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The Ubyssey Nov 18, 2013

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Array w\
HOLLYWOOD NO MORE? // Legendary local cinema on Broadway threatened with closure, renovation P8
IMPROMPTU AID // UBC-affHated conservation group hard at work in villages hit by Super Typhoon Haiyan P3 // Page 2
WHAT'S ON l    THIS WEEK, MAY WE:
MONDAY /18
CAN THE WORLD
HANG TOGETHER?
8 P.M.-9 P.M. @ COACH HOUSE OF
GREEN COLLEGE
Poli sci PhD Charles Roger gives a
talk on taking on the world's challenges through global cooperation.
Free
TUESDAY ' 19
TOONIETUESDAY
ALL DAY ©WHITE SPOT
Wondering what that lineup
around Tim Hortons is about?
It's Toonie Tuesday at White Spot
where the original Triple O's burger
is only $3.33 every Tuesday. This
is not a paid advertisement, but
anin-case-you-didn't-get-it-and-
were-too-afraid-to-ask-someone-
and-didn't-want-to-Google-it.
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
WEDNESDAY' 20
DIRT! THE MOVIE
7:30 P.M. @ FREDDY WOOD THEATRE
UBC's Engineers Without Borders
chapter screens Dirt! The Movie.
Afterthe film, there will bea panel
discussion with experts from
an environmental journalist, the
president of Fair Trade Vancouver
and more.
$5 suggested entrance donation
THE
COVER
Our photo editor returns to Totem for the first time since first year. The
walkways keep both residents and photographers dry on a dreary day.
Photo by Carter Brundage.
Video content
Check out our "UBC Football Men" video
airing now at ubyssey.ca/videos.
^|THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER18.2013 | VOLUMEXCV| ISSUE*
EDITORIAL
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features@ubyssey.es
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The business of comedy
Kaidie Williams
Contributor
"Comedy is the truth masked by
humour," says Ed Hill, a budding
stand-up comedian in Vancouver.
"Often, the truth is ugly and
comedians make it something
acceptable."
Hill was born in Taiwan in
1984. In 1994, while he was still
in elementary school, his parents
took him and his brother to Canada
for a permanent "vacation," which
involved school, work and worst of
all, taxes.
After graduating from Pinetree
Secondary School in Coquitlam,
Hill attended UBC in 2002 and
joined the Arts faculty family as a
member ofthe honours psychology
program. However, he fell out of
love with his choice. He remembers listening to a lecture during a
history class, when the professor
told everyone to close their eyes
and consider the following scenario: "You are 45 years old and it's
Monday morning. What are you
doing?"
As he sat at the back ofthe class
reflecting, Hill said to himself:
"Not this."
A few years after his graduation in 2006, Hill went through
a terrible breakup. His road to
recovery led him to a comedy class
that encouraged him to get back on
stage and channel his comedic personality into a business. He built a
network of people through Google
and Facebook, and spread his
information through these media.
"It's amazing how quickly you can
track people," he said.
On Oct. 31, Hill released his new
debut comedy CD, Canasian. The
=HOTO COURTED ED HILL
Ed Hill's advice on how to achieve success: "Don't play Candy Crush.'
album was recorded live at a comedy club in Taipei. Its cover shows
Hill as a child standing in front of a
park near his home.
"I look like a little Korean Dictator," said Hill.
For his inspiration, Hill admires
Louis C.K.'s work ethic and Dave
Chappelle's insight.
He commented that although
his job may seem like all fun and
games, a lot of work goes on behind
the stage and the laughter.
"The audience only sees 30 to
45 minutes of me, but my preparations take a lot more time. I always
have homework," said Hill. His job
never stops.
"You are in control 100 per
cent ofthe time. You are a business," he said. "I don't report to
a boss, I report to the man in the
mirror."
The nature of Hill's occupation
makes it easy to become swayed by
alcohol and drugs. He prides himself on the discipline he developed
from attending UBC, which forced
him to grow up quickly. He believes
it is important to make the most of
every situation. For Hill, everything in life serves a purpose.
"I am my greatest critic," he
said. He loves the challenges that
come with his job, and he values
every hour in his day.
His advice on how to achieve
success is simple: "Don't play
Candy Crush. It wastes your life.
Build a network of successful individuals, keep your family by your
side and find affordable coffee."
Indeed, Hill attributes his success to McDonalds' double double
coffee — since it was, and still is,
the most affordable. XI
SFU
VANCOUVER SPEAKER SERIES
climate
wars
f riday november 22, 7 pm
a lecture with gwynne dyer
Moderated by Georgia Straight editor Charlie Smith
Tickets $20 at sfuwoodwards.ca
SFU's Goldcorp Centre for the Arts
Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema
149 West Hastings Street
^   WOODWARD'S
SFU'S VANCITY OFFICE OF
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
SFUl—'
PUBLIC
SQUARE
.ARy // News
)RS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
MONDAY, NOVEMB
AID»
CRIME »
Two bikes stolen
from UBC bike
cages
Field staff hand out relief packs to villagers in Panay, Philippines.
=HOTOCOURTESYOFTHE ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETYOF LONDON
UBC team leads aid for 60,000 in Philippines
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
Biologists and social workers from
a UBC-related conservation group
are providing impromptu aid for
isolated communities in the Philippines to help with the aftermath of
Typhoon Haiyan.
Project Seahorse, a UBC-Zoo-
logical Society of London collaborative sustainability group who works
to protect seahorses and create
sustainable fishing practices, was
working on marine conservation
projects with Filipino fishing communities when Typhoon Haiyan hit
the impoverished area on Nov 8.
According to Project Seahorse
director and co-founder Amanda
Vincent, the typhoon cut across the
exact areas where all of their sites
were located.
"We did a quick assessment
and discovered that in many ofthe
NEWS BRIEFS
UBC receives $12M in federal
research funding
On Nov. 14, the federal government
announcedthattheywouldbe
appointing 10 new Canada Research
Chairs (CRCs) to UBC. Including
the three CRC positions that were
renewed and the two that have been
advanced, this represents a $12
million increase in federal funding.
The CRC program recruits highly
esteemed researchers in sciences,
engineering and humanities and establishes research professorships for
them at post-secondary institutions
across Canada.
"We are supporting cutting-edge
research at Canadian universities
and fostering innovation by helping
researchers bring their ideas to the
marketplace," said minister of state
Greg Rickford during the announcement at the University of Calgary.
Thisyear, the federal government
provided 135 new CRCs worth
$108.9 million to 41 post-secondary
institutions through the program.
"The [CRC] program has helped
UBC and other Canadian universities
recruit and retain bright minds in all
disciplines from around the world,"
said John Hepburn, VP research
and international at UBC. "We have
already seen the scientific and economic impact of their discoveries."
CRC was created in 2000 with
an annual budget of $300 million
to establish up to 2,000 research
professorships. UBC has the second
largest number of CRC allocations in
the country, xi
villages where we worked they lost
75 to 90 per cent ofthe houses, and
that is also the schools, and the
health centres, and just everything," said Vincent.
As part of their working strategy, the team sets up local teams
in the communities in which they
work to carry out the conservation processes. Their Filipino
teams quickly got advice from aid
agencies and are now working
to distribute aid, in coordination
with the local government and
other community organizations.
Project Seahorse has been
delivering aid in Panay, Bantayan
and Danajon Bank for several days
now.
"We managed to get hundreds
of kilos of rice into one community
with canned fish and canned meat
and soap and basic aspirin sort
of medicine just so they can deal
TECHNOLOGY»
Medeo connects
patients with MDs
over the Internet
Austen Erhardt
StaffWriter
A company co-founded by a UBC
graduate connects patients with
doctors over the internet.
Medeo, which saw its first
patient in January 2013, facilitates
videoconferencing between B.C.
physicians and province residents.
The service allows anyone with
B.C. Medical Services Plan coverage
to connect with a doctor using a
mobile device or a computer with
a webcam.
Ryan Wilson, the company's
CEO, graduated from UBC with a
bachelor of commerce in 2008. He
said that ofthe 39 staff employed at
Medeo's Vancouver office, 65 per
cent graduated from UBC over the
past ten years.
Medeo currently has over 180
participating physicians, 49 of
whom signed up in October. It
can function as a drop-in clinic,
where users see whichever doctor
is available soonest, and it can also
help users find a permanent family
doctor.
