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The Ubyssey Nov 15, 2012

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Array SHAKING OUR FISTS AT BC FERRIES SINCE 1918
UBC'S OFFICIALSTUDENT NEWSPAPER | NOVEMBER 15,2012 | VOLUMEXCIV| ISSUEXIXII
WARM WINTER
DRINKS TO WET
YOUR WHISTLE
Toddies, ciders and nogs —just a few piping hot booze delivery
methods to get you through exams PS
Teaching assistants will vote
Thursday on whether to accept a new »Page 2
What's on
HIS WEEK, MAY'
Lecture and film screening with Robin Hess-
man: 12:30 p.m. @ Liu Institute
Are you curious about societal, cultural, economic and political changes
that have occurred in Russia since the fall of the Soviet Union? Robin
Hessman has spent her time in Russia throughout the 1990s developing
the Russian version of Sesame Street. Her talk will explore the Russians'
reactions to the changing events over the past two decades. In addition,
there will be a screening of her documentary, My Perestroika. Free.
MOM
MUSIC »
The Return of the Jazz Cafe: 6
p.m. @ Party Room, Student
Union Building
Don't have any plans for Friday
night? The UBC Jazz Cafe has
you covered! Good music, hot
drinks and baked goods. Come
hang out with your friends and
meet new ones. $3.
NEWS»
The Ubyssey Production Day:
1 p.m. @ Basement Room 24,
Student Union Building
Ever wonder how your
twice-weekly student newspaper, The Ubyssey, is produced? Stop by on Wednesday
nights to be a part of the process
...and get free dinner.
It's the end of the universe
and I feel fine: 8 p.m. @ H.R.
MacMillan Space Centre
Worried about the end of the
universe as we know it? UBC
astrophysics grad student
RaminderSamrawillguideyou
on a tour that shows it might
not be as soon as people think.
Admission by donation.
WRITING »
Writing Help Drop-In: 3-7
p.m. @ Chapman Learning
Commons
Are you getting stuck on how
to write your paper? Need help
in developing an outline or formatting your paper for citations?
Drop by the Chapman Learning
Commonsforsome hands-on
advice. Free.
Got an event you'd like to see on this page? Send your event
and your best pitch to printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
Video content
Make sure to check
out the Weekly
Show, airing now at
ubyssey.ca/videos/.
'JJthe ubyssey
Today'sUbysseY was delivered in part
by bicycle, courtesy of AMS Bike Co op
SI ams bike co-op
Visit the Bike Kitchen (SUB north side) for
full or DIY service, free checkups, advice, air and oil,
http://bikecoop.ca
NOVEMBER 15, 2012 | VOLUMEXCIV| ISSUEXIXI
Coordinating Editor
Jonny Wakefield
coord inating@u byssey.ca
Managing Editor, Print
Jeff Aschkinasi
3rinteditor@u byssey.ca
Managing Editor,Web
Andrew Bates
webed itor@u byssey.ca
News Editors
Will McDonald*
Laura Rodgers
iews@ubyssey.ca
Senior News Writer
Ming Wong
Tiwong@u byssey.ca
Culture Editor
Anna Zona
culture@ubyssey.ca
Senior Culture Writer
Rhys Edwards
•edwards@u byssey.ca
Sports + Rec Editor
CJ Pentland
sports@ubyssey.ca
Senior LifestyleWriter
ZafiraRajan
zrajan@ ubyssey.ca
Features Editor
Natalya Kautz
featu res@u byssey.ca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@ubyssey.ca
Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@ubysseyca
Art Director
Kai Jacobson
a rt@ ubyssey.ca
Graphics Assistant
Indiana Joel
joe l@ ubyssey.ca
Layout Artist
Colly n Chan
cchan@ ubyssey.ca
Videographer
SooMinPark
spark@ubyssey.ca
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Riley Tomasek
webmaster@u byssey.ca
3ryce Warnes, Josh Curran,
Peter Wojnar, Anthony Poon,
veronika Bondarenko, Yara
Matt Meuse, Hogan Wong,
^ory Gattens, Brandon
Chow, Joseph Ssettuba. Tyler
McRobbie, Sarah Big am
TheUtysseyr:" ITiclalstudent newspaper of the University or Brmsn Lolumbla.
t Is published every Monday
andThursday by The Ubyssey
Publications Sociely. We are ar
autonomous, democratically
•un student organization, anc
all students are encouraged to
aartlclpate.
Editorials are chosen anc
written by the Ubyssey staff.
They are the expressed opln-
on of the staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe
Jbyssey Publications Society1
or the University of British Co-
umbia. All editorial content
appearing In The Ubyssey Is
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Letters to the editor must
ae under300 words. Please
nclude your phone number,
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edi tonal office ofThe Ubyssey;
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ilssions for length and clari-
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alacing display orclassifiedad-
vertsingthatiftheUbysseyPub-
icatlons Sociely falls topublish
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n the ad occurs the liability of
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J PS shall notbe responsi ble for
slight changes or typographl-
calerrors that do not lessen the
value or the impact of the ad.
OUR CAMPUS
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
=HOTOCOUTESYOF HEATHER HEINE
Heather Heine knows how to multitask; her many projects range from entrepreneurial start-ups to biotech inventions.
Biotech, brews and bear spray
Laura Rodgers
News Editor
Before Heather Heine ran a biotech start-up, before she became
a doctor, before she started a
business while she was still in
med school, she spent a night in
a bunker at an Alberta military
base.
The army had given her a
leaky gas mask. But she didn't
know it yet.
She was barely out of first-
year university and partway
through basic training to join
the reserves. CS gas — Heine
called it "10 times stronger than
bear spray" — was pumped into
a dark room, where Heine stood
with a team of recruits.
"Our eyes and lungs and
mucus membranes were on
fire," said Heine. "One guy was
screaming, 'I'm gonna die, I'm
gonna die.' A few people threw
up."
Heine doesn't recall the exercise fondly, but she's glad she
went through it. "The military's
really excellent at teaching you
to handle stress conditions," she
said.
Heine only stayed in the reserves for a year, but she's found
herself in plenty of stressful
situations since then.'Tt's not
exactly the same, but every time
at UBC during exams, through
really difficult clinical rotations,... probably it's helped."
She parlayed that first university year, plus a couple years at
BCIT after that, into a bachelor's
degree in biotechnology at UBC.
With her sights set on clinical
research, she enrolled in UBC's
combined MD-Ph.D. program.
But when the first year of
med school wasn't enough of a
challenge, she started a project
outside of class that eventually
became the Boulevard Coffee
Roasting Co.
"A series of things just lined
up that made it obvious to me
it'd be the right thing to pursue.
A friend of mine in my medical
class, her mother owned a Blenz
franchise. So I just started to ask
questions."
She hatched a plan for an
organic, fair-trade coffee shop
along with a fellow student, and
cold-called the company that
rented space along University
Boulevard to pitch it.
"We spent the next two years
setting it up. I fundraised several hundred thousand dollars,
mostly through my medical
student friends, who lent me the
money," Heine said. She started
working on the idea in 2003,
but kept it secret for two years
because she wasn't sure how
her Ph.D. supervisor or her med
school profs would respond.
"They wouldn't really
understand why I was doing it,"
she said.
Outside of class, she met with
banks and contractors to get
the cafe up and running. She
opened the Boulevard in 2005,
and the cafe has been successful
ever since.
Heine has since sold her stake
in the business, but she credits
it with awakening her entrepreneurial streak. "It was new and
kind of uncertain and scary," she
said. "[But] I really want to learn
to do this."
After finishing the MD-Ph.D.
program in 2011, she kept that
streak going by founding two
biotech start-up companies.
The first stemmed from her
Ph.D. research into stem cells.
"In the whole stem-cell research
community, there's been a real
struggle to get anything to work.
And I banged my head on that
for about two years," Heine
said. "So I realized, maybe the
tools we're using aren't quite
sufficient for what we're trying
to do."
She developed a new way for
researchers to test how stem
cells develop: an "implanted
Petri dish," roughly the size
of a dime, that can be placed
inside a lab animal. It attracted
attention from stem-cell researchers in both Canada and
the U.S., and Heine moved to
California to continue work
on the project and patent
her invention.
"It's very new at this point,"
she said. "We're not goingto
see what happens with that for
some time."
While she waited to find
out what would happen with
the stem-cell project, she also
started a personal-health
company that launched just
weeks ago.
Called "Talking 20," the
venture allows customers to
measure levels of vitamins
and hormones in their blood
cheaply and easily. "Right
now, you have to go in to the
doctor when you have symptoms [and] get a blood test,...
then go back to the doctor," she
said. Instead, her company lets
customers put a drop of blood
onto a filter card, mail it to a
lab and check test results on
the Internet.
"I want to see what I can do
to make personal diagnostics
and health a little bit more
accessible and convenient," she
said. "You can just start to monitor for stuff on your own time,
as often as you want.
"Everyone is doing these different diets, different exercise
routines, they're taking different supplements, [but] there's
a real black box around what's
actually making a difference.
