemed to be followed
everywhere. One day when he
visited a friend's home where the
CIA typewriter was, he noticed
two suspicious persons suddenly
embracing each other, as if they
were kissing.
He also heard a loud beeping
sound, apparently coming from a
bugging device, and he knew then
the extent of the CIA monitoring
of his activities.
Within a few days he left for
England, where he said the CIA
was apparently ordered by British
intelligence to leave him alone.
Agee said he isn't sure whether
\istm"I1"""i1"*"*"*" •'-■t'"-' - """ ■" '
current steps to expose the CIA
and its covert actions will do any
good. He said if the covert or
"dirty tricks" division was
disbanded, the same work could
be carried out through the
security departments of U.S.
corporations with foreign
interests.
"The CIA isn't a real issue," he
said. "It's an institution of the
U.S. government . . . it's an
institution of the presidency."
He said there's some "effort to
keep the issue to the CIA," which
he said is a "coverup" because the
real issue is the activity of
America's military, economic and
political complex.
—doug field photo
STUDYING IN SLUMBERLAND is a lot easier than wading through
boring notes taken at boring lectures, so this student decided Thursday
to. try for degree of bachelor of snoozing.
Course gets SUBspace
The centre for continuing
education has booked space in
SUB for its English language
immersion program because the
• university has no regular rooms
available.
Assistant centre director Jindra
Kulich said Thursday the program
was refused a seminar room
because there are no rooms
available "all day, five days a
week."
The course is a non-credit
course offered to immigrants or
prospective university students
who want to learn English.
Alma Mater Society
co-ordinator Lake Sagaris said the
centre     will     be     charged     full
convention rates for the room
which is located just off the SUB
cafeteria.
She said this is one of the few
times classes have been booked
into SUB rooms.
Rooms in university buildings
are allocated by the
administration through systems
services, the university's
room-booking organization, on a
priority basis.
Kulich said non-credit courses,
such as the English program
offered by the centre, have a low
priority.
"The primary responsibility of
the university is to undergraduate
and graduate students," she said. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10, 1975
Money please
We want our money back.
From the bookstore,.that is.
It was revealed in senate Wednesday that the little old
campus bookstore pulled down a tidy $120,000 profjt last
year.
Added to $38,000 from the year beforehand you've got
a nice little sum of money sitting in the administration's
hands.
Services offered by the university for students such as
the bookstore or residences shouldn't be profit-making
organizations.
They are a service, not a money-guzzling business.
The administration says its holding the money for
bookstore redevelopment and improvement. But this is silly
for two reasons.
One: students should not be paying for capital costs of a
university-run service. Let the administration do that.
Two: what kind of redevelopment can you get with
$160,000? Certainly not the totally new bookstore which is
needed to properly service ever expanding UBC.
No, the only alternative is to give us back the cash. Give
it back in the form of reduced textbook prices.
And don't forget the interest please.
Election time again
Bring out the pork barrels, red herrings, baby kissers and
stinky cigars.
It's Alma Mater Society election time once again.
See the ad on page five and run for office. Afte/ being
involved in AMS politics you're set for life.
cooYtoUR ASSGNAIENT TONIGHT
H6R5RH BOCK THE THREE
QWtqs anvE RESCUE.
&Jj»X> AVSO.THE.
hersrK/CNs
Letters
Thanks
for blood
On behalf of the UBC engineers, I
would like to thank the student
body for their support at the recent
Red Cross blood donor clinic where
over 2,200 pints of blood were
given.
The 25 cases of beer for the
faculty with the highest percentage
turnout was awarded to Rehab
Medicine which had 30 per cent of
their faculty give blood.
I hope this turnout will be
repeated next spring when another
blood donor clinic takes place.
Chris Taylor
civil engineering 4
Bias
Half-baked and irresponsible
pseudo-revolutionary thought has
'once again surfaced on this
campus i.e. in Prof. Cappon's talk
and lecture, David Fuller's article
and The Ubyssey's own editorials
about the Palestinian Liberation
Organization and Zionism.
They are rife with omission and
distortion. Unfortunately
limitations of space permit only
the most blatant inaccuracies to be
challenged.
In these arguments United
Nations support of the PLO was
used as evidence for the righteousness of the PLO's "progressive"
struggle. This is indeed a peculiar
argument since the majority of the
UN member states are ruled by
oppressive and dictatorial
governments.
Indeed the very fact that
countries such as Uganda,
Pakistan, Brazil, Libya, India,
Russia, Ethopia etc., etc., etc. do
support the PLO could be used to
show the reactionary and murderous nature of this Palestinian
organization.
In addition if the support of
Israel, by the U.S., South Africa
and Rhodesia is damning proof pf
Israel's "imperialism", then how
does one explain the Dutch stand
against the Arab oil embargo and
the recent show of support for
Israel by the only remaining social
democracies (Scandinavian and
northern European countries).
Israel's alliance "with the U.S.
and others is a reluctant one forced
upon her by world cowardice.
Necessity not choice has determined her friendships. Furthermore, the assertion that Israel
is a creation and extension of
British and American imperialism
is lacking in all factual basis.
Despite the Balfour Declaration,
British policy was not supportive of
the idea of a Jewish state, turning
back thousands of Jewish war
refugees and jailing such
Hagganah members as Moshe
Dayan. Both British and American
state and defence departments
have consistently opposed strong
military support of Israel and until
the early and mid 1960's Israel
relied primarily on France for her
armaments.
Indeed continual attempts have
been made by both Republican and
Democratic administrations to
woo the Arabs into the American
sphere of influence — analysis of
U.S. foreign aid, in totality, sho"'s
Arab preference.
Thirdly, how can one take
seriously the sincerity of the PLO
goal for a Palestinian/Israeli
"democratic and secular" state,
after all the blood that has spilled
and hate engendered. Can we find
any semblance of a democracy in
the Arab states or the refugee
camps controlled by the PLO?
And what precedent has been set
in the Arab world for the
realization of a secular i.e. non-
Moslem state? In fact it seems we
must look to Israel as it is today to
find any true examples of
tolerance and democracy.
Freedom of worship for both
Christian and Arab has never been,
questioned and it has been only
since the 1967 war that Jerusalem
and the holy sites have been accessible to all.
I ask those who have participated in this recent outburst of
PLO mania — why so little mention
of the Arab provocations leading to
both the 1956 and 1967 war, the
continual terrorist (not of
liberation) attacks upon Israeli
agricultural settlements from
before 1948 to the present day?
Why no mention of the hundreds of
thousands of Second World War
Jewish refugees who were refused
entry to almost every single
country, and of the hundreds of
ti.->iisai..1s "f Jewish refugees vu0
were ab.e to ilee f;. israel after
their expulsion by the Arab
governments; and why no mention
of the present Arab persecution of
THEU8YSSEY
■ OCTOBER 10, 1975
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977. Editor: Gary Coull
"Let's get this rocket on the road," yelled astro-autocrat Doug
Rushton. "I hope it's another two-week mission," replied a grinning Chris
Gainor, as Heather Walker, Sue Vohanka, Marcus Gee and Gary Coull
jammed a space helmet over his head. "I sure feel good that I gave up my
seat for Ralph Maurer," said a sniffling Mark Buckshon as he watched the
rocket roar off into the sky. Peter Cummings, Doug Field and Matt King
handled the photographic experiments while Boyd McConnell, Cedric
Tetzel, Greg Edwards and Gregg Thompson punctured Eric Ivan Berg's
space suit. Rookies Gordon GJover and Shelagh MacDonald tried to fire the
ret'ro rockets as Jean Randall, Steve Morris, Greg Strong, Brian Gibbard
and Herman tumbled about. Tom Barnes, meanwhile, was planning for the
lunar golf tournament and sold souvenir golf space visors to an eager Jo
Bernardo and Barry Jensen.
Jews in Syria and Iraq?
I can possibly understand the
Palestinian's desire to leave these
and other important questions
unasked but on what basis can they
be ignored by non-Arab PLO
supporters? Those of us who are
striving for the realization of
socialist goals — the elimination of
exploitation and imperialism —
must look carefully at the actions
not just the words of those who
claim they are fighting for these
ideals.
How can an organization which
until late, has proudly announced
to the world its murder of civilians,
be considered worthy of support.
Let me ask you Messrs. Capon and
Fuller and Ubyssey editors — just
in case you're wrong, just in case
this "democratic, secular state"
does not work out, and4ust in case
the full weight of the Arab armies
and PLO are used successfully to
destroy Israel will >ou be prepared
to take pert of that responsibility?
Or is that in fact what.you actually
want?
I trust not — and suggest ll.at in
'he future ycu tread somewhat
more carefully through the maze of
distortion and fantasy that has so
successfully obscured the realities
of this Middle East conflict.
Mark Weintraub
religious studies 4
Dayan
■ ■ .By far your most off-base
comment (in Tuesday's editorial)
was "there was one of the largest
security forces this campus has
ever seen guarding this 'man of
peace'."
Aside from the fact that a gun-
toting Yassar Arafat holding an
olive branch at the United Nations
is far more of a contradiction than
General Dayan "a man of peace"
being surrounded by security
forces, your statement's sarcastic
and cynical tone betrays a very
unfortunate insensitivity to one of
the major tragedies of the Middle
East and the entire world.
The issue is not, as you suggest,
the hypocrisy of a person who is
himself a "man of peace" being
surrounded by armed policemen.
Rather, the issue is the profound
comment  on humanity and the
human condition which is
demonstrated by any man,
whether he be General Dayan,
Martin Luther King, or Gandhi,
who, speaking of peace, is
surrounded by the symbols and
trappings of war.
It is really sad that the symbolism of weapons of war juxtaposed on statements of peace
entirely eludes your writer.
But there is something even
more unfortunate in your editorial
which must be pointed out.
Whatever wrongs you believe
Israel and Moshe Dayan have
committed, your recriminations
and accusations are not going to
solve anything.
Similarly, the emotional
denunciations of the PLO which
could be heard from time to time
emanating from the audience at
General Dayan's speech ire not
going to solve anything.
We are living in an era of
detente, of reconciliation, of
shuttle diplomacy, and of dialogue.
Those are the means whereby
problems will be solved.
The issue is not who is to blame
for the refugee problem — there
will never be an answer to that
question — but rather, what are we
going to do about it?
Can Israeli and Arab unite in a
common front to alleviate the
plight of the Palestinian and make
peace? Your hackneyed and
cliched terms such as "military
industrial complex" and "political
propagandist" are straight from
the diplomatic rhetoric of the 1950s
and 1960s; they are meaningless
slogans which a newspaper that
prides itself on its liberal and
enlightened views should be able to
see through in a minute.
Those phrases and statements
have no place in the 1970s where
both Israel and the Arab nations
are admitting their faults and
working through communication to
understand each other. The real
tragedy is that you, and many
others, insist on living in the past in
a world where the future is where
it's at.
