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The Ubyssey Jan 17, 1980

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Array SAC denies funds fer festival
Organizers of UBC's festival of
religion and the arts are angry that
the student administrative commission has refused to financially support their event.
'"I regret they're not giving us
any money. The only thing they
seem to sponsor are a few rock concerts that make money," said
festival organizer Don Johnson.
But SAC chair Don Tolson said
the commission's waiver of $1,600
fees for room bookings was a large
enough show of support for the
event.
"The Alma Mater Society does
support the event but $1,600 is as
far as we could go. We do feel we
very strongly support them," said
Tolson.
But festival organizer George
Hermanson said when a similar
event was held in 1974 the AMS
contributed $1,000.
"I was surprised at some of the
people on SAC — their narrow
definition of student activity. One
example is that they thought I as a
chaplain shouldn't be a spokesperson for a particular group," said
Hermanson.
He added the SAC decision
typifies the commission's attitude
toward campus events.
"They're inhibiting groups from
sponsoring campus-wide events. I
was disappointed that they didn't
perceive a club doing something for
the whole campus," he said.
SAC's refusal to fund the event
will result in difficulties for festival
sponsors to get donations from the
UBC alumni association, he said.
Tolson said he is aware of the
donation dilemma and as a result
AMS finance director Len Clarke
drew up a motion giving the event a
"token" $200. But the motion-was
defeated, he added.
"They haven't lost any support
from us. They got the room bookings," said Tolson.
Another event organizer, from
the Lutheran student movement,
said it was implied, but not directly
stated, that SAC refused funding of
the event's Jan. 7 meeting because
of its religious tone.
"We figured we're doing
something for the whole campus
and for that reason we couldn't
understand why they pushed the
bureaucracy so far," said Lome
Reid. "We only asked for $200."
He said the intent of festival
organizers was to give another
dimension to a highly technically-
oriented campus.
"Two motions before ours they
gave the engineers $1,000 to send
two people to go to a conference. It
seems sort of funny they could get
$1,000 for that and we couldn't get
$200."
The festival is being sponsored by
Carey Hall, the Jericho project, the
Newman Club, St. Andrew's Hall,
Lutheran student movement and
the co-operative campus christian
ministry.
The festival began Sunday and
will continue until Feb.l. The
event, thematically represented by
"Deep calls to deep yearning of the
human spirit", features displays of
liturgical   art.
A conference on process thought
and aesthetics will include papers
given by theologians and
pholosophers.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXII, No. 40
Vancouver, B.C. Thursday, January 17,1980
Deadline shift
angers hacks
BURIED IN BULLSHIT, weary student waves good-bye to unconcerned
campus before going down for third time. Third year political silence major,
rejuvenated by Christmas break, quickly had spirit broken again when prot
— ed o'brien photo
assigned own text for required reading and demanded three term papers
before Valentine's day. With leap year looming, sociologists predict record
number of Februaryitis cases will prove fatal.
Kenny flip flops on off-campus forum
UBC president Doug Kenny's refusal to attend an off-campus public forum on the
58-acre research park is "short-sighted" and
"stupid", students and community group
members charged Wednesday.
Kenny's insistence that a Jan. 24 public
forum be held at UBC instead of University
Hill High School contradicts previous claims
that the community should be involved in the
park, said the chair of the student representative assembly research park committee.
"He is afraid if the issue goes public there
will be an outcry. I don't think he needs to be
told there is concern in the community," said
Marty Lund.
Kenny claims he made the decision because
a committee of SRA students organized the
forum — since students planned the event, a
forum off campus would be inappropriate.
Kenny said he has agreed to attend a forum
at 7:30 p.m. in the SUB party room on Jan.
24.
"You're dealing with a university concern.
They (the research park committee) asked if
they could have the meeting off campus and I
said no," said Kenny.
"It's a student group who approached me,
so it should be held on campus."
But although a UBC student, Lund said he
represented an anti-park coalition of both
community and student groups formed Monday night at a public meeting. Lund charged
that Kenny knew community groups would
be involved with the Jan. 24 forum when he
made his decision after meeting Lund Friday.
But he still refused an off campus meeting,
Lund said.
Point Grey resident Tom Shandel warned
that Kenny will have to meet with the community in the near future.
"It (Kenny's refusal) is very short-sighted
of him," said Shandel.
He said Kenny will be invited to an off-
campus public research park symposium that
Point Grey community groups are planning
to hold in April.
"We want input into the decision-making
process. Whatever goes into this park has to
go through our streets to get there," said
Shandel.
Kenny said he will receive requests for
meetings with community groups, but refused to commit himself to an off-campus
public meeting. He refused to comment on
either the Monday night meeting of community groups and students or on a planned
KENNY . . . fears public outcry
anti-research park petition slated for presentation to the UBC board of governors Feb. 5.
Kenny said until that time negotiations on
the discovery park lease will continue. He
predicted he could finish the lease negotiations within the next month.
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
Some UBC student politicians are
angry and disappointed by a decision that might prevent them from
running in the upcoming Alma
Mater Society executive elections.
The AMS elections committee
decided to change the nominations
deadline for the society's five at-
large positions from Jan. 25 to Jan.
23, preventing student board of
governors candidates from running
in both elections. The board candidates will be forced to file their
nominations for the at-large positions before board election results
are announced Jan. 25.
Returning officer Diane Campbell said the committee changed the
date because the Jan. 25 deadline
would not have given enough time
to have ballots printed for the Jan.
28 election. "It (the deadline) can't
possibly be that day. I've got to get
all the ballots printed," she said.
Board candidate Bob Staley said
he is angry about the move and
See Page 2: HACKS
PVI strike to
end Monday
By GLEN SANFORD
After two weeks of picketing, 200
striking instructors at Pacific Vocational Institute are expected to return to work Monday.
A tentative agreement between
instructors and PVI was struck
Wednesday morning after all-night
negotiations, said a spokesman for
local 57 of the B.C. Government
Employees Union. The instructors
are meeting this morning for a ratification vote.
But the news comes too late for
nearly 1,000 apprentices whose programs were cancelled Monday by
the B.C. ministry of labor due to
the strike.
Earlier this week the PVI student
union asked the ministry of labor to
postpone cancellation of apprenticeship programs but the request
was turned down, said student union president Janissa Wilson.
"Now they (students) will be put
at the end of the waiting lists for apprenticeship programs and they
won't be able to get in for at least a
month," she said.
Wilson also said the PVI student
union has requested an investigation of the bargaining practices of
both union and management. "If
they don't have a set way to bargain, it (a strike situation) could
happen all over again.
The student union has asked the
PVI administration to extend the
length of pre-apprenticeship and
pre-employment programs by at
least 10 days, said Wilson.
