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The Ubyssey Mar 24, 1966

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Array See
Hender
swim
THE UBYSSEY
general
meeting,
noon
Vol. XLVIII, No. 64
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 1966
CA 4-3916
'Damage in
thousands'
in lab fire
An early morning blaze
burned out a top floor laboratory in the chemistry building
Wednesday, causing damage
estimated in the thousands of
dollars.
The graduate student laboratory was unoccupied when the
fire broke out at 3 a.m.
Fire department officials
said the fire, which destroyed
equipment and fixtures, may
have been caused by spontaneous   chemical   combustion.
• •     •
Heat from the blaze melted
a soldered pipe joint and leaking water spread down the
fourth floor hall.
Three Vancouver fire units
joined the two UBC fire trucks
in the hour-long battle with
the blaze.
All UBC's off-duty firemen
were called in to fight the blaze
bringing the usual campus
complement of four up to 15
men.
• •     •
Chemistry professor James
Kutney said there were no
over night experiments in progress.
He said the laboratory,
used by 12 graduate students
for organic chemistry experiments, was last occupied by. a
student who left at 9:45 p.m.
Tuesday.
"We will not be able to assess the damage until at least
Friday," he said.
• •     •
Kutney said the loss caused
by the fire would probably run
into thousands of dollars.
The graduate students Wednesday began the job of clearing the debris and tallying up
the losses caused by the fire.
Fire department officials are
investigating the cause of the
fire.
Registration
by mail set
for science
By ROSEMARY HYMAN
Science students will play guinea pigs in  a  revamped
registration program next fall.
The program,  enabling stu-
EXAMS ARE NEAR but students still have time to relax on
the lawn in front of the library. Many students ignored
their books and took advantage of the Spring sunshine to
eat their lunch and discuss exams.
Science types to decide
fate of graduating class
An engineer and a physicist will decide the fate of
this year's graduating class.
Art Stevenson, engineering president, has been named
to write the class will, and Daniel Kennedy, honors physics,
will foe class prophet.
Honorary president is engineering dean W. M. Armstrong; honorary vice-president, agriculture dean Blythe
Eagles; valedictorian, Barry Slutsky, law; historian,
Richard McGraw, commerce; poet, Douglas Edgar, arts.
dents to complete advance registration during the summer,
is expected to eliminatte annual registration bottlenecks.
Students will have a provisional program approved any
time after April 15, with confirmation of lecture and laboratory assignments after final
marks and eligibility notices
are sent out.
"We hope to change the
whole registration program
eventually," said Judith Davis,
assistant to the registrar.
"Science is going to be the
pilot project this year.
MAIN PROBLEM
"The main problem in past
years has been trying to get
16,500 students through in the
prescribed time and have them
get adequate advising."
"What the revision in procedure will do is make adequate counselling service available in the spring and summer."
Science Assistant Dean Robert Scagel said the faculty
hoped to complete most aspects of registration before
September.
Advisers have already beer
designated and a timetable f"1"
undergraduate courses would
be posted in the near future,
he said in a letter to Thr
Ubyssey.
SCIENCE PIONEERS
Miss Davis said science was
chosen as the pioneer because
the faculty program offerer.
'ess room for electives, an'1
there -was therefore less neer!
or counselling.
"We can introduce the sys
tern much more easily into this
faculty than into arts," she
said. "It is an easy faculty to
work with."
"Students who don't need
advising can go through registration like clockwork," she
said. "Those who do can see
advisers who should be at the
university at designated times
luring the summer."
OTHER FACULTIES
She said she hoped the procedure could be used in other
faculties "as soon as possible."
'It is not the intention of
the registrar's office to impose
this system on the other faculties. We hope to glean enough
information from this pilot
project so we can turn around
and offer the other faculties
certain advantages.
"But the change can be made
only with the faculty's consent."
Car-jammers
filmed Friday
Crush a-go-go hits UBC Friday.
The British Motor Corporation is sponsoring a contest to
see who can get the most
people  into  a  Mini   Minor.
McGill University in Montreal holds the record with 24.
The CBC will be on hand
to film the contest which will
be held at noon in front of
Brock Hall.
A Pubster team will accept
challenges from all comers.
The winning team will be on
CBC-TV   across   Canada.
AMS GENERAL MEETING TODAY AT NOON
The biggest UBC extravaganza of the year will be held
in the armory noon today.
The extravaganza is the
annual AMS general meeting
and it will feature the entire
AMS council, several hundred
engineers with a tank of
water, a crack team of Ubyssey reporters and photographers, and several thousand of
cheering students.
The purpose of the meeting
is to put several AMS constitutional revisions up for student approval,  and  to introduce the new student council.
AMS president Byron Hen-
BYRON HENDER
. . . he's out
der and treasurer Mike Sommers will present their reports and honorary activity
awards will be presented.
Among the proposed revisions are the elimination of
frosh council representation
and the tightening of referendum regulations.
(See pages 12 and 13 for
complete revisions.)
Engineers will perform the
traditional ritual cleansing
on the new AMS executive.
A quorum of 1,600 students
is required for the meeting.
The history of general meet-
PETER BRAUND
. . . he's in
ings is highlighted by reports
of riot and sabotage.
In 1962, 50 uniformed revolutionaries armed with pistols, rifles, spears, three cars,
a jeep, and a centurion tank
stormed the meeting to set up
a rebel student council dedicated to the abolition of sex.
The rebels conducted a full
scale lunch bag battle with
engineers in the armory and
were defeated.
The meeting in 1964 ended
in a smoke filled chaos when
students planted a garbage
can smoke bomb in the
crowd. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 24,  1966
ECUMENISM?
CHARRED WOOD and broken bottles are mute evidence to the fire which raged in a lab
in the old chemistry building early Wednesday morning. Cause of the hour-long fire and
estimates of the damage have not been determined. Fire officials are investigating. (See
story page 1.)
SUB inquiry prompted
By DAVE WILLIAMS
EDMONTON (UNS) —E. B.
Monsma, chairman of the University of Alberta student
union building, has advised
former 1 ocal sub-chairman
Roger MacAfee to set up a
board of inquiry to re-evaluate
all aspects of SUB planning.
Monsma said in a letter that
the Edmonton students found
the re-evaluation well worth
going through because it ironed
out any remaining problems
and reaffirmed confidence in
the planning commission.
"A second look can only
strengthen good planning," he
said.
MacAfee said the letter was
a joke and he had received no
copy of it.
"This guy just sent letters
to Ubyssey editor Tom Way-
man and AMS president Byron
Hender so you guys could get
me," said McAfee.
In a phone interview Wednesday, Monsma said the letter
had definitely been sent to
McAfee.
He said there had been some
criticism of the union project
there and he decided to have a
second look at the building.
Monsma was responsible for
the petition which brought
about  the   re-evaluation  com
mittee and a student referendum.
Photo show
in Brock link
The Ubyssey photo department decided that links attract.
"That's why we put up our
first annual photo show in the
Brock link," said photo chief
Norm Betts.
The show includes action
photos taken by The Ubyssey's
four photographers on assignment this year.
IMPORTANT   NOTICE
The Book Store
Will Be Closed
All Day
Friday, April 1st
For
Annual Stocktaking
Here's a chance to experience it.  A pilgrimage led
jointly    by   a   Catholic   priest   and   United   minister.
mem.e*     Highlights: visits to  H.Q. World Council of Churches;
^*5»y§k W.C.C. Ecumenical Centre at Bossey: Vatican Secre-
^MffKjii tariat for Christian Unity; Dead Sea Scrolls exhibits,
^4»i_l*v     Holy   Land,   London,   Paris,   Rome,  Athens.
Hogen's Travel Service Ltd.
HAGEN S
736-5651
2996 W.  Broadway
DEAN'S
4544 West 10th Avenue
announces a new
TAKE OUT SERVICE
Phone: 224-1351
TRY THESE UBC SPECIALS
DEAN'S FRIED CHICKEN, Individual Order
3 pieces of chicken, French fries, cole slaw.
Fresh roll     $1-25
BUCKET OF DEAN'S CHICKEN
12 pieces of chicken, French fries.-      $3.60
CHICKEN SNACK
2 pieces of chicken, French fries     $ .75
CHICKEN  IN A BOX
Just chicken — 10 pieces     $2.50
FISH AND CHIPS
2 pieces fish, French fries, cole slaw..     $ .65
FISH AND CHIPS
2 pieces fish, French fries -     $ .55
DELUXE HAMBURGER
Fresh ground beef, served in a bun, with
relish, lettuce, tomato and fried onions,
French fries      $ .70
FRENCH FRIES
Side order-      $ .25
TELEPHONE AHEAD AND WE'LL  HAVE
YOUR ORDER WAITING
IT'S THE SHIRTS at Goldiua
Every eye will be on you this semester,
when you wear any one of Murray Goldman's new
styles, or ail three of theml
Look sharp and cool for
school or social this semester.
Murray Goldman offers
three smart, contemporary
styles ... the British Button-
Down, the Long Point Traditional, and the High-
Collar. (All three styjes
shown by our model.) Along
with contemporary and traditional styles, Murray Goldman offers a wide range of
fabrics and colors, from
dress to sport ... all button-
downs. All Murray Goldman shirts are tapered to accentuate broad shoulders or
large stomachs. And Murray
Goldman features little custom touches, such as shirt
tails, box pleats in back fpr
those who need room to
move, and hanger loops in
the back which serve a multitude of useful purposes
such at attaching balloons or
hanging by your collar out
of a window. Murray Goldman has a style and pattern
for everyone who wants to
look stylish. They even have
a special shirt with, three
different collars ... of
course, they won't sell it to
you unless you have three
heads ... or at least two.
Murrau Goldman
774
Granville Thursday, March 24,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
— norm betts pho.to
HOME EC SHARED most to win trophy for b.est faculty donation to Share campaign sponsored by World University Service. HEUS president Ann Colquhoun cuddles up to award
she accepted on Honrie-ecers' behalf.
INVOLVEMENT NEEDED'
Minister raps church
The church today is too concerned with a return to a
golden age and often ignores
the problems of contemporary
man.
And, UBC Anglican chaplain
Alan Jackson told a Student
Christian Movement audience
Tuesday, "For the Anglican
church it seems to be the Victorian age."
Jackson said man's attitude
to himself had changed since
the 19th century.
'Man understood himself in
a different way then," he said.
"For example he saw God as
giving metaphysical substance
to the British Empire."
Such an attitude is not an option today, Jackson said.
'I would like to see the .Anglican church deeply involved
in the social, political, intellecr
tual and moral problems and
questions which contemporary
men are concerned about."
Jackson was speaking on the
Death of God movement whose
members believe that God has
no relevance for modern man.
"The experience of God's absence is common to most secular men," Jackson said.
"Most modern artists reveal
a world in which God is absent."
Campus
leads to
Conviction    for oantpus
thefts   brought   a Vancouver
man a nine-month prison sentence Tuesday.
Gerald D. Andres, 28, was
found guilty in magistrate's
court of stealing $165 from
coats and wallets from chemistry and chemical engineering
students.
The thefts occurred between
March 12 and 14.
Andres was caught by three
chemistry students March 14,
who held him for police.
UBC Patrol reports only six
stealing
prison
briefcase thefts this year, well
below last years' figures.
Campus RCMP officers report 10 purses and wallets and
two briefcases missing in the
last month.
Commerce student Ken
Roueche and zoology student
Heather Clark are offering $25
rewards for the return of missing notes.
Students should be aware of
the temptation presented by
coats, briefcases and purses
left unguarded, an RCMP
spokesman said this week.
Females scared by snakes
wanted by psychologists
Do snakes scare you, Miss?