Andy Stark
arts 2 Friday, October 10, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Achtung
I am reading this business about
you mit much laughing. Where you
get such britisch sounding name
from? Is maybe you gottet fine
Englisch mama was meeting up
mit not-so-literate continental guy
who is having trouble spelling his
own name? Dat's got no matter.
Very likely you are 100 pro cent
Canadian who is gettet nice
education from first class school
where is only allowed other 100 pro
cent Canadians. Big deal!
Now you listen me one moment,
bub.   When   I   am   coming   this
country as young boy, is speaket to.
me mama and papa only German
(but   I   gottet   one   time   nice
Letters
Ukranian landlady who is having
market effect on my Englisch.)
indisiously, my mama who is
German girl in Sudetenland in
1920's is going to Czechoslovak
school where is nobody making
laughing at her because she is no
speaking Czechoslovak mit first
language.
When I go to school in Canada is
nobody laughing at me either and
saying, "Hey buddy, vat's mit your
Englisch?" By some miracle I am
learning just like other guys to
speaket Englisch — maybe bedder!
Infect, was one guy, he say to me
after many years knowing him
(maybe 16) "Hey man, you mean
you not home-groan Canadian
boy!" U.C. Is so many guys from
local family (you know, Fred
Smith, Bill Jones, Etcentra)
speaking so bad Englisch and
failing class that he is reguarding
me like I am Oxford graduate.
Heavens to Betsy! .
Now I am university many year,
is coming as complete surprise to
me when you say I am illegitimate
because my parents make me
somewhere else born. Is implying
maybe I am not so smart like you
are, hug . . . Weiss guy? Oh sure,
maybe is head of department
helping me to not always split
infinitives, but I am never douting
how I am perfect in all ways in-
spiting the handy cap of my place
of birth.
Waldemar Heckel
classics
P.S. I speak bedder than Jacques
Laperriere, an he was born here!
Support
As faculty members of the
department of English at UBC, we
wish to say that we completely
support, in principle, the views
expressed by Stevan Jovanovich in
his recent article.
Moreover, we deplore the unprofessional and unethical nature
of the response written by "Harry
Eastman."
We were warned: The drivers of
automobiles are becoming extinct
at the rate of one city-full of people
per year. It was explained that the
body-mass to brain-mass ratio
increases to an unacceptable
degree when a one-pound brain is
asked to manage and'manipulate
4,000 pounds of machine in addition
to its own body weight.
Drivers were compared to
dinosaurs in an interview with an
ex-UBC scientist at the graduate
student centre garden of beer
Friday.
The dinosaurs had it good. Sure
they got big; but they had an advantage. None of their fellow
beings were ever travelling at the
rate of 80 m.p.h. in a boss 302
Mustang with a martini in his hand
or a beer between his giant legs. In
fact the danger of injury-causing
collisions actually decreased as the
size of the dino increased.
One: the bigger they got, the
easier it became to see each other.
Two: if two lumbering beasts ever
did accidentally collide there was
so much padding between them
that each thought the other was
giving him some sort , of
upholstered caress. Nine chances
out of 10 they'd end upballing half
the time instead of beating each
other up at the intersection.
Three: hardly ever did these
dinos drive at night. They never
had to remember to turn their
lights on coming home from the
pub.
Irritated by the fact that there
wasn't any rock and roll music to
listep to, and no undergraduates to
watch dance, the scientist coarsely
stated: while the cost in lives is
very high the society profits in this
way: the individual may see
himself in a high-risk, worse than
wilderness situation, thereby
giving his instincts something to
exercise themselves on.
But half of the drivers are drunk
all the time anyway so he
questioned the significance of even
that factoid.
What it all boiled down to was:
driving is about the only legit way
for an individual to commit suicide
in today's society. It is illegal to
take too many pills. If you wake up
from a • shotgun blast and you
aren't dead entirely, you run the
risk of incarceration. But if you
wake up from a car accident
everybody pats you on the back.
Every time we get into a vehicle
we are taking the risk of suicide.
Maybe the machine won't stop at
just the wrong time, maybe we'll
get run into by a loaded insurance
salesman who is taking his last
ride home to his ole lady.
Maybe we have some obscure,
See page 6
R. Allin
E. Kirby
N. Amor
I. Le Blanc
N.Baum
D. Hampton
J. Chard
J. Scott
L. Clark
E. Tait
C. Elsted
C. Watson
J. Elsted
D. Wegner
K. Fernstrom
E. Atkins
M. Ham mett
R. Green
J. Huey
J. Wade
ATTENTION ALL
STUDENTS
NOTICE
OF ELECTIONS
The following AMS Executive positions
are how vacant:
1. AMS Treasurer
2. AMS Co-Ordinator
3. AMS Internal Affairs
4. AMS External Affairs
5. AMS Ombudsperson
Nominations for the five AMS Positions will be
received from 9:00 a.m. Thursday, October 9,
1975 until  12:00 noon  Friday, October 17, 1975.
Nominations and eligibility forms can be obtained
and shall be returned to tbe AMS Executive
Secretary, Rm. 246, SUB. Election rules will be
available at the'above location also.
The Election for all positions will, be held Friday,
October 24, 1975.
Students wishing more information are asked to
contact the AMS Secretary in SUB Room 250 or at
228-2050.
Ellen Paul
AMS Secretary
WOMEN:
Due to the fact that only 7 of a total of 44 students on committees are WOMEN we encourage women to apply for the
following committees:
[1]   Housing
[2]   Financial Aid
[3]   BCSF/NUS [external affairs]
*
[4]   SUB Space Demand
[5]   Elections
[6]   Charitable Donations
[7]    Men's Athletics
[8]   SUB Management
Please submit resume to AMS President, Jake van der Kamp
Friday, October 17,1975. [Don't for get your name, address
and   phone number.] Page 6
THE      U BYSSEY
Friday, October 10, 1975
From page 5
diffuse and sublimated death wish
and we won't find out about it until
it's too late, or maybe practically
anything.
It was argued that the reason the
dino wanted to get so big was each
one of them wanted to get
physically closer to the other ones.
They wanted to extend themselves
further into space because they
were afraid of saber-toothed
tigers. The more space taken up by
dinosaur, ipso facto the less space
there is left for saber-toothed
tigers. One thing that even a dino
wouldn't do was sardine himself
inside iron.
We stopped at a secret
blackberry bush
that's why we were
home so late. •
Never shortchange .
an artist.
He may splash
you.
*     *     *
The best ole Fireface
could do was to lean
against the corner pocket
and order up a drink
called between-the-sheets
and call that grooving.
And remember 'that is how big
she would be now.'
And say
'if there are any calls for me
tell um that I've been out a'town
for six months
and I'm gonna be out a town
for six more months.
I'd just be bored
doing something else
anyway, you don't try to
ram a key where there
isn't a lock. And you
don't have to-mow cement.
Then raise his glass
to his opponent and comment
'here's to up your kilt
with a wild rush.' ^
Weather report: It's blowin' like
a son of a bitch;and there's rain
attached.
Mooings from  the  pasture:   If
McDonald's   ever   closes   that
Remedial
lessons
nixed
From   page   1
The SFU exam is an "exclusion
test" for students whose native
language is not English, screening
out those who do not function
well in the language.
At UVic, no one with a high
school average of less than C plus
is admitted and an English
qualifying exam channels students ■
into different levels of first year
English.
Jordan said it is an improper
use of UBC's resources to provide
remedial language instruction to
students admitted to the
university without a good
command of English. The
university spends $200,000 to
$300,000 a year on remedial
English instruction, he said.
Michael Shaw, UBC academic
affairs vicerpresident said
Thursday he would not want an
exam to restrict people from
entering the university.
But Shaw said the proposal to
use an exam merits "serious
consideration!"
U.B.C.GATE
BARBERS
Internationally Trained ,^^^»
Hairstylists ^^^
Open Tues. - Sat. ^^y»
9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. -^
4605 W. 10th AVE.
■ •■
Z2 8-9345
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
franchise deal with  China  there
won't be a cow left alive on earth.
*     *    *
Space program: We heard what
the ex-scientist said and now we
report it to you. Instead of spending huge amounts of alcohol on
spaceship propulsion we should
funnel that alcohol into artisans.
Let the artisans burn that alcohol
inside their own bodies.
If you take all the alcohol that is
spent throwing a few men around
the earth and divide it up among
the artisans, how far couldn't we
go right here on earth?
If we do that, pretty soon those
creatures out in space will hear
about us. They will want to visit us.
(They are already.) Then the
creatures will be befriended by
these drunken artisans and we can
con the freaks into giving us joy-
rides in their space ships. When the
artisans take their rides they can
memorize how the ship was built.
It doesn't seem too bright to us.
It takes a lot more alcohol to get a
machine high than it does a man.
So Boil down your roller skates!
Make alcohol! And wait for THEM
to contact us. Why should we go
looking for trouble?
We would be smart if we would
just try to enjoy the gravity we
have instead of throwing a few
people out of it at great expense to
all. And for what? If we're not
careful, the scientific military
complex will try to shoot them
down in order to see what their
equipment is made out of. Or
maybe they will attack with pitchforks and rakes as a last resort.
When they get here, all we have
to do is pour a few bottles of stout
into them, get them loaded, ride
around in their machines, then we
can start our space program on the
foundation of what other creatures
have done so far. Simple.
F.O'.
On Campus Thanksgiving?
Got a Friend? Celebrate!
PIT CABARET
Oct. 1 1
Dance to  "BANDIT"
Tickets $2.00 each
Available from AMS Co-Op Bookstore
or at the door .
8:00 p.m. to Midnight
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*
'.-     . cinemacinemacinemacinemacinemacinemacinemacinem
Extraterrestrial visitations
By ERIC IVAN BERG
The Outer Space Connection
directed by Fred Warofinsky
written by Warofinsky & Alan Landsbury
narrated by Rod Serling
Dunbar Theatre
Some 35,000 years ago flaming "chariots"
falling from the sun fired their retro-rockets
and landed on the plain of Nasca high in the
Andes mountains of South America. The
pre-Mayan natives were frightened at first
and ran fleeing for their lives as the space
suited "gods" emerged from their
spaceships. Eventually the humble natives
returned bearing gifts for the new gods —
even offering their virgin daughters for the
pleasure of their stubby little deities with
the glowing helmets.
Many healthy native women were
selected, tested and then artificially impregnated with alien embryos which had
been stored for ages in the vaults of the
starships. These women then gave birth to a
new link — a biogenetically engineered race
of men — the ancient Mayans arising from
Cro-Magnon man. Native chief priests were
given symbols of power — transistor radios
and video devices to communicate with
their new gods.
What SF scenario is this you ask? Is this
another "Twilight Zone" from this film's
famous narrator Rod Serling? Not at all.