The service fulfils certain roles of
a traditional medical clinic: it provides access to medical records created while using Medeo, facilitates
referrals to specialists and sends lab
results when they're completed. Patients are notified via text message
a few minutes before their doctor is
ready for the appointment.
with the pain from their injuries,"
said Vincent.
Yesterday, the first 2,000 relief
packs were sent to coastal communities in Danajon Bank.
"At the moment, we're just focusing on getting food, water, pills and
soap in, and then soon we'll start
moving towards the bigger issues,"
Vincent said. "It's a real and very
difficult situation."
Project Seahorse currently works
with 40 towns and villages, totalling
60,000 people. Vincent said there is
currently no other aid going to these
communities.
"Because they're somewhat
isolated fishing villages, somewhat
remote from the main track, any relief is goingto take a very, very long
time to get to them, if it ever does,"
she said. "Relief in the Philippines is
not [even] getting to the major cities
yet properly.
"We are the people able to help.
There is nobody else, so it would
be unconscionable for us to turn
our backs and say, 'Sorry, we're a
research unit.'"
Their aid work is being supervised by the ZSL, who will be
auditing them.
The group has started a fundraising campaign for their relief fund.
So far, they have raised £40,000
from donors.
"The first thing is to make sure
that we're just getting the emergency relief in... then eventually
start partnering on rebuilding.
"We're really proud ofthe work
we're trying to do, but we're even
prouder of our Filipino researchers
and social workers. A lot of them
have damaged houses and missing
family members, and yet they're just
getting on with it. So it's quite, quite
extraordinary, their resilience." XI
65 per cent of Medeo staff are UBC graduates from the past decade.
=HOTOCOURTESYOFMEDEC
"Medeo is much more than just
Skype for doctors," Wilson said.
However, he said that the service
is not intended to be a complete
replacement for seeing a doctor in
person.
Wilson hopes that Medeo will
save time and money for both doctors and patients. He said the service
should be able to put users in front
of a doctor faster than most regular
walk-in clinics. Medeo can also refer
you to a specialist and, occasionally, have you see him or her the
same day.
"If you went on Medeo right now
and wanted to see a doctor, you'd
wait well under an hour," Wilson
said. "Probably five to 10 minutes."
These time savings could impact
government healthcare spending
as well. Wilson estimated that if
Medeo were to be broadly implemented, it could save the B.C.
government hundreds of millions of
dollars.
Granger Avery, a UBC Faculty
of Medicine clinical professor and
executive director ofthe Rural Coordination Centre of B.C., believes
that telehealth services like Medeo
could be a boon for the health care
system, particularly in rural regions.
"If telehealth services were to be
widely and properly implemented,
the time savings could be huge,"
said Avery.
Medeo's software works on any
modern computer with a webcam,
running Google Chrome. It can also
be accessed on iOS devices, and will
soon be available on Android.
Although the company is discussing the possibility of national and
international expansion, Wilson
said B.C. is their current priority.
"This is our home. We really want
to knock it out ofthe park here."
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=ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER3THE UBYSSEY
60 bike thefts are reported yearly at UBC.
Mariam Baldeh
Contributor
The Chemistry Secure Bike Parking facility has become the latest
location of bike thefts on campus,
with two bicycles recently stolen
from the new bike cages.
Bike thefts aren't a new phenomenon on campus, but Barry
Eccleton, director of Campus Security, noted that the two bikes were
stolen within days of each other.
According to Eccleton, around 60
bikes are stolen each year at UBC.
"Someone must have gotten a
hold ofthe [bike] codes because
there was no sign of forced entry,"
said Eccleton. "These thefts are
usually done on a very businesslike,
organized basis, by professional,
prolific thieves who specialize in
knowing which bikes are valuable."
Eccleton said bike thieves often
have access to the tools needed to
defeat locks — usually cutting pliers
or small bolt cutters that can easily
be concealed.
Although preventing bike thefts
becomes more of a challenge due to
the high volume of bikes on campus, Eccleton said there are things
that cyclists can do to protect their
bikes. Eccleton said cable locks are
particularly vulnerable because
they can easily be cut. He recommended high quality, solid steel
U-locks because they are much
more difficult to remove.
Adam Cooper, UBC's transportation planner, said security
measures are in place to address
bike security. "Reducing theft is
an important goal for our department," he said.
UBC has 10 stand-alone secure
bike parking facilities, providing
over 1,000 weather-protected
bike parking spaces on campus.
Additionally, according to Cooper,
a new secure bike parking facility
is currently being proposed on the
west side ofthe Engineering Design
Center on Engineering Lane. The
EDC bike cage is planned to accommodate approximately 65 bikes,
and will have day-use lockers and a
repair stand. Construction is slated
for 2014. Cooper is optimistic that
this will be the best secure bike
parking project to date.
"I always park my bike [in a
secure bike parking facility], and
I've never witnessed or had my
bike stolen, but I guess it just goes
to show that you can never be too
careful," said Efua Emil, a third-
year Arts student.
Cooper said UBC has also developed videos in partnership with
the AMS Bike Co-op to educate
students about bike safety.
"We often find that many bikes
on campus are not properly locked
... which makes their bicycles easier
to target for theft. As such, we
constantly promote the message
of using a hardened steel u-lock
and encourage cyclists to use our
facilities as a way to reduce the risk
of theft." a NEWS    I    MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18,2013
RESIDENCE LIFE »
Is there a professor in the house?
Michael Griffin moves into Totem Park for Faculty in Residence program
Ana Gargollo
Contributor
A UBC professor is living in
Totem Park.
Michael Griffin, an assistant
professor of Greek and Roman
philosophy, has been living on
the second floor of Shuswap
house since Nov. 1. This is part
of an initiative called Faculty
in Residence, being piloted by
Student Housing and Hospitality
Services (SHHS) in Totem Park
this year.
"The idea is to bring the faculty
closer to the first-year experience
and give ... a human face to the
faculty," said Griffin, "and also to
... add an academic dimension to
events and build a bridge between
the academic and social dimensions of first-year life."
Griffin was contacted by
Janice Robinson, director of residence life and administration at
SHHS, about participating in the
program. He said his experience
doing graduate work at the University of Oxford made him want
to get involved.
"[Oxford] had professors,
graduates students and undergraduates living and working
together in a college and I really
liked that, having all the students
and faculty together," Griffin
said. "I thought this would be
a great chance to get to do that
kind of thing, to get to here to
meet people on a more casual
UBC philosophy professor Michael Griffin has been living in Totem Park for two weeks.
basis to actually get to know
faces. Otherwise, UBC canbe
this very big place."
Griffin currently runs a table
in the commonsblock on Wednesdays and is planning to have dinner with different floors, starting
with his own. He is also available
for help with academics.
So far, Griffin said he has had
a positive experience living in
Totem. "It's almost like respiration to see a campus change
every year, with people coming
in September and leaving in the
summer and coming back. It's
like the campus is breathing. It
always feels very alive."
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
Second floor Shuswap resident Jessamine Kara Liu went to
the movie night Griffin hosted
earlier in the month, which 40
residents attended to watch The
Matrix.
Liu said she wouldn't be
likely to seek him out. However,
according to Liu, the dynamic of
the floor hasn't changed since
Griffin's arrival. "It's not like I'm
more conscious about the noise
level or anything," she said.
Some students living in Totem
Park, however, are not aware that
this has been going on for two
weeks now.
Mistuko Obo, a resident from
ham'lasam', knew Griffin hosted
a movie night, but did not know
he was actually living in Totem
Park.
"Professor in residence sounds
cool. It's just something I have to
get to know better," said Obo.
"I'm not sure it's well known
enough that he is a professor,"
said Jan Bartolome, the residence advisor for second floor
Shuswap. "But I think when
people do realize that and they
do have that conversation with
him, they'll be more involved."
Griffin plans to stay in Totem
for the trial run until the end of
the year. If all goes well, the project will continue in future years.
"Everybody's been very
friendly [and] very welcoming,
and it made me grateful for
that because I kind of came in
the middle of things, so it's a
little weird." Griffin said. "It's
an all-new program idea but
everybody's been awesome. The
RAs have really made me feel
at home.