"There's a few programs who
See Page 2: PVI Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 17, 1980
Hacks miss AMS date
From page 1
charged that the elections committee had no right to change the
nominations deadline. "The elections committee has no authority to
alter a decision of SRA (the student
representative assembly)," he said.
"We decided nominations would
close at 4 p.m. on the 25th (of
January) and there's nothing they
can do about that."
Staley claimed the only action the
elections committee can take is to
ask SRA to change the date of the
election at their Jan. 23 meeting.
The deadline for nominations must
remain unaltered, he said.
But board candidate Shirley
Waters, who co-authored the AMS
constitutional amendments that
forced the at-large elections, revealed Wednesday that the election
must be held by the end of January
to be valid.
She said the biggest possible
change could be to hold a one-day
election on Jan. 31 and close
nominations on Jan. 23.
But Waters said such a move is
unnecessary because most board
candidates will know whether they
have won from information given
by scrutineers after the  Jan.  21
board election. And Waters did not
rule out the possibility she may run
for an at-large position if defeated
as a board candidate.
, If board candidates filed papers
for the at-large elections before
board results were released, they
would not be able to drop out of the
race because the ballots would have
already gone to the printers, said
Campbell.
The only candidate who has
denied interest in running for an at-
large position is Staley. "It doesn't
affect me because I'm going to win
— but everyone says that," he said.
There are no regulations excluding a board member from
holding an AMS executive position.
PVI instructors
to settle strike
From page 1
might need as much as a three-week
extension because they've been
through both strikes," she said.
PVI instructors walked off the
job for two days in November before reaching a contract agreement.
The instructors walked off again
Jan. 7 claiming that PVI had changed the contract that had been
agreed upon in November.
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT
OF STUDENT HOUSING
INVITES APPLICATIONS FOR
RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1980-1981
These positions are open only to single men and
women. Successful applicants will be required to
live in the residences. Application forms and
detailed job descriptions are available at the
Ponderosa Housing Office and at the Front Desk of
each residence area: Totem Park, Place Vanier and
W. H. Gage/
Applications will be accepted from January 7th to
January 18th, 1980, at the Front Desks of the
Residences or at the Ponderosa Housing Office.
ATTENTION ALL
STUDENTS
NOTICE
OF ELECTIONS
The following AMS Executive positions
are now vacant:
1. AMS President
2. AMS Vice-President
3. AMS Director of Finance
4. AMS Director of
Administration
5. AMS Co-ordinator of
External Affairs.
Nominations for the five AMS Positions will be
received until 4:00 p.m. Wed., January 23, 1980.
Nominations and eligibility forms can be obtained and
shall be returned to the AMS Executive Secretary,
Rm. 238, SUB. Election rules will be available at the
above location also.
The Election for all positions will be held Monday,
January 28 and Tuesday January 29, 1980.
Students wishing more information are asked to
contact the AMS Secretary in SUB Room 248 or
at 228-3092.
Diane Campbell
  Secretary SAC
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
CITR wants 'pay for play' leader
Campus radio CITR's proposal
to hire a full-time station manager
will put the club's control into the
hands of a non-student, a source
close to the station said Wednesday.
The source, who declined to be
identified, said the station has little
staff democracy now, and the hiring of a station manager might further limit student participation in
the station's management. "As it is
now, one person alone decides what
the playlist will be," the source
said.
But CITR president Greg Plant
said a paid manager is necessary if
the station is to operate on an expanded basis. "If we did get the
low-power FM licence it would be
impossible for us to get through the
paper work alone on the present basis," Plant said Wednesday.
(CITR applied for a low-power
FM licence on Nov. 17, 1978. The
new licence would enable anyone
west of Granville St. to listen to
CITR.)
And Plant denied that a station
Education lien in
den ef students
OTTAWA (CUP) — Ontario's
education minister was raked over
the coals Tuesday in an angry bear-
pit session with about 600 bitter
Carleton University students.
And they left dissatisfied with
minister Bette Stephenson's
answers.
"How can you stand in front of
us and defend what you and the
Conservative government have
done to the funding of
universities?" asked one student exasperated by Stephenson's
stonewalling of student questions.
But Stephenson refused to get
angry, despite lengthy cheering and
applause after the question and
re-stated her policies on university
funding.
"We all have to learn to live
within our means," she replied.
"There is not an infinite amount of
money to support all those institutions the government funds. Right
at the present time (funding) will
not meet the level of inflation."
(The government announced on
New Year's Eve that tuition fees
will be escalated 7.5 per cent next
year, while individual universities
have the option of imposing an additional 10 per cent increase.)
Anne McGrath, University of Ottawa student president, introduced
herself in French and then continued: "Now I'm going to switch
to English because I know you
don't understand French. And I'm
not very sure you even understand
English.
"What you call 'modifications,' I
call tuition fee increases, what you
call 'accessibility', I call streaming
and what you call 'challenges', I
call obstacles," she said, referring
to phrases used by Stephenson in
her responses to questions.
The student audience erupted
with several minutes of applause
when McGrath finished.
Another student questioned
Stephenson's claims that the province could not afford to spend
more on education and mentioned
the large profits of a multinational
paper company operating in Ontario.
"It seems to me a good idea to
cut the excessive profits of corporations instead of cutting education
funding," he said. "It seems to me
you and your government are too
damned scared of big business."
"I'm not damned scared of
anybody," Stephenson retorted in
her only show of anger.
Another student charged that giving educational institutes the option
of increasing fees by a further 10
per cent was "nothing but a cheap
and cynical political trick to blame
high fees on the universities."
When Stephenson replied that
the move was in answer to a request
by the Ontario Council on University Affairs, the student asked why
the government only follows some
council recommendations. The
council is the ministry's official advisory body, and has recommended
an increase in education funding
that would cover inflation this year.
But the ministry granted only a 7.2
per cent hike.)
A student also criticized Stephenson for refusing to increase the
weekly living allowance of students
on the Ontario Student Assistance
Program. The university affairs
council had recommended it be increased to $80 from the current
$650.
"How do you expect students to
make ends meet?" a questioner
demanded.
"I do hope we're going to be doing something with it," said
Stephenson, adding that student aid
funds already being provided are
"not inconsiderable."
A representative of the Carleton
engineering students told the
minister the civil engineering
department faces loss of accreditation by the Professional Engineering Association because funding
cuts have reduced facilities and increased the student-teacher ratio.
Carleton student president Kirk
Falconer summed up the feelings of
students after the meeting.
"It's a big crock. The provincial
government has not demonstrated a
real financial commitment to
universities. The fact is that we don
not need more 'imagination'. We
need more money."
manager would remove control of
the station from the hands of the
students. "We would have the final
say over the activities of the station
manager," he said. Plant added
that the manager would be responsible to the Alma Mater Society
through the CITR executive.
The hiring of a station manager
for the radio station would set a
precedent as no other AMS club
currently has paid personnel.