For it is the theme of a pseudoscientific
documentary currently riding the Erich von
Daniken bunko bandwagon, which started
with his much televised pop anthropology
entitled Chariots of the Gods. This interesting new documentary, The Outer
Space Connection, nonetheless has not been
produced by von Daniken and his UFOlogist
camera crew. No the whole show was
produced by writer Alan Landsbury from
his book of the same name.
Attacking its audiences curiosity from the
very start Landsbury and his director cum
eo-writer, Fred Warofinsky, stress their
scientific objectivity. They go to impressive
extremes explaining their four travelling
camera crews and the more than one
hundred and twenty locations utilized in the
film. Their sometimes astounding facts are
backstopped by some rather wobbly domed
and   wonderstruck   guesswork   in   un
derscoring their insistance that they have
"startling proof that we are not alone in the
universe!"
But the incredibly controversial von
Daniken is obviously Landsbury's guru at
least when it comes to borrowing theories
and stretched SF factoids. The documentary
will probably be lapped up in sheer bug-eyed
delight by the many UFO freaks and occult
cultists among us. But even the most cynical
and cautiously skeptical audience members
will find some of the evidence impossible to
explain away as mere frisbee throwing
flying saucer fakers having a field day with
their Kodak Instamatics.
Critics of the documentary's deceptive
editing style can point to the huge number of
big "if" prefexes that Landsbury tacks onto
most of his major hypotheses. Surely these
rational thinkers approach the heady
proposition of ancient "gods" from a dying
sun-system arriving variously in South
America, Egypt and Mesopotamia to impregnate the well nigh Neanderthal
tribesWomen with much less UFOria than
the SF faddists. Still chilling to all skeptics
is the seemingly scientific plausability of the
unexplained evidence of the UFO "parking
lot and airfield" at Nasca.
The film goes into great documentary
detail to cover the starflung outer space
theories of immortality which it says is
necessary for deep space voyaging. Other
theories thrown into this von Danikenesque
potboiler are: suspended animation,
Kirilian aura and corona discharge, radio
signals from "another world" received in
1927, interspecies embryo implanation, the
Great Pyramid mystery, the Mayan sun-
calendar mystery and they even chuck in
the frightening Bermuda Triangle mystery
just for luck.
These theories can by no means simply be
laughed off as wild overleapings of the
UFOlogist's imaginations. Landsbury and
Warofinsky carefully show many reputable
scientists and university research centers
working in several of these hitherto completely unexplored areas of study with
important results.
For fascinating instance there is a
biophysical Kirilian effect in existance in all
living things. Filmed under special (and
See pf3 OUTER
'Crazy' good for drive-in
By JEAN RANDALL
Crazy Mama
starring Cloris Leachman & Ann
Sothern
director: Jonathen Demme
Get your cheeks in gear, baby,
for this comedy-gangster flic that
has a plot similar to Bonny and
Clyde and 50's nostalgia
reminiscent of American Graffitti.
This show would be hopelessly
lacking in originality if it were not
Crazy Mama ...
"get your cheeks in gear"
saved by it's outrageous humour.
There is also a satirical portrayal
of vulgarity, as only actresses of
the versatility and intelligence of a
Cloris Leachman and Ann Sothern
can produce. The exception is Cher
Bono's "At the Laundromat" —
LaVerne — who is also a 50's
character of the L.A. scene.
The show opens with a soft focus
flash-back to a young couple living
on Bible-belt farmland, back in the
hungry 30's, who are getting
evicted for not being able to meet
the mortgage payments. Sheba
Stokes is the young wife who
witnesses her husband's killing by
the local sherrif for refusing to
leave his land. It's unexceptional
material, but sad, nevertheless.
Sheba is played by Ann Sothern,
* who, incidentally, hadher own T.V.
series way back when.
Cut to the late 50's in L.A., Mama
Sheba and her daughter Melba
(Cloris Leachman) run a sleazy
beauty salon and are about to be
evicted once again for not paying
the bills. Melba's luscious
daughter, Chyrl, is pregnant by a
Ho-Daddy surfer but Chyrl isn't the
least bit concerned about still
being single.
The three Stokes ladies,
desperate, but loyal to each other,
decide it's high time to fight back.
They make off with the landlord's
car and head for Vegas with Ho-
daddy in pursuit cause he wants to
marry Chyrl. The Stokes clan is on
their way back to Arkansas to
reclaim their land and repay a debt
to the people who evicted them. On
the way they pull a few heists, and
pick up three more people, plusHo-
daddy, who catches up with them
somewhere around Barstow.
Sheba meets Grandma Bertha
over a slot-machine conversation
in Vegas. .Bertha is a little old lady
that broke out of an old folks home
her son-in-law put her in.
Jimbob is a cowboy who left his
wife. He meets and falls in love
with Melba at the craps table.
Grandma Bertha gets the idea to
knock over a Las Vegas wedding
chapel. Melba and Jimbob get
married while Snake, the black-
jacket biker-greaser, and Ho-
daddy clean out the till.
On the road, while being chased
by the-fuzz, there are a couple of
good Burma Shave ads and lots of
50's rock music on the radio.
'Member, My Baby. Loves the
Western Movies, and Running
Bear Loves Little White Dove?
Don't forget the Everly Bros.
The plot really gets rolling when
Grandma Bertha gets shot down in
cold blood by an F.B.I, agent for
picking up a package at an appointed spot. When what's left of
the group gets back to Jeruselem,
Arkansas, "the shit really hits the
fan."
The chase scenes are not what
Steve McQueen gave us in Bullitt,
but they are competent.
So, grab your steady, get some
popcorn, and regress a little.
JAZZ
NOW PLAYING
IN THE BACKROOM
"Bruce Miller
Band"
i
COMING JAZZ ATTRACTIONS       •.
Oct. 13 - 18 "PACIFIC SALT"       8
Oct. 28-31 "OREGON" $
OIL CAN HARRY'S
752 THURLOW
RESERVATIONS
683-7306
SUBFILMSOC presents
I AM
NO ANGEL
( with Mae West)
THURS./SUN. 7:00
FRI./SAT. 7:00 & 9:30
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it     •*— "
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Saturday - 4:00 p.m. to 12:00 a.m.
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Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10, 1975 artsandartificeartsanctartificeartsandaMficeartsan^
Comedy obese hut funny
By STEVE MORRIS
She's 29, lonely, ponderous and
bulging out at every seam. He's a
tax collector, middle-aged and
decidly gay. The third one is
terribly shy, terribly Scottish and a
terrible writer. What's more, the
three of them all live under one
roof.
Charles Laurence put together
what is, for the most part, a
compact, tightly written and
dizzying array of scenes in the life
of these three characters. Vicky
(Susan Wright) is the ponderous
landlady, her tenants being Henry
(Owen Foran) and James (David
Sereth).
My Fat Friend
Written by Charles Laurence
Directed by Bill Millerd
Starring Susan Wright
At the Arts Club
The plot is simple and
straightforward. Vicky is the "fat
friend" who is getting fatter by the
hour. Enter Tom (Jackson
Davies), a tall, youthful American
who is leaving for Iran the next
day. Vicky shares Tom's last night
in London, and is left behind the
following morning with many
hopes and promises. Tom is expected to return to her four months
later, so Vicky has until then to
shape her new image.
If it all sounds like a love story
scenario   you've   heard   several
times before, you're right. But it.
doesn't matter. Laurence does not
concern himself with a story.
Superficial, light and at times
poorly constructed the plot line is
only used as a vehicle to convey to
the audience the playwright's
primary interest and forte: quick
and acerbic one-liners.
The script's true strength resides
in its use of dialogue. Words, words
and still more words. Words which
are biting and sardonic, yet sad as
well as gentle. And of course,
words which are extremely funny.
Laurence has mastered the
exchange of riposte. He sets
characters up only to devastate
them with a single phrase. His
script is a polished one, and is an
admirable example of professional
playwrighting.
However, the script is merely
half the story in this Arts Club
production. Millerd has done a fine
directing job. He has paced and
Shindiggers still righteous
By BRIAN GIBBARD
Remember Shinding? That soporific TV series
featuring your favorite pop music heavies from the
days of Clearasil and the jerk? Well last Thursday I
happened to see one of the better acts to come out of
that show, The Righteous Brothers.
Almost in spite of myself I enjoyed the Righteous
Brothers at the Cave. They had a very slick,
professional and even humorous show. ,
The show started at 3:30 with a disco operation that
was not only unsuccessful' in warming up the crowd
and getting it moving, but judging by some faces near
me it nauseated the older people as much as the
younger.
At 9:00 the"brothers Righteous came on and did
Brothers . . . Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield
their act for exactly (to the minute, in fact) an hour.
And the response they got was something more than
enthusiastic.
Starting off with a "welcome-to-the-club" type of
tune, Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield played most of
their old hits and a few new ones. Most of them were
at least done competently.
They sing much as they did on their old monster
hits. Medley's bass is more hoarse than I remember
it, and occasionally went slightly flat. But his is the
more pleasant voice than Hatfield's, which has an
excessively wide vibrato, but is, in fact, quite weak.
Their backing musicians were good, and played
well together. The band consists of guitar, bass,
drums, piano and the de rigeur keyboard virtuoso.
But even a good backup band can't recreate the Phil
Spector feeling on the golden oldies.
Little Latin Lupe Lu, Unchained Melody, You've
Lost That Lovin' Feelin' were all received with
whoops by the mid-thirties crowd. Soul and Inspiration and Rock and Roll Heaven were faithful to-
the originals. But the brothers were less successful
with some of their other attempts. Incredibly, they
even tried an old Sam and Dave blues number. Blues
singers they ain't, but a good biting guitar solo saved
the tune from being a complete fiasco.
Then again, the crowd wasn't there to hear Hatfield
and Medley sing new stuff. They were there to hear
the lush vocals that made the Righteous Brothers so
successful in the '60's. Along with some mildly
amusing and corny comedy, that's exactly what they
get. The show concluded with that rates of Vancouver
phenomena — a spontaneous, heartfelt standing
ovation. ;
At the Cave until Saturday.
Auditions for the Theatre Department's
Production of
SCAPINO
By Moliere
to be presented January 14-24
Directed By Richard Ouzounian
will be held on
TUESDAY, October 14 (3:00 pm - 5:00 pm)
WEDNESDAY, October 15   (3:00 pm - 5:00 pm)
in Room 112 of the Frederic Wood Theatre Building
— Auditions Open Tq All UBC Students, Faculty and Staff —-
Susan Wright fattening up
timed the piece so well that the
actors execute their parts with
stopwatch perfection. From the
first moment onward, the play
bursts with energy and surges
ahead rarely losing a step.
Credit is also due to the actors.
Sereth handles his part well, and
Wright does a fine job in rounding
out the part of the fat friend in
more ways than one.
But the evening truly belongs, to
Foran. He has the best lines in the
script,. and the ability to deliver
them. He commands our attention
—glen e. erikson
and the audience waits excitedly
for Foran's next verbal assault. He
extracts every humorous ounce he
can from the character, but it is not
so heavy handed that the other
aspects of Henry (slim as they are)
are lost in the uproar. Foran is the
backbone of the production and a
delight to watch.