Two psychology department assistants are looking for
females who are afraid of harmless snakes.
Idea is for young ladies with this phobia- to participate
in experiments one hour a day from the end of exams
through June.
Pay is $2 per hour.
Interested women should contact Ruth or Chris in
Angus 256.
Jackson was followed Wednesday by N. K. Clifford of
the religious studies department.
Clifford said modern religion
Fosters a separation of man
7ith the world.
The death of God theology,
however,  emphasizes  the un-
eality of God to modern man
-ind  the harmfulness  of  relationship with God.
"God is found nowhere in
human experience," he said.
"This new theology will lead
the church into a totally new
oontext of theological discussion.
"There will be radical
changes in theology, different
from disintegration and disappearance."
The new theology did not
erupt out of nowhere, Clifford
said.
"Its adherents are attempting to rediscover the questions
of the 19th century liberalism."
Three courses
amalgamated
A new course, biology 101,
will be offered next year to all
students interested in the field
of biological sciences.
Zoology head W. S. Hoar
said Monday: "First year biology, botany and zoology
courses will be eliminated in
order to provide a common
first year course for students
of the life sciences."
This course will be the prerequisite for any further study
in the department.
Hoar said in this way stu-
dens will not have to immediately decide in which area
of study they will specialize.
fie expects about 2,000 students will take the new course.
MEETING FRIDAY
Student interest
decides housing
A large scale on-campus co-operative student residence
will eventually be erected at UBC if enough students back it.
AMS president-elect Peter
Braund, treasurer-elect Lome
Hudson, and grad student Jim
Slater met Monday to discuss
the feasibility of co-op housing and to find a firm proposal
to present to members of the
defunct University Students
Co-operative Association.
USCA operated a small off-
campus co-op house until last
year and has offered it's
$25,000 surplus to either UBC
or Simon Fraser, depending on
who submits the best proposal.
Hudson envisages a large
scale on-campus building which
could house several hundred
students.
He said the university will
develop part of the endowment
lands for private enterprise
and the co-op movement could
obtain 45 to 50 acres of it for
the building.
There is also the possibility
of obtaining an interest-free
loan from the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation,
Hudson said.
"The whole co-op housing
concept is dependent on student interest."
to arouse students' interests,
a meeting will be held in the
student council chambers Friday noon.
Braund urged all students
who were interested in the
plan to come to the meeting.
Hudson   said   a   co-op   resi-
PETER BRAUND
. . . wants co-op
dence would provide room and
board at $15 to$20 less than
the monthly rate charged by
the administration.
He said the USCA house
charged only $57 a month before it folded.
"If we had a firm proposal
to present to USCA, we might
get the $25,000,"  he  said.
Hudson said USCA had approached the SFA administration and asked it to bring a
proposal.
"But the idea of co-op housing is that it is run by the students who live there," he said.
— don kydd photo
LIBRARY STAFFERS display one of the 7,000 volumes they
are busy unpacking from 65 tea chests which arrived at
UBC from Oxford, England recently. The books were purchased for $270,000 from a professor at Magdalen College. (See story page 16.) mnnstr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-S24J.
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 1966
"And God fulfils Himself in many ways.
Lest one good custom should corrupt the world."
—Tennyson
=^(
,' s*.'^
To the meet-ing
When we have a march, we need your body.
When we have a referendum, we need your mind.
When we have a general meeting, we need both.
We have to have a quorum — thus the body.
We have to pass some resolutions — thus the mind.
Be at the armory.
We need you.
You need you.
If you're that way, don't let the left-wing weirdie
beardies destroy a great society.
If  you're that way,  don't  let  the right-wing  reactionaries stop the democratization of the AMS.
If you're that way, go for a look at the engineers.
But go to the meeting.
— I.C.
Frosh today ...
Ho hum. Once again the frosh are going to be kicked
off council by a vote at the general meeting.
Ho hum. Same thing every year.
Now. We have some news, however. If the frosh
are thrown off council, one of the most ridiculous and
unjust policy changes ever made out here will take place.
The trend to bigger and better groups is deplorable.
The representation situation is unfair, now. Rehabilitation students get one vote. 50 odd students. Social work
get one vote. Less than 100 students.
So why should the frosh, who have only one vote
for more than 3,500 students, lose what little voice they
have?
And don't come up with the garbage about apathy.
So frosh don't vote for their president. Neither do,
for example, education students or arts students. Neither
of these faculties had more than 10 pet cent of the
eligible voters out to the polls. Education didn't even
have an election.
What is important is that the channels of communication are open.
Even if at present they're not used, bent, or plugged
with socks and old love-letters, at least they are in a
state where they can be re-vitalized if the AMS should
ever capture the imagination of all its members.
Finally, the frosh will be around here for the next
few years — or at least some of them will.
Many of the decisions made and policies determined
will affect them, and not the upper-year student leaders
of the undergraduate societies they are to be crammed
into if they are bounced out of the AMS.
So their voice is a vital one.
As well as fresh.
— I. C.
"W/WS"" ■>'* "*/«' „"/'" *'■ ' w' " '.' T"*t -*'.'> •*% * <
sniTOB. T„~ wnu_n. Carol     Wilson     tried    to     make
EDITOR. Tom wayman vertical    thing's    horizontal    while
News    _            Ron Riter CBC   types  wandered  around   im-
Asteeiote George Reamsbottom ?™sse*;   Jim   Go°d   !nUCk   ir°^d
p.                                     ■            .           ., the     library     and     Anne     Bishop
City Al Donald made    sense    of    nonsense.     Bert
Photo   Norm Belts Hill   doesn't  like   fire   stories   and
Sports -_     Ed Clark her   sister   doesn't   want   to   lose
A._'» N.w.                           [>„„ M..II— J°an  Fogarty  talked  to God  and
Ats t News                            Dan Mullen nobody     phoned     Balf.     Williams
Richard Blair, Robbi West wrote   and   wrote   and   wrote   and
Ass't City               Danny Stoffman Blackie had to leave. Pat What's-
Page Friday John Kelsey hisname    sat    on    the    desk    and
„ "      .      '                         i      /■ tried   to  be  everybody s  friend.   Al
managing  Ian Cameron Donald   was   never   around   when
Features      Mike Bolton he was needed. Val Zuker worked,
CUP                             _        _    Don Hull to°-   Also   Fearon   Whitney.   From
photo: Powell, Kurt and the Kydd.
mm
FANTASTIC
REDUCTIONS!
*0FFf*
FANTASTIC
REDUCTIONS!
LETTERS TO
Holy joke! Ian fans protest!
Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir:
I agree with Prof. Tomkins
that Ian Cameron has at
times written some pretty
juvenile tripe.
But why does he have to
pick on one piece of his, on
laying eggs, which does have
a bit of decent humour about
it?
I doubt if Mr. Cameron
really expected it to be taken
seriously.
NORMAN THYER
Asst. prof.. Physics
IN  THE  EAR
'EGGY-POO'
In regard to G. S. Tom-
kins' letter I can only say it
is a relief to find irony is still
a viable media for humor.
At least I trust Tomkins
writes satirically, otherwise
my fear for my friends in
education is indeed warranted.
It seems they are in the
faculty of education with no
faculty for education.
For the religious, the fact
that God made man in such
a way that nine month pregnancies are necessary proves
beyond a shadow of a doubt
that God is both inconsiderate
and has one hell of a sense
of humor.
GORDON B. ALEXANDER
For
MORE LETTERS
SEE PAGE 5
BY IAN CAMERON
Wots that? Burn babies?
I met another friend yesterday. (I hope he doesn't cause
me as much trouble as the last
one did.) It would seem that
he's been studying.
"How's it going, Ron?" I
asked.
He stared at me and opened
his mouth.
"Ron Smith, 4658641. English 200. Swift was one
of England's
greatest satirists, not because of the
things he had
to say, but
the way in
which he said
it. Some of
his   works
• • ." CAMERON
"Hold it," I said. "I was
wondering what . . ."
"... were actually taken
seriously when they were first
printed. People wrote . : ."
'Uh, look, uh, how's your
girl friend doing?" I asked.
". . . letters to editors demanding that his work entitled "A Modest Proposal for
the Fattening of Irish Babies
to be Roasted and Served on
English Tables" be banned as
toeing in toad taste and not
fit . . ."
"Ron, I don't think that I'm
really interested, and I think
you've got that title wrong,
and . . ."
". . . for reading by anyone
of upstanding moral character. Some people called him
foul minded and others said
they thought he was insane.
One man wanted Swift ..."
"Ron, I think you're beating a dead horse, and I think
that your facts are wrong.
No-one . . ."
". . . to be put in prison be
cause of the influence he
might have on children. Actually, Swift was a model person with children, and the
thoughts that he gave to children were not the ones that
readers found in the satirical
tracts and books that . . ."
"Ron." I said, "no one ever
took Swift as a straight
writer. They knew he was a
satirist, and . . ."
"... reflected his thoughts
on politics and public morality and that have come to be
a  standard   form   of  writing
it
'Well, I'll see you around.
But I still don't believe that
anyone could take such obvious satire seriously."
Well, after all the work he's
put in, I hope his profs appreciate his stuff.
.«« ft Aitf. A ft **■#
*--"*   I.-*.'  ."■*  *.'_."*'»   * '*   *   * '■»   * 'J Thursday, March 24,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
Here's a little graft for you'
Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir:
Thank you for your generous editorial of March 8.
I like being a popular hero.
For your interest I am sending you a copy of the history
of the Library we recently
published.
At this time of year I don't
really expect you to read it,
but perhaps you'll find time to
admire the pictures.
BASIL STUART-STUBBS.
University Librarian.
Ed. note: The history,
"Scrapbook for a Golden Anniversary", is an 80-page history of UBC library now on
sale at the bookstore for $2.
There are 24 pages of pictures. One of them, the UBC
library in 1925, is reproduced
below.
'FLY RIGHT
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
An open letter to Dr. Malcolm McGregor:
Dear Sir:
At the University Clubs
Committee awards banquet
last Thursday, you were
quoted as saying the following (on the participation of
students in the administration):
"I pay $116 to Air Canada
to take me to Regina and back
tout I don't go up to the pilot
to tell him how he should run
his plane, even though his
actions concern me. Why
should the student participate
in the administration ?"
To carry this rather childish analogy a step further,
would you still not tell the
pilot how to run his plane
if he started to do loop-the-
loops or if he decided that it
would .be better for you to go
to San Francisco instead of
Regina?
Certainly you do not tell
the pilot how to run his plane
. . . but this is because you
know he is taking you where
you want to go and in the
manner in which you want to
get there.
The pilot is submitting to
the needs and desires of the
passenger, and if these needs
and desires were not satisfied,
both the pilot and the airline
would be out of business.
Similarly, the university
student wants to be able to
get where he wants to go and
in the manner in which he
wants to get there.
If the administration insists
on imposing its authority on
the students (and professors)
. . . i.e., if the administration
itself does not differentiate
between "freedom" and "licence" except in those not
sanctified by an administrative position, it is only reasonable that the students have
some say in how the university is run.
If the administration would
admit that this thing we call
"society" is dynamic and If
it would then strive to meet
the needs of the students
rather than to "meet the needs
of our society" (a cliche implying some kind of permanence), I am sure that the students would no longer be concerned with participating in
university administration.
PETER R. COLES,
Education III.
•      •      •
'WATCH IT!'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I wish to bring to the
awareness of students in residences the dangers in not
rousing one's self-sufficiently
before venturing to the cafeterias for breakfast.
Just last Tuesday morning
(March 16) Lower Mall residents sadly witnessed the
product of long hours of
studying and early arousal.