Filmsoc member Peter Leung
said his club does not rely on out
side help in its operation. "We'd be
against someone coming from the
outside to help run Filmsoc," he
said.
Plant said the station manager
would improve the station's day-today operation. "We need something that sounds reasonably professional," he said. "We're competing with the big guys and we
need professional input."
And competing with other local
stations fits in with Plant's goals for
CITR. In the proposal Plant pre
sented to the AMS executive, he
said: "The next major project of
CITR would be to obtain a limited
commercial licence. This licence
would allow CITR to sell air time
for commercial gain."
The student representative assembly recently passed a motion
asking for a task force to investigate
CITR's proposal, and make recommendations on its implementation.
The task force will present its findings to the student administrative
commission, who will in turn pass
the information back to SRA.
— ed o'brlen photo
DEEP IN SUB war gamer John Puddifoot prepares newest edition of student administration commission for historic re-enactment of charge of the lightheaded brigade. Failure of communication, arrogance of leaders and ignorance of troops lend authenticity to modern ride into valley of dearth. While commissioners admire own magnificence, students are left to ponder reason why.
Exam policy sparks controversy
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
Students gained an academic victory Wednesday night as senate approved a motion giving them the
right to see and discuss final exam
papers with their course instructor.
Fiery feel fuels fire with Yule fir
The town of Chapais, Que. might not be the only
place with a match-happy Scrooge on its hands.
A resident of the Gage north tower decided to turn a
cheery Christmas conifer into a fiery fir near the building's elevator shaft early Tuesday morning:
"Someone set a Christmas tree on fire in Gage residence for some strange unknown reason," Wilf Ferguson, campus fire department captain, said Wednesday.
Ferguson termed the incident "a stupid prank"
and said the tree was no longer burning when firemen
arrived on the scene. "The only damage was to the tree
and to the floor around the elevator," he said. "The
fire went out before it could do much damage."
The fire might have caused a great deal of damage
and injury, housing department spokesman Dima Ut-
goff said Wednesday. "Even though the fire was set in
a place which was not conducive to burning, if you
have a fire anywhere long enough, it's going to be
dangerous."
Utgoff said the incident resulted in quick and efficient evacuation from the building. Gage staff banged
on doors and awakened the residents, who escaped
about 2 a.m. in their pyjamas, he said.
Ferguson said no leads to the culprit's identity have
yet been uncovered. "Nobody really knows who did
it," he said. "We haven't been able to track it down
and we have nothing really to go on."
Damage to the building is estimated at $200. The
tree was completely demolished.
"The major emphasis for the motion is that the students want this as
an educational process," said student senator Doug Watts, who
moved the motion.
"I was frankly quite surprised by
the students' reaction to this on a
campus supposedly known for its
student apathy," he said.
Arts dean Robert Will said that
only students who had failed would
want to see their final exam papers
and this could lead to "nasty confrontations".
"We're setting ourselves up for
mitigation. I don't see how it can be
done," he said.
Will added that students would
probably want to discuss marks
with professors in the summer,
when most faculty members are
unavailable.
"This is an extraordinary change
in procedure. I doubt whether it has
any educational value."
But student senator Chris Niwinski said many professors already
practice this policy and added it is
not a great change.
Science dean Cyril Finnegan said
the policy would "leave itself open
to mischievious behavior."
Medicine dean William Webber
said he has only encountered one
problem over final exams in 19
years.
"We should be cautious about
adopting a policy without thinking
about all the implications. There
are cases where it's inappropriate
for students to go over their
exams," he said.
He added there are differences
between educational mid-year exams and certifying final exams.
But Watts said it is a shame a
final exam should be considered only for its grade value.
"The point is to let the students
see exams as an educational process. I'm sorry the faculty feel
threatened by the motion. If you
don't know where you've failed I
don't know whether you've learned
anything." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 17, 1980
SAC pulls crass
double cross
The student administrative commission's members should all be
looking over their shoulders for the next while.
For lightning bolts, that is.
By refusing to give even $200 toward the cost of financing the
festival of religion and the arts, SAC has taken another step toward
alienating the entire campus community.
It wasn't enough that they earlier attempted to make the
festival's orgnizers pay for their room bookings. Now they claim
that free room bookings are their contribution to the event. Keeping in mind that every club is entitled to free room bookings, it isn't
much of a contribution.
And the SAC commissioners have a strange set of values. They
lightly approved a $10,000 expenditure for CITR without the approval of the student representative assembly. Shortly before
refusing the festival's funding, they approved a $1,000 expenditure
for two engineering students to attend a conference in Houston.
But it seems religion isn't one of their favorite things. They won't
admit it, but that's what it looks like. When a similar event was held
five years ago, the Alma Mater Society chipped in $1,000. This
year's petty mandarins are obviously not inclined to be even one-
fifth as generous.
But let's not be too harsh. After all, there have been many events
this term that were much more important and more worthy of support than a crummy religion and arts festival. Or have there?
The term's first concert is coming up tomorrow. And there
haven't been any speakers. Speaking of speakers, didn't we spend
a lot of money on those few we had last term?
When it comes right down to value for the money, the $200 SAC
should have given the festival organizers is a hell of a good deal.
They're offering 42 events for $200 — that's less than $5 per event.
And the list of events isn't exactly a Bible-thumper's dream. A
few religious services are intertwined with the musical presentations and lectures on the relationship between spirituality and fantasy, spirituality and popular music . . . The events the festival offers probably appeal to a greater number of UBC students than any
other organized series of events this year.
But why should SAC support it? After all, what's a few Christians? But there must be an awful lot of them out there. Maybe
even a few of the SAC commissioners have a little faith. As long as
it's not in themselves it won't be misplaced.
The smug SAC mandarins can relax now. It's too late to help the
festival out, so they've got nothing to worry about.
But there are rumors that the commissioners plan to install a>
lightning rod above their meeting room.
'The cold fronts move from the electoral ridings to Ottawa where it makes most
Tories unseasonably hot under the collar."
THE UBYSSEY
January 17, 1980
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
As student apathy reached epic proportions, the dying members of student activism glowed on at the ever-sterling Used-to-be. "Where can you get a decent
Jacuzzi in this one-horse town?" moaned a despondent Heather Conn. "Student like is such a bore," complained world-weary Tom Hawthorn. "With human
offal like Gary Brookfield polluting our fair campus it's no wonder that our alma mater resembles nothing so much as the underside of Ed O'Brien's tongue,"
muttered a cynical Erica Leiren. "Don't worry kids, there's always disco when ya got the blues," squealed the irrepressible Peter Menyasz. Ross Burnett and
Kevin finnegan put down the ether bag for a moment as they attempted to dissuade the once-lovely Julie Wheelwright from apply Mr. Gillette's wares to her
needle scarred arms. Geof Wheelwright came up with anagrams for "despair" while Steve McClure and Glen Sanford found student activism over in the corner
in a bag that was also a damned good pillowcase when you got right down to it. And they did.
