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The Ubyssey Oct 26, 1967

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 COMMITTEE TO EXAMINE SENATE SECRECY
UBC senate refused to act Wednesday night on
a move by student senators to end its secrecy policy.
Graduate student senator Mark Waldman moved
that an open gallery be allowed in senate meetings.
The motion was seconded by undergraduate senator
Ray Larsen.
Only Larsen, Waldmen, and undergraduate senators Gabor Mate and Kirsten Emmott opposed a move
to refer the secrecy issue to the committee on role
ind organization of senate.
The senate secrecy motion was the only one
presented to senate by the students in their first
appearance as members of; UBC's top academic policy making body.
The students were elected last week in an vote
supervised by the Alma Mater Society.
A non-student senator said: "There is a great
ieal of sympathy for the idea of having a public
gallery here.
"But it is not appropriate to vote on the issue at
this time."
Waldman was named to the role and organisation of senate committee.
Committee appointments for Larsen, Mate and
Miss Emmott were deferred after Larsen indicated
the undergraduate senators did not wish to sit on
committees dealing with ceremonies, athletics, and
university art.
These committee appointments had been suggested to the students before the meeting.
Senate chairman Walter Gage suggested the students name the committees they wanted to sit on.
The senate agreed to this informal procedure.
The students indicated they were interested in
seats on the curriculum, new programs, and library
committees.
The discussion sparked an angry comment from
alumni representative Stuart Lefeaux.
I've been here for a year and have never spoken
before," he said. "I am amazed at the new tenor of
senate that after being on senate only ten minutes,
students are receiving such consideration."
Gage replied: "I asked the students for their
opinions."
In reply to Lefeaux, Mate said he was amazed
the senator would break a whole year's silence to say
students are being given too much consideration.
"Many students on campus think that they are
not given^o much, ibuf.jather^too little, consideration in^tne^&verhing ofxtfe ufiwel'sMy," he said.
nft_te asked senate what is being dpne about the
arts faculty two-year language requirement.
_«i&was toialb&r ^^geO^^t the issiie had been
discu_tee*»previously by senate, but h&e now been re-
ferredHo^-fiWrts faculty committe,e.J(-' J
i^tf^d $4h^ocommitt<^»p-aj>/to report back
to senate dtfisng' \h& *pT*«3etit academic year.
Dean of arts Dennis Healy interjected: "The report will be ready when it will be ready."
Mate asked if a presentation of students' wishes
on the language requirement at this time was in
order. Gage said it was out of order.
In other business, senate was told funds for
a proposed clock tower near the library cannot be
diverted for anything else.
All four student senators told reporters after
the meeting they were very pleased with their
reception in senate.
Psst
THE UWSSW
can you keep
a  secret?
/ol. XLIX, No. 16
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1967
224-3916
— chrif blake photo
O, WHAT A LOVELY LIFE we lead ... the sky was blue, the air cold and crisp, shot with the
sense of autumn. The waves pushed relentlessly, beautifully forward. And a lone soul
danced along the logs, celebrating the glory of his existence.
'Councillors
don't do job/
says CUS rep
By PAUL KNOX
University student councils aren't doing their jobs, says the
field secretary of the Canadian Union of Students.
This is the main reason for student disenchantment with
CUS, Bob Baldwin, a senior political science student at the
University of Western Ontario, said Wednesday.
Baldwin is in Vancouver to discuss CUS and educational
problems with UBC student leaders.
(A referendum is to be held Nov. 1 at UBC to determine
whether students wish to remain affiliated with CUS.)
In an interview, Baldwin said student councils have a responsibility to their students to discuss resolutions that arise from
annual CUS conferences. They should either pass or reject these
resolutions and report their decisions to the next CUS conference.
"At present, councils send delegations to the conferences
but when they come back to the campuses, all they do is talk
about mickey mouse dances and games," he said.
When asked how people could be elected to student councils
who would give serious consideration to CUS proposals and
concepts, Baldwin said he didn't know.
"Students have to be made aware somehow that they constitute CUS," he said. "Because they think CUS is apart from
the student government structure, they aren't interested in the
organization.
"I'm disillusioned by the atmosphere I've seen at UBC in
the two days I've been here.
"UBC hasn't really taken advantage of the opportunities that
CUS offers. This is why people like Lynn Spraggs (engineering
president) and Peter Uitdenbosch (commerce president) say
that UBC doesn't derive any benefits from CUS."
On Wednesday, the commerce undergraduate society withdrew its support of CUS at a meeting, citing inefficiency and lack
of initiative as the reasons.
Baldwin complained that students have no concept of unity
and won't unite to solve common problems.