A misfortunate student,
stumbling through the queue
with groggy head and mal-
focused eyes accidently placed
two glasses of juice on his
tray — this not escaping the
keen surveillance, of the four
foot (in height) dietician affectionately nicknamed "Hawk-
eye."
With much concentration he
managed to grasp such words
as "juice," 'juvenile," 'immature," "give"? etc.
Still in a fog he extended
his hand with the glass of
juice, half-expecting his hand
to strike the wall beside his
bed and fall back on his pillow, this poor mal-coordin-
ated boy placed the juice
glass in the palm of the hand
in front of him, not realizing
that that palm was a product
of his mal-foous.
He missed (somehow he
missed by 15 to 20 feet).
The dietitian, perceiving
the glass of cool, freshly-
drawn milk, proceeded to
rouse this misfortunate lad by
direct application to head and
face regions.
Realizing the value of this
method, the lad wiped the
milk from his eyes, grasped
his second glass of juice, and,
not having completely regained his coordination, poured it on the dietitian instead
of himself. Poor thing.
At last coming to his senses
the student realized what had
happened and clasped his
hands to his face in horror
(this leaving the tray without
support, it went the way of
the apple) and fled.
So students, for your own
health and the glory of
SOMM Soc, don't toe having
your lights on all night.
M.R.S.S.S.
\
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FIRST ANNUAL
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KlNOLy? THRIFTY? ASCETiC? [
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For Someone Special
Phone AM 1-7271
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5555 W. Blvd.
MICHELANGELO
ANTONIONI
Staffing
umurnnmuawm
Antonioni in Color
Red Desert is at once the most beautiful, the most simple and the most
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so prodigiously gifted that he can marshal a whole new vocabulary of cinema
to reiterate his now-familiar themes.
The new element of Antonioni's art it
color.
0
TIME. FEB. 19, 1963
2244730        Start*
4375 W. 10th     Today
Mamooks Office Closes
FOR THE TERM - FRIDAY, MARCH 25
We will try to do any emergency orders received after
this date. They can be phoned into the office at noons.
Dm yetting married'..
CONSULTANT,  MR. R. YACHT,
Please forward a copy of your wedding
invitation album to.
Name 	
Address	
™CARD SHOP
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE — 1966
Effective September 24th, 1965, to April 15th, 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS
SUNDAYS
(Beginners & Preschool Children)
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m:**
12:45—2:45 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
*    Special student admission: 15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — No. 19 & 20.
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled.
ADMISSION: Afternoons    —    Students 25c    Adults 60c
Evenings    —    Students 50c    Adults 75c
Skate Rental 35c per pair — Skate Sharpening 35c pair
For further information: Call 224-3205 or 228-3197
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
General Meeting
TODAY 12:30
Armouries
AGENDA:
Minutes of General  Meeting  Last Year
Honorary Awards
President's and Treasurer's Reports
Constitutional Revisions
Others
"ONE OF THE MOST
BEAUTIFUL
MOVIES EVER
MADE!"
-Life Magazine
METRO-GaDWYN-MAYER presents ACARLO PONTI PRODUCTION
DAVID LEAN'S FILM of boris pasternaks
DOCTOR ZIIi\\< .<>
STARRING _. ■
GERALDINE CHAPLIN -JULIE CHRISTIE TOM COURTENAY
ALECGUINNESS • SIOBHAN McKENNA ■ RALPH RICHARDSON
OMAR SHARIFiaszhivagoi ROD STEIGER ■ RITATUSHINGHAM
SCRCEN PLAY BY CXRECTEO BY
ROBERT BOLT- DAVID LEAN in panavision' and metrocqlor
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Starts
Thursday Evening
April 7,. 8:00 p.m.
STANLEY
Granville at 12 th Ave.
Schedule of
Reserved Seat Performances & Prices
EVENINGS 8:00 P.M.
MATINEES 2:00 P.M.
(Wed., Sat., Sun.  &  Holidays)
Loge      R. Orch.       F. Oreh.
EVENINGS $3.00      $2.50       $2.00
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EXTRA MATINEES DAILY
APR. 8th Through APR.  17th
Mail self-addressed, stamped
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envelope with your cheque or money
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must include bank exchange.
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™ •■■» ■■■»■» ■■■■l-i-MIMHHam .__■__> ■■___ fe-__H___n  HMMM«MI__HHMHila-_ll____IM_atM«____lV Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 24,  1966
MORE FOREGROUND
Ian remembers those meets —
packed with nostalgia, hot air
By IAN CAMERON
"Cameron," says my editor,
"In order to revive your good
name, which has been besmirched by that letter, and
in order to say good-bye to
your fans, and mostly in order
to fill up a page that I haven't
got any material for, write
a long story on the general
meeting."
Well, there have been some
beauties.
The first year I was out
here the Ubyssey editor was a
fellow named Roger McAfee.
At the general meeting that
year they tried to tank him.
Out the door went Roger.
After him went the engineers.
He went into the pool, but
several chunks of his flesh
stayed under the engineers'
fingernails.
He just couldn't understand
why they threw him in. "I
just can't understand it," he
said.
Next year I didn't see too
much of the general meeting,
because the whole thing was
obscured by the toilet paper
used to mummify AMS president Doug Stewart.
People stayed away from
that particular meeting by
the thousands. The armory
was empty, while the caf, the
Brock, and the Campus Cupboard (remember that?) were
full.
Next year, AMS president
Malcolm Scott got up and har-
rumphed his way into the biggest farce ever presented at
UBC.
People   left   all   over   the
IAN CAMERON
. at a stunt in the old days
place. And there wasn't a
quorum. Again.
Nothing got done.
The referendums were left
unratified.
The only light shed on the
meetings was brought by the
engineers, who presented
Scott with several copies of a
particularly revolting picture
that the AMS had purchased
for $1,500.
Last year, when some fellow named McAfee (was it
only last year?) was President, he was presented with a
loving CUP which read TO
ROGER WITH LOVE FROM
ROGER.
Appropriate, but it didn't
get much done.
Neither did the recipient.
General meetings at this
campus are a farce.
BAD BOYS
RAGGE SHOPPE
Things to come
• Seude Bikinis
• Lederhosen
. . .cord, velour
& leather
• Leather Honda Hikers
Fall in and we'll bother you
with some other bad items .
Mel and Bry
Bad Boys Ragge Shoppe
315 Seymour
Whatever became of:
Nero C. Caesar,
CLASS OF '57?
Whenever conversation on the campus
turns to music, someone is sure to mention
the name of Nero Claudius — the man
with the golden lyre. No other virtuoso
on this difficult instrument has ever come
close to the renown achieved by this boy
from Antium. In his formative college
years, Nero was something of a traditionalist, but at his apex he came very
close to what moderns call "Le Jazz
Hot". Those of his contemporaries and
relations who survived the era he dominated — and they are regrettably few —
recall that in his final phase he was
strangely preoccupied with torch songs.
His career reached its peak in Rome in
a blazing performance of his famous lyre
solo against a trumpet obligato by a
group of cats known as the Praetorian
Guardsmen. Rome was never the same
thereafter.
Borne wasn't rebuilt in a day. Safe, steady
saving at the B of M is the surest way to
build your finances. Open your B of M
Savings Account today.
Bank of Montreal
COMACU* "JiMt S«AtA
THE  BANK THAT VALUES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS
Your Campus Branch:
The Administration Building:      G. F. PEIRSON, Manager
COUNTRY-WESTERN
BLUE GRASS
RICHARD & JIM
TILL MARCH 26
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For the Person Who Reads and Uses
BIFOCAL LENSES
These can now be obtained at a price within everyone's
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Then check with London Drug Ltd. Optical Dept. You will
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Complete with optical prescription ^T    H        ^m ^^
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QUALITY IS NEVER SACRIFICED
AT LONDON DRUG OPTICAL DEPT.
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imini
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Phone 681-6174
OPEN MONDAY TO SATURDAY 9 A.M. to 5:30 PJN.
FRIDAY NIGHTS TIL 9 P.M.
Mail Orders Receive Our Prompt and Careful Attention
■_■■■___■_■_■__-_-____-_ Itidgat T«ms AvoUobt* ■■■■■■■■i NATIONAL   FLESH
VOL.: (CENSORED) NUMBER: DIRT
IT COMES WEEKLY
POINT GREY SIN BIN
sub sinks,
mud flees
SEX AND SIN are going on just about everywhere. All the enterprising
young deviate- has to do is keep his eyes and ears open. For the story of how
this young couple found an evil in paradise of sensual pleasure, see page 4.
By WRONG WRITER
Little Petey Btawn was
nearly eight today.
All year long, he had
pestered his parents about
when his birthday would
be.
His mother, a punctual
woman, primily said,
"Petey, you were born at
2:18.31 p.m. on March 24,
1958.
"You'll be eight at 2:18.31
p.m. Thursday," she said
punctually last week.
Little Petey, an anxious
boy, wanted his birthday
presents early in the morning. He told National Flesh
reporters he could not wait
for 2:18.31 p.m.
Little Petey, at exactly
10:45.07 a.m. (EST) took
the toy sub he got from his
loving mummy and daddy
across the road to his
friend's house where there
was a large puddle to sail
it in.
It molested him. Time
stopped.
The National Flesh learned today his parents are
reportedly suing the puddle but it seems to have
left the country.
WEE PETEY
. . . swims
Late
FINAL
• • •
Bloodlettings inundate campus
By BARRY BOOKREVIEW
Flesh And Blood Reporter
Today, quite a lot of hit-
;ings, killings, and slayings
shocked the bloodshot UBC
.ampus.
Home economics instructor
Mrs. Mary Lee O'Pea, for example, was knifed, so very
cruelly, while demonstrating
the stirring up of consomme
rice.
•      •      •
The knife went through Mrs.
O'Pea's liver, observers said,
causing blood to redden the
rice.
Student Doreeen Burke was
in tears after the incident.
TThe blood made the rice
all red." she sobbed. "Oooh. I
hale red rice. And I had been
really looking forward to starling consomme studies."
• •      •
Police found Mrs. O'Pea's
liver and bits of bladder in the
rice.
Home ec officials said new
rice would be obtained for the
next consomme class.
• •      •
A hard bashing occurred in
Dr. Sergi O'Shaughnessy's Slavonic Studies 401 class in
Buchanan Bldg.
Bashed was slav Bervin
Kaminshki.
Kaminski, a Commie suspected to be not only pink, but
to have red-oriented associations, had maligned economic
prerequisities.
He was hit right in the re-
BERVIN KAMINSKI
. . then his brain fell out
taliation by a suspect who
fled.
Blood spurted from the top
of his head, sloshing Sergi.
A small lump, probably the
Slav's brain, popped out, striking student Elsa MacFee.
"I look the lump home as
a souvenir of Bervin," she told
police. "Myself and Bervin
were close — although quile
respectable."
Blood drippend even in the
office of The Ubyssey, a campus sheet.
Editor-in-chief Tom Wayman
sharply needled editor Dan
Mullen, a Canadian.
"Mullen, I suspect you of
distorting and suppressing
news." needled Wayman.
Mullen, sorely punctured,
bled. VIRTUAL SLAVERY HERE
DARK IN SHADOWS
Press oppressors crush human dignity flat
By NELLIE HAM
The dark shadow of scandal hangs heavily today over
the whitewashed facade of the
brand spanking new Specific
Press building high on the
lush banks of False Creek
heights.
Specific Press, not yet clear
of last week's charges it got
the choice building site dirt
cheap through graft with a
Liberal zoning board, reeled
under new charges hinting at
shoddy moral practices and
unscrupulous scruples.