By STAN PERSKY
I realize that we must speak no
evil of the dead, but is it okay to say
a few nasty words about the recently-retired?
You've never heard of Jack Parnall, unless you happened to attend
UBC sometime during the last 20
years. Parnall was the registrar of
UBC from 1957 until just the other
day.
Registrars are faceless, but
powerful university bureaucrats.
They're responsible for producing
calendars that tell you what's being
taught and where to take the final
exam. They also make sure that
your name and student number
don't get lost in the computer, even
as you yourself get lost in the hallowed halls trying to find your classroom. And finally, if you haven't
slept through too many classes and,
by some accident, ascended to the
rank of graduate at your Alma
Mater, the registrar sees to it that
you receive a degree, which usually
includes his signature just to make
it kosher.
That's what Jack Parnall's been
doing for a couple of decades. As a
melodious eulogist said on Parnall's
retirement, "John Parnall's name
hangs on office and professional
walls from Bella Coola to
Baghdad." True enough. His name
doesn't hang on my office wall, but
I'm sure it's there on my UBC degree, which is currently stashed with
the rest of the "don't-throw-out-
you-may-need-it-someday" heap of
junk in the basement.
I had run into Parnall about a
dozen times in as many years. On
most of those occasions I was the
student troublemaker wanting some
sacred rule broken (or slightly bent)
and Parnall was the faceless but
Jack, we hardly knew
ye were a bureaucrat
firm representative of institutional
authority dryly informing me that
the rule, irrespective of whether or
not it made sense, couldn't be
broken.
Just the other year he explained
to me why, in the election for university chancellor which he was supervising (I was running against
some timber baron), it was impossible for the candidates to include a
statement saying what they intended to do if elected. The rules simply
didn't envisage such a breach of
feudal etiquette. However, if I wished to go to the such-and-such committee, said Parnall, perhaps the
rule could be modified in two or
three years.
Of course, I never blamed Parnall. It certainly wasn't anything
personal on his part. He was merely
the agent of higher authority —
those bank presidents and forest
moguls who run UBC.
They're the ones who don't want
universities to be places where people debate, act upon and solve the
problems of our declining civilization (they don't mind the debating
part as long as we keep it down to a
dull roar, but they definitely become upset if we- look as though
we're about to rise from our armchairs). In my innocence, I never
even silently accused Jack Parnall
of having a thought about these
weighty and un-registrar-like matters.
When I heard that Parnall was re
tiring, I was perfectly prepared to
let the news go with a quiet sub-
vocal "that's nice," and a reminder
to myself to address future correspondence to his successor, Ken
Young, a somewhat livelier, curly-
haired, motorcycle-riding sort of
registrar.
But quiet old Parnall didn't leave
quietly. Instead, he took the opportunity of. his departure to cast the
last stone. He told us what he
thought of some of those rebellious
youths to whose degrees he had appended his clear, neat signature (he
signed the last 75,340 degrees by
hand as a "personal touch").
Apparently, he was still angry because one UBC president back in
the late 1960s "had been chased out
of here because he tried to deal sensitively and seriously with dissidents
who were just plain frauds. From
the point of view of
administration," recalled Parnall,
"it was a period of sheer annoyance. Students were not really sincere in efforts for any substantial
change that would help society.
They wanted change for the sake of
change. They were vandals."
Little had I suspected the venomous rage that lurks in the hearts of
faceless bureaucrats. They should
retire more often so that we can become party to their inner musings.
Of course, as one of those "fraudulent dissidents," I had to re-examine my conscience. (You remember
what a conscience is, don't you? It's
that metaphysical personal entity
we're each issued that concerns itself with such abstract and almost-
obsolete matters as truth and
justice.)
Well, it was a good time to re-examine one's conscience, since the
trivial, self-centred 1970s (when
students didn't make trouble and
Parnall lived out his term happily)
were ending, and we were entering
an uncertain and ominous decade in
which the spectre of the generation
of the 1960s will again haunt us.
What were those changes-merely-
for-the-sake-of-change that we had
so passionately fought for? Let's
see, we were loudly opposed to an
economic system that resulted in the
starvation of Biafran babies,
weren't we? We wanted that changed (just for the sake of change, of
course). Oh yes, and we opposed
the United States' napalm-and-
megaton-bomb war in Vietnam.
And we didn't like Martin Luther
King or Che Guevara getting
slaughtered for the changes-for-the-
sake-of-change they believed in.
And yes, we were against the oil
oligarchs, the timber tycoons and
profit-maximizing private enterprisers destroying the earth. We
thought it would be a pleasant
change to save the planet.
And finally, much to the displeasure of Parnall, we thought the
university should be changed into a
place where these issues were a relevant  part  of our  education.  Of
course, we were, at times, silly,
over-zealous, rhetorical, and from
the point of view of administration
a pain in the yazoo.
In retrospect, we were probably
also right. Not about everything.
Our demands for student power
were misguided to a degree, but
those demands had only taken
shape because our teachers, who
should have been demanding these
things long ago, had abdicated their
responsibility. Innocently, and not
so innocently, we reminded them.
(As for that university president
who was run out of UBC, as I recall
it, his departure was not a result of
student demands, but occurred
after he called a press conference
denouncing the educational policies
of the Socred provincial government and their university appointees.)
perspectives
Since then, we have had change
for the sake of change aplenty.
New, improved deodorants, oven
cleaners, mouthwashes, cola
drinks, razor blades, cars, fighter
planes, interest rates and the rest of
the cornucopia have been urged and
dumped upon us. Not a day goes by
without thos6 changes for the sake
of change, that Parnall and I so
heartily deplore.
As for those changes for the sake
of humanity — well, those are still
in the works.
Jack Parnall's signature may be
written on many pieces of paper,
but that doesn't mean his name will
be remembered.
Stan Persky is a tired '60s retread
who won't forget. . . and is also a .
. . former Ubyssey staffer. Thursday, January 17,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Park not a fait accompli
We are told, both by the administration and by our candidates
for student government, that the industrial research park proposed for
UBC lands is a "fait accompli", as
planned. I hope not!
I feel great concern over various
issues related to the park, a concern
shared by many other students as
well as Point Grey residents.
My fundamental concern is that
Discovery Park was presented to
the public as a fait accompli. We
were told that the project would
happen (indeed, was happening: the
actual lease is now being
negotiated!), and that it would unequivocally benefit the public.
Yet the public has had no opportunity to provide input into a formal policy governing the activities
that will be conducted at the park.
Indeed, though general promises
have been made on certain topics
(weapons research, encroachment
onto the Endowment Lands), no
official statement of policy exists
which can be used to hold the directors of Discovery Park accountable
to these promises.
Some issues that this policy must
But if
you need
a gidget...