Alison Green's set design is a
fine creation of atmosphere. It
utilizes the little space the Arts
Club affords judiciously, creating a
set which is both artistic and
functional.
OUTER SPACE
From   PF   2
unexplained Kirilian
photography, fingertips glow with
an eerie blue bioplasmic
emanation — even from the hand
of a long dead Egyptian mummy!
The intriguing question then
asked is was not the incredible
Egyptian skills for embalming the
royal dead done to prepare the
bodies for long space voyages in
the gods' nuclear powered sky
chariots?
The already highly
controversial film perhaps asks
more questions than it can — or
even intends to answer. Incredible
footage on the actual "cloning" of
animal tissue to produce exact
xeroxed genetically duplicated
salamander fish are shown. Could
this have been the technique of
the purported alien bio-engineers
as they "designed" the new and
genetically improved races of
man? The film also asks if the
Great Pyramid of Cheops actually
(pick one) is a: (1) space beacon
(2) astrological
See pf7 OBSERVATORY
- Ai'na of Loomed IJeef    fJ5S
Try
you'll like it
DELICATESSEN-RESTAURANT
3211 W. BBOAPWAY
TAKE-OUTS - 738-2010
LICENSED PREMISES
VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
lectures
DR. GARY SCHWARTZ
visiting professor, UBC
department of psychology,
from Harvard
BIOFEEDBACK,
MEDITATION AND
THE VOLUNTARY
CONTROL OF MIND
OVER BODY
Or. Schwartz has been in the
forefront of research on human
self-control and its relationship to
yoga and meditation.
SAT., OCT. 11,8:15 p.m.
Vancouver institute
lectures take place on
Saturdays at 8:15 p.m.
on the ubc campus
in lecture hall no. 2
instructional resources
centre
admission to the general
public is free
Friday, October 10, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Zoo/crjoofesZoofeboofesJooftboofcsfoofe&oofts/oofeboofcsZoofcboofesio^baofcsZoofeboofesioo
Monsters, death
By ERIC IVAN BERG
Randolph Cranstone, the
Dagwood Bumstead of the Surreal,
just watches calmly as his favorite
Loch-Nessiezype monster comes
waddling ridiculously out of a lake
to rape and devour his pretty
chambermaid right on his own
front lawn. Thus begins author
Bullock's latest book — a
cerebrally surreal effort in which
everything preposterously unbelievable magically occurs.
Randolph Cranstone And The
Pursuing River is, nevertheless, an
imaginative leapfrogging for any
reader at first. It stretches the
reader's own gullibility in its incredible narrative to and past the
point of. grandly ironic larceny and
fable-making. Essentially it is an
experimental foray so highly
charged with its own engines of
overleaping imaginative energy
that it threatens to- leave the'
unimaginative reader behind.
Randolph Cranstone and
The Pursuing River
by Michael Bullock
Rainbird Press, Vancouver
1975. 208 ppg. $10
Midiae! Bullock is the author if
this • wildly parabolic trip into
fiction. His experienced craftsmanship and editorial skill have
cut and honed this almost runaway
energy so that the work actually
appears to get away with its many
large-to-little literary "crimes."
Michael Bullock himself is a
printing press — a tour de force of
n almost all the literary arts. He is at
once a surrealist poet, playwright,
fiction writer, graphic artist,
award-Winning translator and
teacher who is currently an
associate  professor  here   in  the
creative writing department of
UBC. With 10 major titles already
published (not to mention innumerable magazine publications)
he still finds editorial time to be-the
editor-in-chief of the university's
literary journal, Prism International; as well as being on the
editorial boards of The Canadian
Fiction Magazine and Contemporary Literature In Translation. Bullock came to Canada
from his native England in 1968 as
a Canada Council Fellow and
variously travelled, translated and
taught writing before finally
joining the UBC faculty in 1969.
The prolific author's literary
"crimes," as it were, in his latest
book could perhaps best be blamed
upon the reader's initial expectations and perplexities involving the professor's prose style.
Cranstone,, which contains the
author's own arresting graphic
doodlings, is a collage of the
unexpected just waiting to spring
BULLOCK
like a giant lobster for the nose of
the unsuspecting reader.
The book of rather fabulous
fables is constructed during the
first half of its length as the
astounding dreamlike diary of one
Randolph Cranstone, a university
lecturer gone askew, at his enchanted country estate. 'It tells of
his travels abroad and then of
Randolph back home again. The
remainder is prose poem fables —
dozens of difficult to delightful
short fiction vignettes dwelling
upon the realms of the fantastic,
the enigmatic, the very
surrealistic and the just plain
strange. All these short mystery
pieces are grouped under the
catch-all title of "The Pursuing
River" and supposedly written by
the protagonist, Randolph.
As the "Dagwood Bumstead of
the Surreal," Randolph displays
confusion to comic, almost mock-
heroic, proportions. He appears to
be in an indecisive dither as to
what to do dramatically. Actions
happen to him over which he has no
control; exotic transformations
follow deep sea-changes and even
savage maimings. From all this he
manages to emerge unscathed
with a cartoon character's serial
resiliency.
The reader should he prepared to
accept Bullock's very own and
highly personalized extensions of
surrealism. Perhaps poking fun at
himself in his poetically proverbial
manner, Bullock runs his lecturer
Randolph through some' really
quite witty slices of his surrealistic
pie — approaching slapstick with a
straight face. Randolph's Alicelike adventures in his many
mysterious and imaginative
wonderlands simply drip of irony
in all their eggshell enigmas.
Aside   from   having   a   huge
'What a feast is here for everyone
with a love of life, let alone music!
An inspiring and thrilling experience!'
New York M
"•••'/,•! A musical joy! Delightful!"
-   Ann CiUcinno   N.Y   Daily News
"Succeeds in turning the rare trick of
revealing an extraordinary human
being as well as an amazing artist!"
New York Time;
"An astounding picture! A true
revelation of simple greatness!"
-Archer Winsten. N. Y. Posl
"A thrilling experience! Marvelous!"
- Seventeen Maga/me
"A rich, delightful, experience! Joyful,
U[w/ll I III IVJ .       - -William Wolf  Cue Magazine
"A glowing 90 minutes! Delightful!"
WNt'W TV   N.Y.
CAI lllcil dill ly.     —Pauline Kael, The New Yorker ^:>:.*■:,«
Academy Award Winner
ARTHUR RUBINSTEIN
LOVE OF LIFE
Varsity
SHOWS AT
7:30 - 9:30
224-3730*'
4375 W. Wth        -     GENERAL
homicidal monster in his swimming pool, Cranstone prophetically
lives out his dreams and finds
many other monsters in his
imagination. Foreboding water
images trickle through, all of his
waking nightmares as Bullock's
hero labors under a phobic persecution complex. In this wet
obsession he feels that a river (the
title) is secretly following him.
Large scale kitty cats of King Cong,
economy size, ripped perhaps from
Gulliver's own travelogue, suddenly rear up out of nowhere to nab
Randolph and carry him off to
their litters to be bashed about like
a ball of elephant-sized kits.
The sexually witty haunting of
Randolph by a mysterious oriental
femme fatale named Onoko furnishes much of the surreal hilarity
of the chase throughout his torturous daydreams and travels
abroad. Randolph the puppy dog
follows his willowy Onoko, or the
mere mystery of her, to the "House
of Joy" in the Oriental City
(Tokyo? Shanghai?) from some
vague western port (Vancouver?).
Dogmatically trying to imbue his
staid academic life with "true
meaning and purpose" he follows
her through never-never lands of
the imagination, always pursued in
turn by a river trying to drown
him.
Bullock's much admitted talent
and craft has produced this subtle
and poetically personal prose. It is
a writing style that rather selectively attacks his reader's lower
levels of subconscious comprehension with a sometimes almost
maddeningly evasive and
mysterious depth of meaning.
Perhaps "mystery" is the key
word here in the delicate coding of
these sometimes, flowery   fables.
One should not approach these
cryptic parables and comic satires
as if they were mere segmented
short stories. Rather one should
insurgently try to sneak up and
ambush them with one's own
imagination, enjoying them as if
they were exotic prose poems with
fable trailers tacked on. Poignant,
puzzling, sometimes bizarre, but
always well woven fictions they
will leave the imaginative reader
hanging on like Dagwood/-
Randolph in the end where "behind
him, coming inexorably closer, he
heard the sound of rushing water."
a different
set of jaws   ^
Musical comedy
satire on sex;
coarse language
throughout
R. Mcdonald
B.C. Director
CAMBIE ai  18th
876-2747
STARTS
TODAY
Shows at 7:30-9:30
Matinees
Sunday 2 p.m.
Thi terrifying
motion picture
Vogue
M» (JKANVIU.E
685-5434
JAWS
RICHARD DREYFUSS
ROBERT SHAW
Mature—Some frightening and
gory scenes—R.McDonald, B.C. Dir.
Shows at  12:15, 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:30
Sunday 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:30
Odeon
THE HERO OF TRUE GRIT MEETS HIS MATCH
John Wayne — Katherine Hepburn
"ROOSTER COGBURN"
Shows at 12:15, 2:10, 4:10, 6:05
8fl  GRANVILLE
682-7468
8, 10:00
GENERAL
Sunday    2:15
Coronet
851  GRANVILLE
685   6(28
CHARLES BRONSON
"HARD TIMES"
MATURE, FREQUENT VIOLENT SCENES
R. Mcdonald, B.C. Director
Shows—12:20. 2:15. 4:15, 6:10, 8, 10
THE CANADA WAR MEASURES ACT WAS RIGHT OR WRONG
"LES ORDRES"
Dunbar
224-7252
DUNBAR at 30th
GENERAL
Shows at 7:30 — 9:30
Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10, 1975 PF   INTERW
Bach by popular request this week's   PF interview is a
continuation of  ghostly   columnist   Flake  09Hallijon9s
award winning interview with rock star Frank Zappa.
F.O'.:. What form is your music falling
into these days?
, Zappa: Well I'm not much of a progressionist myself. I just jump around on top oi
it.   ■»      .       _        '
..F: And what about the musicians that you
have playing with you?
Z: Well the one that has the most fun is
the drummer because he doesn't have to
worry about holding one whole note. His
•function within the group is to simultaneously keep time and track what I play, which
is very hard to do. He happens to have instantaneous pattern recognition, his ear
hears in advance of what I'm going to play.
The old time bass players used to like
to play root notes, the note that gives the
£hord its name, the one that lets the audience know what key you are in. Now I like
those kind of bass payers. But today with
the new mahavishnu consciousness, the bass
player is playing anything but the root note.
Leading, especially in an environment like
you have in a gymnasium, to a mass conflict of garbage flying all over the room.
•Those notes don't stop after you play them.
They keep going.
It just so happens that our bass player
is of the school that doesn't mind playing
the note that is the root of the chord.