"I've liked it a lot and haven't
even had any fire alarms after 2
a.m. yet." XI
TERRORISM »
Campus lecture spurs debate on Islam and terrorism
UBC Islamic studies professor Rumee Ahmed addresses students in the Global Lounge
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
Rumee Ahmed studies suicide bombings, torture and terrorism.
Ariela Karmel
Contributor
The Islamic perspective on terrorism was subject to debate and
scrutiny in the Global Lounge on
Thursday night.
Rumee Ahmed, a professor of
Islamic studies in the Department
of Classical, Near Eastern and
Religious Studies, gave a lecture on
Islam and terrorism before opening
the floor for discussion with the
audience. Ahmed specializes in the
study of suicide bombings, torture
and terrorism.
The lecture began with a question: what is a terrorist? Ahmed
said, "The problem ofthe definition
of a terrorist is that the word is
too narrow and broad at the same
time." Fraught with inconclusive
and ambiguous connotations
depending on one's context, Ahmed
cited this "inexact nomenclature" as a major problem within
our society.
In the Islamic tradition, Ahmed
said it is more important to ask
what terrorism does than what it is.
"To ask what something 'is' is
an anathema to Islamic tradition;
the word 'is' does not even exist in
Arabic," said Ahmed.
"I define a terrorist in terms
of what it does, and its effect on
people: it creates fear, promotes a
social or political ideology, and does
not distinguish between civilians
and non-civilians."
Most visibly, terrorism causes peoples and governments to
reshape priorities. "The typical
reaction is that security becomes
more important than anything else.
In the name of security, everything
becomes justifiable," Ahmed said.
Ahmed said that, when threatened, people respond based on
self-interest when they should be
focusing on the needs of others.
"Those who suffer the most from
acts of terror are always minority
groups, women and those with the
least, and we should be expending
our energies to help them," said
Ahmed.
He added further that in a culture of fear, it is very easy to turn
away from those in need and to foster a society of blame and isolation
rather than interconnectedness.
"An us-versus-them mentality
arises, which creates a perpetual
cycle of blame and conflict where
there is no victor," said Ahmed.
He said the Islamic message is
to create "aman" or safety inside
oneself and for factions to come
together in mutual support to
bridge the divide. "In the absence
of prophethood, we are all the
same," Ahmed said.
The majority ofthe event was
composed of discussion. One
theme that was repeatedly raised
was the clash between practicality
and idealism. Several audience
members wondered whether
prioritizing security might be a
logical and practical reaction to
terrorism, despite the issues this
causes.
"From a religious perspective,
salvation should be man's main
concern and not security. And
when we continue to operate with
a knee-jerk response, a vicious
cycle ensues," Ahmed replied.
"Religion doesn't operate on
practicality, but assumes an ideal
situation."
Students had mixed responses to
the lecture. Amna Chaudhry, a first-
year pharmacy student, generally
agreed with what the professor
had to say, but took issue with the
idea that religion doesn't operate on
practicality but solely on ideals.
"There are many practical elements of religion that are compatible
with our society," said Chaudhry.
Amna Ellnour, a second-year linguistics student, enjoyed Ahmed's
lecture. She agreed with his message that by prioritizing the needs
of others instead of succumbing to
self-interest and fear, a better society canbe built.
However, Ellnour questioned
the assertion that the onus seemed
to be put more on society instead
of on terrorists themselves. She felt
that not much was discussed about
actual terrorism, what it stems from,
or how to interpret it. "Instead of
discussing how to better react to
terrorism, I would have liked to
hear about what it is about a culture
or society that inspires terrorists,"
said Ellnour.
This event was presented by the
Pakistani Students Association as
part of an initiative called Destination South Asia which began
in 2012. According to marketing
representative Ali Sikandar, this
initiative entails various lectures and
workshops, culminating in a conference in March which will focus on
the politics, economics, fine arts and
society of South Asian countries. II National
COUNSELLING »
Concordia opens Sexual
Assault Resource Centre
Concordia now has a Sexual Assault Resource Centre.
PHOTO BRANDON JOHNSTON3THE LINK
Alejandra Melian-Morse
The Link (Concordia)
MONTREAL (NUW) - After
two years and a thousand-strong
petition, Concordia's highly anticipated Sexual Assault Resource
Centre is finally open.
Concordia's Centre for Gender
Advocacy, which promotes gender
equality and empowerment among
marginalized groups, had been
advocating for a sexual assault
centre on campus since the spring
of 2011 due to the high rate of sexual
assault — which includes any unwanted act of a sexual nature — on
university campuses.
"Around one in four students
experiences some kind of sexual
assault during their post-secondary
career," said Julie Michaud, the
Centre's administrative coordinator.
"[The Centre] thought that was
completely unacceptable and that
it just didn't make any sense that
there was no dedicated service to
meet the needs ofthe survivors at
Concordia given that statistic."
The outline the Concordia
administration proposed after announcing its plans in April to open
the new SARC by this fall included
many ofthe Centre's original goals,
such as the inclusion of all genders
and the hiring of a social worker to
handle counselling and academic
accommodation, to name a few.
The university has committed
only one year to the project, but Michaud says she doesn't think it will
be dismantled anytime soon. "Just
the fact of creating a sexual assault
centre sends a strong message to the
Concordia community," she said.
"Its very existence, that there's a
place called the Sexual Assault Resource Centre, is really important."
Much ofthe new centre's focus
will be on assault prevention.
"For too long, the sexual assault
prevention advice that has been
given out has been, 'Don't walk
alone at night, don't dress like a slut,
don't leave your drink unattended,
don't flirt with someone you don't
know,'" said Michaud.
"But it's not up to the potential
victim of sexual assault to prevent
themselves from being victimized,
it's up to the person who wants to
have sex with someone to check
in and find out if the other person
is actually consenting, and that's a
skill that canbe learned."
Montreal has various resources and services for sexual
assault, but Michaud says there
are many advantages to a Con-
cordia-based centre.
"It's nice to have a person on site
in an official Concordia office be
able to, if necessary, call a... professor who a survivor might not feel
comfortable asking for accommodation and say, 'I'm wondering if
we might be able to make arrangements to accommodate this person
who is going through a rough time,'
or helping somebody get to and
from classes if the perpetrator is a
fellow student, for example."
Social worker Jennifer Drum-
mond, the SARC's recently hired
coordinator and the one full-time
position at the centre, echoed
the sentiment.
"The good thing about having
something on campus is that it offers immediate support, immediate
crisis intervention and immediate
information," she said.
Drummond added that she's now
in the process of putting together
a wide range of resources for the
Concordia community, including
crisis intervention, referrals and
volunteer opportunities.
Educating and raising awareness
about sexual assault prevention will
also be one ofthe resource centre's
main goals, according to Michaud.
"The best way to talk about what
consent is and how to make sure
you've got it is to actually have a
conversation with people, because
then that gives you time to pull out
all ofthe cultural baggage and ideas
about sex," she said.
Volunteers at the SARC will be
holding workshops to start the conversation with the community.
Despite the focus on prevention,
Drummond says the SARC will
primarily be a safe space for sexual
assault survivors where they can get
the help needed to move forward.
"When someone comes and
meets with me... they can expect
someone who's non-judgmental.
They can expect what we discuss
to be confidential, they can expect
to be treated with respect and to
be believed and [they can expect]
someone who will go over their
options with them and provide them
with support," said Drummond.
The SARC is currently looking to
fill a roster of volunteers to staff the
centre.
Volunteer opportunities are
available to anyone interested, but
Drummond said she hopes to bring
survivors of sexual assault together
for support.
"I think there's something really
powerful in survivors working with
other survivors," she said. "I think
that the expertise and knowledge
that people have from their own
experiences is huge and that's something that you don't learn at school."
Ultimately, Michaud says the
opening ofthe SARC marks a step in
the right direction for the university.
"I think there might be a bit of
a fear that if we talk about sexual
assault as something that happens...
people will think that it's a problem
at our university," she said. "But the
reality is that it's a problem at every
university. Talking about it doesn't
indicate that it's a particular problem [at Concordia], it just indicates
that you're actually dealing with it,
which is a really positive thing."
MOVEMBER»
'Staches can lead to slacktivism
Jeremiah Rodriguez
The Western Gazette (Western)
LONDON (NUW) - With men
beginning to avoid the razor this
month, a new study says people
growing facial hair for prostate
cancer awareness might not
be more likely to fork over any
dough to the cause.