A few thoughts concerning the
proposed research park. To quote
from the student representative
assembly research park committee
statement: "The situating of an industrial research park on the UBC
campus has major implications for
the nature of the university . . .
UBC has been respected as a
broadly-based, independent institute of higher learning . . . the
members of the university community as a whole would be compromising their independent
status."
In real life, there is a continuum
of intellectual activity which, to
take an example, stretches from the
pure mathematician with his
abstract work, to the theoretical
physicist who applies these thoughts
in explaining physical phenomena,
to the engineer who uses an effect to
design a useful device, to the
technologist who may use this
device in some industrial process to
make you a gidgit.
The flow of thought goes both
ways, and its stages are neither well
defined nor easily separated. Not
too long ago university liberals were
decrying our ivory tower attitudes,
(i.e. the attempt to isolate and
elevate the initial stages of the
above intellectual process). Though
the concerns expressed by the committee appear to have substance, it
may be worth considering that such
a park may function as an effective
interface between academics and
another important sector of the
general community. It isn't immediately clear to me that
"business" and "industry" are
four letter words, or that they refer
to corrupting influences.
Randall Woods
graduate studies
Well, it's heartening to see most
students have discovered the
typewriter. Makes it a lot easier to
lay out the letters page. Just a word
to remind you all. The Ubyssey office in SUB 241k has a bevy of
typewriters and everyone is.
welcome to use them, if the need
be.
That is, if you can find one that
works. Mine only writes drivel.
address: architecture and landscape
architecture, (How many stories
will the buildings be? How energy-
efficient? Will the park be surrounded by a green belt?); traffic,
(Will there be light industry as well
as research, implying high truck-
traffic volume? If so, over what
roads? Will bus service to campus
be increased to comfortably accomodate the park staff?); the relationship of the researchers to the
academic university (TRIUMF, the
various practical schools), handling
of high-technology wastes, land
use, etc.
These are not trivial items,
roadblocks set up by someone who
"hates progress"! They are issues
that affect the quality of life for
residents of the Point Grey area,
and the quality and type of education offered at UBC.
Sign  the petition  to  the  UBC
board   of   governors   calling   for
public hearings on Discovery Park!
Arle Kruckeberg
Botany
ARTS PRESENTS
BARCADI NIGHT
Friday, Jan. 18
4:30 - 8:00
Buchanan Lounge
Humm'n Coke, Cheap Bears
EVERYONE WELCOME
CHANGE OF LOCATION
Vancouver Quadra Liberal Association
Nominating Convention
Friday, January 18, 1980
7:30 p.m.
Changed from VanDusen Botanical Gardens
to
Hellenic Community Centre
4500 Arbutus St.
Right Honourable Pierre Elliot Trudeau, PC, MP
Guest Speaker
Careers
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
A Midsummer Night's Dream
by William Shakespeare
with Paul-Emile Frappier
JANUARY 25 - FEBRUARY 2
(Previews — Jan. 23 & 24)
8:00 p.m.
STUDENT TICKETS: $3.00
BOX OFFICE - FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Room 207
Support Your Campus Theetre
TEACHER INTERVIEWS
SCHOOL DISTRICT 88 (TERRACE)
On campus interviews will be conducted, March 10 - 12, with graduating
teachers for positions in the Terrace District effective September 1,1980. Attempts will be made to correlate the interviews scheduled with the number of
vacancies expected in particular subject field and/or Grade levels. To obtain
an appointment, please submit, before January 31, a completed B.C.T.F.
Application form, copies of PRACTICUM REPORTS and a completed
personal resume. References and further reports may be submitted in
January or at the interview.
Mr. M. Bergsma,
Director of Instruction,
Box 460,
Terrace, B.C. V8G 4B5
HELP YOURSELF
FREE SELF-HELP
WORKSHOPS TO
INCREASE YOUR SKILLS
WORKSHOP 1 - Effective Study Habits
Four one-hour sessions on developing
more efficient methods of study.
WORKSHOP 2 - Personal Growth
A small group workshop to help define
personal goals, set plans to reach them
and practice new behaviours with the
support of other interested persons.
WORKSHOP 3 — Assertiveness for Men & Women
Six one-hour sessions to develop confidence and communication skills.
WORKSHOP 4 - Job Search Techniques
Five one-hour sessions aimed at providing
students with information and skills
beneficial in seeking employment.
WORKSHOP 5 — Making Career Decisions
An exploration of the process of making
career decisions.
All workshops commence the week of January 21.
Sign up now since enrollment is limited.
STUDENT COUNSELLING & RESOURCES CENTRE
PONDEROSA ANNEX "F"
THERE ARE THREE STAGES
IN YOUR CAREER
WHEN YOU MOST NEED
FINANCIAL HELP:
1. To get through your graduating year
2. To get into practice
3. If you later branch out on your own
Through its Business Program for Professionals, specifically designed for the graduating student ... the Royal
Bank is there with financial help when you need it.
7 branches conveniently located within the University area
• 10th & Sasamat  .228-1141
• 17th & Dunbar 731-6501
• 2909 W. Broadway 733-8194
• 4th & Balsam 736-7684
• 15th & Arbutus 731-4938
• 41st & Collingwood 263-2308
• Kerrisdale 2208 W. 41st   261-1311
So'don't hesitate to call on your Royal banker for advice or information on
any of the helpful Royal Bank services.
When you succeed . . . we succeed
ROYAL BAN K Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 17,1980
'Tween classes
TODAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Sign up for Wen-Do classes, noon, any day this
week, SUB 130.
Lesbian drop-in, 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
First meeting, noon, IRC 1.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Practice debate on the topic That Love is Free,
noon, Buch. 204.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House
lounge.
PHOTOSOC
An exhibition, 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., SUB art
gallery.
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Reflections of India, paintings from the 16th to
19th centuries, until Feb. 11, Museum of Anthropology.
IVCF
Paul Stevens speaks on Why^People Don't Believe 4And Some Reasons For Faith), noon,
Chem. 250.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Organizational meeting, noon, International
House main floor.
AQUASOC
Pizza party, 7:30 p.m., SUB 207.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Doug Sanders speaks on the early gay movement in Vancouver, noon, SUB 111.
INTRAMURALS
Co-rec volleyball drop-in, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.. War
Memorial Gym
kW&33
AWARDS OFFICE
An awards office representative will discuss student aid, noon to 2:30 p.m.. Speakeasy.
AMNESTY UBC
Letter writing workshop, noon, SUB 224.
UBC BALLET CLUB
Classes resume this week, term fees are due
SUB party room.
NDP CLUB
Alan Bush addresses meeting for election campaign workers, noon, SUB 119.
IYS
Lecture by Dr. Hasham, noon, SUB 117.
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION, ARTS
Lecture by Irving Hexham on Man, Superman,
Son of Man, noon, SUB art gallery.