F: You instruct him to do so?
Z: Sure.
F: Do your own a bulldozer? . . *. There
is this myth that when you want to unwind
from whatever makes you tight, you go to a
gravel pit by your house and move gravel
around with a bulldozer.
Z: It just so happened that I used to live
in a house in Los Angeles that had, on the
top of the hill, a bunch of deserted road
grading equipment. You can thank rolling
stone for that myth. They insisted on photo-
•graphing me sitting on top of this equipment. They ran photograrjhs of me sitting
on the things in 1968.
F: How did they get you up on those
things?
Z: It's in my back yard Why shouldnlt
I go up there?
F: You don't enjoy driving those things?
Z: No. I'm not the bulldozer type. Nor do
I care for motorcycles.
F: From where, are we receiving. the
most call for reform in the U.S.?
Z: I think that the call itself, when it is
heard, is only heard from the mouths ot
those who have access to a olace from
•which their voice may be amplified.
F: Music being one of theta?
Z: Most of the things fhtat are heard
from the musical world, cries of protest and
so forth, are really cries to sell records.
F: Who are your peers?
Z: The only person that X relate to creatively is Captain Beefheart/ Not all the
time, because his musical education atops
when we try to discuss th<* retBsfS^tjf^nlS-
But I appreciate the inan MjfclfV" ',"■'.'
F:   We weren't speaking ** fl^.in;^tots
cal execution or lyrics l* ~J   "***" «--*—-■-
pie who's perception is: :aj«,
People who enjoy Zappafaf
*aTJy ...
Z: Are somewhat twii
F: Why do yoo com
peer, would it be beeai
In their music?
Z: Well I only said
group. He comes over
listen to rhythm and
about ft.
F: What difficulties do you encounter in
trying to keep a band of virtuosos together?
Z: I had a band of virtuosos one time
but it didn't last very long. In spite of their
musical ability they were no people to tour
with.
F: Ego difficulties?
Z: No. It's just a matter of: I like to
have a good time. If I'm not having a good
time, i mean, why bother?
F: Are you talking about friends? You
just play with friends?
Z: No, I'm talking about the difference
between somebody who has virtuoso technique and somebody who understands what
it's like to go on the road and play rock
and roll; because that's really What it's
about. I seem to have a format that is
just an extension of the normal kind of
roqk and roll that everybody dreams about.
F: You have assembled people that you
are comfortable paying with, people that
you can stand on the same stage with . . .
Z: It's not staying on. the same stage
with, it's travelling with them for two
months, and it's your off-days Why should
I travel with a bunch of people who wouldn't
be fun to go to a bar with, or just hang out
with? It's very difficult to find people that
you can even have a conversation with, and
when you're all in the same transportation
situation for two months it's like one big
time capsule. If you can't get along and
have a good time and appreciate somebody
when he's grouchy in the morning and so
on and so forth, I mean It's Just not good.
F: Who chose the name Intercontinental
'■■ Absurdities for your company?
Z: That's mine: I did.
F: In what sense are absurdities" tans-
ported?
Z: From continent to continent
F: What are the absurdities that are
being transported?
Z: Well, try the group itself for one
thing, then try the ideas for the songs for
another.
F: These are absurd in their foundations?
Z: They're absurd in the fact that they
exist.
F: It's absurd thtat musical people would
be expressing themselves in this fashion?
Z: It is absurd that such a thing would be
allowed to exist in an environment that is
otherwise hostile to numerous things about
their follow travellers.
F: The liberates that the musicians take,
this is part of the absurdity, that they are
allowed to take these liberties?
Z: No. You don't know how music works.
F: Yeah.
Z: It's just the contrast between what we
do, why we do it the way we do it, where we
do it .who we do it for, and the way things
are when we do it, that is the absurdity.
F: We are still not too clear whether you
mean that the music itself is absurd or the
whole phenomenon of there being such a
thing as rock and roll where musicians can
freak out within form and structure is absurd.
If. Well it start there and grows out in
spherical progression.
F:- Where did you receive your education? ^   ■-
%: t&y education/ wa» received 'where-
.ewer I was. I. dWt teally start learning
ja&QBntc astir ijjofoat til school,
the song. It has nothing to do with drug references or anything else. It's talking about
a boxfull of dental floss.
F: What are we to discern from this;
that it was just frivolity?
Z: No. You can take anything you want
from it. There are people who are attaching great importance to the song with its
dental floss and its allusions to whoopie ty
o ty ay and certain things like that, so it's
an all-purpose song.
F: So, as far as you are concerned the
listener may arrive at any conclusions that
he chooses.
Z: Sure, why not? You can't stop um.
F: What was the creative urge that laid
down this particular song?
Z: I got up one morning, went to shave,
there was a box of dental floss sitting on the
sink. I said, nobody ever wrote a song about
dental floss. If you had to, how would you
do it? I went to the basement got the typewriter out and constructed all the musical
paraphenalia that goes along with a set of
rhymes that revolved around the dental
loss, how you raise tt and so on and so
forth. It was an intellectual challenge.
„F: What sort of thinkers do you read?
Z: I can't really remember one I liked. I
used to have a Quite high regard for a
thinker named Smith unto I suspected that
he was employed by the CIA.
F: And we similarly suppose that you
don't participate in discussions concerning
dichotomies like mind/body?
Z: You mean an out of body experience?
One of those jobs?
F: No. We were just thtinkmg of any
split between the spirit that goes off the end
of your guitar and *he being producing the
aforementioned vibrations.
Z: What specifically in those regards?
You mean I'm supposed to sit here and say
well that's that and this iff this?
F: We were wondering if you ever travel
in these realms with friends and if so were
there any findings?
Z: You mean do I ever sit and space out
wondering where it's at?
F: That is what we would like to know.
Z: Well I had a conversation with Frank
the other night, he's a guitar maker in Los
Angeles. What it boiled down to was if
you travel at the speed of light you're going
to have to make up your own ether as you
go along. Just like rock and roll.
F: Were there any other findings?
Z: One: the cosmos cannot be purchased,
not by donation, taxes or otherwise. Nor by
endless amounts of self punishment, or
flagulation> or other ways of making yourself suffer.
F;*So it cannot,be purchased. Are there
any inroads besides money?
Zi In many- areas it's -out of stock. In
some att&s It'has Seen, back-ordered, in the
SDtu c&Btuxy jrot -can say that many of the
d*Uva$kfofe Jssen. delayed, due to the
*' ' :*t«4« take us there?
flittt won't do it is
takes so much time to discuss it; you could
use that time writing something.
F: People who like your music might
enjoy how you* relate to things like form/
content. We will try to be specific. Things
like the dental floss ranch, what are we
to discern from that lyric?
Z: Dental floss is flax strands coated
with parafin. It is dispensed from a white
plastic box that says Johnson and Johnson,
although that information was omitted from
in music
huge ex-
spending
Something
equipment I
would certainly spend it elsewhere. Even
chum-equipment costs money.
F: Would you like to orchestrate your
audience's response? You were quoted as
saying that the audience applauds at the
wrong times for the wrong reasons.
Z: Well you can't change that. You have
to take it for what it is, you know. Why
should you make them have a bad time by
turning them around.
F: How would you instruct them so they
could have a better appreciation of your
music?
Z: I don't think that's possible to do.
Usually they're just too stoned to really
enjoy the way I would enjoy a piece of
music. But that dde"sn't mean there isn't
something for them to enjoy even though
their minds are all fogged up. There's a
little visceral grime there that they can
partake in.
F: What would be a sophisticated audience?
Z: 1 don't think there is one.
F: If there could be one what would it
look like?
Z: If there was one, I wouldn't be the
sucker to play for them.
F: Well where are we then, on the edge of
some unapproachable void?
Z: I'm not.
F: Is the audience just a bunch of meat
out there?
Z: No the audience is an organism.
Every audience is an organism for that
event. They cease to be individuals at the
point when the lights go out. The further
into the show you get the more they become that organism. At the end of the
show that organism divides up just like one
4,000 unit amoeba and just goes out the
door never to exist again, so every audience
is a very special group. It has its own
character, its own vibe, its own aura, and
everything else. It's an animal that happens
only the one time.
F: When you get in front of them do you
try to ascertain what their level of musical
development or understanding is?
Z: It doesn't take too long to ascertain
that.
F: Would it be intriguing to you to try to
instruct ypur audience in how to respond
to your music.
Z: I've done some work in that area in
the past and the results have been unsatisfactory, I just don't make any attempts to
educate an audience at the same time I'm
playing for them.
F: In this print format then, what would
be some instruction that you would like to
impart to the audience so they can get a
better appreciation of your music?
Z: Well the first thing is, I won't tell
them anything about it. Just tell them how
much work went into bringing it to their
town; and what the odds were against put-
tin#jtt.ig> on mat stage in the first place.
Wi j&ife should appreciate the fact that
the music is even existing at all against
such great odds?
Z: That's right. You start there and anything beyond that is pure gravy.
F: What is some of that gravy beyond?
What would an audience be that could pick
up on the music to your satisfaction beyond
the point of being just a roomful of mindless
boors ...
Z: I wouldn't call them mindless boors,
that's your expression.
F: Excuse me. We wouldn't say that you
did call them mindless boors.
Z: I just want to make sure that thai
goes on the tape recorder; that is if the
tape recorder is working at all.
F: What are the odds against it?
Z: fifty-fifty.
Ft What service do you perform for the
audience, a chance to escape or give tb*m
some groving or what?
Z: Well the escape and so forth is completely their interpretation.
F: What do you see that you do for them?
Z: My service to the audience is that I
contribute in making the show.
F: Muchas gracias senor.
Z: Try interviewing the Rolling Stone one
day.
Friday, October 10, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 5 Student budget cultural
highlights of the upcoming week
j re many and varied. Perhaps best
of the bunch may be the free
Vlusic Department recitals such as
Berkley's Dr. Alan Curtis' free
harpsichord concert today at
noon in the Recital Hall.'Tonight
flautist Paul Douglas,
accompanied by pianist Harold
Brown, give another Music
Department freebee concert in the
Recital Hall at 8:00 p.m.
Musically minded students
should also keep in mind that
UBC's Thursday Evening Alumni
Concert series started last, night.
The upcoming dates are October
23; November 6 and' 20—*
Thursdays all. The whole student
scries is only $6.00 (ph. 228-33 13
tor more info) but pennypinching
students can catch the rehearsals
tor free on the Tuesday noons
preceeding the Thursday concerts
at the Recital Hall.
The Queen E Theatre has a
different type of musical billboard
just up around the bend. It's the
Shawn Phillips Concert tomorrow
night (Oct. 11). Julian Bream the
guitarist and lutist follows him on
Sunday night. Also Surfday the
VSO sounds off at 2:30 p.m. with •
the music of Mozart, Strauss and
Liang. The excellent violinist
Victor Tretyakov is guest artist
with Akiyama on the baton. This
VSO bill repeats Monday and
Tuesday nights (13 and 14) of
next week.