There isn't really any hard data
so that a person can figure out
for themselves what's going on
inside of them."
So far, the company has
had thousands of orders from
around the world. Heine hopes
that it, and similar ventures,
can empower people to be more
active in how they maintain
their health.
When asked how she keeps
finding the energy to take on
multiple demanding projects,
Heine almost seemed surprised by the question. "I've
noticed if I have enthusiasm
about something, I have seemingly limitless energy for it,"
she said.
"That's kind of the slogan
for me: we need to get as much
done, as quickly as we can." Xi tNewsl
EDITORS WILL MCDONALD + LAURA RODGERS
DAY, NOVEMBER is, 201
TRANSIT »
6fAOO fewer cars.
UBC commuters use transit more than anyone else
\n the region — and ridership keeps growing.
TVxaVs our commitment to sustainable transportation.
LABOUR»
«*MlVW
UBC-0 students were previously unable to opt into the U-Pass program.
<AI JACOBSON F
U-Passes to be offered to UBC-0 students
Visiting students must pay AMS fees to opt into the program
Ming Wong
Senior News Writer
UBC Okanagan students currently
studying at UBC Vancouver may
soon be eligible for a U-Pass.
AMS Council has passed a
motion to give UBC-0 students
the option to opt in to the U-Pass
program, which they were
denied before.
"It's been a bit more difficult and
arduous than we had originally
anticipated," said AMS President
Matt Parson on trying to find a way
thatUBC-0 students could join the
U-Pass program. "But thankfully
the passing of our motion last Wednesday brings the end of this issue
and we'll be able to offer UBC-0
students [at] UBC Vancouver a
U-Pass."
Parson said that some technicalities still need to be sorted out
with Enrolment Services. He hopes
UBC-0 students will be able to pick
up U-Passes as early as December.
However, AMS VP External Kyle
Warwick said TransLink is still
working on the issue of whether
UBC-0 students canbe included in
the terms of the current U-Pass contract. He said that this could delay
the process until at least January.
UBC-0 students aren't fee-paying AMS members, which complicates the the issue of getting a
U-Pass. "TransLink is tryingto
limit the number of exceptions [to
the U-Pass contract],... so they are
fairly strict on the condition that
for you to be eligible for a U-Pass,
you must be a member of the AMS,"
said Parson.
To qualify as AMS members,
UBC-0 students will have to pay
the $21.50 AMS membership fee.
Parson said the university would
like them to pay the $197 Athletics
and Recreation fee as well. He said
said these visiting students will still
have to pay fees to their Okanagan
student society.
At the last AMS Council meeting,
VP External Kyle Warwick said this
arrangement will be a temporary
solution until April 2013, when the
new U-Pass contract is put in place.
"We're optimistic that with a
new contract being written with
TransLink, we can write in some
language where there would be a
recognition of traveling students
from sister institutions and allowing them to be considered under
the umbrella of AMS membership,"
said Parson.
The U-Pass would give UBC-0
students a $30 all-you-can-ride
student pass, as opposed to a regu
lar-price $81 one-zone bus pass.
Up until now, the AMS has been
refunding UBC-0 students the
difference between their full-price
passes and the U-Pass price, but
Warwick said in a Council meeting that it's not the best use of
AMS money.
Daniel Vineberg, a UBC-0 student who was in Vancouver last year
for a cross-campus exchange, said
he went through a tedious process
to get his transit passes reimbursed.
"Last year, I was promised by
the former AMS President that if I
kept all my transit receipts, I would
be fully refunded. It took about a
dozen visits with the AMS and the
better part of the year to get this
promise realized.
"I'm happy to know people
won't have to go through that mess
again." tJ
NEWS BR EF
UBC prof takes racial discrimination case to B.C. Supreme Court
The case of a UBC education professor who claims she was the victim
of racial discrimination is now in the
hands of the highest court in the
province.
The B.C. Supreme Court heard
arguments earlier this week over
whether to throw out a human rights
complaint Dr. Jennifer Chan filed
against UBC.
The hearings are another step in
Chan's complaint, which she filed
in May of 2010 after being denied a
prestigious research position. Chan
argues she was not appointed to
the David Lam chair in multicultural
education in part because she is Chinese-Canadian. Chan, who lost the
chair to a white candidate, claims she
is more experienced in the field.
Last January, the B.C. Human
Rights Tribunal allowed Chan's
case to proceed to a full hearing,
despite numerous attempts by
UBC to have the case dismissed. I n
March, UBC filed a petition to have
the B.C. Supreme Court review the
tribunal's decision. UBC argues that a
tribunal hearing would be redundant,
because a university investigation of
Chan's complaint determined there
was no wrongdoing on the part of
appointment committee.
Chan claims that UBC's process
was unfair because the university
hires the investigator and sets the
terms. Chan named several senior
administrators in herinitial complaint.
The court is expected to reach a
decision before the end of the year. Xi
SUSTAINABILITY »
Student wants to
replace paper towels
with hankies
Laura Rodgers
News Editor
Sam Dabrusin wants to save the
environment — one hanky at
a time.
He's giving out free handkerchiefs at UBC, hoping that
anyone who takes one will use the
hanky, rather than a paper towel,
to dry their hands after they use
the washroom.
It all started when Dabrusin,
now a third-year political science
student at UBC, went on a high-
school exchange to Japan. "For
the first month or so, my hands
were always wet; I was wiping
them on my pants," he said. "They
don't have paper towels or hand
dryers in over 90 per cent of the
bathrooms there.
"It's the cultural norm to carry
around a handkerchief.... Then
when I got back to North America,
I started using [handkerchiefs]
again without thinking."
While canvassing for Greenpeace after his first year of university, Dabrusin tried to think up a
project he could start to help the
environment, and his mind went to
his hanky habit.
"I made the connection in my
head that [paper towels] were dead
trees that we just throw in the garbage.... I was just using less."
Dabrusin approached the sustainability committee at the AMS
Sam Dabrusin (left) distributes free hankies
and he learned how much paper
towel waste comes from just the
SUB. "I found out the SUB goes
through about 40 bags of trash a
day, just out of the bathrooms," he
said. "At least 90 per cent of that, or
more, is going to be paper towels,
right?"
He made a pitch to the AMS
about a plan to offer free hankies outside bathrooms, but they
weren't able to offer him grant
money for the project.
"We didn't see the connection
between buying a handkerchief
and then getting people to consistently use a handkerchief instead of paper towel," said Tristan
Miller, AMS VP Finance.
Undeterred, Dabrusin wound
up getting $1,100 for his project
from another group, the Student
Environment Centre. He used it
to buy hundreds of handkerchiefs
from Hankettes, a Vancouver
Island company.
KAI JACOBSON PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
in the SUB.
He's been handing them out at
a booth in the SUB since Tuesday,
and suggesting that anybody who
takes one also donate to the Ancient
Forest Alliance. "The response has
been pretty good," he said. "It's a
behaviour change thing, so it's a big
project. We're aiming to do this next
semester as well."
Dabrusin hopes that the project won't just save trees, water
and energy; he also wants it to get
people thinking about how much
they consume.
"This is a really good way to get
into a discussion about the disposable culture that we have right
now.... On campus, we'll have a meal
and we'll throw out some plastic,
we'll throw out some styrofoam, all
without thinking about it.
"We'll do that on a daily basis,
and that's just for meals.... There's so
much other stuff, too, that's very disposable. I think this would be a good
way to start that conversation." Xi
TAs to vote on
tentative deal
today
=LICKR PHOTO/JR DODGE
The vote will be held Nov. 15 at 4 p.m. in
Woodward lecture hall 2.
Will McDonald
News Editor
The TA union has a tentative deal
with UBC, but it isn't what they
were hoping for.
The agreement includes wage
increases and hiring preferences
for fifth-year doctoral students.
But union members were also
hoping for tuition waivers,
a childcare fund and hiring
preferences for third-year master's students.
"It wasn't the deal that we
wanted, of course. That's the
result of the bargaining. Over
two years of negotiations, you're
bound to make concessions on
both sides," said Michael Stewart, spokesperson for the TA
union, CUPE 2278.
UBC spokesperson Lucie
McNeill said that both sides
had to make concessions at the
bargaining table.
"Bargaining is a tough business and generally neither side
is 100 per cent happy because it
involves compromise," she said
"That's the nature of negotiations."
The deal includes no retroactive wage increases for 2010
and 2011. TAs will get a retroactive two per cent wage increase
for 2012-2013 and an additional
two per cent wage increase in the
final year of the deal.
The TAs asked for, but didn't
get, a tuition waiver and cost
of living protection. Instead,
the union will put part of their
first year's wage increases into a
financial hardship fund.
Stewart said he didn't know
how much money would be in the
fund or how it would be divided
among members. He said a committee would be formed to figure
out what to do with the fund.
The deal also includes protection from academic harm for
TAs, meaning that union members can't face academic penalties for job-related grievances.