•      •      •
Haunted by phantom ISU
(Inter national Scatalogical
Union) men, and rumors of
washroom phantoms on the
third floor, Specific Press officials refused comment on
the charges.
"Splutter." spluttered greying, distinguished publisher
Stuart X. Establishment, senatorial hopeful.
vWhy  don't they  leave  us
(EARTH MOTHER ON LAM from specific press building, snapped by intrepid, accurate Flesh reporter.
alone? We can't help il if the
papers   are
mechanical
late.   We've
difficulties."
got
• * •
He refused further comment, but your National Flesh
reporter learned late yesterday the "mechanical problems"  centre around an  un-
Flesh finds
counterfoil lam!
to nip Nip
infiltration
oiled slot that keeps slipping
out of gear.
The moral turpitude
charges cited by critics concerned pressmen taking belts
in the composing room.
• •     •
Hundreds of feet of belt
for the new high-speed Val
W a r t e n presses have been
stolen, but as a suspect ISU
man confided to me, "What
the hell, the belts didn't
work, either."
Specific Press mingling editor Urwin Swingate denied
Slave labor was being used
to power the building's heating plant.
"Goodness gracious, no,"
Swingite said. "We're using
copy boys, ex-Tory cabinet
ministers and Vancouver
Strife moonlighters. We pay
them well, they're not slaves."
• •      •
Inquiries, however, determined Swungoot's definition
of "good pay" amounted to
all the torn newsprint the
power-plant boys could take
home each week.
With the newsprint worth
$140 per ton, the more than
20,000 tons lost every week
on the efficient presses
amounts to $7,000 for each of
the 400 power-plant workers.
Asked about this figure,
composing room manager
Slats Flattery stubbed his
running shoe in the ground
and whined: "It's not the heat,
it's the humility.
"If people around here
were less humble, the web
wouldn't break all the time
and we could cut our newsprint loss to 10,000 tons a
week."
• •      •
Flattery sniffled, hitched
up his canary yellow cutoffs and went back to work,
his chartreuse burlap sports
jacket blinding ISU men in
the room.
National Flesh learned today that Specific Press scribe
Simmer Up has developed a
system for getting rid of
waste newsprint.
"Burn it." she cackled.
"Burn it. I've got friends who
love fires more than my pet
ghost loves  firewater." .
• •      •
LATE FLASH: Just as NF
was going to press, it was
learned Specific Press has
been traded to singer Bong
Crassby in return for the
front half of Mix Ring's race
horse George Yellow.
V.ucuuvcr. B.C. Iiul not on Wt'-iit'siliiys wlion w- gu lu (ho Y.
By RON LILY
We thought we licked the
yellow nips in '45 but we were
wrong.
Dead wrong.
And that's how we might
end up if the 20-year-old plot
discovered Wednesday by the
National Flesh works—dead.
Back in 1945 a group of discontented interned nips decided they had had enough of
w h i t e y ' 'domination''. Now
everyone knows whites are always fair and never discriminating.
But, as the National Flesh
learned, these cracker-eaters
started raising their yellow
offspring with one aim in
mind: to take over the world.
And they've started. In recent years, much to the outrage of decent god-fearing
whites, they are infiltrating
the ranks of power.
They are surrounding us
with   their   beaming   yellow-
stained faces, pacifying us with
their complacency, and all the
while quietly chanting their
slogan: from cookie to commissar.
And as the National Flesh
learned Wednesday they have
come a long way in their insidious campaign. They are
entering our schools by the
thousands, in order to brainwash our beloved children —
the hopes of our country.
They are undermining our
great and glorious civilization,
no one is safe in these perilous
times.
However, the National Flesh
learned today that a group of
concerned whites have taken
the initiative and started a
combat organization — Never
a Nip Shall Rule.
Their first project: to take
every box of Quick-Nips off
every shelf of every supermarket. The producers will go
broke.
earth mom runs
p. 2 pix
Sex, sin everywhere
—see p. 1 pix
Lots of Fun in Sun
Slot man Pivoting
P-Ki- 7
Keep Incest
In the Family
Y'all Come? Nope,
Just Breathin Hard
Page  I
-P9l^_fl!_K^l__fiJ^
SEIZURE SEEKS BELLY-BUTTONS
Boy Wonder with the
shirtteu cuff Alex Mac-
Gee attack! a mound
of soggy lettuce (top)
(bottom) with abject
glee.
Seizure relaxes Friday!!
You better buy one SEX-SADISM SCANDAL!
Residences rocked!
BEATEN, BRUTED, PERVERTED, SHOCKED CO-ED
. . . getting band-aids at Westbreak
Bruted, perverted
co-ed found down;
powers threatened
By BOILED AS A BOOT
Flesh Slum Reporter
A sex-andi-sadism scandal rocked residences today and threatened to overturn
dormitory powers-that-be.
The scandal broke when campus RCMP
found a girl lying by the roadside near Fort
Slum late last night.
"I wouldn't like to say exactly what was
wrong with her, but she was certainly in sad
shape," said a police spokesman.
The girl related a tale of brutality and
perversion unequalled in residence annals.
"It certainly bea^s anything I've ever
heard," the cop said, scratching his left ear.
The girl was taken to Wesbreak Hospital,
where she was reported to be under heavy
sedation.
Contacted by National Flesh reporters, her
parents were shocked and upset toy the news,
♦batoolish-   w yfitrope
"We've always trusted our daughter to do
what's right." wept Mrs. P. R., of Kelowna.
"She told us when she was pregnant; she
didn't even try to hide all the other things
she did. Why would she hide a thing like
this?"
BODUED AS A BOOT
... on Slum scene
"M m-m-nn-m," said residence head Malcolm McGreek, when informed of the scandal. "At least it keeps students out of the
university administration.
"The Greeks had a word for it," he
smirked.
Exclusive National Flesh sources reported
some 297^ resident students were involved
in the smutty sensation.
"The half was a bad mistake from early in
the game," the source commented.
NF EXPOSES SHAMELESS SEXUALITY
RAMPANT IN GIRLS' DORMS, P.E.H
By   HELEN   COVERR
NF Bloke Reporter
Doodling in the Dorm?
Yes, and what's more,
there's Preverts in P.E.!
National Flesh has once
again been called upon to expose life as it really is.
This time we have gone to
UBC to investigate rumors of
rampant lesbonature raging
across the campus. Incidents
of shameless sexuality are
taking place in such allegedly innocent educational activities as  physical  education.
For example, the girls in
P.E. indulge in sports involving bodily contact; they have
showers together (in the
nude ! !) using the same bar
of soap; they even dance together under the pretense
that there are no available
males to dance with. (See picture.)
The dormitories are an even
greater breeding ground for
lesbonature. Here the girls
eat, bathe, and SLEEP together, all without faculty supervision.
Think of two girls spending months together in a tiny
cubicle where there is no
room to move without touching; then think of the fact
that these girls do not move
out of residence, and the only
conclusion can be that they
enjoy this close physical contact.
Rom-mates have even been
known to scrub one another's
backs in the bathtub!
National Flesh interviewed
several co-eds and the administration this week about their
feelings on this subject.
Second-year physical education student Wilma (please
call me Willy) C. said:
"Oh. I just can't wait to go
out to the schools and teach
those lovely  girls  everything
I've   learned!"
A fourth-year student of
the   same   faculty   expressed
The   administration   had
little to say about the lesbian
situation at the university,
her feelings in the statement:
"I know my enjoyment of
university is due lo the many
friends I have made among
the girls in my faculty; they're
so friendly, and this friendliness has helped me through
many of the . . . um . . . prob
lems  I had when  I came  to
UBC."
The girls in residence offered such remarks as:
"I don't know what I'll do
without my room-mate next
year. I've never been this
close to anyone before."
Another co-ed said:
"I haven't had any problem with the girls in my residence, but my boyfriend is
being a real drag about taking my girlfriends with us on
dates."
PERVERT ATTACKER
. . . from cops' sketch
One faculty member said:
"Well, I feel that the students here are old enough to
choose their own friends; and
besides, some of my best
friends are homosexuals!"
. REDSHIRTS QUEER, TOO
Loveseat outlay critic hit
by riding crop goon squad
By
WHIPLASH McGASH
NF Crop Reporter
DORM GIRLS TAKING P.E.
. . . getting ready for showers
Homosexuality is expected
to run rampant in UBC's
engineering faculty.
Cosmopolitan AMS council
hardly batted a collective
eyelash Monday night in passing a motion approving a $139
grant to the engineering
undergraduate society to help
pay for a pair of love seats
for the EUS common room.
Only science undergrad society president Brown Williams rose to speak indignantly against this insult to moral
decay.
"Since engineering is an
all-male faculty, we would
be contributing to homosexuality."
Engineer Jim Lighttouch
rose and lispingly objected:
"On the contrary, we are
merely promoting inter-faculty relationths."
Through the chorus of approving    chuckles,    a   husky
voice suggested Williams be
punished for his attempt to
block the motion.
As if on a pre-arranged signal, doors at the ends of the
council chambers burst open
to reveal several heavily-
built men and women.
Their leather boots shook
the floor as they strode over
to the hapless Williams' chair
and began to beat him with
short  leather riding crops.
At this point a National
Flesh reporter and photographer were ejected from the
meeting before they could
protest brutal beating.
A panting councillor turned
his attention away from the
perverted spectacle long
enough to order a burly ser-
geant-at-arms to "Get those
journalists out of here before
we have to whip them, too."
Both Flesh staffers. struggled violently in the grasp of
the guard but were unable to
incite him to anything more
than a healthy kick when he
deposited them on the floor
outside the chamber. GERDA GOIN'  A-CLUBBIN'  with the
whipper.
NF goes undercover
-where the action is
By RENOIR BALFAC
When giving young men back rubs, don't
rub too low — it's, ah, upsetting for them.
Other details, as pried out of reluctant
nurse trainer Emma R. Nuerolog, read like
this:
Never lean over a bed so that you touch
the horny young patient — it's, ah, upsetting for him;
Don't bend over with your back away
from the patient. It shows too much leg,
and, if you're within reach, proves — ah —
tempting for the horny young patient;
Make sure the patient keeps BOTH hands
on the bed, and preferably under the
covers, when you're near the bed. Waist-
high beds and, ah, thigh-high hands prove,
ah, tempting to the horny young patient.
The final instruction gleaned toy your
NF reporter: "If all these moves fail, and
Hot time
in club
~ Gerda
A NIGHT
MADE ME
By MRS. KOOT
Flesh Family Kid
Gerda confessed she spent a ni^ht in
UBC's faculty club.
Gerda divulged her closely guarded
secret to National Flesh in an exclusive
interview Wednesday.
"That was one of the hardest night's
work I ever did," she said.
"I do not feel I was paid enough for the
services rendered," Gerda said, "but it was
back in 1946 and I was relatively inexperienced then.
"I was 11 then."
"From UBC's faculty club Greda went
east where she moved in higher whirls.
"The experience I gained at UBC was
a capital asset in Ottawa," she said.
"You might say my night in UBC's faculty club made me," she laughed.
When asked how she happened to come
to UBC she said she had been hired for only
one night and did not at that time think it
would lead to a permanent (oops) career.
"I was hired as a whipper because the
regular whipper was ill," she said.
"When at last Spud had been whipped I
found that dinner was over, everybody had
gone home and the place was locked up,"
she said.
"I guess I was a little slow." she said,
"but you must remember I was inexperienced then. I'm fast now."
"After trying all the windows and doors
and finding them locked I reconciled myself to spending the night there alone," she
said.
"I was unable to get out until the following morning when the early shift came to
open the bar," she said.