Nana Mouskouri the
internationally famous songstress
.sill   also   be  starring   at   the QE
Theatre next week (Saturday,
Oct. 18, 8:30 p.m.-and a SRO is
virtually guaranteed so hurry.
Also upcoming on the QE concert
program are the following so take
note: Donna Fargo, Johnny
Paycheck and Wilf Carter Country
and Western Concert on Sunday,
Oct. 26; Glen Yarbrough and The
Original Limeliters on Thursday,
Oct. 30; and An Evening With
Roberta F!a'k and Co. on Friday,
Oct. 31. ;
Similarly the QE Playhouse
Theatre premieres the drama
Kennedy's -Children on Tuesday.
Oct. 14 at 8:00 p.m. The whole
show will be directed by Eric
Hasnain and is the work of
playwright Robert Patrick.
Vancouver Chamber Choir
presents Baroque Masters, a
concert under the direction of
conductor Jon Washburn. The
concert goes at 8:30 p.m. tonight
(Oct. 10) in the Ryerson' United
Church at 45th and Yew. Also
coming up on the Vancouver
Chamber Choir's fall concert
series are Great Poet's Concert on
Nov. 7 and the Christmas concert
of December 12 entitled a
Ceremony of Carols. VCC tickgt
information for all students can
be obtained by phoning
732-6026; also available Magic
Flute Record Shop, Arbutus and
West 4th.
Wolfman Jack, famous rock
and roll AM-jock, performs his
thing with the Stampeders this
Saturday night (Oct. 11) at the
PNE Gardens. Famous for his
deejay incredibilities and hype the
Wolfman will be helping the group
hype- its latest album, New
Orleans. The Wolfman will also be
signing autos for groupies at The
Coggery in Gastown tomorrow
afternoon.
'Dean't @6i«teAe &U4i#te
TRADITIONAL CHINESE FOOD
4544W. 10th
Ave.
FULL FACILITIES
FREE HOME DELIVERY
(Minimum order $4.00) 228*9794
Place your order Vi hour before closing
10% DISCOUNT U.B.C. STUDENTS
HOURS
Mon. to Fri. 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.
Fri.-Sat. 11:30 a.m.-11  p.m.
Sun. 5:00-10 p.m.
(CLOSED TUESDAY)
Our  Coffee  Shop   is open  6
days a week.
(Closed Tuesday)
I COMING MONDAY, OCT. 13 until NOV. 1
&gL   ys-«»*H^8*$
SHL 32092 - AL GREEN IS LOVE - Al Green
DES 18072 - THEIR GREATEST HITS- Ten Years After
UKS 53110 - 100 C.C. - 10 C.C.
THS 16 - FROM MIGHTY OAKS -Ray Thomas
UKS 53107 - SHEET MUSIC - 10 C.C.
XPS 631 - TRES HOMBRES - Z.Z. Top
ANA-1 - METAMORPHOSIS- The Rolling Stones
BMC 3002 - THE GUITAR - Liona Boyd
AQR 506 - STAND BACK - April Wine
XPS 656 - FANDANGO - Z.Z. Top
9102 500 - ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK - 10 C.C.
THS 14 - BLUE JAYS - Justin Hayward & John Lodge
LAT 1003 - THE HOMECOMING - Hagood Hardy
THS 12-13-THIS IS THE
MOODY BLUES - 2 Record Set-$8.99
WXDOX
AV 69005 - THE BEST OF THE STYLISTICS
AV 69006 - DISCO BABY - Van McCoy
BTSD 6021 - STEPPIN - The Pointer Sisters
BDS 5141 - IMAGINATION - Gladys Knight & Pips
BDS 5612 - I FEEL A SONG - Gladys Knight & Pips
NBLP 7001 - KISS
AV 69008 - THANK YOU BABY - The Stylistics
CAS 1059 - LORD Of THE RINGS - Bo Hansson
KSBS 2603 - FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN - Charlie Daniels
CAS 1063 - MONTY PYTHON'S PREVIOUS RECORD
AV 69002 - LOVE IS THE ANSWER - Van McCoy
KSBS 2607 - NIGHTRJDER - Charlie Daniels
NBLP 7016 - DRESSES TO KILL - Kiss
PS 2003 - SONS OF THE BEACHES - Flash Cadillac
& The Continental Kids
BTSD 6022 - CHAIN REACTION
The Crusaders
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SMAS 11419 - VENUS & MARS -
Paul McCartney
ST 11395 - DESOLATION BOULEVARD - Sweet
SMAS 832 - MEDDLE - Pink Floyd
SMAS 2653 - SGT. PEPPER'S - The Beatles
STBB 388 - UMMAGUMMA - Pink Floyd
ST 11418 - NO WAY TO TREAT A LADY - Helen Reddy
ST 11392 - SPARTACUS-TRIUMVI RAT
AL 4038 - SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST -  The Headhunters
AL 4052 - LEVEL ONE - Larry Coryell
UA-LA 441 - WHY CAN'T WE BE FRIENDS - War
UA-LA 339 - ELDORADO - The Electric Light Orchestra
UAS 6754 - THE BEST OF GORDON LIGHTFOOT
SABB 11445 - CAUGHT IN THE ACT - 2 Record Set -
Grand Funk Railroad - $5.99
STCH 639 - ALL THINGS MUST PASS - 3 Record Set
— George Harrison - $9.99
0&6sound
556 Seymour St., 682-6144
Open Thursday & Friday until 9 P.M.
Page Friday, 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10, 1975 oddsandendsoddsandendsoddsahdendsoddsandendsoddsandendsoddsandendsoddsand
Max's prairie memories
ByGREGSTRONG
The Night We Stole the Mountie's Car is a
series of warm recollections by author Max
Braithwaite upon his life as a prairie school
teacher. With insight and wit Braithwaite
tries to escape the unhappy years of the
,"Great Depression." It is the gentle humour
of his stories that allows us to laugh both at
them and in turn at ourselves.
The novel is constructed around fourteen
incidents or episodes during Braithwaite's
Observatory
From PF 3
observatory/temple (3) giant water pump
or (4) decoy tomb?
Landsbury actually starts f.o saw off his
own rather thin limb when he announces
that the interstellar UFO "fleet has left a
coded message behind for all mankind. In
shades of 2001; A Space Odyssey, Star Trek
and Space 1999, he decodes the message as
saying that the "gods" will be returning to
Earth promptly on Christmas eve circa 2011
A.D. (?)
f Whatever your opinions about the current
von Daniken cult are they will only be
reinforced or badly shaken by this
documentary admixture of astounding fact
and science fiction wishfulfillment. This
unique con»bination in the Outer Space
Connection makes the film, despite the
brainwashing hype of its incredibly expensive advertising campaign, one which
cannot be easily dismissed as pure bunko
editing technique. It is worth seeing for its
controversial prognosis and the inexplicable
questions alone
teaching career in Wannego, Saskatchewan.
It chronicles his personal growth and
metamorphosis from a poor school teacher
to a successful freelance writer.
It is in his characterizations that Braithwaite's skill surfaces, as his characters are
neither starkly good nor evil but are so very
human with all their inherent contraditions
and little idiosyncracies.
There is "Archie the Apologetic
Apothecary," also called "that damned
queer druggist," "the fidgety pharmacist"
and also the shyest man that Braithwaite
says he's ever known. Thus accordingly
"guys like Archie are somehow sent to small
towns to relieve the monotony of existence"
as they become a constant source of
amusement to the townspeople.
Another character is Tight Ass Wembly
(or "Titus" as he was called in refined
circles), "a-constipated farmer so stingy he
couldn't bring himself to pay to get
married" and "so ignorant as to talk almost
entirely in swear words, though being
somewhat of an artist in this respect,
producing the most colourful similies in a
province noted for its similies."
This highly entertaining novel is certainly
one aspect of "Canadianism" in literature
packing a special brand of humour. In his
description of the people as he knew them
and of their little town of Wannego,
Saskatchewan, Braithwaite's style seems
reminiscent of Stephen Leacock, the famous
Canadian humorist of another age. Braithwaite is appealing to that newly awakened
sense of nationalism within us; of cultural
identification with the things we believe to
constitute the "Canadian experience." As
one of his characters, Sgt. Stonemaw of the
Mounties, so ineptly puts his finger on this
fledgling   sense  of  identity;   "We're   all
Canadians .. . Ukes, Frogs, Wops, Hunkies,
Kikes .. all membersofone big family."
But underlying these ethnic currents of
humour and Canadiana are moments of yet
another view of Braithwaite; of the sadness
and tragedy among his memories of the
Prairies and in a larger sense, the pathos of
our lives.
Ruby Lopynski, the town whore, whom
Braithwaite hadn't the heart to tell, that no
"not all fathers had slept with theig twelve
year old daughters and started them in on
prostitution." This was one of those
moments that Braithwaite felt really sick;
"sick of the lousy, stinking, rotten,
hypocritical society of that year-of-our-Lord
1936." ■
The Night We Stole the Mountie's Car
written by Max Braithwaite
published by McLennan and Stewart
$2.95 .
The noyel culminates in the title story;
"The Night We Stole the Mountie's Car."
"Most people when thinking of the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police think of their
musical ride , or of their "they always get
their man," motto but Braithwaite says
"but I always think of bootleg whiskey and
the night we stole Sir Percival Ardley's
convertible." Ardley, a mountie, was an
Englishman so cultured and refined as to
make the entire male population of Wannego "feel inferior, especially in the eyes of
their women." Ardley, the mounted, had
them fawning over him and his adventure
"in India, Australia and South Africa and
other places where the sun never sets."
Percival, vicariously known as "King Shit
from Turd Island" by some of the men or
more popularly as "Lord Percy," organized
a social club ball. "Why even in India, which
"is further from the centers of culture and
civilization than we now find ourselves, it is
possible to maintain the amenities."
The night of the social affair^raithwaite
and his friend Rick Tapley, completely
drunk, ran down the corridors of the hotel,
"banging on the doors of travelling
salesmen and shouting, "take cover! The
gophers are revolting!" Later the two
friends attempted to steal Percy's beautiful
chromed convertible as a joke and Percy,
"very stern and red in the face, one of those
disgusting drinkers who become more
steady, the more they drink," suddenly
appeared right^n front of the car, "you two
are under arrest!" he shouted.
Braithwaite and Tapley, laughed so hard
that they fell out of the car, then they
grabbed Percy's mountie hat and climbed a
telephone pole. They woke up the next day in
a jail cell all hung-over and with what felt to
be twisted arms. "While a very angry
Englishmen in an R.C.M.P. uniform stood
outside saying things like car theft, resisting
arrest and creating a public nuisance. "No
sense of humour, these Englishmen."