In the Journal of Consumer
Research, scholars at UBC have
published findings that support
the idea that small public token
forms of support lead to "slacktivism."
"What we find is that symbolic token action is very public in
nature. We find that when people
are asked to donate something
more meaningful like time and
money, they aren't any more
likely to help," said Katherine
White, co-author and associate
professor at the Sauder School of
Business at UBC.
"Organizations like charities
and social causes have to think
about what their goals are,"
White added.
"If your goal is to generate
a certain amount of monetary
donations then it's suggested that
public forms of support might not
lead to an increase of donations
down the road."
White and her co-authors Kirk
Kristofferson, a PhD student in
marketing at Sauder, and John
Peloza, of Florida State University, were inspired to understand
the rise in the public perception of "slacktivists" who may
incorrectly associate a click with
financial support which campaigns may be gunning for.
In the experiment, participants offered a private token
form of support were more inclined to donate time and money
when prompted afterwards.
FILE PHOTO KAIJACOBSON3THE UBYSSEY
Moustached men aren't as willing to part with their cash as their razors, according to a study.
"We do find that find that if
people can make their first act more
private or if they really think about
how their own values align with the
cause, you can flip the effect so that
the small act of token support can
make them more likely to support
later," White said.
Adam Hahn, a post-doctoral
student in social psychology at
Western, said that this type of
symbolic support without engaging
is nothing new, but outlets like
Facebook, hashtags and other public
tokens of supports have certainly
made it easier.
"Media forms like Facebook
have created new ways to engage
in impression management that
we didn't have 20 years ago,"
he said.
Hahn added that the study
didn't necessarily mean that Mov-
ember moustaches had a harmful
effect on fundraising, or that
public supporters of awareness
campaigns are any less supportive
than people who did nothing.
EXPLORE YOUR CAREER OPTIONS
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Wednesday, November 20
5-8 pm
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Get it right. // Sports + Rec
EDITOR  NATALIESCADDEN
MONDAY, NC
HOCKEY»
Women's hockey T-Birds flying high
Seventh straight victory puts UBC atop Canada West standings for first time in team history
Jenny Tang
StaffWriter
After a rest over the Remembrance Day weekend, the UBC
women's hockey team faced off
against the University of Saskatchewan Huskies on Friday and
Saturday and were able to extend
their winning streak, putting
them on top ofthe Canada West
regular season standings for the
first time in team history.
On Friday, the Thunderbirds
were eager to continue their
victories and scored on three of
their four power plays. Freshman
Hannah Heisler scored two of the
three much-needed goals, both at
the beginning and the end ofthe
game.
Assisted by captain Christi
Capozzi and assistant captain
Sarah Casorso, Heisler managed
to tip in Casorso's shot from the
point in the last five minutes of
the first period.
Adding to the goal tally in the
second period was Tatiana Rafter,
who lengthened her lead in the
Canada West scoring rankings
with her 10th ofthe season.
The Huskies bit back with two
more goals in the third period
from their top scorers Cami
Wooster and Julia Flinton. With
the scoring neck and neck, the
'Birds needed one more goal
to win.
[There was] all kinds
of stuff we could make
excuses about, but
great teams find ways
to get through that and
our competitive spirit
pulls through in those
situations.
Graham Thomas
UBC women's hockey head coach
Heisler answered again and
went on to tip in her second
powerplay goal. She was helped
by Casorso and Rafter in the last
10 minutes ofthe third period,
and UBC came out victorious
with a 3-2 win.
"I wanted to go out there and
fight for first, and we did, and
now we're first," Heisler said excitedly. "It was a big team effort.
Both my goals were tipped from
the point and they were nice shots
from the point first. We just need
to keep the momentum and build
off it, don't let them get back and
give it to them tomorrow."
Coach Graham Thomas was
happy with the victory but was
still aware of their flaws.
"We still need to work on our
consistency, that's for sure."
he said. "Sometimes we get the
mentality that we can go at 70 per
cent, 80 per cent, maybe, and then
they'll just sit back. [But] that's
not the case here, they're going to
push back."
"[The powerplays] really bailed
us out tonight," Thomas admitted.
"That's not always going to happen, and we've got to make sure
we [don't] rely on that to score
goals every game because that's
kind of unheard of."
On Saturday night, it looked
like the odds were against the
'Birds, as they had players who
weren't at their best and refs who
weren't on their side. Nevertheless, UBC was keen on cushioning
their first-place standing and
triumphed with an overtime goal
from Nikola Brown-John to seal
the victory.
The game opened with neither
side scoring and lots of back-
and-forth play. However, just 46
seconds into the second period,
UBC opened with an exciting goal
by Casorso, who slotted the puck
in the net with a cross-ice pass
from Rafter.
However, penalties would
plague UBC at the end ofthe
second period. The Huskies had
the 'Birds scrambling on a four-
minute penalty kill and managed
to even the game when Kaitlin
Willoughby shoved the puck in.
Right as that four-minute
major was ending, Rafter took an
interference penalty, and Rebecca
Unrau joined her in the box to
serve an unsportsmanlike penalty
after Thomas argued with the ref.
That gave the Huskies two full
minutes of 5-on-3, but the 'Birds
defence was able to limit their effectiveness, and goalie Samantha
Langford made some beautiful
saves to keep the score even after
two periods. She would go on to
clock 30 saves on the night.
With the score remaining
tied at 1-1 at the end ofthe third
period, the game was sent to
overtime. Less than two minutes
in, UBC was shorthanded again
as Brown-John was sent to the
box for unsportsmanlike conduct.
Langford and the 'Birds defence were again able to hold off
the Huskies.
Finally, 8:48 into the 10-minute
overtime period, Brown-John put
the winner past Huskie goalie
Karen Lefsrud for UBC's seventh
straight victory.
"[There was] all kinds of stuff
we could make excuses about,
but great teams find ways to get
through that and our competitive spirit pulls through in those
situations," said Thomas after
the game.
Thomas was particularly
pleased with his goaltender.
"[Langford] was unbelievable. She
hasn't started in a while, [but] had
an opportunity here and totally
took the ball and ran with it."
He has also been impressed
with Casorso's two-way performance throughout the season.
"Her competitive spirit — I just
can't go back to that enough. You
challenge her at anything and
she will fight to make sure she
wins. She makes good defensive
plays, she makes good offensive
plays and makes good plays at
late times and she's a big leader
back there."
PHOTO JOSH CURRAN3THE UBYSSEY
Above: Sarah Casorso opens the scoring in the second period. Below: UBC celebrates Nikola Brown-John's overtime winner.
Now on a seven-game win
streak, UBC has a target on
their back.
"Teams want to knock you
down and take you out," Thomas
said. "Teams are going to come
at us, so let's have some fun and
welcome the challenge."
The 'Birds will face off with
the University of Manitoba Bisons
for the first time this season next
weekend in Winnipeg, and then
return home to play the University of Lethbridge Pronghorns
before the winter break. XI
=HOTO JOSH CURRAN3THE UBYSSEY
WOMEN'S
HOCKEY
BY THE NUMBERS
BIRD DROPPINGS
Men's basketball (2-4) Men's volleyball (5-3)
Friday @ TRU: 78-65 L Friday @ WIN: 3-2 L
Saturday @ TRU: 86-56 L Saturday @ WIN: 3-0 W
Women's basketball (4-2) Women's volleyball (8-0)
Friday @ TRU: 65-57 OTL Friday @ WIN: 3-1W
Saturday @ TRU: 71-54 W Saturday @ WIN: 3-2 W
Men's hockey (3-8-1)
Friday @SASK: 6-3 L
Saturday O SASK: 3-0 L
•7 ™fc™ A wins-losses-draws so far this season
WB9BX wins-losses-draws at this point last year
time in team history that UBC has been in first place
in the conference standings
goals scored by UBC, the most in the conference
goals by Tatiana Rafter, the most in the conference
points by Rafter, also the most
games in a row in which Rafter has a point
asssists for Sarah Casorso, second-most in the
conference MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013    |   SPORTS + REC
RUNNING »
David Slade engineers success on the track
Fifth-year student athlete races dean of material engineering in support of United Way
Jaime Hills
Contributor
Toy cars and cops and robbers:
seems like a simple life that
might not be more than a child's
playground routine. But for David
Slade, it was the beginning of
much more.