The TA union's last collective
agreement expired in 2010.
Stewart said the union's week
and a half of job action helped
them get the deal.
"We feel we secured the
best deal that was possible,"
said Stewart.
McNeill said the deal had to
take into account the other union
agreements that have been made
on campus.
"Hopefully ... there are some
elements that were really important for both sides that were
agreed upon and that's enough
to have people say, okay, this is
what's feasible right now. This is
what's realistic," said McNeill.
TAs will vote on the tentative
agreement on Nov. 15. The union
executive is recommending members accept the deal. tJ NATIONAL    I    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15,2012
REGINA »
Offensive language at campus pub leads to sensitivity training
Student said homophobic team names at pub trivia made him uncomfortable
Kristen McEwen
The Carillon (University of Regina)
REGINA (CUP) - Bars aren't
exactly places for polite conversation; campus bars are no
exception. Jokes made within
the walls of the Owl, a student
pub at the University of Regina,
can be edgy, but sometimes
edgy crosses the line into very
offensive territory.
During the Owl's trivia
night, held on Oct. 11, taglines
for teams included derogatory
words such as "faggot" and other
homophobic statements.
Accordingto Nathaniel Cole, a
regular patron at the bar, seeing
and hearing the rest of the crowd
laugh and the hosts of the game
encourage the word to be used
made him feel uncomfortable.
"I think probably being one of
the only out gay men in the room,
hearpng] the word 'faggot,' it
was really isolating and it was
kind of scary," Cole said.
"It kind of hit home for me, because those are the kind of words
I've heard my entire life, you
know? I decided that I was going
to do something about it."
That evening, Cole took to
Twitter to express his disapproval. Taking his frustrations
further, Cole decided to write a
letter to campus newspaper the
Carillon. The letter was published on Oct. 18.
The letter spoke about his
experience that evening and how
unwelcome he felt in the pub. In
the letter, he acknowledged that
he knew the management at the
Owl did not condone these types
of actions, but he still wanted an
apology from the hosts.
After the letter was published, Cole said he received
some backlash.
ARTHUR WARD PHOTO/THECARILLON
The University of Regina Pride Centre for Sexuality and Gender Diversity provided positive space training to the pub's staff.
"I felt kind of shitty for a
couple days," he said. "It took a
lot for me to, you know, publish
in the newspaper — outing myself
to the entire campus or the entire
city or [whoever else] reads it.
"It's a difficult part of the
process, and there are people
who hurt my feelings or made me
feel unsafe. It just took me a lot
to do that because lots of times I
just don't say anything and go on
with it."
On Oct. 11, the Owl's manager, Alexis Losie, was out of
the country and noticed Cole's
comments on Twitter. She direct
messaged him and promised that
an apology would be made.
The same day that Cole's letter
appeared in the paper, Losie
made an official apology with the
staff, face-to-face with Cole.
"It was what I wanted to
do. It's hard to admit you were
wrong, it's hard to say, 'I'm sorry
and I made a mistake.' So for all
of us to have to do [that] to Nathaniel and actually see his face,
you know, that's a hard one when
you can see emotion on someone's face versus reading it on a
page," said Losie.
Since that trivia night, the
opportunity for teams to use
taglines has been removed.
Losie said that she was aware
of some of the more offensive
taglines that were used in the
past, but hosts had said it was
hard to censor what would be offensive to some and not to others.
Losie also added that another
regular patron approached her
to express their discomfort with
jokes about child molestation,
since they had experienced it
when they were younger.
At times, expressed Losie, she
had also taken offence to explicit
taglines, including one that
implied violence against women
and necrophilia.
"I just wanted to address our
customers. You don't know how
it affects the person sitting at a
table beside you or even someone
at your table when you laugh
about that stuff," Losie said.
On Nov. 6, the Owl staff
received positive space training
from the UR Pride Centre for
Sexuality and Gender Diversity.
The positive space sessions
explain the "benefits of making
a space more inclusive [for] LG-
BQT identities," said UR Pride's
executive director Leah Reiser.
The sessions also explain how
to use respectful language and
stand up against others using
offensive language.
"We really wanted to bring
that exact training to the Owl.
That would be a first good step
to combating the incident that
had occurred and incidents that
happened before," said Reiser.
Losie said that the worst
outcome of the training would be
staff members only adopting this
new attitude temporarily.
"But the best case scenario is
that they extend [the training]
outside of here and also take it
to their friends when they're at
a house party, [so when] these
words come up, they make a
point of saying it's not acceptable," she said.
While Cole said he has put the
incident behind him, he is not
optimistic that anything is about
to change.
"I don't think there's going
to be any drastic change, but at
least there's people talking about
it," he said.
"But at the same time, the
only people talking about it are
the ones who care about these
issues in the first place.... The
people who need to change their
mindset haven't heard about it or
don't care.
"But I hope for those that
have, that it's kind of made them
think that it's 2012. Just because
gay people can get married
doesn't mean there's equality
across the board and there's not
oppression for those people on a
daily basis."
UTown a UBC CEEP
world cafe workshop
- November 27
What are your ideas to make UTown@UBC a low carbon community?
Join us on November 27, for lively discussion on reducing energy and
emissions use with fellow student and neighbourhood residents.
esday, November 27,2012 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Old Barn Community Centre, 6308 Thunderbird Boulevard
refreshments will be provided.
Can't make the workshop? Not a problem-participate online at
sustain.ubc.ca/ceep between November 27th and December 7th.
UBC and the University Neighbourhoods Association (UNA) are collaborating, in partnership with BC Hydro,
on the development of a Community Energy and Emissions Plan (CEEP) which will result in a plan for reducing
GHG emission and energy use in UTown@UBC.
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
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ift!# £I*H  H  S» H^6|-b A^f S2|«hA|7|  HUMdl-.
ELECTIONS »
Vancouver to get new
federal riding for 2015
Omar Shariff
The Voice (Langara College)
VANCOUVER (CUP) - Another
member of parliament will
be joining the House of Commons to represent Vancouver's
growing population.
The proposed Vancouver-Granville riding, which will
be cut out of the five pre-existing federal voting districts, will
likely be in place for the 2015
federal election.
The Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for B.C.,
the group that maps out all of
the province's new ridings,
has just wrapped up a series
of public hearings to gather
public input about the proposed
electoral district.
John Hall, chairperson of the
commission, said that during
the public hearing process,
Vancouverites' main concerns
were whether or not the designation between the east and west
sides of the city would remain
the same.
"In the areas of Vancou-
ver-Kingsway and Vancouver-East, [the residents] were
anxious around Main and Ontario streets," said Hall.
"They wanted to see it preserved as the boundary for the
western part of the city."
Hall also said that federal electoral districts are re-examined
every 10 years to make sure that
each riding represents roughly
the same number of constituents,
with the goal being 101,879 constituents per riding.
"The changes are driven by the
census numbers," said Hall.
"And with the [Vancouver-Granville] riding in place, all
the ridings in Vancouver are very
close to the electoral quota."
Stephen Phillips, head of the
political science department at
Langara, thinks the new proposed ridings in B.C. will have an
overall positive effect.
"We are under-represented
in the House of Commons," said
Phillips.
"This current redistribution
is designed to establish the
principle of representation by
population."
"We're going to be gaining an
additional six seats in the House
of Commons, going from 36 to
42," said Phillips.
"So that'll redress the population imbalance somewhat."
But even with these new ridings, Phillips believes that B.C.'s
population will only continue
to grow.
"As soon as [the new riding] is
in place, it'll begin to get out [of]
joint yet again," said Phillips.
"But at least the gap will be
narrow for a certain period of
time." Sports + Rec
)R C.J. PENTLAND
URSDAY, NO
FEATURING
CJ.
PENTLAND
FORMERATHLETETURNED
OLD MAN.
ANDREW
BATES
WATCHESALOTOFSOCCERAND,
WELL, MORE SOCCER.
ANNA
ZORIA
FAVOURITE SPORT: KEEPING UP
WITH THE KARDASHIANS.
JONNY JEFF
WAKEFIELD    ASCHKINASI
JUST FINISHED READING
FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS.
WHEN HE GOESTO A GAME, HE'LL
TWEET ABOUT IT. #GOBIRDSGO
BEST TEA
OFTHE
SEMESTER
MOST—_
DISAPPOINTING
TEAM OFT
TERM?
I
I
I
1
WHO WILL BE THE BEST
TEAM DURING THE
REMAINDER OF THE
YEAR?   ^^
THE UBC WOMEN'S
FIELD HOCKEY TEAM
WILL LOSE A GAME
WHEN...
GAGAN DOSANJH AND
JANINE FRAZAO BOTH
WON CANADA WEST MVPS
IN SOCCER. CAN ANYONE
STANDUPTO THEIR
GREATNESS?
UBC IS TO WINNING
NATIONAL
CHAMPIONSHIPS AS
YOU ARE TO...
WHAT IS THE BE
RECREATION
ACTIVITY O
CAMPUS?