Braithwaite finally left his Prairie town
and went to Toronto. But lie has remembered his life and times on the prairies and
the people he knew;
"The cold, dust storms, poverty and indifference became a memory. At first a
bitter memory, but as time passed a fond
memory. For the great compensating factor
of the plains is the people. Like the climate
they are harsh at times, gentle at others but
never dull."
Braithwaite has certainly proved that
grim reality can be so much more comical
than fiction. He has also shown that comedy
can contain some.clear insights into the
human experience. It is a good book, a
Canadian one at that, and I would recommend it to anyone
Bookstore too small says acting head
From   page   1
on the bookstore to undertake a
review of bookstore operation.
He said there may be a "quick
review" of the store while the
sommittee recommends a
permanent    manager   to   replace
Bob Smith who resigned last
month.
Vogt said outside experts may
be called in to give opinions on
UBC's bookstore as part of the
review.
Senate   Wednesday   instructed
its ad-hoc committee on the
bookstore to review the
bookstore's current profit
situation.
Senate made the decision after
student senator Gordon Funt told
senate     that     students     pay
'UBC veeps hiring okayed'
A Canadian Association of
tJhiversity Teachers official said
Thursday it is not uncommon for
tiigii admmistration figures to be
appointed after sitting on their
own selection committees.
Mark Thompson, head of
CAUT's economic benefits
committee and UBC commerce
professor,    -said     appointments
similar to those of UBC
vice-presidents Charles Connaghan
and Michael Shaw, who sat on
their own selection committee,
are "not infrequent" occurrences.
Alma Mater Society council
tabled a motion Wednesday to ask
Caut to investigate the
vice-presidential selection process.
Council will vote on the motion at
Five AMS posts contested
in elections Oct. 23 and 24
A special Alma Mater Society
election to fill five executive
positions has been changed a third
time - to Oct. 23 and 24.
That day won't conflict with
education students' practicum
month.
Originally the election was to
be held Oct. 15.
However, when AMS treasurer
Dave Theessen and co-ordinator
Lake Sagaris announced their
resignations Wednesday, AMS
council decided to delay the
balloting day to Oct. 29.
But that day, AMS officials
later discovered, conflicted with
the practicum days of about
1,200 third- and1 fifth:year
educatfon students.
, "The late resignations of
Theesen and Sagaris made two
elections necessary if we (council)
didn't set the election back to a
later date," AMS secretary Ellen
Paul said Wednesday.
"So we set it back and avoided
the extra expense and trouble of
two elections."
In a planned shuffle by the
Student Unity Party, Theessen
resigned Wednesday as treasurer
so he can seek the internal affairs
position and Sagaris resigned as
co-ordinator so she can seek
external affairs.
Earlier, the ombudsperson post
was vacated because student court
ruled last year's ombudsperson
election was invalid.
External affairs officer Stew
Savard was forced to resign
because he was not readmitted to
UBC. Jennifer Fuller resigned
from external affairs for health
reasons.
Nomination^   close     Friday.
its next meeting, as well as a
motion calling for the resignation
of Connaghan and Shaw.
"I'm sure it's ' happened
before," Thompson said. "For
example, the dean of commerce,-
Noel Hall, sat on the president's
selection committee for a new
dean."
CAUT president David
Braybrooke said in a telephone
interview from Halifax he was.
unaware of the selection
irregularities in the cases of the
two vice-presidents.
"Our last meeting was in the
beginning of September, and we
didn't hear anything then,"
Braybrooke said. "We depend on
information or grievances from
local faculty, and so far there
haven't been any."
Braybrooke would not
comment on whether the methods
of the selection committee were
unethical.
"In a situation where the
university's reputation is at stake
as in this instance, we hold an
investigation on the spot and
don't comment unless a complaint
is made," he said.
Thompson said he felt the
administration president had the
right to have his "own people" as
vice-presidents.
"He has to work with these
people closely, and should be able
to choose people in whom he has
confidence," Thompson said.
"outrageous" textbook prices,
and said he saw no reason why the
bookstore should make a profit.
Acting bookstore, manager Don
Donovan said in an interview
Thursday the bookstore needs
more space. "The bookstore is far
too small to serve a university of
this size."
Donovan said the main
problems with expansions are
finding space tin campus and
getting money. He said large scale
renovation or relocation of the
store would require
"astronomical" amounts of
money.
Donovan said the UBC
bookstore has less floor space
than many other university
bookstores.
He    said    the   Association   of
University and College Stores has *
suggested  bookstores  have  three
square   feet   of   floor   space   per
student.
UBC's bookstore has 24,000
square feet of floor space to serve
23,500 students.
Donovan said the bookstore's
profits come "almost entirely"
from the stationery section with
additional money coming from
calculator sales.
He said summertime tourists
also add to the store's profits.
"There is an increasing number of
people on campus in the summer
— our sales have been reflecting
ft."
Donovan said the store lost
$18,000 last year on textbooks.
He said the store could only
break even on textbooks "if
publishers were to give higher
discounts on books and if we were
to sell all the texts we bring in."
"The problem is that we don't
sell them all."
Donovan said publishers give
the bookstore a 20 per cent
discount below the 'suggested list
price.
"Our policy is to sell at the
publisher's list price," he added.
He said the 20 per cent discount* is
spent on staff salaries andfreight
costs to ship the books to UBC
from the publisher.
"About 90 per cent of bur
books come from back eastreither
in the States or Canada, and some
come from England. The freight is
a major factor," Donovan said.
"Another major factor in
pricing in the last year or two is
the shortage of paper and
increasing paper costs."
Donovan said books ordered
from outside Canada must be
ordered through an agent
approved by the publisher. The
agent has the sole right to
distribute the books in Canada,
and "will add an extra amount on
top of the book price."
"That's a big source of increase
in the price of books in Canada,"
he said.
Donovan said when publishers
print' a new run of books at an_
increased price, agents will
sometimes put stickers on their
stock of earlier, cheaper editions
hiking the price to conform with
the higher new price.
"Students seeing those three
different stickers are enraged,
quite understandably," Donovan
said. He said the practice annoys
him, but added that .the bookstore
"will always sell at the suggested
list price."
Senate last year set an April 1
textbook ordering deadline.
"We had tremendous
co-Operation from faculty this
year," Donovan said. "They
helped quite a bit this year.
"There were more textbooks
available in September this year
than in previous years and this
was almost entirely due to faculty
for getting orders in earlier this
year than in the past."
Friday, October 10, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10, 1975
Hot flashes
Bureavcrafs
wanted
For all students graduating this
year and seeking federal
government jobs, this is your last
chance.
Applications for all types of
jobs in Canada's far-flung
bureaucracies are available in the
Student Services office, Ponderosa
Annex F and must be on the way
to Ottawa no later than Tuesday.
In case the post office is shut
down by labor hassles, the
applications will be sent by
courier from the student services
office.
Me men
Women who like dancing with
women will have the chance to do
just that at a dance Saturday
exclusively for women.
Sponsored by the women's
office, the dance will be held in
SUB 200 from from 8 p.m. to 12
mklnight. Admission is $1.50 and
the   usual   refreshments   will   be
available.
But no men.
Control
As if the mind doesn't have
enough trouble looking after
itself, a Harvard psychologist will
be at UBC Saturday to tell Row it
can control the body as well.
Gary Schwartz is a visiting prof
from Harvard University and has
been in the forefront of research
on the process involved in human
self-regulation and the voluntary
control of mind over body.
His work is helpful in
understanding yoga,
transcendental meditation and
Zen.
Schwartz will^jive^ his talk at
8:15 p.m. Ln IRC 2.
Paul tin
What's so special about being a
Chinese Canadian?
Everyone is welcome to find
out. Paul Lin, director of East
Asian Studies at McGill University, will deliver a presentation
titled Conciousness and Identity
for Chinese Canadians Today.
This talk, sponsored by the
Chinese Varsity Club, will be held
at noon a week today in SUB
theatre.
Midterms are coming up and
you've got to study over the long
weekend.
But unless you study in the
Sedgewick or Woodward
Libraries, don't put it off to
Monday, because all the other
libraries will be closed that day.
Sedgewick will be open from 9
a.m. to 11 p.m. Thanksgiving and
Woodward will be open from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. All libraries will
follow their usual hours Saturday
and Sunday.
'Tween classes
TODAY
WOMEN'S OFFICE
Poetry   reading   with   Daphne  Marlatt, noon, SUB art gallery.
NEWMAN CLUB
Bible study, noon, SUB 105B.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting, noon, upper lounge, International House.
CAMPUS CYCLISTS
General   meeting,  results of  bicycle
survey, noon, SUB 211.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
NDP activist  Roger Ward speaks on
three  years of NDP government  in
. B.C., 8 p.m.,1208 Granville.
SATURDAY
WOMEN'S OFFICE
Women's  party and dance,  8 p.m.,
SUB 200.
MONDAY
FEMINIST KARATE ASSOCIATION
Meeting,   beginners   welcome,   6:30
p.m., SUB 207-209:
TUESDAY
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr.   Ledsome  speaks   on  the  physi-
ology of death, noon, IRC 1.
CHARISTMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, Lutheran
Campus Centre.
PRO-LIFE SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 117.
KAYAK AND CANOE CLUB
General    meeting   and    film,   noon,
SUB 205.
MY JONG KUNG FU
Practice, '4:30  p.m., SUB ballroom.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Luther's table talk and dinner, 6:30
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
SIMS
Transcendental meditation program
and introductory lecture, 8 p.m.,
Bu. 232.
WEDNESDAY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Weekly   testimony   meeting,   noon,
SUB 113.
SIMS
Transcendental meditation program,
noon, Bu. 104.
THURSDAY
BALTIC YOUTH ASSOCIATION
Films    and    discussion    on    Latvia,
noon, SUB 213.
Some diamonds
were born
to be
a cut above
and Ben Moss
has them
MAKE A SPLASH WITH
RK W00DSPICE COLOGNE
Ask for
your stylist
Corky
Leo
Ernie
Maryke
Carlyne
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
3644 WEST 4th AVE., AT ALMA
731-4191
6 diamond bridal set in white
or yellow gold
Engagement Ring  $375
Wedding Ring  sl 10
Sen dfioss
deaeUers
Pacific Centre
Oakridge Shopping
Centre
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi
TM
Free Introductory Lectures by Teachers of
the Transcendental Meditation program,
trained by Mararishi Mahesh Yogi
TUESDAY, OCT. 14, 8:00 BUCHANAN 232
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 15, 12:30 BUCHANAN 104
"Ushering in the Dawn of the Age of Enlightment"
IH Y 41111
7thPAN AMERICAN GAMES,
Mexico City, October 12-26.
CBC Radio reports at 5 minutes
to the hour.
GSC — Your Olympic Networks
THE CLASSIFIEDS
BATES:   Campus - 3 tines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional lines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming- Events
40 — Messages
LEARN THE ART OF Turkish Oriental
Belly Dance. Tues. 7 to 9 p.m. Four
sessions, $16. 2947 West 41st. Enroll
any time. 433-8157 or 261-8044.