The two biggest aspects of
Slade's life seem to have been
confirmed at a young age. He is
now a fifth-year UBC engineering
student on the varsity track and
cross-country team.
Slade knew he wanted to go
into engineering from the get-go.
"I feel lucky in that sense. I know
a lot of people who have switched
faculties," he said. "I knew from
a very young age that I wanted to
be an engineer."
He also learned very early on
that Mom knows best. "I had a
little remote control car that I
loved when I was a kid, and it
broke one day," Slade recalled.
"I took it apart, figured out what
was wrong, put it back together
and it was working again. [My
mom] kind of put the idea in my
head that 'you should be an engineer' and I thought, that's kind
of cool."
The idea went from being
"kind of cool" to something that
stuck with him throughout his
high school career. Now, after
five years at UBC and a summer
internship with Powertech Labs,
Slade is ready to get going in his
engineering career, looking to
become employed by a testing or
consulting company.
Slade also loves to run. This too
he learned early on in life, with
games on the playground in elementary school being no problem
for him. He was quick to mention
cops and robbers, in which all
he had to do to win was outrun
someone. Seems like a good mentality for a cross-country runner
to have.
In October, UBC held an event
for the United Way, the university's designated charity, to raise
funds and awareness for the
goals ofthe organization. The
dean of material engineering,
Marc Parlange, proposed a challenge to his students: he would
personally match the fundraising
efforts of anyone who could beat
him in the race.
A friend of Slade's took the
opportunity to sign him up, without his knowledge and as a joke,
and informed him of it a week prior to the race. Rather than leaving
it as a joke and removing himself
from the race, Slade thought,
"Why not?" He started calculating the money he could bring in.
Seeing as running is what he
does, no training was required.
He proceeded to focus instead on
raising funds through his peers,
professors, friends and family.
Of course, with a competitive
spirit, Slade had to look up Dean
Parlange first to confirm that
he could in fact win the race. "I
wanted to make sure he wasn't
some ex-national athlete."
With most of his races being
eight kilometres long, a two-kilometre race would feel like a piece
of cake. All he had to do was take
it back to his playground days
of cops and robbers, and simply
outrun the dean of his faculty. "I
didn't know what to expect," he
said. "They told me, 'Just run with
the dean for the first kilometre
and then do your thing.'"
What Slade did not see coming
was two members ofthe triathlon
club also participating in the race,
and taking off from the beginning. Naturally, as a competitive
athlete, Slade was having none of
that. He just had to beat them —
which, in winning the whole race,
he did.
Slade didn't know much about
United Way before his involvement in the race, but he is now not
only well-informed, but excited
to share what he knows. The
mission statement of United Way
is to "strengthen our community's
capacity to address social issues,"
something Slade was able to do
through his outreach in fund-
raising within his own community, spreading knowledge and
increasing awareness. In just over
David Slade is a fifth-year Engineering student on the varsity track and cross-country team.
a week's time, he raised $491 for
the organization.
Slade's team is preparing for
Canadian cross-country nationals at the end the November. But
unfortunately, with the recent
diagnosis of a stress fracture
in his foot, he will be unable to
compete, putting an end to a fall
season in which he was "batting
1.000" — in other words, getting
100 per cent personal best times
in all his races.
However, in the spring, like
many of his fellow Thunderbirds,
he will be graduating, and preparing to take on whatever comes
after UBC. But if he keeps it up the
way he's going, he'll be doing much
more than fixing toy cars and
playing cops and robbers. XI
PHOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC3THE UBYSSEY
Slade set personal bests in all his races this fall, but was sidelined recently due to an injury.
=HOTOKOSTAPRODANOVIC3THE UBYSSEY
LAUNCH YOUR CAREER
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RHYS EDWARDS
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18,2C
FILM»
SAVE
ME
RALLY to show
St. jS»«»*!S™
7&&&SP)
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
The Hollywood is one of relatively few cinemas in the world which still use a 35 mm film projector. Despite local support, the art deco venue may be turned into a gym.
The price of nostalgia
Local single-screen Hollywood Theatre may shut down
after over 70 years of programming in Kitsilano
Aurora Tejeida
Senior Culture Writer
When the Hollywood Theatre
opened in 1935, its billboard
might have been Vancouver's first
permanently attached neon sign.
The art deco theatre, located
at 3123 West Broadway — a mere
four bus stops away from campus
on the 99 — is listed on the city's
heritage register. But its original
wrought iron seats and its ticket
machine, one of a few in North
America still in working condition,
might not be enough to prevent the
current owner from turning it into
a fitness centre.
In 2011, the Hollywood closed
its doors after being sold to a
developer. But it re-opened when
two local churches signed a lease
and created the Church at the
Hollywood. Since then, the theatre
has been used to host Sunday services, and as a venue for all kinds
of events.
"The Hollywood represents the
heart of Kitsilano," said Sarah Kift,
who manages communications
and administration for the Church
at the Hollywood. "It's a place that
people hold dear."
The Hollywood is the neighbourhood's only remaining
single-screen theatre, a dying
breed in the city. According to the
Vancouver Heritage Foundation,
three single-screen theatres have
been demolished since 2006, the
most recent of them being the
Ridge in Arbutus.
Many of them are waiting to
be demolished so the land canbe
used for apartment buildings or, in
the Hollywood's case, a gym.
According to Kift, the Hollywood originally closed in 2011 because, like many other theatres, it
was a victim ofthe film industry's
push to go digital. This has been a
common problem ever since studios decided they no longer want
to pay to print and ship movie reels
because ofthe added cost.
It reportedly costs $1,500 USD
to print one copy of a movie on
35 mm film, which later needs to
be shipped to theatres in a heavy
metal canister. In comparison,
making digital copies only costs
$150.
This year, two thirds of theatres
were already using digital copies,
also known as DCPs (digital cinema packages), which are basically
files stored in a hard drive. The
University of California Institute
for Research in the Arts predicts
that only 17 per cent of cinemas
will stili project 35 mm films
in 2015.
With a declining number of
studios producing 35 mm films,
the issue many cinemas are facing
is the need to purchase machinery that can project digital video.
These projectors can set theatre
owners back between $70,000 to
$150,000.
The Hollywood
represents the heart
of Kitsilano. It's a
place that people
hold dear.
Sarah Kift
Manager of communications and
administration for the Church at
the Hollywood
This is why it comes as no
surprise that procuring 35 mm
films is one ofthe biggest issues
when planning a screening at the
non-digital Hollywood Theatre.
"Our first movie, which was a
total miracle, was the only print
of It's a Wonderful Life on 35 mm
in North America, and it was a
beautiful black and white print
that was in excellent conditions,"
said Kift.
This was the Church at the
Hollywood's most attended event,
even though it was Christmastime and the Hollywood had been
closed for almost two years. Over
1,000 people showed up to see the
film. That weekend, eight screenings had to be scheduled, since
the theatre only fits 486 people,
according to Kift.
As part of their farewell activities, the theatre will host three
final screenings ofthe 1938 classic
You Can't Take It With You. The
original 1938 print arrived last
Thursday.
Since September of last year,
the Church at the Hollywood
has screened around 15 movies,
most of them in partnership with
the Vancouver Heritage Foundation. Tickets are usually $5 and
proceeds go to charities. When
the theatre reopened with It's a
Wonderful Life, the Church at the
Hollywood made $8,000. Some
ofthe benefactors include the
Kitsilano Neighbourhood House
and the Lookout Emergency Aid
Society in the Downtown Eastside,
among others.
Because screenings at the
Hollywood aren't for profit,
studios don't ask for a percentage
ofthe earnings. Studios charge
them $300 to get the print and
between $300 to $600 to have it
shipped.
"Normally you would be paying
the studios over 70 per cent of box
office proceeds, but some of them
have been sympathetic. They have
been very generous," Kift said.
The screening of You Can't Take
It With You, including food and
promotional costs, will come in
around $800 to $900. Like all their
other events, it will be run entirely
by volunteers, and all proceeds
will go to charities.
LAST CHANCE?
Since their lease started, Church
at the Hollywood has received
over 350 calls from people and
organizations wanting to rent the
space for events. But the church
has only lent it on a limited basis.
In the last year, the theatre
has been the stage for music
videos and community forums.