WH/
THE
UBC
DEM
WHAT PLAYER Wl
THE FIRST-EVER
UBC AWARD FO
STIN?
Women's field hockey and
men's soccer both won
nationals, but soccer has to
get it. Including preseason:
24 games, zero losses.
Does this need to be stated?
Well, ifyou needed a hint, the
team starts with "F" and ends
with "ootball."
Honestly, everysingle team
has a shot at making nationals.
But the favourites to win gold
have to be women's volleyball
and men's basketball.
The team decides to play with
tree branches.
guess maybe Zeus. But I'm
not sure how great his ball
handling would be.
Forgetting to screw the gas
cap on after fuelling the car.
If it existed, it would be wiffle
ball baseball. Someone needs
to makethat happen.
Brandon Deschamps feat, the
offensive line. They came out
of nowhere to help UBC lead
the conference in rushing.
It's hard to argue with men's
soccerforfinishing undefeated while playing twice
as many games as the last
team to do the same thing.
really wanted the football
team to bounce back after
last year. And despite the bad
four-game start, they made
all the right changes! But they
changed too late.
I think it'll be a basketball year.
The men's and women's teams
have looked flawless, and they
have what it takes to make a
deep playoff run.
Caught in a time loop, the
team is forced to play against
a version of itself until one
team wins.
Frazao can bend a bowling
ball with her right foot. Frazao
can bring down a construction crane in the penalty area
and not concede a foul.
Catching busses at the very
last minute.
The "biking through pedestrians" slalom on the tiny
construction paths.
Billy Greene, for the away
game against Manitoba. With
postseason hopes still alive,
he got knocked out of the
game, came back in, threw a
40-yard pass and collapsed.
UBC Plant Sitters. Their last
couple of games have kept
me at the edge of my seat.
Team Zooey Deschanel's
face. It is tragically losing
the battle to Z. Deschanel's
bangs. My Sunday prayers
are with you.
The UBC figure skating
team: 50 Blades of Toope.
Namaste.
My old therapist, Steve, will
stop wearing his stupid fisherman hats. Which will be never.
God, Steve.
Yes. Also, no. I feel like those
names could be very chic if
they lost two to three vowels.
nducing thefear of God in
small children, grannies, therapists and boyfriends.
Float in the pool face up; float
in the pool face down; sauna;
cigarette; cucumber water.
Godspeed.
When I hear the word "beast-
in'," I instantly picture the weird
tantric sex I once had with
an ex-sailor in the Caribbean
under a grand piano. Sorry
what was the question? I'm
having a moment.
UBC's soccer teams are in
a class of their own. Look at
their stats against the other
CIS teams. They are depress-
inglygood.
Obviously we expected better
from football. We thought that
returning Billy Greene would
be enough, but the lack of
depth on defence was painfully clearfrom day one.
imagineeach team will
probably be best at their
respective sports.
The entire team decides, in
the interest of levelling the
playing field, to eat nothing
but Domino's pizza foran
entire season.
Yeah, his name was Terry Fox,
youjerk.
Forgetting which night the
recycling goes out on.
Dodging longboarders.
Seriously, none of them know
how to stop.
Beastin'? What is this "beast-
in'" you speak of?
The women's rugby team
wins my vote. They may not
win all their games, but why
not root for the underdog?
Between the look of disappointment in Billy Greene's
eyes and the lack of Ram Jam
being played at Thunderbird
Stadium, the T-Bird footballers
ain't been ballin'.
Swimming, hands down. I
mean Brent Hayden used to
be on that team, right? He
won something at the Olympics once.
The varsity athletics department decides to treat their
athletes to the Burger Bar, all
day, erryday.
Did anyone else just read that
and think Gangnam Style?
Guilting people into doing
things for me, then forgetting
what I need from them.
Running up and down the
stairs at Wreck Beach. No
better way to fight off those
caf curly fries.
He's not a player, but the
announcer at the volleyball
games is beastin'. It's genetics, ladies and gentlemen! SPORTS + REC    |    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2012
BASKETBALL»
T-Birds stay undefeated
HARDWOOD HIGHLIGHTS
by Henry Lebard
It was as though already having one
last-minute victory wasn't enough
to instill a sense of urgency for the
UBC women's basketball team in
their home opener. The Thunderbirds made it interesting yet again
on Saturday, and for the second
consecutive game of their back-to-
back series with Thompson Rivers
University, the Thunderbirds just
managed to slide past the Wolfpack
to improve their conference record
to 4-0.
"It was way more [intense] than it
needed to be," said fifth-year Leigh
Stansfield after Friday's win, where
she contributed 16 points.
A last-minute push in Friday's
game saw the T-Birds claw back
from an 11-point fourth-quarter
deficit to win 75-71. A barrage of
Cassandra Knievel three-pointers
helped spark the fourth quarter
comeback and gave her a career
high of 20 points.
Defensive lapses in the paint led
to the T-Birds' troubles early on
throughout Friday's contest. Despite
being able to make several runs
that seemed to be the start of UBC
comebacks, the Wolfpack continued
to get past the T-Birds' interior
defenders for easy layups.
"We weren't really executing on
defence," said Stansfield. "[UBC
head coach Deb Huband] kind of lit
a fire under [us] at halftime."
(£j)  HUMBER
The Business School
HOGAN WONG PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
UBC used a couple of last-minute efforts to pull out two wins on the weekend.
It certainly showed, as the
T-Birds forced six Wolfpack turnovers in the final quarter. However,
to continue to be successful, the
team will have to get out to better
starts; good teams will not allow
them to come back.
"We've got to come out stronger,"
said Knievel after Friday's game.
"We were not really moving the ball
or working as a team on offence."
Saturday's contest also came right
down to the wire. Kris Young added
to her list of great games by totalling
22 points, 10 rebounds — seven of
which were offensive — and six assists, all the while playing a key role
in the final minute of a contest that
was neck-and-neck.
While down 70-68, Youngtook
the ball in what looked like the
T-Birds' final possession of the
Advertising- Media
Management
Alternative Dispute Resolution
Event Management
Fashion Management &
Promotions
Financial Planning
Global Business Management
Human Resources
Management
International Development
Marketing Management
Public Administration
(imvfiYt?
TO LAUNCH
WR CAREE
FIND YOUR NICHE Wf
A POSTGRAD IN BUSINESS
game, and with just 17 seconds
to play, the third-year hit a tough
jump-shot to tie the game at 70.
TRU was given the final possession and a chance to split the
weekend double-header. But with
eight seconds left, the 'Birds forced
a Wolfpack turnover and the ball
ended up in Stansfield's hands. She
hit the tie-breaking shot with four
seconds left, putting UBC up to the
final score of 72-70.
After this weekend's performances, head coach Deb Huband will
certainly be stressing defence to her
young team.
"It's great to [get] the win, but it
was a really ugly game," Huband
said after Saturday's game. "I was
hoping that after [Friday] night,
we'd be able to get a little bit closer
to where we're going, but I think we
just really struggled on the defensive end. We need to improve our
defence; we can't give up 70 points
a game."
The T-Birds will face the University of Fraser Valley Cascades this
Friday at 6 p.m. and Saturday at 5
p.m. at War Memorial Gym, before
travelling to Saskatchewan and
Alberta the following weekend. Xi
BIRD DROPPINGS »
UBC teams get out the brooms
Hockey cruises to a sweep | Women's volleyball dominates
UBC men's hockey got back on
track on the weekend, sweeping the
University of Mount Royal Cougars
in Calgary. Friday night saw the
T-Birds prevail 7-2, while Saturday's
contest resulted in a 3-2 win.
The opener saw Cole Wilson lead
the way with a hat trick. Max Grassi,
Joe Antilla, Brad Hoban and Scott
Wasden also added markers to help
snap UBC's mini two-game slide.
Saturday proved to be a much
closer contest, with the teams
trading goals until the third period.
Dillon Wagner broke the deadlock
with nine minutes remaining in the
third period to put UBC up one, and
the 'Birds held on for the win.
Steven Stanford picked up the
win on Friday, while Jordan White
played Saturday and made 32 saves
for the victory.
UBC moves to 6-3-1 on the year
and will take on Manitoba at home
this weekend; puck drop is at 7 p.m.
on Friday and Saturday night.
Men's basketball remains perfect
A couple of wins over Thompson
Rivers University Wolfpack have
moved the UBC men's basketball
team to 4-0 on the season. The
Thunderbirds took down the Wolfpack 82-70 on Friday and followed
that up with a convincing 97-63 win
on Saturday night.
First-year Isaiah Soloman
sparked the T-Bird offence on Friday night, finishing with 18 points.
In total, five UBC players scored in
double digits.
Saturday saw the T-Birds in command throughout the entire contest;
they led 23-1 after one quarter and
cruised the rest of the way. It was
a balanced scoring effort, with 10
players contributing points.
UBC, currently ranked No. 1 in
Canada, will take on Fraser Valley
this weekend at home. Tipoff is 8
p.m. on Friday and 7 p.m. on Saturday at War Memorial Gym.