10 —For Sale — Commercial
DO SWIMMING, writing, ballroom dancing, outdoor activties interest you?
Vegetarian 36 year-old man, non-
smoker, non-drinker, would like to
contact lady to share companionship"
and explore these and other areas.
All replies will be answered. 738-7320,
P.O. Box 3932, Station D, Vancouver.
C & C SPORTS
Volume Discount Sale
$1 off for every $15 in purchases
Save on squash racquets, ski jackets,
etc., etc. Open 4-9 Thurs., Fri.; 9-6
Sat.; 12  noon 4:00 Sun.
3616 WEST 4th AVENUE
50 — Rentals
CHARTER — CLASSIC 47' SLOOP $175/
day or 93' Diesel Yacht. (Floating
Stereo.) Boogies up to 60 people.
$350/day. 299-9461 — 687-2916, Russ.
60 — Rides
11 — For Sale — Private
1972 GMC  JIMMY CUSTOM 4X4 AUTO.,
p.s., p.b., completely customised,
stero spoke wheels, Armstrong tires.
Only 2 brought into B.C. Call Rick
Stevensen   669-5681 or 733-4184.
ELTON JOHN TICKETS for Sunday
night concert. Phone 922-4301.
NEW IN VANCOUVER! Interior Decorator. All new European styles. Wood
graining, wall coyerings, painting.
Reasonable rates. Phone 876-3936.
TWO AR3A SPEAKERS and a Marantz
receiver model 2245. Phone 874-7442.
70 — Services
20 — Housing
30 — Jobs
BE PART TIME DISC JOCKEY no experience necessary but must enjoy
contemporary music and working
with large groups of people. Open to
men and women 19 years and over.
Call: THE REVOLVING SOUND
COMPANY, 669-5849, 7 days a week,
8:00 a-m. - 12 p.m.
PART TIME employment, sales oriented,
to sell and demonstrate Bonne Bell
Cosmetics.   Phone   946-9634 after  5.
BABYSITTING available in my home by
hour, day or week. West 10th Ave.
Almost anytime. 224-4783. ,   *
SWINGING COUPLES & SINGLES meet
others in Wash. & Western Canada.
Est. 1969. Free sample ads, details.
CY Club, P.O. Box 753, New Westminster, B.C.  V3L4Y8.
PERMANENT HAIR removal by Electrolysis Kree Method in my home.
Prices are reasonable. Phone 738-6960.
85 — Typing
90 - Wanted
35 — Lost
WALLET — grey. Please call K. Stockholder 228-4637 or 263-4939. Keep money as reward.
WANTED TO BUY OR RENT: One Flute
in good condition. Phone 263-4075.
WANTED:   ELTON   JOHN   TICKETS  —
preferably Mon. night. Phone 435-9804;
anytime.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM Friday, October 10, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
SPOB TS
Soccer 'Birds need win badly
By CEDRIC TETZEL*
The UBC Thunderbirds soccer
team will play their first home
game of the season when they
entertain the New Westminster
Blues Saturday at the Thunderbirds Stadium at 2 p.m.
This will be the game where the
'Birds have to prove whether they
are worth anything this year or
not.
UBC started the season with a
clunker, losing 3-1 to the Eldorado
Glens Sept. 10. The way they
played prompted coach Joe
Johnson to threaten some of his
players with the axe.
This worked for a while and the
'Birds did play their second^ame'
of the season- with a little more
perk. Nevertheless, at the end of
the game, they found themselves
on the same end of another 3-1
decision.
With a 0-0-2 record the 'Birds
started their, annual southward
trek to Colorado, only this time
also decided to drop in at St. Louis
and Kansas City.
The UBC started their. U.S.
series against fhe perennial
N.C.A.A. soccer stronghold, St.
Louis University.
Craig Campbell scored first for
the 'Birds, but the Americans
rallied to beat them by the familiar
score of 3-1.
From St. Louis the 'Birds moved
on to Kansas City hoping.for better
things to happen. They were out of
luck and left the city with a 2-6 loss
to Rackhurst College.
Just when everything seemed
rotten the 'Birds came up with a
win: their first this seasons They
beat the Littleton team in Denver
by a score of 4-0. The goals were
scored by Steve Kisic, Roy
Zuyderduyn and Ron Hurley who
found the net twice/
With that'win under their belts,
the 'Birds went on to demolish all
their opponents in Colorado,
beating Mission Trajillo,
Metropolitan   State   College   and
Colorado State College 5-0, 4-1 and
4-0 consecutively.
Coming home after these
morale-boosting wins, the 'Birds
plunged into local league play with
a game against newcomers to the
first division Wesburn Kejacs.
They started by losing a goal 15
seconds into the game. UBC did not
even have a chance to touch the
ball before they had to retrieve it
from the back of the net.
That was not the end of their,
troubles. To add to their despair,
they scored... in their own net.
They did manage to fight back
for a draw and in fact was kept
from going ahead when their goal
was disallowed for offside.
With a 0-1-2 league record, the
'Birds know it is time for them to
make a move.'
Coach Johnson says he would
like to come back from the
Thanksgiving break with five
points with five gJrmes played. The
'Birds will meet the Vancouver
Firefighters Monday at. 2 p.m.
at Capilano Stadium.
The Saturday game will be the
first time the 'Birds have played an
established team since their U.S.
trip and they have to prove they
are as good as they say.
Eastbound 'Birds No. 7
The Thunderbird football team
, heads off to Winnipeg in search of
v its first road victory of the season
Saturday.
Last Saturday's 22-13 loss to the
University of Alberta Golden
Bears marked the half way mark
of the season for the 'Birds. Their
, record now stands at 3-2, good
enough for a share of third place in
the Western intercollegiate football league.
A win over the hapless
University of Manitoba Bisons
Saturday will move UBC right into
contention.
Despite their fine performance
thus far into the schedule the game
is not likely to be an easy one for
the 'Birds. Veteran defensive back
Ten Hon Choo and line backer Mike
McKay-Dunn both sustained knee
injuries against the Bears. On top
of that kicker Gary Metz came
' down with appendicitis Monday.
These injuries coupled with the
fact that coach Frank Smith can
take but 28 players on road games
may hurt UBC's performance.
One big plus for the 'Birds is the
fact that the powers that be were
not taking their loss to Alberta too
seriously. For the second straight
week the Canadian Intercollegiate
Athletic Union rank UBC in the top
ten of the country's teams.
The national rankings are as
follows:
1) University of Toronto Blues
2) University of Ottawa Gee-Gees
3) University of Saskatchewan
Huskies
4) St. Mary's University Huskies ■
5) .   Wilfred   Laurier   University
Golden Hawks
6) University    of    Calgary
Dinosaurs
7) University of British Columbia
Thunderbirds
8) Acadian University Axemen
9) University of Western Ontario
Mustangs
10) University of Guelph Gryphons
UBC ATHLETIC SOCIAL CLUB
DANCE
Live Music
OCTOBER 11  - SUB BALLROOM
8:30-12:30
FULL FACILITIES
TICKETS $1.50
MEN'S INTRAMURALS
NEEDS REFEREES
For Hockey, Basketball, Soccer
No Experience Necessary
Pay $3.00 and $3.50
Come to Room 308
War Memorial Gym
or phone 228-4648
VASQUE CASCADE
^You'll be glad you've got a boot
this good !<i.) foam rubber padded top for
2)   snug, comfortable fit. (2.) NICKEL PLATED EYELETS
won't rust or corrode. (3.) LITTLEWAY CONSTRUCTION with heavy leather msole.(4.)VIBRAM- LUG
SOLE AND HEEL for traction. (5.) TWO STRONG
MIDS0LES for support. (6.) SPLIT LEATHER
UPPERS with reinforced ankle cup.
The lightweight boot is designed for
traij hiking with packs up tD 25 Rounds.
It is constructed of split leathers for
flexibility and comfort. For a professional fitting, see our experts.
tfotoouMtaikbeota
THE
GREAT ESCAPE
Cross-Country Skiing
SALES & RENTALS
Hiking, Back-Packing,
nippon cvcis
1790 West Georgia (at Denman)
BICYCLE SALES, SERVICE
RENTALS
One Block From Stanley Park
687.5337-
Women in motion
Health, Sport ond Recreation
OCT. 23- 30 —AT U.B.C
PLAN TO ATTEND
1. THE SPORTS FESTIVAL
CLINICS - NO ADMISSION CHARGE
COME DRESSED TO PARTICIPATE
FITNESS,    WATERPOLO,    SYNCHRONIZED
GYMNASTICS,      RINGETTE,     POWER
RAQUETBALL, LACROSSE, NETBALL
FOR DATES AND TIMES
ROOM 208 - MEMORIAL GYM, 228-2295
SWIMMING, RHYTHMIC
SKATING,     SQUASH,
2. THE CONFERENCE
Oct. 24, 25 & 26 — S.U.B. Ballroom
REGISTRATION IN SUB AND MEMORIAL GYM 12:30-1:20
OCT. 10, 14, 15 16, 17
Charge—$10.00 including banquet
Many  eminent  speakers  will   deal   with  physiology,   nutrition,   medicine,
psychology and culture as they relate to participation in physical activity by
women and girls.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION-
MARILYN POMFRET or MARY FINCH 228-2295 Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10, 1975
LENCO*GARQARD *TEAC • HA8MAN-KA8O0N * HSHBB .CITATION • ROBERTS * ALTEC •SUPERSCOPE *TAHDB§R8 * YAMAHA .KOSS ♦TEAC *
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YAMAHA^v1TrERE0
Yamaha's computer-designed CR400 AM/^M
stereo receiver offers guaranteed performance
specifications, clean power and a wealth of important features unique in its price range. More than
16 watts per channel into 8 ohms, both channels
driven, 20-20,000 Hz, at the 0.5% distortion level.
FIVE-YEAR WARRANTY.
• YAMAHA
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Ultra-compact bookshelf/wall mount speakers,
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A new Yamaha breakthrough brings you the same
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PE3012 AUTOMATIC
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A fully-featured turntable with auto start & stop, 3
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Complete with walnut base, dust cover and the
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TOTAL SUGGESTED LIST PRICE $696.80
A&B PRICE
$499
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o/y/uaco A-25
Since the introduction of the
A-25 in late 1968, Dynaco loudspeakers have rapidly ascended to the front rank of popularity
by virtue of unprecedented consumer appreciation of their outstanding value. It is the phenomenally popular speaker
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SUGG. LIST $104.50 A&B
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TEAC.
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Slip on a pair of Koss PRO-4AA
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range of ordinary dynamic Stereo-
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the smoothest-responding and
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we have yet tested "
Sugg. List $75.00
A&B PRICE
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With their dazzling array of features,
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price, these units are unexcelled by
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2 YEAR PARTS AND LABOUR WARRANTY!
MODEL 360S list $599.95 .. A&B PRICE
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