Strathdees  in  concert,   3:30  p.m.,   SUB  art
gallery.
Strathdees in concert, 8 p.m.. University HH1
United Church.
FRIDAY
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General   meeting,   noon.   International   House
lounge.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
PROGRAM COMMITTEE
Square dance, 8:30 p.m.. International House
upper lounge.
HSSC
Annual bzzr and skits nite, advance tickets $1
from HSSC reps   730pm   to130am, SUB
ballroom
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION, ARTS
Recorder recital by Jim Whittaker and friends,
noon, SUB art gallery.
Ron Reed and Thomas McCay host a music
open stage, 3:30 p.m., SUB art gallery.
SUNDAY
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION, ARTS
Worship, 7:30 p.m., school of theology, Epiphany Chapel.
MONDAY
CCCM
Anglican-United communion,  noon,   Lutheran
Campus Centre.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION, ARTS
Drama with Greg Myers, noon, SUB art gallery.
TUESDAY
COALITION FOR A SAFE CAMPUS
Regular meeting, 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
PRE-MED
Lecture on opthamology by Dr. S. Drance,
noon, IRC 1.
EL CIRCULO
Organizational meeting for club for Spanish people, Spanish students and hispanophiles, noon,
Buch. 352.
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION, ARTS
Jazz and Spirituality with Elmer Gill and group,
noon, SUB art gallery Folk Music with Thomas
McCay, 3 30 p m , SUB art gallery
Help make UBC
campus safer
The Coalition for a Safe Campus
is a group of people concerned
about the frequency of rape and
sexual assault on campus. We are
collecting information about safety
on campus.
If you have any concerns or information regarding problem areas on
campus, please complete this form
and return it to the women
students' office in Brock Hall room
203 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30
p.m., or send it to the women
students' office through campus
mail.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
Hot flashes
Do you have any safety concerns about
on campus?     w ..
Yes Wo
If so, what are they and where?
Do you have any suggestions
for improvement?
areas
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
CLASS OF '80
Written Applications are now
being accepted for:
1. The $4.00 per graduating student rebate for funding of grad composites
and/or functions. The application
must specify:
(a) what your committee will be using the funds
for; '
(b) The funds required;
(c) In the case of composites, submit photographers name, and;
(d) In the case of a Grad function, submit date,
place and details;
(e) Name of applicant and their faculty or department.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS
FEBRUARY 1, 1980
Signed:
BRUCE LARKIN
President
Racommanding products formulated
. by th* Institute of Trichology
Wmmm\
HAIRWORLD
2620 SASAMAT (W Oh AVE. & SASAMAT
224-4912 224-1862
1ST
INVENTORY SALE
OUR LOSS IS YOUR QAIN
Downhill
Ski Bags
10%
Off
Wool &
Corduroy
Knickers
10% off
Flashlites
10% off
Wine Skins
10% Off
Vests
10% Off
Socks
10% off
Sportscaster
Dacron
Ski Jackets
30% off
X-Country
Ski Poles
10%
off
Ground
Sheets
10%
Off
OPTIMUS
77 A Alcohol
Stoves
10% off
Wool &
Cotton
Underwear
10-50% off
PACK&
BOOTS SHOP
BROADWAY,   Tel.   738-3128
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional tines 36c.
Commercial — 3 tines, 1 day $3.00; additional tines
50c. Additional days $2.75 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in ad-
vantx. Deadline is 11:3Q a.m., the day before publication.
PubUcatHtm Offim. Room 24% S&M., UBC, Van.yBvC. V6T1W5
Jobs
NEED EXTRA CASH? Work own hours.
Need 5 P.T. people to help me in my
business. Call Ms. Fetterly at 524-6748.
JOBS!
Lake Tahoe, California!
Little exp. Fantastic Tips. Pay.
$1600-$3800. Summer. Thousands
needed. Casino's. Restaurants, Ranches. Cruisers. Rafting, etc. send
$4.96 for application/info/referrals.
LAKEWORLD 141. Box 60129, Sacto.
CA. 96860 U.S.A.
35 — Lost
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS SPECIALS: Sherwood H12ROK Hockey sticks $4.95; grey
sweat pants $9.95; polyester hockey jerseys
$9.95; racquetball racquets $9.95; bicycle
panniers, $14.95; Wilson World Class tennis racquets $29.95 (strung); grey-colored
down jackets $34.95; Nike LDV Or Osaga
joggers $39.95; Waxless X-Country ski
package $79.50; and dozens of other well-
priced items at 3615 West Broadway,
733-1612.
GOLD BOX linked chain bracelet on Jan. 7.
Very sentimental Christmas gift. Reward.
Call 922-8732.
A   GOLD   BRACELET  on   Jan.   10.   Great
sentimental  value.   Reward.   Please call
Maria at 929-3674.
65 — Scandals
11
For Sale — Private
THE SPARK BOOKSTORE, 25 West Cordova (behind the Army & Navy) 681-7723. We
carry Marxist-Leninist books and periodicals
on the class struggle in Canada and around
the world. We have a limited number of
records and progressive novels in French and
English. Drop in to browse or debate.
Wed.-Fri. 6-9; Sat. 11-4.
IT'S A BIRD, IT'S A PLANE, no, you fools
it's SUPERMAN in SUB Theatre this
weekend. Thurs. 7:00 p.m. Fri., Sat. 6
Sun. 7:00, 9:45.
"STREETS" AND "ORIGINAL SINNERS"
will be at the Fog Show in the Pit on
Monday, January 21 at 8:00 p.m.
80 — Tutoring
85 — Typing
15 — Found
WOMEN'S   BRACELET  in  Wesbrook  on
Monday. Phone Steve, 922-6553.
FOUND A WEDDING RING in UBC Bus
Stop area. Call 266-4433.
20 — Housing
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and accurate.
Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
TYPING. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Fast accurate. Bilingual.
Clemy 266-6641.
YEAR ROUND expert essay and theses
typing from legible work. Phone 738-6829
from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
30 — Jobs
90 - Wanted
DISCOVER FOR YOURSELF
Exams are fun!
Assignments enjoyable!
ADVANCED READING
TECHNIQUES
a one day course
For information Brochure call
266-6119
WANTED, CALCULUS TEXT by Shanks
and Gambill for Math 101 immediately.
Phone 733-4193 GOS.
TENOR SOLOIST
Required for Chalmers United Church, 12th
and Hemlock, Vancr. Excellent opportunity
for young singer. Phone 922-0419 for further
information.	
99 — Miscellaneous Thursday, January 17,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
• ill
s
■"""V
Despite the concerted efforts of a
group of professors, The Ubyssey
will shortly lose its entire sports department.
As it has been threatening to do
since shortly after the Great Trek,
graduation will claim our sports reporters. Both of them. And that
means we are looking for a sports
editor and staff for next year.