The UBC women's volleyball team
easily handled the University of
Saskatchewan on the weekend,
sweeping the Huskies 3-0 on both
Friday and Saturday night.
UBC recorded an attack percentage of .455 on the night, with
Shanice Marcelle and Jessica von
Schilling leading the way with eight
kills each. Brina Derksen-Bergen led
the defence by tallying eight digs.
Saturday night was more of the
same. UBC got out to early leads in
each set and didn't look back, winning again in three straight sets.
Currently ranked No. 2 in
Canada, the 'Birds (5-1) will head
to Calgary next weekend for a
two-game series.
Men's volleyball splits
After being swept by Saskatchewan on Friday night, UBC men's
volleyball rallied on Saturday to
tough out a five-set victory.
Currently ranked No. 8 in Canada, the 'Birds came out on top in an
extremely close contest on Saturday
against the No. 7 ranked Huskies.
David Zeyha led the way with 21
kills, while Quentin Schmidt had 14
kills and 15 digs.
UBC (2-4) will travel to Calgary
next weekend.
UBC rowers victorious
UBC had a strong showing at
nationals in Victoria last weekend.
Katherine Enns picked up a silver
medal in the women's single lightweight, and UBC lightweight men's
pair Evan Cheng and Maxwell
Lattimer swept both the senior and
under-23 categories in the event.
Also, Valentin Dunsing earned
a bronze medal in the lightweight
men's single, Rob Gage and Alex
Janzen took fourth place overall
in the men's two-event and Zoe
Fetting-Winn took the top spot for
U23 women for U23 gold. Xi
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 12027
Public Open House
Ponderosa Commons - Phase 2
You are invited to attend an open house on Wednesday, November 21 to view and comment on the
development proposal for the Phase 2 of the Ponderosa Commons.
3:00 - 5:00 PM
Wednesday, November 21,2012 3:00 - 5:(
Cedar Room, Ponderosa Centre, 2071 West Mall
Subject
Site
Main Mall
*®
East
Phase 2
Longhouse
•
Meeting
West Mali
Phase 1 s™nS
$ ontinufng   st>a«
Studies
West
Parkade
^Westj
Lower Mall
Location §■  s, ,ohn%
— jjj       College
Place
Vanier
Residence
Drive
Residente
Plans will be displayed for the Phase 2
project (22,145 m2) that will incorporate
student residence housing (an additional
523 beds) combined with academic and
administrative units and a range of
amenities.
Representatives from the project team and
Campus + Community Planning will be
available to provide information and
respond to inquiries about this project.
For more information on this project,
please visit: www.planning.ubc.ca
For further information: Please direct
questions to Karen Russell, Manager
Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
This event is wheelchair accessible.
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
o| #x|^
a-tis *i«
gfi* n|S t Xlfe #££rSa7h#CH Si£Mcr.
ZL  5# W^SI-^ Al-arg £S|S|-A|7|  rJhg-l_|d|-.
a place of mind
THE   UNIVERSITYOF   BRITISH  COLUMBIA
campus+community planning THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2012    |   SPORTS + REC
SOCCER»
SOCCER wSr
DOMINANCE    B^ffis
58,
»goals scored by UBC in
19 games this season.
J.U goals allowed by the
Thunderbirds in 19 games.
1 shot on goal that UBC
allowed in the final game
against Cape Breton.
J. / goals scored during the
year by Gagandeep Dosanjh,
Canada West MVP and CIS
national tournament MVP.
D players named CIS
tournament all-stars:
Dosanjh, Luke O'Shea, Steve
Johnson, Paul Clerc, Reynold
Stewart and Brandon
Bonifacio.
2i players named All-
Canadians: Dosanjh was
named to the first team, and
defenceman William Hyde
was named to the second-
team.
=HOTOSCOURTESYOFYAN DOUBLET
The UBC men's soccer team won their 12th national championship after defeating Cape Breton 1-0 in the CIS final on Sunday.
Thunderbirds refuse to lose
19 wins and o losses later, UBC men's soccer are champions of Canada
Andrew Bates
Managing Editor, Web
They would not lose again.
After disappointment in previous
years and a season of easy wins, the
UBC men's soccer team were one
big game away from a CIS national
championship when they lined up
against the Cape Breton University
Capers on Sunday afternoon at
Laval University. This time, when it
counted, UBC's focus was overpowering.
The T-Birds were not going to
slip behind early and find themselves shut out, which was how
they lost their last national final
to York University in 2010. They
were not going to be shocked by a
90th-minute goal while riding out
a stalemate to reach extra time,
which was how they were turfed
by the University of Alberta in Edmonton last year, before they could
even make nationals. This time,
they wanted to make good on the
promise of an undefeated season.
And on Sunday, they did it. They
snagged a goal early on and then
locked the Capers out of the game.
The Thunderbirds held Atlantic
champions, who led their conference in shots during the regular
season, to exactly two shots in the
final. Only one of those shots was
on goal, and it wasn't until the 81st
minute.
The 1-0 score line didn't reflect
a decline in attack, either; the
Thunderbirds could have added an
insurance goal from several missed
chances in the first half. They
moved the ball, fed the attack and
kept such utter control of the pitch
that Cape Breton couldn't steal the
ball, and couldn't muster anything
when they had it.
"As the minutes started to
churn away in the second half and
they weren't getting a sniff in and
around our area, I was maybe as
comfortable and confident as you
can be with a one-goal lead in a
championship game," said UBC
head coach Mike Mosher.
It's a type of confidence a coach
can rarely afford. Last year, the
Thunderbirds thrived through a
hail of offensive might, but stum
bled somewhat when knocked off
their stride. They went undefeated
through Thanksgiving, but a loss
to Victoria saw them drop nine of
the last 15 points; despite staying
close against Alberta in the Canada
West final, they could not hold on
in those last five minutes to seize a
berth at nationals.
But this year was different.
"[Dedication] never wavered
throughout the whole season,"
Mosher said. "Sometimes everybody can get a little bit worn down.
We never got worn down.
"I never sensed any sort of monotony.... This team was not going to
be denied."
But one couldn't be blamed for
wondering if there was monotony in
the season. In a schedule unbal-
Mainland rivals Trinity Western
University. It's indicative of the
Thunderbirds' tenor at that point
that Mosher said the players were
disappointed to finish with a tie.
However, the undefeated season
saw the whole roster thrive. New
additions like midfielders Reynold
Stewart and Milad Mehrabi joined
up with Gagandeep Dosanjh to
form an attack that didn't rain
down like previous iterations, but
worked in tandem with the centre
of the park. The midfield was
nailed down by Marco Visintin
and Brandon Bonifacio, two of the
three fifth-year co-captains, who
focused on dispossessing opposing
players and firing outlet passes to
speedy attackers.
After finishing the Canada West
hopes ended in pretty dramatic
fashion," Mosher said. "It didn't
matter who it was; the fact that
we'd lost in that fashion with a
good team... just served as a pretty
motivating factor."
In the final, after going ahead
early on a Mehrabi goal, Alberta
stole back in the first minute of the
second half, holding the final at a
deadlock again. The game was testy,
with jeers, chirps and a challenge
on Dosanjh that Mosher said made
the team livid.
"Quite honestly, it pissed everybody off. We had to calm all the
players down," he said. "The way
you do it is go and stick another goal
in the net, and lo and behold, who
got the winning goal in that game?
Gags."
'«     u
ancedto accommodate new schools
that didn't seem quite ready to hang
with CIS teams, many of the results
were comfortable victories, peaking
with 6-0 and 8-0 wins against
Lethbridge and UNBC, respective-
ly.
It didn't help that UBC couldn't
take down Alberta in the only
regular season meeting, where
they played to a 2-2 draw. They also
drew both meetings with Lower
season with 11 wins, no losses and
three draws — but with no wins
against Alberta or TWU, the other
two teams in the national top 10
rankings — UBC ended up back
in the Canada West final against
Alberta. Both teams had already
qualified for nationals, but Mosher
said the T-Birds wanted a banner,
not revenge, for 2011.
"The fact is that our [2011] season
ended and our dreams and our
In overtime, Dosanjh put it home
to seal the conference title and the
team's first win against Alberta
since 2009. "It showed that we, as
a team, can battle it out," Dosanjh
said. "That win really proved that
we had the character and we had
the willpower and the team could
actually get it done and not just roll
teams over."
Dosanjh had a sour 2011 season,
despite emerging as rookie talent
the year before, but he bounced
back to lead the Canada West in
goals with 12 and finish as conference MVP. He said the team
focused on preventing errors in
order to rule out defeats like those
in 2010 and 2011.
Come nationals, there were very
few of those errors. Teams couldn't
cope with UBC's early goals and
suffocating control, which led to
convincing 3-0 and 4-0 wins in
the first two rounds. "We always
put an emphasis on coming out
strong and running teams into the
ground early on," Mosher said.