The Heritage Foundation has
screened several movies, and the
CBC premiered a documentary.
They've also had concerts and
music nights with local musicians.
"The demand for the Hollywood
as a venue is huge," said Kift.
Since most of their events are
volunteer-run and not geared
at making a profit, there is a
business aspect that has not been
exploited by the Church at the
Hollywood. This adds hope that
there could be a future for the
historical site.
In the past, other historical
single-screen theatres, such as
the Orpheum, have survived
by converting into arts and
culture venues.
Another example is the Rio. It
still holds regular screenings, but its
survival is attributed to the incorporation of live shows and a liquor
licence. There's also the Kerrisdale,
which is now the Russian Community Hall. Much like the Rio and the
Kerrisdale, the Hollywood Theatre
has also functioned as a community
centre.
"[The Hollywood Theatre] is a
place where you can connect with
people, and there aren't many
spaces like that left," Kift said. "The
Broadway corridor is all shops and
private homes. There isn't a third
place where you can interact with
your neighbours."
A Vancouver Sun article reported that the owner intended
to rip out the sloped floor to put
in a second story for the planned
fitness centre.
"The Hollywood as we know it
won't exist anymore," said Kift.
But there may still be some
hope. Last week, city council
agreed to grant a 75-day stay for
the Hollywood Theatre, during
which time there will be hearings
aimed at trying to convince the
developer to keep the theatre as
a multipurpose community and
cultural space.
"I think Kitsilano has many
fitness centres, but there's only
one Hollywood Theatre," concluded Kift. Vi
The screenings will take place on
Wednesday, Nov. 20, Thursday,
Nov. 21 and Friday, Nov. 22. Doors
at 7p.m., show starts at 7:30.
MUSIC »
Mental health
maestro
=HOTO JIMMY THOMSON3THE UBYSSEY
UBC grad Hannah Epperson is in the
running for the grand prize in the Peak Performance Project — but her chances may
be affected by her choice of charity work.
Jimmy Thomson
Contributor
Call her crazy, but Hannah
Epperson might be crippling her
chance at $102,700 in order to support a cause she cares about.
As part ofthe Peak Performance
Project, Epperson, a self-recording
violinist with a rising reputation in
the West Canadian music scene, is
required to take part in a charity
event. And although the charity she
wishes to support doesn't fit the bill
- it must be a registered charity -
she has decided to take her chances
with the high road.
"The work that I did with a
charity needed to be part of a bigger
story outside the parameters of a
competition," said Epperson, who
graduated from UBC's human geography program in 2012.
When she started considering
her options, MADCaps seemed
like a logical fit. The organization
is part of a fledgling movement to
de-emphasize the medicalization of
mental health. It's a cause Epperson
holds dear.
"My insights come from my
brother," said Epperson, "who has
come through the entire mental
health system."
Her brother had symptoms that
worsened with treatment after he
was diagnosed with a mental illness.
For the Epperson family, this was
the start of an ongoing interest in
how mental illness is treated in B.C.
MADCaps is mounting legal
challenges against provincial
health authorities, arguing that the
way mental health is treated here
violates the Charter of Rights. As
it stands now, if a person is diagnosed with certain mental illness,
he or she does not have the right to
refuse treatment.
Organizations such as Mad in
America and UBC's Therapeutics
Initiative are also starting to argue
that medications for mental illness
are over-prescribed, especially for
younger people. A recent publication
by the latter organization determined that a quarter of children on
antidepressants had experienced
"psychiatric adverse effects." Other
approaches, like Open Dialogue and
the Hearing Voices Movement, are
also seeking a different approach to
mental illness.
Epperson's charity show in
support of MADCaps will be held
Dec. 4 at the Unitarian Church of
Vancouver. Whether the Peak Performance Project will recognize it as
a charity event remains to be seen.
"I've gotten really involved with
this cause," explains Epperson. "If
that's not what they're looking for,
that's fine." U
Hannah Epperson will perform in
the finale ofthe Peak Performance
Project at the Commodore Ballroom
this Friday, Nov. 21 at 8 p.m. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013    |    CULTURE
THEATRE»
ART»
Blurred lines
Except in the Unlikely Event of War
twists reality and fiction on stage
PHOTO COURTESYTIM MATHESON
Robert Moloney plays a paranoid right-wing radio host in the meta-theatrical play.
Olivia Law
StaffWriter
It's not often one hears of a
play which spans across several
decades, interweaves multiple
subplots together and stars
both the writer and director as
main characters.
Except in the Unlikely Event
of War does just this. Revolving
around three entwining storylines
set in 1965,2015 and the present
day, writer Sean Devine seeks
to address topical contemporary
issues in an exploration of art,
politics and war. In 1965, a secret
council convenes at an Arctic
weather station to discuss the
need for war; in 2015, a right-wing
radio host, also based in the Arctic,
is interrupted by reports ofthe
surfacing of a Chinese submarine
in Resolute Bay; and in the present
day, Devine and director Richard
Wolfe struggle to stage their play
against the possibility of cuts to
their funding.
Describing his new work as a
"distinctly Canadian" play, Devine
is clear about the importance of
addressing the issues which are so
at the forefront of many "left-leaning" Canadian's minds.
"There is a strong current in
the play which gets very pointed
towards the Harper government,"
Devine said. "[Canadians] are concerned about policies, and this play
does address issues pretty head on,
and so what 'distinctly Canadian'
means is that the play plainly addresses things most relevant to the
society around us."
Originally intended as an adaptation of American author Leonard
C. Lewin's controversial satire
Report From Iron Mountain: On
the Possibility and Desirability of
Peace, the play was expanded into
present day and future storylines
because Devine found that the
themes addressed in the book are
still relevant today.
"That's how I came up with
the idea for the radio show-based
2015 storyline. The themes in
Lewin's book are echoed in today's
culture, so I thought, 'Why not
do something really, really crazy
and add a third storyline?' For a
more important reason, it was one
thing to see how the themes of
the 1965 story have resonance in
everyday life, but also how themes
of oppressiveness and censorship
had a direct correlation with arts
in Canada."
Devine stresses the importance
ofthe artist in protest. "There
have been numerous instances
where the government have done
things which can be seen as a tax
on culture. For example, where
plays appear to promote terrorism etc, funding gets cut. There is
[often] a clamp down on culture
because it is the artists who speak
critically."
Keen to display the impact art
has on society, Devine makes use
of satire to address important
political issues.
"Satire can be even more
wicked and more dangerous in the
attacks that it makes on society
than drama. We are using this
as the sharpest weapon we can.
Nothing is more engaging than the
audience laughing in engagement
ofthe truth. To laugh at something
which is dark is a real display of
emotional engagement."
Two theatre companies (Pi
Theatre and Horseshoes & Hand
Grenades Theatre) are involved in
the production, and it is clear that
the relationship between the them
is strong. There is a mutual admiration between Devine and director
Richard Wolfe, a UBC alumnus.
Their ability to bounce ideas off
of one another contributes to the
originality ofthe project.
Wolfe commented on the
strength of collaboration, not only
between Pi Theatre and Horseshoes & Hand Grenades Theatre,
but also with the audience. "Because this is the premiere [ofthe
play] it's not done ... until the audience comes in and becomes part of
the performance. We really don't
know what we have until the first
audience, which is very exciting."
The companies use the term
"meta-theatrical" to describe Except in the Unlikely Event of War. In
the storyline set in the present day,
all ofthe characters use their own
names, and so the lines are blurred
in terms of fact and fiction.
"Aspects ofthe real individuals
certainly come through in the
present day story," said Wolfe.
"The whole play is exploring [the]
mutability of truth — what is real
and what is not."
The company are believers in
the idea of audience engagement.
To this end, after each performance ofthe show, audience members will be invited to participate
in a "protest lounge." If they go on
stage and perform a two-minute
political rant, they'll receive a
free beer.
"There has to be more to the
way we approach performance
these days,' said Wolfe. "You can't
just sit in your seat passively, it
needs to be a full evening." tJ
Except in the Unlikely Event of
War runs at the Yaletown Roundhouse Community Centre, 181
Roundhouse Mews, until Nov. 30.
The sixties on display at The Photo Show: 1969/2013
Miguel Santa Maria
Contributor
When entering The Photo Show:
1969/2013 for the first time in the
newly built Audain Art Centre, one
immediately notices two things.