"A student comes out of a class and tells his friends he's
dissatisfied. But even if they agree, they never think of forming
a group to put pressure on council or faculty to improve the
situation.
To Page 2
see: Dissatisfied
LOVE  LETTERS?
SEE PAGE 7 Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 26, 196!
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Phone 224-0640
Warrior against lump sugar, beds, speaks
Canadian satirist and newspaper columnist
Richard Needham speaks at UBC Monday.
Needham writes a daily column for the
Toronto Globe and Mail which alternately damns
the system and aphorises on human nature.
Known in his column as Rudolph J. Needle-
berry and Rasputin J. Novgorod, he wages a
continual war against prison-like high schools,
lump sugar and twin beds.
With   the   aid   of   his   secretary,   Fearless
Francis, Needham also directs a campaign against
Canadian men who ignore Canadian women.
"Take a woman out to breakfast and buy her
flowers," he said.
His book, Needham's Inferno, a collection of
columns published last year, won the Leacock
award for humor.
Needham • is here on the invitation of the
English department.
He speaks in Bu. 106 at noon.
Student loans may dry up
Applications for student loans are still being
accepted at UBC.
But the approval of further applications is
not definite, said Dean Walter Gage, acting UBC
president and Dean of Students.
"There is no guarantee there are sufficient
funds to meet the demand of applications made
at this time," he said Wednesday.
"On July 1, the beginning of the loan year,
the federal government makes an allocation to
'f •v-.'A.X'N
<i
Trackless  trains
stop parking trek
Miain and East Malls may have a free
tractor bus system next week.
The plan calls for two Pacific National
Exhibition tractors pulling two cars each
operating in peak rush periods from the
far end of B and C parking lots down the
malls as far as possible.
Proposed operating times are from 7:30
to 8:45 a.m. and from 3:00 p.m. to 5:30
p.m., beginning Monday night and ending
Friday afternoon.
Drivers will be UBC engineers, who
will make a special trip Thursday afternoon to the annual Tea Cup game at the
stadium.
"We are not certain that we can get
this idea to work full-time, but we're going to try," said Don Munton, Alma Mater
Society first vice-president.
The plan's continued operation would
depend on the PNE, Munton said.
For next week, the PNE is giving the
university the use of the tractors and carriages free.
Munton is trying to get a trucking company to donate transportation of the vehicles from the fair-grounds to the campus.
Arnie Myers, UBC director of information, who suggested the idea of a permanent minibus system, hopes to house them
in the armory.
Aquarian speaks
An Aquarian monk who says the thanata-
phobia of most professors stems from an animallike fear of death speaks at UBC today.
Brother Anthony Decus, who was driven from
the U.S. after he tried to march from Seattle
to Washington, talks to students in Cataract 304
at noon.
each province according to the number of students eligible to enter post-secondary education,"
Gage said.
"Once this allocation is used up, it is up to
the provincial government to ask for a supplement."
Upon receiving a student loan application,
Gage considers it and makes a recommendation
to the B.C. student aid loan committee in Victoria.
This committee has the final say in whether
or not a loan will be issued.
"I have recommended over 4,000 applicants-
since July," Gage said.
W. D. Reid, head of the loan committee in
Victoria was not available today for comment
on the funds for UBC students.
DISSATISFIED
From Page 1
"Most students never ask themselves what
the hell education is all about. They don't
question the role of education in society."
Meanwhile, Alma Mater Society President
Shaun Sullivan said he supports CUS in principle, and thinks the result of the referendum
will be extremely close.
"I think there are undesirable features in the
structure of CUS," he said. "There should be
provincial organizations under the national
union."
Baldwin said regional organizations were once
a part of CUS but have disbanded.
"Existing provincial unions such as the B.C.
Assembly of Students provide a useful force, but
only from a tactical standpoint. A national force
is needed to express the theories of student involvement in defining the role of education in
society.
"That's really what CUS is all about."
Replying to charges that CUS has lost effectiveness as a national force with the loss of
Quebec students, he said that Quebec left mainly
because of a lack of intellectual concern among
English-speaking students.
"The Union Generale des Etudiants de Quebec is much more advanced in concept than
CUS," he said.
When asked about the recent pullout from
CUS of the University of Alberta, Baldwin said
that it was a good idea to have a reactionary
force (such as Alberta) in Canadian student affairs, because it would encourage more students
with ideas on student union to express their
views.
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TH E     U BYSSEY
Page 3
BACKED  BY  COUNCIL
SEE THE GIRL? Where's the girl ? The first red-blooded male to come to The
Ubyssey office this morning, and show us where the girl is, will receive
one dozen of the good stuff for this amazing feat of perception.