"You defend from the front and
you make it easier on your backline
and on your goalkeeper. With that
pressure, we were able to win the
ball, and... the only pass that they
really had was a long ball, and then
you're kicking it to the likes of [UBC
defenders] Steve Johnson and Paul
Clerc. You're playing right to their
strengths."
By the final, everyone had their
own reason why losing wasn't an
option, according to Mosher. There
was Brandon Bonifacio, who was
vocal about his determination to secure a championship before graduating. There was reliable defender
William Hyde, who had crumbled
in the 2010 final and wanted to
avenge that.
Steve Johnson, who missed many
of the team's postseason opportunities through injuries, scored the
winning goals in the quarterfinal
and final. Midfielder Devin Gunenc,
a co-captain dropped to the bench
and shifted into defence due to a
midfield of riches, put the team first
and shone, according to Mosher.
"We practice on a pretty regular
basis, once a week, scenarios where
you're up a goal, you're down a goal
with 15 minutes to go," Mosher
said, saying he reminded the team
of this at halftime. "If we go to last
15 minutes — we practiced this, you
guys know what to do."
"We knew what it took to get to
the finals,... but the only difference
we had was the gutted feeling of
losing in a final," said Dosanjh. "We
just made sure that none of that
would ever happen again." Xi Culture
ANNAZORIA
DAY, NOVEMBER is, 20:
BOOZE»
THEATRE»
As the days get shorter,
the nights get colder
and exams loom on
the horizon, few
things can warm
you up and soothe the nerves
more than a hot, boozy beverage.
You'll find this alcohol-infused
tradition in any colder climate:
the Swedish have Glogg, the
British have the hot toddy,
the Quebecois have Caribou,
and the rest of Canada has
coffee with Baileys.
Ifyou try our twist on
these classic recipes, you
should have no trouble
keeping warm this winter.
1. RUM AND EGGNOG
CHAI
With a chai base and a splash
of rum, this is a much lighter
take on the most decadent of
holiday drinks.
1/2 cup eggnog
1 oz. rum
Freshly steeped chai tea
Pinch of grated nutmeg
Heat a half-full mug of eggnog
in the microwave, making sure it
does not boil.
Add rum and top up with
chai tea. Dust generously with
nutmeg.
2. SPIKED PEPPERMINT
MOCHA
When the holidays arrive at
Starbucks, so do the hordes of
students eager for a festive fix.
Skip the line and relax at home
with this spiked DIY version of a
coffeehouse favourite.
1 cup freshly brewed coffee
1-2 tbsp. cocoa powder
1/4-1/2 tsp. peppermint extract
1 oz. Kahlua or vodka
Milk (to taste)
Sugar (to taste)
Whipped cream
Crushed candy cane
Fill a mug three-quarters full
with coffee and stir in cocoa
powder. Add peppermint extract
and liquor, adjusting to taste.
Add milk and sugar if desired,
and top with whipped cream and
crushed candy cane.
3. GINGERED APPLE
CIDER
Ginger balances the sweetness
of cider and gives it a surprising,
spicy kick. The ginger pieces
will soften and caramelize while
cooking, so leave them in for a
tasty garnish.
1 cup apple cider or juice
1/2-inch piece of fresh ginger,
peeled and thinly sliced
3 whole cloves
1 oz. sherry, brandy or rum
Combine apple cider, ginger and
cloves in a saucepan and simmer
over medium heat for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and stir
in liquor.
4. MULLED WINE
Mulled wine takes a bit more
time and effort to prepare, which
makes it the perfect drink option
for putting together with friends
— especially if they bring the
wine.
1 large orange
1 lemon
3/4 cup sugar
6 whole cloves
1 cinnamon stick
2 bay leaves
3 whole star anise
2 bottles cheap red wine
Slice off long pieces of peel from
<AI JACOBSON PHOTO. KIM PRINGLEILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
the orange and lemon; then
slice them in half and squeeze
the juice from each into a large
saucepan. Stir in sugar, pieces
of peel and spices, and boil the
mixture for five minutes until
syrupy.
Add red wine and simmer on
low for 10 minutes. Ladle into
glasses and serve with a twist of
orange peel. Serves 5-10. Xi
—Jessica Dawson
Women take the
lead in Dancing at
Lughnasa
Rhys Edwards
Senior Culture Writer
In its next mainstage production,
Theatre at UBC blends religion,
comedy and domestic turmoil into a
powerful vision of family history.
Dancing at Lughnasa is a
semi-autobiographical account of
playwright Brian Friel's childhood
growing up in County Donegal,
Northern Ireland, in 1936. Abandoned as an illegitimate love child,
Friel's character, Michael, scandalizes a deeply religious community.
Already embittered by their own
conflicts, his five aunts, the Mundy
sisters, must negotiate their difficult
personalities to take care of the
young Michael.
Dancing is, unfortunately, one
of the few plays that features a cast
of strong female protagonists. The
lack of major roles for women is
particularly salient for the theatre
department's acting students, the
majority of whom are female.
"Just having a play in general
that has five strong female characters doesn't happen a lot.... Most
plays are written about men," said
acting student Tracy Schut, who
plays Kate Mundy.
Dancing is also renowned in both
theatrical and academic circles for
its witty, quintessentially Irish dialogue. Accordingto acting student
Emma Johnson, who plays Christina Mundy, the cleverness of the
play's language evokes the nature of
Irish culture at that time in history.
"Words are so important,
because they're not only communicating to one another, but
they're also a form of play, a form
of entertainment for ourselves
when there really isn't much else
to do," explained Johnson. "It's
the glue that holds these people
together and keeps them from
going insane."
"The writing is fantastic, but
it's very complex," added acting
student Courtney Shields, who
plays Maggie Mundy. "Part of it is
[that] the playwright is Irish; it's a
different lens.... It's not comedy in
the way I think that North American audiences see comedy, but it
is very funny in this sort of prickly
way. There's a lot of images buried
in the writing and the language that
make the play really beautiful, but
also really meaty for the actors to
deal with."
The subtlety of Friel's script
has proven to be refreshing for the
cast. Whereas previous mainstage
theatre productions have focused
on larger-than-life characters
and spectacular stage action
(such as March 2012's Macbeth
and September's The Duchess),
Dancingis a more intimate, dialogue-driven affair.
"With this one, we are real
people, [and] this is how we're
interacting in these given circumstances," said Schut. "These
characters are multi-faceted;
they're complex. [We're] not just
playing one thing or realizing one
emotion."
It was this quality that attracted
director John Cooper to the production. Cooper said he hopes that the
poetic quality of the play will leave a
lasting impression.
"Friel is a master playwright....
His dramatic writing is so specific
and active that it constantly shows
you what it expects from you," said
Cooper, who has been directing
shows for over three decades across
Canada. "He also speaks wonderful
words and tells great stories in that
fine Irish tradition — a true love of
language." Xi THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15,2012    |    CULTURE    |    9
DEALS»
---3^9i1SrTHx-Tnc-
^J^4—
4.25
THANK   YOU    I'll
Shhh! No one has to know it's not your birthday.
KAI JACOBSON PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
Campus guide to birthday f reebies
Rhys Edwards
Senior Culture Writer
Birthdays: that blessed time of
year when one celebrates their
successful departure from the
womb and the staving-off of their
immanent demise. As an opportunity to spend precious time
with beloved friends and family
and to reflect on life thus far,
every birthday is a crucial juncture of growth and self-evaluation.
Much more important than any
personal development, however,
is the receiving of free stuff. As
students, we need to pounce upon
every deal we can get, and birthdays are the ideal time to gouge
UBC's cafes and restaurants for
everything they're worth. Hold
no quarter, for our venerable
educational institution is unkind
to our wallets.
With this mantra in mind,
check out these local businesses
for special birthday deals.
THE VILLAGE
BOOSTER JUICE: Sign up for the
Booster Juice newsletter online.
You'll get a coupon for a free
smoothie on your birthday.
VERAS BURGER SHACK: Sign up
for the Vera's newsletter online.
You'll get a $10 gift certificate on
your birthday. The manager at the
Vera's in the Village also says that
he may give a 10 per cent discount
to someone if it's their birthday.
BLENZ COFFEE: Show proof that it's
your birthday and you will receive a
free medium coffee.
STARBUCKS: Register for a Starbucks
Card online. Use it at Starbucks and
receive either a free drink or food
item on your birthday.
ONE MORE SUSHI: Mention that
it's your birthday to score a
free dessert.
FRESH SLICE: The manager of the
Village Fresh Slice says that he will
offer a discount to someone if they
order an extra-large pizza on their
birthday.
ONCAMPUS
MAHONY'S: Ask your server very
nicely and she might give you a
free shot or dessert.
THE PIT PUB: Ask the bartender
very nicely and he will give you "a
free high five."
B3
Birthdays are the
ideal time to gouge
UBC's cafes and
restaurants for
everything they're
worth.
BLUE CHIP COOKIES: No discount,
but they now offer giant "birthday cake cookies," complete with
personalized messages. Order two
days in advance.