When asked if she ever considered returning to UBC she said her work in the
east was keeping her pretty busy.
"I found life in the east much more exciting and rewarding," she said.
"I have my own potato-whipping business
in Ottawa now," said Gerda Guilt.
horny young patient is still horny, well, ah,
what the hell . . . "
UBC nurses have had the law laid down
— but not too far — to them.
The law, otherwise know as Nurses' Rule
Number One, reads as follows, as discovered
by your IN inquiring reporter.
GERDA, OR MAYBE IT WAS PORSCHE, tucking the
goods up her gigi.
LATE FLASHES
Fetish holes dentists
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (CPN) — A fast-breaking sex
fetish outrage broke at Harvard University here today,
allegedly involving holes in the dentistry faculty.
Sub-humans riot, orgy
BURNABY, B.C. (Where?) — Police riot squads
late today surrounded a nearby mountain to quell a
depraved orgy and riot rampaging through dense underbrush.' Sub-human youths of short stature are suspected.
BI orgs are back again!
PANGO-PANGO (URP) — Hordes of green, hairy
blorgs descended on this remote jungle metropolis early
tomorrow (time change, you moron) and reportedly
puced several natives, while secondifying others.
Morovians due tor vamp
MORAVIA (ESP) — Vampires will strike this sleepy
Bavarian hamlet tomorrow, wreaking death, destruction,
sex and little pin-prick holes in the neck. A pain, you
might say.
Aunt Asa's lonely hearts club for bleeding fools
Aunt Asa's lonely hearts
service will try to match you
with those of similar tastes and
interests. Send $1 per insertion; respondent send $1  also.
* •      •
We reserve the right to refuse advertisements.
We never do.
YOUNG, fun-loving trio, mature, experienced, ambivalent,
wishes to meet same living in
university area. Object: higher
mathematics. References requested. Box H-3, N.F.
• •      •
CLEAN, non-smoker, non-
drinker, non-indulger, 22,
blond, handsome, Anglo-Saxon,
desires broad-minded companionship   for   summer   trip   to
AUNT ASA'S TATTOO
... a life of heart help
Fire Island. Box F-2, N.F.
WANTED, one virgin to help
in new fascinating cult. Exciting experiences promised. No
cranks or fakes please. Box
M-4, N.F.
YOUNG lady, affectionate,
university graduate, cultured
charming, wishes to share
apartment with same, rent free.
Object: mutual enjoyment. No
triflers  please.  Box M-5,  F.E.
TWENTY-year-old man, dark
curly hair, blue eyes, wishes to
meet purposeful, mature
woman, preferably over 40.
Woman should know her own
mind and be prepared to make
decisions. Box P-2, F.E.
Tall, dark, handsome  co-ed,
LONELY HEART BEING
MEASURED for a mate, off
the top of the head.
loves leather, rubber goods,
spike heels, in painful need of
strong young woman with
same interests.
Object: pleasurable companionship. No one under five
ft. eleven need apply. Box M-7,
N.F.
•      •      *
PURE, sweet, young lady
wishes to meet handsome
young man for educational
purposes. Interests i n c 1 u d e
horseback riding, travel by
train, psychological essays, and
toying with small, blue-eyed
children.
Object: broadening educational and cultural viewpoint. Thursday, March 24,  1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
SEX, CHINA  AT PHILY
Tree University' grows
PHILADELPHIA (CUP) —
In its three months of existence, the Free University of
Pennsylvania has attracted 700
students to its 32 courses.
Founded by professors, graduate and undergraduate students in the Philadelphia area,
the Free University has grown
beyond all expectations and
has recruited 10' to 15 per cent
of its enrolment from the community.
The institution offers such
courses as modern Chinese
history, revolution in Latin
America, African development,
and communist infiltration and
subversion.
The most popular courses
so far are modern Chinese history,   with   70   students,   and
DISTINGUISHED INDIAN educator Dr. Mohan S. Mehta,
vice-chancellor of Rajasthan
University, will speak April
6 at noon in Bu. 106.
courses on sex and psychology.
The Free University was set
up to facilitate an exchange
of ideas between professors
and students outside the university. Its goal is to relate
the classroom to problems o_
the day.
Anyone, regardless of views,
may speak to a class if he can
interest  students   or   members
of  the   community  in   participating.
The institution's administration acts merely as a clearing
house and co-ordinator; it does
not establish policy.
The Free University is considering expanding further into
the Philadelphia community to
attract a larger percentage of
non-students to its classes.
ONLY TWO NOW
Students needed
for CUS seminar
AMS first vice-president Bob Cruise  is  going to the
University of Waterloo for eight days Aug. 28.
And he wants eight students
to go with him.
Cruise and the students will
attend the Canadian Union of
Students seminar on Identity
and Anxiety: Crisis of a Student Generation.
Today is the deadline for
applications to attend the seminar on the all expense paid
trip.
Cruise said: "We have only
two applications so far."
Application forms for the
seminar are available in the
AMS or CUS offices in Brock
Hall and should be returned
to the CUS office, Brock Extension 258.
BAY
Starts Tomorrow
THE BALCONY
Shelly Winters    Peter Falk
Restricted
Plus
THE SILENCE
Ingrid Thulin,
Gunnel Lindblom
Students 75c
DELTA
Starts Tomorrow
NAKED AMAZON
Plus
IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE
Cliff Richard
Quebec students want fee
freeze, then abolishment
MONTREAL (UNS) — An immediate freeze on tuition
fees by the provincial government and action toward
abolishing them has been demanded by L'Union General
des Etudiants du Quebec.
The 55,000-member studetn union called on the government to present a plan to be negotiated with the union
executive by June 1966.
UGEQ represents students from Quebec's three French-
language universities—Laval, Montreal, and Sherbrooke—
as well as normal schools and classical colleges.
FINE
"Cradle thru College Footwear
"PACE-SETTING STYLES
FOR YOUNG MEN ON CAMPUS ...
e Desert Boots
e Hush Puppies
e Grained  Calf Brogues
e Hand Sewn Loafers
COLLEGIENNE SHOES
try the "Open Look" for Spring
NEW HEELS - CIRCLE TOES
CAMPUS WEAR
e      e      e
ALSO "Special Care in Children's Fittings"
The NEW Store In The University Area
4516 West 10»h 228-8115
YOUR STUDENTS' COUNCIL
URGES YOU TO VOTE
YES!
on Tuesday for the
$2.00 AMS Student Activity Fee Increase
1. Without this increase it will be necessary to
reduce the present AMS program, as approximately
$15,000 interest received from Student Union Building
funds will not be available next year.
2. Undergraduate and club grants have barely increased in the past TEN years while their respective memberships have doubled.
3. Intramural sports, which involve more than 5,000
students, require increased assistance.
4. There has been no activity fee  increase toward
the AMS programs for 12 years.
5. The present AMS student activity fee is lower than
that of most other Western universities:
UBC $29.00
University of Victoria 30.00
University  of  Alta,
Edmonton 34.00
University of Alta.,
Calgary $32.50
University of
Saskatchewan 32.50
Victoria 30.00
University of
Manitoba 24.50 Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 24,  1966
Proposed   Constitution
Changes...
These are the proposed revisions to the
AMS Constitution. Today's general meeting
will consider them in two categories, non-
controversial or housecleaning, mainly
changes in wording and significant, possibly
controversial policy decisions such as removing Frosh president from council.
Non-Controversial
1. By-low 1  (3)
now reads as follows:
Honorary members shall comprise all graduates
of the University, members of the Faculty, and
others upon whom honorary membership may
from time to time, be conferred by the Society or
by Students' Council.
Proposed Revision:
Honorary members shall comprise all persons
upon whom honorary membership may, from time
to time, be conferred by the Society or by Students' Council.
2. Proposed  Revision
ADD BY-LAW 1 (4) as follows:
Associate members shall comprise all members
of the Faculty.
3. Proposed Revision
RE-NUMBER existing By-laws 1 (4) to 1 (6) as
1 05) to 1 (7).
4. By-low 2 (3) (c)
now reads as follows:
Upon the written request duly signed by 100
active members of the Society with the approval
of Students' Council.
Proposed Revision:
Delete By-law 2 (3) (c)
5. By-low 3 (4) (f) (xvii) (o)
now reads as follows:
Two members of the Students' Council to be
appointed by the President of the Students' Council in consultation with the Treasurer, and
Proposed Revision:
The U.C.C. Treasurer and two members of the
Students' Council to toe appointed toy the President
of the Students' Council in consultation with the
Treasurer, and
6. By-low 3(4)(e)
now reads as follows:
The Secretary shall take the minutes of all
meetings of the Students' Council and of the Society and shall conduct all correspondence of the
Students' Council.
Proposed Revision:
The Secretary shall take the minutes of all
meetings of the Students' Council and of the
Society.
7. By-low 3 (5)
now reads as follows:
Each Students' Councillor shall have one vote
with the exception of the Editor-in-Chief of the
Ubyssey and the representative from the Residences who shall not have voting power.
Proposed Revision:
Each Students' Councillor shall have one vote
with the exception of the Editor-in-Chief of the
Ubyssey and the representative from the Residences.
8. By-law 3 (6) (g)
now reads as follows:
In accordance with the provisions of Section 28
of the Societies Act R.S.B.C. 1960, c. 362, the Society shall have the power to impose a fine not
exceeding $5.00 on any member who has contravened any By-Law of the Society.
Proposed Revision:
In accordance with the provisions of Section 28
of the Societies Act, the Society, shall have the
power to impose a fine not exceeding $5.00 on
any member who has contravened any By-Law
of the Society.
9. By-law 3 (6) (k)
<sS23Si
%
now reads as follows:
The meetings of the Students' Council shall be
conducted according to the procedure set down
in Roberts' Rules of Order, latest edition.
The elements of a general meeting . . .
Proposed Revision:
The meetings of the Society and the Students'
Council shall be conducted according to the procedure set down in Roberts' Rules of Order, latest
edition.
10. By-law 5 (2)
now reads as follows:
The signing officers of the Society shall be any
two of the President, First Vice-President, Secretary, Second Vice-President, Co-ordinator of Activities and Treasurer; provided that any one person
does not sign in two different capacities.
Proposed Revision:
The signing officers of the Society shall be any
two of the President, First Vice-President, Secretary, Second Vice-President, Co-ordinator of Activities and Treasurer; provided that no one person
may sign in two different capacities.
11. By-law 9
now reads as follows:
A request by the Society to the Board of
Governors for an alteration in the amount of the
membership fee of the Society as fixed toy the
Board of Governors of the British Columbia
University Act, R.S.B.C. 1960, c. 38 shall not be
made until the request has been approved toy a
referendum by secret ballot of the active members of the Society. Two weeks' clear notice of
intention to hold such a referendum shall be given
by the Secretary of the Society on resolution of
the Students' Council or a petition signed by five
hundred (500) active members in good standing
of the Society, and the proposed request shall not
be deemed to have been approved unless twenty
percent (20%) of the active members vote, and
two thirds of the votes cast approve the change.
Proposed Revision:
A request by the Society to the Board of Governors for an alteration in the amount of the membership fee of the Society as fixed by the Board of
Governors under the Universities Act shall not
be made until the request has been approved toy
a referendum toy secret ballot of the active members of the Society. Two weeks' clear notice of
intention to hold such a referendum shall be given
by the Secretary of the Society on resolution of
the Students' Council or a petition signed by five
hundred (500) active members in good standing
of the Society, and the proposed request shall not
be deemed to have been approved unless twenty
percent (20%) of the active members vote, and
two thirds of the votes cast approve the change.