Those applying now will have the
inside track on these exciting jobs,
and will receive three months free
training in how to make boring
jocks sound exciting.
Applicants need riot have journalism experience, although a
knowledge of sports is an asset.
Teetotallers with serious intentions
to remain that way are advised not
to apply. An advanced ability to
dodge telephone books while typing
would be a definite plus.
So if those planned 15 units have
dwindled to a scant six, and if even
those  are  dependent  on  a hasty
transfer of your student loan to certain profs' bank accounts, wander
up to SUB 241k, in the northeast
corner of the second floor, and tell
somebody to buy you a beer. Before
you know it, you'll be a sports reporter, just like Jim Taylor.
With luck, though, you'll keep
your hair.
»      *     *
The UBC badminton team has
placed five members on the team
that will represent Vancouver in the
B.C. Winter Games in Kimberley at
the end of February. Cathy Jones
and coach Beryl Allan qualified by
winning the women's doubles in the
Vancouver playdowns on the weekend.
Phil Wong and Lorraine Pepper
qualified by winning the mixed
doubles, while Wong and Len Pepper were runners-up in the men's
doubles.
Upcoming
TODAY
Intramurals
Co-rec volleyball
7:30 p.m., mem gym
last day of registration:
women's bowling night
Women's curling
Junior zone playdowns,
winter sports centre
FRIDAY
Intramurals
Bowling and pizza night,
7 p.m., SUB games room
last day of registration:
men's curling league
Women's basketball
UBC vs. Victoria,
6:46 p.m., mem gym
JV's vs. Victoria,
6:30 p.m., gym A
Totems vs. Capilano,
6:30 p.m., gym B
Men's basketball
UBC vs. Victoria,
8:30 p.m., mem gym
Squash
Black Knight tourney,
winter sports centre
Swimming
UBC vs. SFU,
7 p.m., aquatic centre
Men's ice hockey
UBC at Calgary
Volleyball
UBC at Victoria invitational
SATURDAY
Intramurals
Women's curling bonspiel,
10 a.m., winter sports c'tre
Women's basketball
UBC vs. Victoria
6:45 p.m., mem gym
Men's basketball
UBC vs. Victoria,
8:30 p.m., mem gym
Men's swimming
UBC at Tacoma
Men's gymnastics
UBC vs. Washington,
3 p.m., gym G
SUNDAY
Women's soccer
UBC vs. Retreads,
10 a.m., Maclnnes field
Women's ice hockey
UBC vs. Burnaby "B,"
6 p.m., Kensington
WEDNESDAY
Intramurals
Co-rec inner tube
water polo
7:30 p.m., aquatic centre
Women's indoor softball,
4:30 p.m., gym A
last day of registration:
co-rec snowshoe trip
women's floor hockey I'gue
men's 3 on 3 basketball
The UBC fencing team has obtained the services of Zbigniew
Skrudlik, a Polish fencing master,
as coach.
Skrudlik, who has won two medals in Olympic competition, is a former national coach in Poland and
has trained 109 masters.
Skrudlik lias been hired by the
B.C. fencing association for one
year.
*      »     *
Men's and women's basketball
highlight the sporting events on
campus this weekend.
The Thunderettes and Thunderbirds will be facing the University of
Victoria Friday and Saturday in
War Memorial Gym, with the
women's game starting at 6:45 p.m.
and the men's at 8:30 p.m.
Victoria's women's team is ranked first in the nation and the men's
team third.
The women's junior varsity and
totem basketball teams will also
play Friday night in gyms A and B
respectively. Both games start at
6:30 p.m.
Also Friday night the swim team
hosts a powerful Simon Fraser
squad at the aquatic centre, with the
dual meet starting at 7 p.m.
Saturday at 3 p.m., the men's
gymnastics team hosts the University of Washington at gym G.
Sunday at 10 a.m., for those of
you still coming around from Saturday night, the women's soccer team
will play the Retreads on Maclnnes
field behind SUB.
And all weekend, squash and
curling tournaments will be happening at the winter sports centre.
All sporting events on campus,
with the exception of playoffs, are
free to students with valid AMS
cards.
PAYMENT OF FEES
THE    DEPARTMENT   OF    FINANCE,    THIRD    FLOOR
GENERAL   SERVICES    ADMINISTRATION    BLDG.
WISHES TO REMIND STUDENTS THAT THE SECOND
INSTALMENT IS DUE ON OR BEFORE:
FRIDAY,
JANUARY 18, 1980
APPLICATION
FOR
GRADUATION
Application for graduation cards are now being mailed to students
registered in the graduating year of the following degree programmes: B.A., B.F.A., B.Mus., B.Com., Lie. Acc't. B.Ed.(Elem),
B.Ed.(Sec), B.P.E., B.R.E., and B.Sc. All students who expect to
graduate this Spring are requested to complete and return both
cards to the Registrar's Office (Mrs. Kent) as soon as possible, but
no later that February 15, 1980. Any student in the graduating year
of these degree programmes who does not receive cards in the mail
should confirm with the Registrar's Office that his/her local mailing
address is correct.
Students in the graduating year of all remaining degree programmes,
except Graduate Studies, may obtain their "Application for Graduation" cards from their Faculty Offices. Students on the Graduate
Studies programmes may obtain their applications from their
graduate advisors.
"Application for Graduation" cards are also available in the Office of
the Registrar.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the students to apply
for their degrees. The list of candidates for graduation to be
presented to the Faculty and to the Senate for approval of'
degrees is compiled solely from these application cards.
NO APPLICATION-NO DEGREE
BACK TO THE GRINDSTONE SALE
FOR THE RUNNER .
REG.   SALE     for THE OUTDOORSPERSON	
Saucony Trainer Shoes
45.00
39.99
Saucony Hornet Shoes
39.99
33.99
Saucony Doves
37.95
25.99
New Balance 320
45.00
34.99
New Balance 355
45.99
34.99
Adidas TRX
33.99
28.99
Etonic Streetfighter
47.99
41.99
Pony Sprints (limited sizing)
19.95
14.99
Pony California
27.95
17.99
Brooks Villanova
35.00
29.99
MARATHON rain suits
44.99
31.99
Wigwam Socks
2.50
1.99
REG.  SALE
GORTEX jackets 69.99       54.99
SNOWBIRD vests 59.99       39.99
UBC jackets 43.99       33.99
VIVANT X-country ski package 114.99       99.99
SALE RUNS FROM
JAN. 15 - JAN. 19
9:00 am - 5:30 pm
FOR THE SWIMMER
20% off ALL swimwear!
FOR THE TENNIS STAR
20% off ALL tennis racquets!
Fred Perry Tennis Shoes
ABC
RECREATIONAL
EQUIPMENT
29.99       21.99
at 2 locations
2130 Western Parkway (UBC)
228-0626
or
865 W. Broadway
874-3329 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 17,1980
Kenny makes mark on UBC
By TOM HAWTHORN
It's been a tough year for administration president Doug
Kenny.