VANCOUVER'S WESTSIDE
THE EATERY (3431W. BROADWAY):
Mention it's your birthday for a
free dessert. With a larger party,
you may also get a free Eatery
T-shirt or pair of underwear.
THE N AAM (2724 W. 4TH AVE.): Show
proof that it's your birthday and
receive a percentage discount
equal to the age you're celebrating. Xi
SHAMELESS GIVEAWAY
NON OPT-OUT STUDENTS Oft
WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!
WARN I NG
Y I in 5 students
have experimented with
LIVE THEATRE
THE UBYSSEY IS GIVING AWAY TICKETS TO
DANCING AT
LUGHNASA*
Al^^^l^^^*^^^^^^^^^-
I.CHO
(NOVEMBER 15 - DECEMBER 1, WED TO SAT© 7:30PM)
2. COME TO RH 23 IN THE SUB TO CLAIM
V/!lUlulWilvLtiil.F:Y''fll\l%AlVi
*CULTUM MAYBE HABIT I
WWW.THEATRE.UBC.CA
THE/VRE
THE UBYSSEY
Public Open House
Proposed Changes to Campus Shuttle Routes - November 26
UBC is working with TransLink to identify improvements to the existing
community shuttle service on campus. The proposed changes include an
expansion of the coverage of the C20 shuttle, and a redistribution of the
C22 service hours to the C20, as the C22 is currently underutilized.
The existing C20 shuttle route currently operates in a one-way loop, serving the university community
from Marine Drive to the UBC bus loop. The C22 route presently serves the university community from
Hampton Place to the UBC bus loop.
Mon
Thui
Thunderbird Arena, Main Concourse
6066 Thunderbird Boulevard, Main entrance on Wesbrook Mall
Thunderbird
Parkade
I harmacy
Health Sciences Mai
Doug Mitchell
Thunderbird
Sports Centre
Tennis
Centre
Meeting
"Location
The public is invited to come learn about the proposed changes and
offer feedback. Transportation planners from UBC and TransLink will
be on hand to answer questions.
Participate online between November 23 and
December2 at www.planning.ubc.ca
For more information on the consultation process, contact:
Campus and Community Planning at melissa.pulido-gagnon@ubc.ca
or Translink at kate.grossman@translink.ca
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
o| S*|-& SgJS n|S 4= SJ-& -s-Saf aa^f -&o| Si-fSM^K
g-£!# flsH n as Bsi°hb M^S ^-s|s|-AM uHM^h
IUBC        a place of mind
THE   UNIVERSITYOF   BRITISH  COLUMBIA
TRANS/MNK
campus+
community
planning Opinions
LAST WORDS
FARTING SHOTS AND SNAP JUDGMENTS ON TODAY'S ISSUES
FARE HIKES MAKE POSTGRAD CALCULATIONS
EASIER FOR UBC
STUDENTS
TransLink just announced its
fare prices for 2013, and surprise,
surprise — they're going up.
TransLink announced Tuesday that the cost of fares will rise
as much as 12.5 per cent in the
new year. Starting Jan. 1,2013,
adult one-zone fares will rise to
$2.75 — an increase of 25 cents
— while the cost of a monthly
three-zone pass will increase as
much as $19. And while it's still
under negotiation, don't expect
the price of the U-Pass to stay
static either.
As a student, you're probably
goingto start thinking about
opportunity costs once you're out
of university. Say you don't have
a job lined up immediately after
graduation (har). Is it worth it to
work where you can in Vancouver
until you find something better?
Or does the prospect of paying
$151 per month to commute
from the suburbs make leaving
Vancouver sound appealing?
At least anecdotally, we know
that Vancouver has a tough time
keeping young people around.
This additional sticker shock
isn't goingto help matters. It's
time governments harness this
populist outrage and start looking
seriously at cost controls. Otherwise, the price of transit will be
another mark against Vancouver
for UBC students.
IF UNA WANTS TO BE
A CITY COUNCIL, THEY
SHOULD GET USED
TO OUR PETULANT
EDITORIALS
It seems we have developed a
beef with certain members of the
University Neighbourhoods Association (UNA) executive.
At the last UNA meeting,
at least three members of the
UNA board complained about
a Ubyssey ediorial that might
have poked fun at the residents
of campus neighbourhoods. We
might have implied they were
cranky, and definitely brought
up the fact that they frequently
try to assert themselves in ways
that are detrimental to students.
The UNA chair even wanted to
know who in the AMS runs The
Ubyssey (we've been independent
from the AMS since 1994).
There was a failed motion at
the last UNA meeting to make
committee meetings public.
Several board members raised
concerns that only members of
the media would show up. They
said that observers might limit
their ability to have open discussions. They also complained that
one of our reporters showed up at
a public meeting and quoted what
speakers said.
The UNA keeps saying they
are a city council and should be
treated as one. Well, you know
what happens at city councils?
People record the meetings.
Councillors are quoted in the
media. And papers write far more
critical editorials.
LETTHECHAN
CASE HAVE A FULL,
INDEPENDENT HEARING
As usual, UBC is tryingto control
its own destiny in-house. But
this time they want independence from legal process, and
that's worrying.
Jennifer Chan is a UBC
professor who argues that she
was passed over for a research
chair position because racial bias
crept into a sloppy appointment
procedure. She went through
UBC's internal harassment and
discrimination investigation
process, but decided to take her
complaint to the B.C. Human
Rights Tribunal when UBC's
investigation looked biased.
The tribunal agreed that her
case should go to a hearing after
numerous attempts by UBC to
have it thrown out. In March
of this year, UBC applied to the
B.C. Supreme Court for a judicial
review of the tribunal's decision.
The first round of hearings were
held Tuesday.
Essentially, UBC is tryingto
block Chan's complaint on the
basis that she has used up her
chance for appeal by first using
the university's internal method
for dealing with these complaints. They say she's shopping
for a sympathetic judge.
The argument that private
dispute resolution takes legal
recourse off the table is worrying
for two reasons. The first is that
UBC has a questionable historical
record of handling these issues
fairly. It isn't necessarily broken,
but it does raise issues of whether an organization can fairly
investigate itself.
It is worrying, then, that UBC
thinks that its process should
stand outside the jurisdiction of
the independent Human Rights
Tribunal — that if you're intimidated and worried and possibly
don't know anything about the two
methods, you should be forced to
make an irreversible choice.
UBC's lawyer says this is a
unique case, that the tribunal
NDIANAJOEULLUSTRATIOWHE UBYSSEY
screwed up their decision and
let the case go to hearing on a
technicality. The B.C. Human
Rights Tribunal is an important institution, but it isn't held
in high regard by the public;
it's largely seen as an outlet for
people who like to feel sorry for
themselves. Bleeding faculty and
staff through drawn-out legal
battles might end up becoming
UBC's preferred strategy for dealing with these complaints.
If UBC is confident in its
equity policies, it should let
them be tested in the public eye
through a full independent hearing. UBC argues that it would
be a waste of public resources.
Isn't it even worse to fight this
case through to the highest court
in B.C., with the argument that
"our policies are really good"? If
Chan's case goes through, it will
be the sort of test UBC's equity
policies could really use.
RELATIONSHIP
BETWEEN GRAD
STUDENTS AND UBC
STILL UNRESOLVED
UBC's strike-ridden autumn
ended last week with the TA
union and the university brokering a deal. They got the same
raise everyone else did. And
they've been placated by a couple
of snazzy contract provisions that
won't cost UBC more money, even
though they didn't get anywhere
near what they came in for.
Throughout their dispute, UBC
was adamant that they would
only negotiate about on-the-job
stuff, and tuition and other grad
funding issues were off the table.
But when UBC refused to consider the broader financial situation
for grad students, they left some
major problems unaddressed.
Grad students are only paid
by the hour in specific settings
— leading labs and discussion
groups, marking papers and so
on. During the rest of their time,
they wind up doing a lot of free
or poorly funded labour. It contributes to their degree requirements, sure, but it also greatly
benefits their grad supervisor or
principal investigator.
The pipeline isn't leaky; it's
broken. We're glad the TA union
got a small raise, but universities still exploit grad students in
other ways. If they want anything
to change while they're off the
clock, they will need to raise
hell on their own, without the
convenient narrative of a labour
battle supported by one of Canada's largest public-sector unions,
if they want anything to change
while they're off the clock. Xi
Local politics can be
sexy, too
t
KATICHISMS
by Gordon Katie
One of the challenges of writing
a regular column in The Ubyssey
is that our publication is UBC-fo-
cused, while most of our audience
simply isn't. It is plain to see that
students care much more about
international politics than local
politics.
Right now, who could talk about
mundane things like UBC's governance structure or the long-term
sustainability of TransLink? We
have to make fantastical prognostications about Obama's second
term, or prattle on about General
Petraeus's sensational sex life!