12. By-law 11 (6) (a)
now reads as follows:
There shall toe a Students' Court which shall
be empowered and is hereby empowered subject
to Section 62, sub-section 1, sub-Daragraph G and
H, Section 87 paragraph B and F and Section 88
1960, c. 38 and Section 28 of the Societies Act
R.SJB.C. 1960, c. 362 to exercise disciplinary
powers over students and Alma Mater Society
organizations.
Proposed Revision:
There shall be a Students' Court which shall
be empowered and is hereby empowered subject
to Section 61 of the Universities Act and Section
28 of the Societies Act to exercise disciplinary
powers over students and Alma Mater Society
organizations.
13. By-law 15 (3) (b)
now reads as follows:
Whether in their opinion the balance sheet
referred to in the report is properly drawn up
so as to exhibit a true and correct view of the
affairs of the Society according to the best of
their information, the explanations given to them,
and as shown by the books of the Society.
Proposed Revision:
Whether in their opinion the balance sheet and
statement of revenue and expenditure referred
to in the report present fairly the financial position of the Society and the results of its operations
for the period under review.
Controversial
1.  By-law 3(3)(h)
now reads as follows:
The duly elected Presidents of the following
Undergraduate Societies and Students' Associations:
(i)    Agriculture Undergraduate Society
(ii)    Architecture Undergraduate Society
(iii)    Arts Undergraduate Society
(iv)    Commerce Undergraduate Society
(v)    Education Undergraduate Society
(vi)    Engineering Undergraduate Society
(vii)    Forestry Undergraduate Society
(viii)    Frosh Undergraduate Society
(ix)    Graduate Students' Association
(x)    Home Economics Undergraduate
Society
(xi)    Law Students' Association
(xii)    Library School Students' Association
(xiii)    Medical Undergraduate Society
(xiv)    Music Students' Association
(xv)    Nursing Undergraduate Society
(xvi)    Pharmacy Undergraduate Society
(xvii)    Physical Education Undergraduate
Society
(xviii)    Rehabilitation  Medicine Undergraduate
Society
(xix)    Science Undergraduate Society
(xx)     Social Work Students' Association
(xxi)    Presidents of Future iDegree granting
Faculties, Colleges and Schools.
Proposed Revision:
DELETE BYJLAW (3) (h) (viii) and re-number
(ix) to (xxi) as (viii) to (xx).
2. By-law 7 (2)
now reads as follows:
With the exception of the President of the Frosh
Undergraduate Society and the President of the
Social Work Students' Association, nominations
for all such elections shall not close before the
Friday following the last election of the Executive of the Students' Council. All elections under
this By->Law shall be completed within two weeks
of the completion of the last election of the Executive of the Students' Council.
Proposed Revision:
With the exception of the President of the
Social Work Students' Association, nominations
for all such elections shall not close before the
Friday following the last election of the Executive of the Students' Council. All elections under
this By-Law shall be completed within two weeks
of the completion of the last election of the Executive of the Students* Council.
3. By-law 7 (3)
now reads as follows:
The President of the Frosh Undergraduate Society and the President of the Social Work Students' Association shall be elected before tile
second Monday in October.
Proposed Revision:
The President of the Social Work Students' Association shall toe elected before the second Monday
in October.
4. By-law 3 (6) (e)
now reads as follows:
Have power to engage and pay such assistants
as it may require or deem necessary for the efficient carrying out of the work of the business
office and of other activities of the Society.
Proposed Revision:
Have power to engage and pay such assistants
as it may require or deem necessary for the efficient carrying out of the work of the business office and of other activities of the Society. Such
power to engage and pay shall include the power
to pay the President a salary or honorarium in
addition to the honorarium provided for in By-
Law 20, for the full-time services of the President
during the summer academic recess in his capacity as President of the Society, and shall further include the power to engage and pay any
other director or directors required during the
summer academic recess for the performance of
a specific task. Thursday, March 24,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  13
5. By-law 2 (9)
now reads as follows:
The signatures of five hundred (500) active
members of the Society or one hundred (100)
active members with the approval of Students'
Council shall be required for the calling of a
referendum.
Proposed Revision:
DELETE BY-LAW 2 (9) and insert new BYLAW 3 as follows:
BY-LAW 3 Referendums
(1)A referendum may be called:
(a) By resolution  of Students'  Council.
(b) By a petition bearing the text of the
proposed referendum and supported by
the signatures and registration numbers
of five hundred (500) active members
delivered to the Secretary.
6. Proposed Revision
ADD BY-LAW 3 (2) as follows:
(2) The text of a referendum Shall be so drafted
as to present a clear question capable of
being answered "yes" or "no", and sufficiently narrow in scope for there to toe no
ambiguity with respect to such answers.
7. Proposed Revision
ADD BY-LAW 3 (3) as follows:
(3) If in the opinion of Students' Council a
petition for a referendum does not meet
the recmirements of By-Law 3 (2), Students'
Council shall request Students' Court to
prepare a suitable text.
8. Proposed Revision
ADD BY-LAW 3 (4) as follows:
(4) A referendum initiated by petition shall
be put to the membership within ten (10)
days of its delivery to the Secretary, unless
Students' Council has within that time proceeded under By-Law 3 (3), in which event
it shall toe put within ten (10) days of the
delivery of the text of the referendum
toy Students' Court to Students' Council.
9. Proposed  Revision
ADD BY-LAW 3 (5) as follows:
(5) Students'  Council  may add separate  and
alternative questions to any referendum initiated by petition.
10. Proposed Revision
ADD BY-LAW 3 (6) as follows:
(6) A referendum shall be binding if at least
twenty percent (20 %) of the active members vote and there is a two-thirds majority.
11. Proposed Revision
RENUOVIBIER existing BY-LAWS 3 to 23 as 4
to 24.
AIR . . .
FIRE .. .
WATER . . .
PROPOSED REVISIONS TO AMS CONSTITUTION
Submitted by Garth Brown — January 24,  1966
1.  By-law 3 (3) (h)
now reads as follows:
The duly elected Presidents of the following
Undergraduate Societies and Students' Associations:
(i)    Agriculture Undergraduate Society
(ii)    Architecture Undergraduate Society
(iii)    Arts Undergraduate Society
(iv)    Commerce Undergraduate Society
(v)    Education Undergraduate Society
(vi)    Engineering Undergraduate Society
(vii)    Forestry Undergraduate Society
(viii)    Frosh Undergraduate Society
(ix)    Graduate Students' Association
(x)    Home Economics Undergraduate Societj
(xi)    Law Students' Association
(xii)    Library School Students' Association
(xiii)    Medical Undergraduate Society
(xiv)    Music Students' Association
(xv)    Nursing Undergraduate Society
(xvi) i   Pharmacy Undergraduate Society
Physical Education Undergraduate
(xvii)    Society
Rehabilitation Medicine Undergraduate
(xiii)    Society
(xix)    Science Undergraduate Society
(xx)    Social Work Students' Association
(xxi)    Presidents of Future Degree granting
Faculties, Colleges and Schools
Proposed, Revision:
Fifteen Members at Large to be elected from
the student body by a system of proportional
representation.
2.  By-law 3 (4) (i)
now reads as follows:
The President of each of the Faculties, Colleges
or Schools (as defined in By-Law 3 (3) (h) shall
be the spokeman for his respective organization.
These Presidents shall be the direct mode of
communication both from the Student's Council
to the Student Body and from the Student Body
to the Students' Council. The Presidents shall sit
as voting members of the Students' Council and
shall not delegate their voting rights.
Proposed Revision:
DELETE BY-LAW 3 (4) (i)
3. By-law 7 - Election of Students'
Councillors other than Members of the Executive
(1) The President of each Faculty, College
or School named in By-Law 3 (3) duly
elected in accordance with the constitutions of their respective organizations
shall be members of the Students' Council.
(2) With the exception of the iPresidei_t of
the Frosh Undergraduate Society and the
President of the Social Work Students'
Association, nominations for all such
elections shall not close before the Friday
following the last election of the Executive of the Students' Council. All elections under this By-Law shall be completed within two weeks of the completion of the last election of the Executive
of the Students' Council.
(3) The President of the Frosh Undergraduate Society and the President of the
Social Work Students' Association shall
toe elected before the second Monday in
October.
Proposed Revision:
(1) (a) The election shall be held on the Wednesday following the election of the Executive of the Students' Council. Provided
that if the University is not in session on
the day elections should*be held, the particular election shall be held on the next
day following on which the University is
in session.
(to) Nominations for all positions shall be received by the Secretary of the Society from
9:00 a.m. on the Wednesday two weeks
preceding the election until 12:00 noon on
the Thursday directly preceding the election day. The election date and the nomination closing dates for all offices shall be
published in at least two editions of the
student newspaper preceding the nomination period.
(c) Nomination shall be signed by not less than
ten active members in good standing of
the Society. All nominations shall be delivered to the Secretary of the Society
within the time aforesaid and shall forthwith be posted by that officer on the Students' Council notice board.
(d) Active members only shall have the privilege of voting at these elections.
(2) The elections shall be decided by the proportional system known as the single transferable
vote under which:
(a) Each elector has one vote and one only.
(b) The elector votes:
(i) toy placing the figure 1 opposite the
' name of the candidate he likes best.
(ii) he is also invited to place the figure 2
opposite his second choice and so on,
numbering as many candidates as he
pleases in the order of 'his preference.
(c) The candidate to ensure election need not
poll a majority, but only a certain proportion of the votes cast. To ascertain this proportion, called the quota, divide the total
number of votes cast toy one more than the
number of seats to be filled, and add one
to the result.
(d) The Returning Officer ascertains the result of the election as follows:
(i) he counts each ballot paper as one vote
to the candidate marked 1 thereon; he
also counts the total number of votes.
(ii) he ascertains the quota.
(iii) he declares elected the candidates who
have received the quota.
(iv) he transfers the surplus votes of those
candidates who have received more than
the quota to the unelected candidates in
direct proportion to the next preferences
indicated by the electors. If the second
choice is elected the third receives the
vote and so on. All of the ballots are
counted to determine the proportion of
transfers allocated to unelected candidates.
(v) he declares elected those candidates who
after the transfer of surplus votes have
obtained the quota.
(vi) he eliminates the candidates lowest on
the poll one after another, toy transfer-
ing their votes in accordance with the
wishes of their supporters to the unelected candidates indicated as next
preferences. This process is continued
until the required number of candidates
have each obtained the quota and been
declared elected, or the number of candidates not eliminated is reduced to the
number of seats still vacant in which
event the candidates not eliminated are
declared elected.
(e) After the ballots have been counted, the Returning Officer shall place them in a
package, which package shall be sealed in
the presence of the scrutineers and preserved by the Returning Officer until after
the Annual Meeting of the Society.
(f) Polling booths shall be open from 10:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on election day, with the
exception of those at Fort Camp, Acadia
Camp, Totem Park and the Common Block
of the "Permanent Residences which shall
be open from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. only,
on the day preceding election day.
(g) All elections shall toe in charge of the Elections Committee, and the elections shall be
conducted to comply with the aforesaid
sections and such further regulations as the
said committee shall make from time to
time, and which are not inconsistent with
the By-Laws of the Society.
4.  By-law  10 (10)
now reads as follows:
The Treasurer shall deposit a sum calculated on
eighty cents (80c) per active member of the society for the Women's Athletic Association, such
fund to be a first charge on the revenue of the
Society and to be applied at the discretion of the
Women's Athletic Association.
Proposed Revision:
The Treasurer shall deposit sums of money for
the Men's Athletic Committee and the Women's
Athletic Committee in accordance with the policy
as laid down from time to time by the Students'
Council and/or General Meetings. Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 24,  1966
THROW OUT UNION JACK'
SF acts to fly UN flag
By ANN BISHOP
Simon Fraser Academy's
Union Jack—the last such flag
at a local university—may be
fluttering through its last year.