The first is that, from looking
at photos ofthe original 1969
counterpart to the very same
exhibit, located near the entrance
to the gallery, the layout and the
entire room in general are eerily
similar to that ofthe previous exhibit at the Student Union Building
almost 40 years ago. The second is
that a majority ofthe photos seem
unremarkable by the standard of
more current works. However,
these two same factors are what
make a short visit to this exhibit
worth it.
The Photo Show is a remarkable display of archived conceptual photography by a number
of 1960s and '70s UBC alumni,
such as Christos Dikeakos
and Jeff Wall, as well as other
non-affiliated artists.
This is not the first time a
majority ofthe photos have been
displayed in an exhibit under the
title. The basic premise behind
the exhibit, both then and now, is
simple enough: a display of avant-
garde photography from a variety
of artists working in the late 1960s.
The present-day iteration ofthe
exhibit also displays the process
behind how these photos came to
be, as well as some modern day
versions ofthe same images.
The quality ofthe photos
themselves is not professional, and
a number of them look like they
were taken in a fumble. However,
this does not detract from their
quality, and instead provides a
more personal, roguish appeal
that opposes the glamour of fixed
tripod photography. The content
of these photographs is fascinating
regardless of quality, presenting
visual patterns and techniques
JIMMY THOMSON/THE UBYSSEY
The first exhibit in the newly opened Audain Arts Centre looks back towards the history of
one of Vancouver's most famous exports: photography.
unique for their time.
Some examples include an obsession with linear patterns — the
traffic lines on a road, pedestrians
crossing an intersection — in the
photos of Bill Vazan, and the time
lapse experiments on a sidewalk of
Donald Burgy. Other interesting
pieces include high-speed freeze
frames of car lights in the fog, the
frame-by-frame record of photographers taking their own personal
work and non-photo items such as
magazines and photography note
scans.
There is one possibly significant
distraction within the exhibit,
which simultaneously acts as
something that makes The Photo
Show all the more compelling: its
archival appeal. It is definitely
a sight to see images of places in
Vancouver such as Cambie Street,
Kitsilano Beach and downtown
Granville from the late 1960s
and realize how much they have
changed — or how much they
remain the same).
Again, some ofthe pieces are
also accompanied by more recent
recreations as well; however, these
reproductions act as a distraction
from appreciating the technique
and concepts used to take the
photographs. Instead, visitors
might be preoccupied with a game
of spot the difference. This dichotomy between the present and
the past is as much the exhibit's
special gift as it is a curse.
Overall, The Photo Show is an
interesting survey, both for those
who have an appreciation for the
artistic medium and for those simply interested in a fragment ofthe
medium's history in this city, 'ffl
The Photo Show: 1969/2013 runs
until Nov. 30 in Room 1001 ofthe
AudianArt Centre, 6398 University
Blvd., open Wednedsay through
Friday, 12-4 p.m.
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 13029
Public Open House
Cellular Antennas on New SUB
You are invited to attend an Open House on Thursday, November 21 to view and comment on a
rooftop antenna proposal from Rogers Wireless for the new Student Union Building (SUB).
Date:
Place:
Thursday, November21, 2013 11:30 AM -1:30 PM
South Lounge Area, Student Union Building, 6138 SUB Blvd
Gym
Noith
Meade
Hillel
House
Brock
Hall
SUB.
n
Meeting
Location
Aquatic
Centre
East Mall
508   p
Subject
Site
DH Copp
Abdul
Ladha
Bookstore   Michael
Smith
Plans will be displayed for the
addition of Rogers rooftop radio
communications antennas and
equipment on the new SUB.
Representatives from the project
team and Campus + Community
Planning will be available to
provide information and respond
to inquiries about this project.
For more information on this
project, please visit:
www.planning.ubc.ca
For further information, please direct questions to
Karen Russell, Manager Development Services karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
This event is wheelchair accessible.
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
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a place of mind
campus + community planning
THE   UNIVERSITY OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA II Opinions
LLUSTRATI0NINDIANAJ0EL3THE UBYSSEY
Having a professor living in your residence might be at a blast, until it isn't.
LAST WORDS//
DON'T STEAL BIKES
Bike thefts on campus are nothing new, but bikes being stolen
from locked cages is. Two thefts
out of 1,000 bike storage cages
total is not a terrible statistic,
but obviously this should not be
happening at all.
You could criticize UBC
for not have more secure bike
storage, but they already have
metal code-access-only cages.
One could presume there is some
issue with the cages — perhaps thieves have discovered a
loophole, or maybe people aren't
locking their bikes away correctly — but we must avoid blaming
the victims of these thefts.
This is the fault of bike
thieves. Don't steal bikes. Not
only is it morally wrong, but with
the increased security presence
on campus due to the recent
sexual assaults, you're even more
likely to get into police trouble.
And for you onlookers, if you
see a bike theft in progress,
do something.
HELP THE SEAHORSES
HELP THE PEOPLE
It is fantastic to see Project Seahorse, a UBC-affiliated research
and conservation group, helping
provide aid to those in the Philippines affected by Super Typhoon
Haiyan.
It would have been easy for
Project Seahorse organizers to
put their conservation on hold
and let the Philippine govern
ment, the Red Cross and other
aid organizations take care of
providing food and medicine to
those affected by the typhoon.
Instead, they marshalled
their existing connections and
teams of local workers to begin
delivering aid themselves to the
villages where they had been
working. Their efforts are especially essential given that they
were operating in isolated fishing
villages that were not being
reached by aid.
While the academics behind
Project Seahorse are not experts
in donating aid, the fact they
are the sole providers of aid in
an isolated part ofthe country
makes their relief work especially important to support.
We encourage those looking
to assist their efforts to donate at
http://justgiving.com/ZSLPhilip-
pineAppeal.
PROFS LIVING IN REZ
COULD GET WEIRD
Having a professor live in residence is a really weird idea. It
crosses tons of boundaries, is
undoubtedly a total buzzkill to
the students sharing a floor with
him and is prone to utter awkwardness.
For one, what kind of person
wants to live in student residence
once he is a full-blown adult?
That's not a rhetorical question.
There are no doubt plenty of
creepy guys in Vancouver who
would kill to get back into the
student residence party scene.
But there are also people who
COURTESY THEZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OCLONDOK
The Project Seahorse team has stepped up in the Phillipines.
might find it an interesting way
to see what college students are
like outside ofthe classroom and
how things have changed since
they were young.
In the case of Michael Griffin,
the classical studies professor
living in Totem Park, it appears
to be the latter case. He seems
like a very cool professor who
took Student Housing up on
an interesting offer to move
back into rez for a few months.
He is holding movie nights in
the house lounges and eating
meals in the dining hall with
different floors.
Students can benefit
from Griffin's stay
by interacting with
a professor outside
of lectures or office
hours, and perhaps he
will help humanize
academics to skittish
first-years
Students can benefit from
Griffin's stay by interacting with
a professor outside of lectures
or office hours, and perhaps he
will help humanize academics to
skittish first-years.
In any case, we hope that if
the "Professor in Residence"
program is continued or expanded, administrators make
sure to find the right candidate,
and constantly evaluate whether
the program is achieving what
organizers would like to see.
EVALUATE YOUR
TEACHERS
As the term comes to an end,
most courses offer you the
opportunity to provide feedback
on your professor. These teacher
evaluations can be tedious and
annoying, but they offer a great
opportunity to improve not only
your professor's future classes,
but every class you take.
Faculties take evaluations
from students very seriously and
comments offered in one class
— not enough time spent taking
questions, course went too quickly, tests were too close together
— can be applied to others.
So do your best to fill out a
few evaluations, because you're
not the only one who wants to
learn. XI
Time for the AMS to
tackle student debt
PHOTO COURTESY THE AMS
To promote their student debt campaign the AMS organized "The Walking Debt," with
studentzombies marching around campus on Halloween.
TANNER BOKOR
Op-Ed
While UBC and institutions across
our country are finding new innovate ways to take post-secondary
education to the next level, conversations are still ongoing regarding
the future ofthe accessibility and
affordability of getting an education.
Post-secondary education
contributes in many ways to
British Columbia's economic and
social well-being. The province's
post-secondary institutions provide thousands of jobs to faculty,
administrators, staff and students.