There is no single reliable statistical indicator to demonstrate this
phenomena, but the closest thing
is the persistently dismal turnout
for AMS elections. Typically only
8-15 per cent of students vote in
AMS elections, while my Facebook
feed is still ablaze from the recent
U.S. election.
Why? Tweeting about the
failure of Petraeus's counter-insurgency plan will have little to no
effect on Obama's AFPAK strategy,
but harassing AMS President Matt
Parson might bring real changes to
things that are important to every
UBC student.
Therein lies the paradox of
our political consciousness: our
attention is inversely correlated to
our influence. The average student
almost certainly spends more time
on international politics than they
do Canadian politics than they do
provincial politics than they do
local politics, but their influence
runs in the other direction.
The standard response is simple: local politics are boring. However, anyone who has followed
politics at UBC knows this to be
patently false.
Just look at the stories of our
past few decades: a complaint
filed to the UN; The Ubyssey
locked out by an AMS executive
who didn't care for having a
media watchdog; protesters so
moved that they actually sewed
their lips shut; snipers on the
roof of the Chan Centre; an AMS
president who attempted to
provoke a federal investigation to
smear his political opponents as
supporters of terrorism. Is this
not riveting political theatre?
On the other hand, the recent
U.S. election couldn't have been a
more boring affair. Two corporate candidates spent the better
part of a year re-reading the
same tired scripts, only to end
up exactly where they began: a
moderate president, a Republican
House and a Democratic Senate.
OK, but local politics doesn't
mean anything, right? At an international level, we're talking about
life and death; at a local level,
we're talking about student fees
and parking meters.
There is more substance to this
retort, but it leaves much to be
desired. Certainly global issues
are profoundly important, but
that is not to say our local issues
are trivial.
The City of Vancouver's recent
transit plan dubiously zones
under-populated areas as "transit
corridors" to encourage development and extend gentrification
further eastward through Vancouver, says the Mainlander.
In The Ubyssey, you will learn
how UBC pilfers 23 per cent of all
student rent through a complicated "internal loan" scheme,
where the university charges
exorbitant interest to itself and
forces students to foot the bill.
The Tyee documents the
systematic dismantling of B.C.'s
environmental assessment
legislation: first, the legislation's
statement of purpose was removed, and next, the re-written
legislation forced the assessment
process "to be consistent with
the policies of the government
of the day — a death knell, say
critics, to the independence of
the office and its work."
Don't get me wrong: I am not
advocating the political equivalent of a 100-mile diet. We must
be critical of Obama's inaction
on climate change, evisceration of cherished civil liberties,
clamp-down on whistle-blowers, dangerous provocations of
Iran and continued support for
undemocratic regimes all over
the world.
However, we should recognize
that change begins at a local
level. If we start from the politics
of our backyard — winning the
important personal, political
and professional fights — bigger
changes will follow. Xi
Late exam schedule racks
up airfare costs
LETTER
To the editor:
UBC releases all final examination
dates at the beginning of October,
though students registered for those
courses in late June. The university
claims to do so because it minimizes
exam conflicts and hardships. However, the late release of exam dates
results in an extra cost to students
who are making travel plans for the
end of semester (i.e. booking flights).
This may seem insignificant, but
booking a flight earlier significantly reduces the cost of travel for
students. Even during the three
months that pass between registration and the release of the university
exam schedule, students can see a
dramatic increase in the cost of their
trip home. In some cases flights can
increase by over $600, which could
be the difference between some
students being able to go at all.
UBC takes pride in being a
school with an international
student body. It must consider the
impracticality of the late exam
release dates. As it stands, UBC already has over 8,500 international
students, and that does not include
out-of-province students. If we say
flight prices increase on average
by $300 from September to October, and say 6,000 UBC students
are forced to wait to book their
flights, that is 1.8 million wasted
dollars that could be saved by UBC
students per year. That is most
likely a conservative estimate. The
real amount could be upwards of
$3 million.
Exam conflicts and hardships
will likely occur regardless, and if
the system is the reason holding
back the release of exam dates, the
system should be updated.
—Nathan Bird
Economics student W Scene
CLASS CURVES
What does grade distribution say about your class?
V)
LU
Q
D
H
V)
LU
Q
D
H
"The Double Hump"
Things start getting murky here. This curve says your class
has a whole bunch of people who get it and a whole bunch
of people who don't. Scaling marks up won't help everyone - only those who are already on top. Get the junk out of
r*DAncc lo/\   yourtrunk and start studying'cause you really don't want
oKADb^^^j^   to be stuck on the wrong side of these humps.
LU
Q
D
H
"The Baggage"
■   This curve teTls you that the students in your class are all
over the place. There are a few students at every grade
level, and here's where the baggage comes in. Some instructors will want their classes to be normally distributed
so they'll devise a scaling method that most helps those
who don't understand. The loweryourgrade.themore bell
GRADE^^%2   curv'n9 is going to help you out in this one.
What I'm Drinking Now
Pre-Finals Edition
COLT 45
Source:
That bench near
the bus stop
COUGH
SYRUP
Source:
Shoppers Drug
Mart
COFFEE
Source:
Great Dane
Coffee Shop
TEQUILA
Source:
The 24-hour liquor
store on Broadway
we wish existed
@overheardatubc What if
cats had their own Internet
that was full of pictures of
people?" (via @jayeei6) #UBC
@JacquiiNoel Goodbye all
aspects of my life that I
enjoy. I'm going to miss you
#midterms
@gorgopa Now I remember why I never come
to this class, the prof treats us like we're in
kindergarten. #iooLevelCourseProblems
@tripnslide So about that paper... or 2.
#StudentPains
HACKEDEX
YOUR UBC WORD OF THE WEEK
Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) is
the national governing organization of
university sports in Canada. It includes the
majority of all large universities throughout
the nation, including UBC. CIS is divided by
regions, meaning that UBC competes in the
Canada West conference.
PIC OF THE WEEK
Real challenges.
Unreal rewards.
Yes. It's as intense as you expect.
Tough projects. Tight deadlines.
It can be scary. But the growth is
incredible. Because you have the
support of your peers, the guidance
of a mentor and the wisdom of partners
to see you through. All of whom never
forget they started out just like you.
Visit ey.com/CA/Possibilities.
See More | Possibilities
IJimador
T ■
coinnj/iai HiCHDnnifmn]
TEQUILA REPOS100
<AI JACOBSON PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
A behind-the-scenes shot from our winter drinks feature.
=U Ernst &Young
Quality In Everything We Do 12    I    GAMES    I    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15,2012
1
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23
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27
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29
30
31
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33
34
35
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38
39
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43
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■ 45
46
47
48
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51
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USEDB
ITHPER
MISSION
ACROSS
1- Super Bowl XXXIV champs
5-Very, to Verdi
10-Ladies of Sp.
14- Baseball family name
15-Some horses
16-Cabbage-like plant
17-Narrow ledge
18-Suckle
19-First name in fashion
20-Having a handle
22- Vigorous exercises
24-Molars, e.g.
25-Imaginary
26- Winder for holding flexible
material
28-Big brass
32-Tract
35-Verily
37- Slum area inhabited by a minority
group
38-Lush
39-Fit for a king
41-Great length of time
42-Fancy home
45-Farm female
46-Treater's words
47- Australia's Rock
48-Electric fish
50-Animal bite worry
54-Moral principle
58-Divide
61-Comfortable
62-Make for it
63-Audacious
65-Lubricates
66-Circularband
67-Instant
68- first you don't..
69- Entr'	
70- Consumers
71-Lady of Spain
DOWN
1-Capital on the Atlantic
2-Coeurd'__
3-Code name
4- Large island of Indonesia
5-"Judith" composer
6-Trifling amount
7- It's a wrap
8-Goose genus
9-Grenoble's river
10-Azure
11- Sitarist Shankar
12-A Baldwin brother
13-Cong, meeting
21-Common article
23-Swearwords
25-Peter Fonda title role
27-Fictional Jane
29-Bingo call
30-Molecular component
31-Unit of loudness
32-On the main
33-Optimistic
34-Kitchen addition
36- Word that can succeed old, ice
and bronze
37- High level of satisfaction
40-Amazes
43-Place in order
44- Former Russian ruler
46-Bonelike
49-Permit
51-African language group
52-Anatomical passages
53- Spine-tingling
55-Israeli seaport
56-Religion of the Muslims
57-Jai alai basket
58-Franklin D.'s mother
59-Actor Stoltz
60-Football kick
61-Affirmative votes
64-TV adjunct
7
8
3
5
7
5
4
6
8
7
3
1
6
2
5
4
9
3
8
7
9
4
1
2
3
1
6
7
1
4
6
8
2
3
=UZZLE COURTESYOF KRAZYDAD. USED WITH PERMISSION.
First person to enter The Ubyssey office
and debate who should win the AL MVP
award with C.J. Pentland gets 100 free
copies of the paper. Great for reading or
making paper baseball bats!
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE: SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
Mortgage Industry Career Expo
Sign up today at www.mortgageconference.ca!
www.caamp.org • www.mbabc.ca

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