SFA students' council is
writing a letter to the board of
governors asking to replace the
Union Jack with a United Nations Flag.
The suggestion came from
UN club president Tom Tyre.
Tyre said the Union Jack
means nothing to the many stu-
SIR OUVRY
UBC frat man charges
Peak irresponsible'
A UBC fraternity member
has charged Simon Fraser
Academy's newspaper, The
Peak,   with   irresponsibility.
Larry Herbert of Zeta Beta
Tau fraternity at UBC, Wednesday, charged The Peak
with unfair coverage of the
fraternities' point of view.
The charge came in connection with the referendum at
SFA Tuesday, which read:
"Do you as a member of the
Simon Fraser Student Society
wish the SFSS to recognize and
sanction Phi Epsilon fraternal
group (proposed Delta Upsilon
colony)."
The referendum was defeated.
Herbert charged The Peak
had printed only arguments
against fraternities and had
helped destroy the chances of
founding fraternities at SFA.
'Peak . editor, Gillian Land-
ridge, said she had approached
Phi Epsilon president, Don
Kennedy, for an article giving
information on fraternities in
general.
"I gave him a week's time
to hand the thing in, but because of lack of communication
nothing was received."
dents from outside the Com-
comwealth.
"Canada is not ah active
member of the Commonwealth,
but she is one of the most active members of the UN," he
said.
Only flag flown at UBC is
the Canadian leaf — except on
UN day when the UN flag is
flown.
UBC traffic diretcor Ouvry
Roberts said it is not his department's policy to fly more
than the Canadian flag because it would make things too
complicated.
"I consider it most sensible
to fly only one flag and that
should be the Canadian flag,"
said Roberts.
"I would like to see the
Union Jack flown on campus
as well myself, but as traffic
director I don't plan to fly anything but the Canadian flag."
Past president of the SFA
UN club, Brian Kirby, disagreed with Tyre.
"Both the Union Jack and
the UN flag should fly, but
that symbol of Social Credit
(the B.C. flag) should come
down," said Kirby.
The UN club has offered to
purchase the first flag if the
administration approves council's suggestion.
Socreds meet
General    meeting    Monday I
noon Bu. 317. Election of officers.-
FRANTIC!!
Moving
Across
The Street
ALL STOCK MUST GO BEFORE WE MOVE
SUITS "^15
00
TIES 25c and 95c
SOCKS ALL 69c
i. SPORT SHIRTS from $1.95
Sweaters
from $4.95
Dress Shirts
from $2.95
EL_P^^ This is an
\ \^Ajjf»honest to
V»*^^^^%  goodness Sale
^^ of last season's
Merchandise that will save you
dollars, don't miss it, come in
now! Stock up on your summer
requirements.
SUITS »5So $49
50
ALL STOCK MUST GO
ABBOTTS
2906  WEST BROADWAY
Broadway
Store
Only
YOUR STUDENTS' COUNCIL URGES YOU
TO VOTE
YES!
On Tuesday to Switch the AMS
Athletic Fee Over to the Administration
HERE'S WHY
1. Responsibility of athletic financing is currently
shared equally between AMS and the University Administration.
2. In effect, half of the funds available to athletics
are tied up in the student political framework.
3. The $5 AMS per capita fee has not changed since
1957, while costs have risen in the nine-year period to
mammoth proportions. This fee is also the lowest in
Canada.
4. AMS has not been able, nor is it likely to be able,
to raise the student fee in any way commensurate to the
needs of athletics, principally because many other student
issues are gaining priority over athletics.
5. One of the most significant effects of the referendum would be to protect the $5 fee from any student
groups which might wish to use this money for other purposes. Any cut in that fee would, to a large extent,, kill
UBC athletics. Such a proposal is coming before the AMS
General Meeting, Thursday, March 24.
6. If Administration takes over the sole responsibility for athletic financing then athletics will be looked after
realistically, according to its needs, as any other department of the University.
7. Both the President and Vice-President of the University have indicated that student participation in athletic
policy making should not be eliminated if the fee changeover should be acceptable to the students.
8. In the majority of universities across Canada and
the U.S. the Administration has the entire responsibility
for the financial support of athletics.
Students are asked to vote in favor of the athletic
referendum Tuesday, to put the financing of UBC's sports
on a realistic and solid basis.
The AMS executive has consistently expressed the view
that the AMS is not the appropriate body to be involved in
raising funds for extramural athletics; rather, it should
contend itself with the intramural programme that concerns entire student body participation.
The Men's Athletic Committee and the School of Physical Education which provides the UBC coaching staff, have
expressed unreserved approval of the fee change-over. Thursday, March 24,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
EXAM-WORRIED STUDENTS relax at the library doors
hoping to soak in some of the knowledge seeping from
the building as well as the sunshine which has covered
the campus for the first three days of the week.
UBC GYMKHANA
Blooming Berry
wins in hot Lotus
Bruce Berry drove a Lotus Elan to first overall in the
UBC Sports Car club's annual spring gymkhana Sunday at
Park Royal.
Berry bettered 80 other competitors in the B.C. championship event, turning the three-
quarter mile main course and
quarter-mile short run in a
total of two minutes, 27.5 seconds.
Mike Hunter of UBC was
second in a TR-4, three tenths
behind Berry. Don Lamont of
New Westminster (Datsun) w^s
third in 2:27.9.
Bob McQuarrie of UBC turned fastest time of the day on
the slalom (1:15.3) while John
Schuberg put his Sprite
through the short course in
1:16:1, best of the day.
Drivers were required to go
as fast as possible around a
series of pylons laid out on the
blacktop.
Class winners: A—Berry (Lo
tus) 2:27.5; B—M. Hunter (TR-
4) 2:27.8; C—Ed Piekaar (Datsun)  2:48.8;   D—Bill  Edwards
Family ties
up club exec
The university clubs committee executive will be a family affair next year.
This year's president, Mike
Coleman, has been re-elected
president at the UCC general
meeting.
Named secretary was Coleman's little sister, Sally, arts I.
Elected, vice-president was
Jeff Flack, ed. H.
Ken Hawley, com. II, will be
treasurer and public relations
officer is Ken Gaglardi, grad.
stud. I.
(Honda) 2:28.2; Sedan I—Don
Munro (Cooper) 2:36.3; Sedan
III—Randy Writters (Falcon)
2:59,2; Modified under 1500 cc
—Jok Hobson (Cooper) 2:31.0;
Modified over 1500 cc—John
Milroy (VW) 2.31.2.
10%  Discount on
Corsages & Wedding
Bouquets
CASH  and CARRY
Vogu* Flower Shop
2197  W.   Broadway 736-7344
Fine arts degree
course offered
MONTREAL (UNS) — A
new course leading to the degree of bachelor of fine arts
—the first in Canada—will
be started this fall at Sir
George Williams University.
a university spokesman said
Tuesday.
McCUISH
FORMAL AND
SEMI-FORMAL
Rental  and  Sales
TUXEDOS    -    WHITE    DINNER
JACKETS - TAM.S - MORNING
COATS - ACCESSORIES
Complat* Six* Rang*
STUDENT   RATES
FORMAL WEAR
LTD.
MON.-SAT.-9:30 le 5:30
2046 W. 41st
PH. 263-3610
C.U.S.O Volunteer David Henry
Reports from In
Dear Friends,
I've finally arrived at my assignment in
Chowdwar, a small town 270 miles south of
Calcutta and about 40 miles from the Bay
of Bengal. The school I'm teaching at is
still in the process of toeing built, but two
classes have already started,
It's a very interesting and challenging
assignment. The school is a Technical
School designed to train boys for work as
technicians or prepare them for' more advanced studies in the engineering field. it
is the first school of its kind in the state
and will be used as a model for the establishment of other schools throughout the
state. There are three large factories within
three miles of the school and this creates a
rather dynamic atmosphere with whistles
blowing and much heavy traffic. However,
it is a common sight to see a farmer with
his team of bullocks and wooden plow
working in a field beside a steel plant.
The boys are between 12 and 14 years
old and very enthusiastic about learning
English so teaching is fun. Much of the
vocabulary they have to learn isn't associated with their culture so it's often a case
of creating a situation to illustrate the
meaning of a particular word. This can
create some pretty amusing situations.
Two days after I arrived I was invited to
attend a Hindu wedding. It's difficult to
describe without pictures but I found many
parts of the ceremony quite similar to ours.
There was a great feast and the food was
delicious. We ate Indian style, sitting cross-
legged on the floor. I find this position a
little awkward and I'm always afraid I'll
end up with my foot in my plate. The food
served at the school is all cooked Indian
style and I really like the hot curries. I
think I'll find Canadian food a little dull
when I return.
The times passes very quickly. A normal
day starts at 5:30 a.m. I take the students
for a half hour P.T. period from 6:00 to
6:30, (this involves a half mile run and-took
a few days to get used to). Breakfast or
tiffin as it's called here is served at 7:30
and classes begin at 8:30 and run until 4:00
p.m., with two hours off at noon. Sports and
hobbies from 4:00 to 6:00. From six o'clock
to nine o'clock there are special classes for
students who need extra tutoring. Supper
is at nine o'clock and it's lights out at ten.
We're taking the students on a ten day,
thousand mile excursion during the
Christmas holidays. This is to acquaint
them with the different industries as well
as to show them the rest of the country.
We're going to be in Puri, a coastal town,
on Christmas Day so I'll probably celebrate
it by swimming in the ocean and eating
coconuts. There is plenty of fresh fruit
grown in the area and oranges, bananas,
coconuts, and pineapples are always available at the hundreds of little roadside shops.
Everyone wants to know what Canada
is like. I've found that it's generally regarded as a land: of ice and snow and that we
make big steam locomotives. Apparently
we exported some steam engines to India a
few years ago. They have a distinctly different sounding whistle and have been
dubbed "Canada Engines" by the people
here. Many of the students come from
farms and so they want to know how much
milk a Canadian cow gives and how many
bushels of wheat we get per acre. When I
tell them a Canadian cow gives fifty to
sixty pounds of milk per day they are
astounded. They tell me that they're doing
well if they get five or six pounds from one
of their cows. Once they hear this they
want to know how they can get their cows
to produce more.
To anyone who may be considering serving with CUSO I would say this — If
you like teaching, meeting new people, new
ideas, and: new places and are willing to
miss a few of the creature comforts of our
society (which you really won't miss any
way) it will probably be the best two years
of your life.
—DAVID HENRY
Dave Henry is one of the 18 volunteers who went to India from the Asia Orienta
Hon here at UBC last November. There are now 37 CUSOites in India.
Applications at International House are available until the end of April. Candidates applying do rot face any competitive selection since CUSO will place as
many volunteers as it can get in the field.
NORTH
Western £pcrtiHf tjwfo
LTD.
3715 W. 10th Avenue
TENNIS
1966 SLAZENGER TENNIS RACKETS
SLAZENGER TENNIS BALLS _._--	
SLAZENGER Tournament Practice Balls
10th at Alma
from $7.50 to $20.00
 $2.25 per tin
 48e each
GOLF
SLAZENGER, SPALDING & McGREGOR GOLF CLUBS
ALL GOLF ACCESSORIES
OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT
SLEEPING BAGS - GROUND SHEETS - AIR MATTRESSES
PACK SACKS AND PACK BOARDS
SOON IN STOCK - HIKING BOOTS
WE  CARRY  A  FULL  RANGE  OF  FISHING  SUPPLIES Page  16
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 24,  1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Wild-eyed witches meet
WARLOCK SOC
Formation meeting of the
UBC witches and Warlock Society Friday noon in Bu. 2233.