Under attack from students for his role in raising tuition
fees and establishing the research park on campus, Kenny has
also had to watch the quality of education at UBC slip further. 	
That slip is the responsibility of
the provincial Social Credit government, which has been chopping at
UBC's budget with a verve it usually reserves for human resources
projects.
And Kenny has not had much
success in saving his university from
the axe of universities minister Pat
McGeer.
As the Kenny administration
faces an increasing amount of criticism from all directions, it has pulled up the drawbridge to protect the
kingdom. But neither the peasants
nor the dukes are backing off.
While this year has been quieter
than some earlier in Kenny's five-
year term as president, 1979 has not
been one of Camelot's best.
Kenny, 56, has also had to deal
with the added burden of personal
the first to admit that the president
must speak to the public to swing
them to UBC's side.
But many campus observers feel
that he is failing, and failing miserably.
Decline in popular support of
post-secondary education has been
one of the dominant trends of the
'70s, and B.C. has been no exception.
So with the government against
him, and the general public in favor
of the government's position, Kenny has been forced to bring the
chuckwagons in a circle to protect
his university.
That strategy has not succeeded,
as continual pot shots gradually
erode UBC's position.
Kenny's occasional forays into
enemy territory have not garnered
KENNY, DOUGLAS TIMOTHY
Public relations
Leadership^
Dealing with
goverment
Relationship with
students
Accessibility to
students
All the president'sjnen
problems, the most serious involving his daughter's involvement in an
automobile accident.
When the subject of Kenny's performance comes up in discussions
with the campus power brokers and
observers, most are eager to discuss
the accomplishments and failures of
his administration. It is from these
discussions that the following
markings are based.
PUBLIC RELATIONS C
Kenny is UBC's most visible
spokesman, with high standing and
a great deal of respect in the community. He is also a very shy, personal individual. And in this period
of insecurity in the university's progress, the two are not complementing each other.
Kenny is concerned that the quality of education offered at UBC is
declining because the university is
not being given sufficient funds to
maintain its old standards of excellence.
Yet he is having a great deal of
difficulty in getting that message
across to the public. He himself is
any great successes. Some of his
campus critics have been silenced by
his efforts, others strongly impressed, but he has still not been successful in the immediate goal: swing the
public to UBC's side in the war
against Socred cutbacks.
"We're not debating fat any
more because that's already gone,"
he told the Vancouver Board of
Trade regarding cutbacks in 1978.
"The imminent debate is over how
many bones are to be removed from
the skeleton.
"I also strongly suspect that governments don't realize just how serious the situation is becoming. The
academic enterprise in British Columbia is being seriously jeopardized."
The words are good, but the response usually isn't. Kenny is an
awkward speaker, clearly uncomfortable in addressing large audiences, and often evasive or unconvincing when answering questions.
"His intentions are good," says
one academic. "It's just that we're
seeing this university's quality slip
away more and more and more.
Kenny isn't stopping the erosion."
LEADERSHIP |S
While Kenny's intentions toward
UBC are good, and his statements
proper, he just doesn't seem to inspire action.
And again, this relates back to
the fact that he's a private man.
His toughest critic is the faculty,
which has been ornery throughout
his term as president.
That conflict is the result of a
more powerful faculty than existed
before Kenny's climb to power.
Both deans and the faculty increased their campus power under the
term of the late Walter Gage.
And the faculty have their own
ideas about the direction of UBC.
Kenny hasn't, and won't, change
that direction.
He knows he should provide the
leadership necessary to get the university back on its feet in the '80s.
He wants to provide that leadership. But he simply lacks the
charisma.
DEALING WITH THE      A
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT
"UBC would be in a lot worse
shape if it weren't for Doug
Kenny," said a former board of
governors member. "He's the only
thing between us and McGeer."
Almost, all observers were
unanimous: Kenny is the toughest
president of B.C.'s three universities when it comes to handling the
provincial government. Simon
Fraser University's George
Pedersen and the University of Victoria's Howard Petch are seen to be
virtual McGeer puppets, lacking the
experience and ability to battle him
on key issues.
Kenny, on the other hand, has
been quite firm with McGeer and
the Socreds, preventing them from
escalating tuition fees astronomically and slashing the budget beyond
the bare bone to the skeleton.
Without Kenny, say his supporters,
universities minister McGeer may
as well be administration president.
RELATIONSHIP    WITH   _m
THE STUDENT BODY IS"
Kenny has about as much
understanding of student criticisms
as Pierre Trudeau understands
Western alienation. He doesn't.
When some students, including
the student representative assembly,
were critical last year of the research
park plan, and accused Kenny's
administration of not bothering to
consult the student body before going ahead with the scheme, Kenny
was totally baffled. He could not
comprehend their demands. I'm
working in your interests, Kenny
told the dissenters, why can't you
accept that and let me get on with
this project.
Kenny fails to understand that
students are as cynical about the administration's intentions as the
public is of politicians. And while
Kenny might have what he feels are
students' concerns, his perception
of student desires and their actual
demands are often not one and the
same.
Kenny's confusion is understandable, especially since no single
body, even the SRA, accurately
represents the abstract nonentity of
"student opinion". But his un-
familiarity with the actions of
bodies like SRA is inexcusable. One
gets the feeling, said one student
politician, that a few students with
access to Kenny's office are able to
influence his perceptions of student
demands.
His office was so confused by
criticisms of the research park
scheme that he literally had to ask
student politicians: "Why, why are
some students opposed?"
And one of the major reasons for ,
that opposition, say the student
politicians heading the dissention, is
that Kenny has a credibility gap
with many students.
ACCESSIBILITY B
TO STUDENTS ■
But while Kenny often fails in
understanding UBC's students, he
has been for the most part available
for research park forums, or discussions with student politicians.
Some observers say they feel Kenny should devote more time to student concerns rather than stroking
alumni association egos.
Yet, when compared to the attitude of many other Canadian
university presidents, Kenny is an
open, pleasant individual, willing to
make an occasional public appearance at student events.
ALL THE b
PRESIDENT'S MEN ■
If Kenny has an albatross hanging from his neck, it would have to
be his three vice-presidents.
Erich Vogt, Michael Shaw and
Charles Connaghan are a major
hinderance to the administration's '
credibility. "They all share the
same kind of temperment, keeping
things close to their chests, for some
reason concealing information they
don't need to," one source said.
"Yon don't build credibility on that
kind of foundation."
And while Kenny has tried to
point UBC in the right educational
direction, his vice-presidents have
failed in interpreting that direction
and the message fails to get across.
It is a .strange fraternity indeed.
KENNY: king takes lumps
as Camelot undergoes
attack
■*»
<V ^
#

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