Post-secondary institutions are
an essential component ofthe
province's innovation ecosystem,
and provide many ofthe inventions,
new processes and patents that will
drive the economy ofthe future.
On a more individual level,
people with a post-secondary
education earn higher incomes, are
less likely to be unemployed, find
jobs more quickly if they are laid off
(even during economic downturns),
are less likely to engage in criminal
behaviour, tend to lead healthier
lives and have children who are
more likely to succeed in school.
These individual economic benefits
are of special interest to lower and
middle-income families, but these
very same students - even when
they are willing to take on high
levels of debt - are being priced out
ofthe system by the rising cost of
getting an education while living in
Metro Vancouver.
Your AMS believes the B.C.
government plays a crucial role in
making university education more
affordable for all students. Increasing accessibility to post-secondary
education is both socially equitable
and essential for B.C.'s continued
economic prosperity. The need is
especially urgent, since the province may soon face labour shortages
lasting into the next decade. In this
regard, changes made last year by
the government to the student loan
repayment relief program are a step
in the right direction. But this program does not address the "sticker
shock" problem that affects lower-income students in particular.
The AMS could not agree more
with provincial education minister
Michael de Jong. "We have to stop
thinking of education as just K-12,"
he said in a statement earlier this
year. "By 2020, almost 80 per cent
of new job openings will demand at
least some post-secondary training,
and that proportion is growing all
the time."
Although the government rightly
points out that skills training is
an important component of any
post-secondary system, we need a
diversified workforce, trained not
only in skills-based disciplines, but
also in disciplines that are able to
inject the creativity and innovative
thinking necessary to create the
industries of tomorrow. Degree
programs, especially those in the
social sciences and fine arts, play a
crucial role in the future development of our province and country,
and must be considered as vital to
our post-secondary system as skills-
based disciplines. For the benefit
of not just the current generation,
but those yet to come, our province
must take a balanced approach
to post-secondary, creating more
spaces for skills-based education
while continuing to foster and
expand programs that promote new
ideas, new approaches, and build
new opportunities for a skills-centered workforce.
It's up to us all to
make known the value
we place in our time
in university and
acknowledge that
though we are in tough
economic times, the
entire post-secondary
community is in this
together.
Furthermore, we grow increasingly concerned with the level of
support the provincial government
provides to institutions across
B.C. For those who appreciate and
understand the benefits of education and the unlimited number of
opportunities that come from it, it
is our job to send one clear message:
post-secondary education is not
a luxury, it is a necessity. Regardless ofthe results ofthe provincial
government's core review processes, it must be strongly stated that
post-secondary block grants are not
a source to balance the province's
cheque book.
As such, the AMS is calling on
the provincial government for a
reduction in student loan interest
rates, the re-introduction of an upfront needs based grants system in
B.C., a seat at the table in helping to
reshape B.C.'s student loan system,
additional financial assistance for
graduate students — including the
establishment of a graduate provincial scholarship — and to hold the
line on, if not increase the level of,
core funding provided to institutions throughout B.C.
It's up to us all to make known
the value we place in our time in
university, and acknowledge that
though we are in tough economic
times, the entire post-secondary
community is in this together. XI
Tanner Boker is the AMS vice-president, external affairs. II Scene
wiawawMan
THE 20 HIGHEST
PAID* EMPLOYEES
AT UBC
Plus UBC's biggest expenses
(Dolla dolla bill, y'all)
STEPHEN TOOPE
UBC president
$533,445
2
GAVIN STUART
Dean of Medicine
$ 513,905
3
FRANCOIS BENARD
Medicine professor
$480,485
4
ALLAN JONES
Associate dean of Mec
Jicine
$427,524
5
ALPOETTCKER
UBC Properties Trust1
CEO
^^H $415,528
6
STEVE ALISHARAN
Sauder MBA director
^H   $408,856
0
JAI PARIHAR
IMANT2 CEO
^H $403,113   /
8
DAVID OSTROW
Medicine professor
$395,669/
9
ROBERT HELSLEY
Dean ofSauder
^H $390,011-
10
DARREN DAHL
Associate dean of Sauder
■   $387,249
11
DAWN DEWITTTALBOT         Associate dean
of Medicine
$380,810
12
NATALIE STRYNADKA            Associate dean
of Medicine
$378,507
13
DAVID SNADDEN
Medicine professor
$375,075
14
DANSKARLICKI
Sauder professor
■   $366,758
15
NEIL REINER
Medicine professor
$363,724
16
FRIEDA GRANOT
Sauder professor
|  $343,157
17
EDWARD CONWAY
Medicine professor
$342,291
18
DALE GRIFFIN
Associate dean of Sauder
$341,135
19
JASON FORD
Associate Medicine professor
$340,434
20
MICHAEL ALLARD
Medicine professor
$339,509
UBC head
honchos
Medicine
Sauder School
of Business
* includes salary, wages, bonuses, gratuities, taxable benefits, etc.
1 UBC Properties Trust manages the university's land and real estate assets
2 IMANT (UBC Investment Management Trust) manages the university's investments
Source: 2012-2013 Consolidated Financial Statements of UBC
Graphics by Ming Wong. Data compiled by Ming Wong and CJ Pentland
Total amount of
scheduled payments:
$917
million
Dean's list
I. Medicine
,2. Sauder
3. College of Health Disciplines
Louise Nasmith: $320,356
4. Law
Mary Anne Bobinski: $301,512
5. Science
Simon Peacock: $294,624
6. Dentistry
Charles Shuler: $286,667
7. Arts
Gage Averill: $286,025
8. Forestry
John Innes: $268,575
9. Education
Blye Frank: $252,575
10. Applied Sciences
Eric Hall: $250,075
II. Land and Food Systems
Murray Isman: $226,645
12. College for Interdisciplinary Studies
Hugh Brock: $224,241
13. Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
Susan Porter: $175,075
Some top UBC payments:
$42 million
to Bird Construction
$12 million
to TransLink
$76.9 million
to Ledcor Construction
Interesting UBC payments:
$34,556
to Menchie's Frozen Yogurt
$4.4 million
to Apple
$39,539
toVicki's Nail Studio 12    I    GAMES     I    MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18,2013
Crossword
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20-Nothing, in Nantes
21- Legislative assembly
23-Sailors
24- Jamaican popular music
25-Immerse
26-Molasses
29-Diet successfully
33-Grinders
36- Mex. neighbor
37-Romance lang.
38-Lowly workers
39-PC monitor
40-Blazing
41-Isn't wrong?
42- Pro
43- Actress Silverstone
44-Pond organism
45-Controversial
47- Writer Hentoff
49-Animation frame
50- all-time high
54-Writings
58-VCR alternative
59- Silas Marner author
60-Olive genus
61- Langston Hughes poem
62- Nasal cavity
63- best friend
64-Actor Ken
65-Impudent
66-PartofQ.E.D.
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39- anglais (English horn)
40-Boxer Laila
42-Goat's milk cheese
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48-Bohemian
51-Name
52-Shun
53-High times?
54-Discounted
55-Bones found in the hip
56-Sardine containers
57-Heavy book
Nov. 14 answers
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THE TRUTH
IS OUT THERE.
Write for news
news@ubYSseY.ca
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 13031
Public Open House
Wesbrook Place Lot 32 - Prodigy
You are invited to attend an Open House on Wednesday, November 20 to view and comment
on a residential development proposal for Wesbrook Place Lot 32. Plans will be displayed for a
new 6-storey 17,150 sq.m market residential project in Wesbrook Place.
.Vednesday, November 20, 2013 4 - 6 PM
Commons Room, MBA House, 3385 Wesbrook Mall
Wesbrook Mall
UMima        Magnolia
Gramle
Terrxalll
Hve'?n'   Wesbrook
Wesbfook
Community
Cenlie
Meeting
Location
Dahlia
House
University
Hill
Secondary
School
Blockhouse
Pack
Ross Drive
Representatives from the project team
and Campus + Community Planning will
be available to provide information and
respond to inquiries about this project.
The public is also invited to attend the
Development Permit Board Meeting for
this project on December 11. Check link
below for details.
For more information on this project,
please visit: www.planning.ubc.ca
For further information:
Please direct questions to Karen Russell,
Manager Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
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a place of mind
campus + community planning
UNIVERSITY OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA

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