All welcome.
• •      •
COLLEGE LIFE CLUB
Nootka House, Totem Park,
9 to 10 p.m. College Life premieres- ' with folksinger Ann
Mortifee and speaker John
Flack, National Director of
Campus Crusade for Christ.
• •      •
PHRATERES
Last All-Phi meeting of the
term will be held at noon Friday in Bu. 104.
• •      •
GERMAN CLUB
Friday noon in Bu. 202 the
club will host the German Consul. Everyone welcome.
Library staff
cleaning out
65 tea chests
A recently purchased collection of 7,000 rare medical and
scientific books has arrived at
UBC.
Librarians are now unpacking and classifying the books
from the 65 tea chests in which
they travelled from Magdalen
College, Oxford.
The books were purchased
from Dr. Hugh Sinclair of Oxford for $270,000.
Dr. Sinclair said he sold the
books to UBC because "he
wanted his collection to be
used by serious students, not
hoarded by collectors."
President John Macdonald
said: "The collection was purchased as a result of the buying
program initiated a year ago
by a gift from H. R. MacMillan."
The lumberman philanthropist gave UBC $3 million to
buy books over a 10-year
period.
When  You've
Finished Your
EXAMS
And You're Out
Earning Lots Of
MONEY
Spend Some Of It At
Kerrisdale Cameras
Remember
NO SPECIAL
DISCOUNT FOR
STUDENTS
At our prices we could ADD
10%   and    still   beat   most
stores in town ! ! !
Kerrisdale Cameras
2170 W 41st Ave. AM 6-2622
BIG BLOCK
Executive committee election meeting Friday noon in
Gym 211. A special note to this
year's New Big Block winners.
Fittings for sweaters will also
be Friday at noon in Gym 213.
• •      •
VCF
John Flack discusses the Life
of Jesus Friday noon in Ang.
110.
• •      •
POETRY READING
Steve Cummings reads from
past and recent works., Bu.
219 noon.
JUDO CLUB
General meeting Friday noon
in Math. 100. Elections for next
year's executive. Grading tournament March 28-30. You must
sign up by Friday and attend
both nights.
Rent
A Gown
Lovely    Selection
Brides
Attendants
Formal   Wear,
Fur   Stoles,
Tux.  & Din.
Jackets,  Costumes.
MARIE BRUCKER SALON
Designers and Dressmakers
Sales and Rentals
2608   Granville 733-6727
4691   Kingsway 435-1160
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines. 1 day, $.75—3 days. $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Please bring or send to Publications Office, Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost   &   Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.	
LOST: SILVER PLATED SOUTH
American bracelet with carved designs. Sentimental value only. Reward.   Ph.   CA   4-6823.
FOUND: LADY'S GOLD WATCH
outside Gym Tues. March 15. Ph.
AM. 1-8479 after 10:00 p.m.
KOUND: GLOVES LEFT BY
hitchhiker in blue Chev. Friday.
Phone  CA 4-6823.
BLACK WALLET. PLEASE RE-
turn, cards important. Keep
money.   AM   6-21.1.
LOST: ONE WHEEL CHAIR FROM
Wesbrook  Hospital.   Please return.
LOST:    GOLD    FRATERNITY    PIN
near    Brock.     Sentimental    value.
Reward.   CY  8-1285.	
WHOEVER TOOK NOTES MARCH
11   Bu.   104   9:30   please   return   or
Phone   263-3492.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Motorbike & Scooter Insurance,
also from $17.00 up. Ted Elliott,
224-6707.
JEES SWEETS BETTER LATE
than never; Never better -than
late;  er,  Never later better .
WANTED: PARTICIPANTS FOR
study in Psychology Dept. Only
females who fear harmless snakes.
$2 an hour. Very interesting, nothing difficult involved. Additional
participants will be needed after
the exams, too. For more information contact Ruth Kent or Chris
Funs, Rm. 256, Henry Angus Bldg.
WEST VAN GRADS REUNION
dance. The Shockers, Apr. 2, Glen-
eagles. Tickets Kim's Drugs Park
Royal.   No   invitations   needed.
Wanted
15
WANTED — SKI BOOTS (9%-iP),
poles and skis (app. 195 cm.). 876-
9740.
WANTED: TEXTS AND NOTES
after final exams. Ed. 332 and
Math. 202. Price? Payment cash!
Wlrite J. Hoover, 550 W. Keith,
N.   Van.
I WILL PAY $10 FOR THE CQM-
plete English 40 correspondence
course (High School). Phone Anne
261-8450.
Travel Opportunities
16
I WOULD LIKE TO FIND A GIRL
to travel with in Europe during
June. Phone Julie, Rm. 333, 224-
9883  or 224-9908.
RETURN FLIGHT FROM LONDON
Aug. 13, $200. Phone Gary, AM
3-5082   or   AM   6-9618.
Automotive & Marine
Motorcycles
27
COMPETITION MACHINE. 1966
Bultaco "Matador" 250 cc. Used
once. Paid $860. Must sell. Call
Dick,   224-6453.
Scandals
39A
SANDALS:
THE  BLIND  OWL
2057   A   West  4th   Avenue
WILL THE PERSON WHO TOOK
my brief case from the Main Library Sat. noon. Please return to
same place — with instructions on
where to send $25 reward. (No
questions asked.)
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typing
43
TYPING 25c PAGE or $1.95 HR.
West End 685-5539 eves. Campus
pickup and delivery. $1.00 for short
papers,
STUDENTS — TYPING DONE IN
my home. Essays, reports, etc.
Mrs. U. V. (Rae) Chambers. Phone
AL   5-9493.
WILL DO TYPING IN MY HOME.
25c page. 738-6829. Call Monday-
Thursday after 10 a.m.	
FAST,     ACCURATE     TYPING     OF
thesis, essays, etc. Phone 733-0789.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
YOU CAN EARN NEXT TERM'S
Fees by selling advertising for The
Ubyssey. This is an excellent opportunity for several ambitious
students to gain sales experience
and to earn worthwhile commissions. Work to start early next
September. If interested apply to
A. Vince, Manager of Student Publications, Brock Hall. (Afternoons
only.)
HEAD LIFE GUARD POSITION
open at Abbotsford for May, June,
July and August. Applicants
should have Red Cross Instructor's
and R.D.S.S. Award of Merit.
Wage. offered is $1.75 per hour.
Extra hours are available. Apply
in writing to Mr. D. Brown, 3"8"25
AVest 4th Ave.,  Vancouver 8.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
TENOR  SAX..   $140.   Phone   224-9845
Dave RM.  3.
LOOK ! ! ! 13 ARMI DESKS IN
good condition. Must sell—only $4
each. Ideal as substitute for study
desk or for use as phone desk.
Phone   874-9301.
RENTALS   &   REAL ESTATE
Room ft Board
82
ROOM   AND   BOARD   ON   CAMPUS
Fraternity.  PhPone 224-9790.
Furn. Houses ft Apts. 83
Automobiles For Sale
21
1965 DATSUN
13,000 miles.
evenings.
1,500     SPORTCAR
Phone :    731-9544
1731-9455
1957 CHEV — PERFECT ENGINE.
And, 1955 Olds 88. Power steering, power brakes, fully automa'tic.
Phone  BR  7-8476.
TR-3. MUST BE SEEN, FULLY
equipped, wire-wheels, over drive,
Michehn tires, radio, 2 Lucas
lamps, ski-rack & chains, 40^000
miles, black-red interior. Phone
224-3121   (Barry).
'59 FORD FAIRLANE STANDARD
2-door, white walls, good condition,   $695.   Phone  AM   1-4600.
1955 METEOR V8 AUTOMATIC —
Radio, seat belts, good cond. Private.   $325.   AM   1-2923.
'53 PONTIAC H.T. VERY CLEAN,
rebuilt hydramatic, doesn't use
oil. Ph. 224-9752, Rm.  226, 2-5 p.m.
HOlSE, MAY - SEPT. 1 BDRM.
Gas Ht., El. Stv., & Wt., Lge. Lt.,
Nr. Bus. 20 min. to town, (car)
YU   8-0138.
SUITE TO SHARE FOR SUMMER
months. Good location. Very reasonable cost.  Call Ted,  738-2655.
FOR SUMMER — FEMALE STIT-
dent wanted to share one bedroom furnished apartment. University Boulevard. 228-8353 evenings.
ONE BLOCK FROM GATES.
Avail. 1st May. Self-contained
basement suite for 2 or 3 quiet
male students. Fully furnished,
bathtub, etc. International students   welcome.   Phone   224-4245.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
DE LUXE SUITE FOR RENT.
Available April 1. Private garage
and garden. Wall to wall carpets.
Fridge & stove, good view. Near
Spanish Banks. Suitable for husband and wife or 2 persons. Phone
224-0124.
ARTS & COMMERCE GRADUATES
Opportunities exist within our Company for 1966 graduates to train as Marketing Representatives. The successful
applicants will be interested in sales and related field
administration work, have some mechanical interest and
aptitude and be willing to relocate within the Province.
The established training program will be modified to fit
the education and experience of the successful applicants.
DIRECT ALL APPLICATIONS TO:
MR. D. W. HOLME, Personnel Division,
STANDARD OIL CO. OF B.C. LTD.,
355 Burrard Street,
Vancouver 1, B.C.
PLAYHOUSE  THEATRE   CO.   PRESENTS
THE WORLD PREMIERE
LIKE FATHER, LIKE FUN
by ERIC NICOL
Beloved Campus Humorist for 10 years "Jabez"
Opening March 24 - April  19
QUEEN ELIZABETH PLAYHOUSE
Be sure to see this fresh new comedy
by famed  humorist Eric Nicol
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Student Court and Discipline Committee
Applications should be made by letter to the Secretary of the Alma Mater Society not later than Friday,
March 25, 1966 for
Student Court:
The Chief Justice must be a student entering
third year law. Other positions on the Bench are
open to any student.
Clerk of the Court:
This position is open to any student.
Discipline Committee:
These positions are open to any student.
Assistant Co-ordinator:
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of Ass't. Co-ordinator. Applicants should apply in
writing to the Co-ordinator-Elect, A.M.S. Office, Brock
Hall. All applications must be accompanied by an
eligibility form. Applications will close on March 24,
1966.
Brock Management Committee:
Applications are now toeing accepted for positions on
the Brock Management Committee. They should be
sent, to the Co-ordinator-Elect, A.M.S. Office, Brock
Hall. Applications must toe submitted by March 24,
1966.
Chairmen Needed:
Applications are now being received for chairmanship
of the following committees:
Housing Coordinator
Brock Art Manager
Open House Chairman
Totem Editor
Leadership Conference Chairman
College Shop Manager
Academic Activities Committee
All applications  shall  be  in  writing and  shall toe
addressed to the Secretary (Box 54). Eligibility forms are
available in the Secretary's office (S. Brock).
Applications must be submitted toy 4:00 pjn.
March 24, 1966.
Academic Symposium Chairman:
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of chairman for 1966-67. Write to ACADEMIC SYMPOSIUM COMMITTEE box No. 2 Brock Hall.
CUS IX Seminar:
Aug. 28 to Sept. 4 at Waterloo University (Ontario).
Topic: Identity and Anxiety: Crisis in the Student
Generation. Application forms in AMS office and
CUS office. Deadline for Applications Thursday,
March 24. 8 delegates. Costs paid by the Can. Union
of Students.
Seminar will consist of a discussion of the political,
psychological, and institutional causes of student unrest and identity problems.
Anyone may apply.

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