SFU prof union grows
By MIKE FINLAY
A legally represented union appears
destined to replace the faculty association at Simon Fraser University.
Spokesman Dale Sullivan said the
union was created several months ago
due to increasing difficulty in dealing
with the administration.
More than 150 applications have
been received since the resignation
Friday of the association's five-man
executive.
Dr. William Vidaver, president of
the association, said disunity and ineffectiveness in dealing with the administration prompted the mass resignations.
"In the union we would do more
than just exist," he said. "It's a tighter
organization."
"The administration is inexperienced," he said. "Before the creation
of SFU they were businessmen and
race track owners."
The union has had an executive
since March of this year, but was registered only this month, he said.
"We may seek government certification," Sullivan said.
Neither UBC acting president
Walter Gage nor SFU president Patrick McTaggart Cowan could be
reached for comment.
Faculty housing
on endowed lands
By HEW GWYNNE
The use of UBC endowment properties for low cost faculty housing
was supported Monday by endowment
lands manager M. E. Ferguson.
"I see no immediate reason why
suoh an idea can not be developed,"
he said.
The idea calls for endowment
properties closest to the campus to be
set aside for low-cost faculty housing.
The suggestion made by associate
English prof Thomas Blom, was
backed last week by city alderman
Tom Alsbury.
Fergusson said if developers of such
a project did not violate provisions of
the National Housing Act, such a project would be feasible.
Aldermen Alsbury, Ed Sweeney
and Halford Wilson have been appointed by the city to negotiate with
the provincial government.
Nothing can be done with the lands
now until Premier Cece Bennett appoints the five man board of the Universities Real Estate Development
Corporation.
This was given power to administer
endownment lands, after being passed
Discrimination
charges made
KINGSTON (CUP) — Kingston
landlords and apartment owners discriminate against foreign students, a
West Indian student at Queen's Uni-
versiy claims.
David Roett, an engineering postgraduate student from Barbados says
he telephoned one house and asked
to look at an apartment for rent. The
landlady was agreeable until she
thought to ask where he was from.
When he replied "from the West
Indies" she said he wouldn't find the
apartment suitable. He asked to see it
anyway, but the landlady refused.
The apartment was listed by the
Queen's placement housing service.
Noel Brown, a West Indian physics
grad student said he feels the service
should not list housing which discriminates." "The university is an international sort of place, and should not
sanction such action," he said.
G. O. Saunders, director of the
Queen's housing service, said, "If we
hear of anyone who has made a statement of this kind (refusing to rent to
colored students) we will delete him
from the list."
Saunders said some landlords ask
specifically for foreign students, who
are   thought   to   be   less   rowdy   and
as bill 90 during the  1965 legislative
assembly.
The corporation would be able to
borrow money from banks, businesses
and individuals for development projects. But according to section 11 of
the bill, no loan will be granted to
the corporation without Bennett's approving signature.
Alsbury said if the city could manage whatever area the university put
aside for faculty housing, the land
could be included by the city under
the limited dividends division of the
National Housing Act.
This division provides for the non
profit development of certain lands.
"I think the housing idea is excellent," said Alsbury.
"I'll be very pleased to see anyone
from UBC who is interested in furthering th project."
GREAT  TREKKER
Keenleyside gets
top AMS honor
Dr. Hugh Llewellyn Keenleyside is
UBC's Alma Mater Society Great
Trekker for 1967.
Keenleyside is co-chairman of the
British Columbia Hydro and Power
Authority.
The Great Trekker Award is the
highest honor the AMS can give an
alumnus of UBC.
It commemorates the spirit of the
Great Trek of 1922, when the students
of the university marched from the
Fairview shack to Point Grey campus,
a move which resulted in the establishment of the campus at its present
site.
The award is a model of the cairn
made from stones carried by the students protesting the government's lack
of action in building the Point Grey
campus.
The Great Trekker award is presented to an alumnus who has
achieved eminence in his chosen field,
made a worthy contribution to his
community and evidenced an especially keen and continued interest in
UBC.
Keenleyside graduated from UBC in
1920 and received his MA and PhD
from Clark University, Worchester,
Mass. From 1925 to 1927 he lectured
in history at UBC.
Keenleyside is presently on the
UBC  senate.
In 1928 he entered the department
of external affairs at Ottawa and later
became a member of the Canadian
delegation to the general assembly of
the United Nations during the second
part of its first session in 1946.
;M0RALMAN,WE'VE SELECTED (MXeA/?D0NAHE//1!l\\E CHAMPION BOILED^)
^CANDIDATERDR THE ELECTION!^BEET-FUSHM. QlRfliVbU REMEMBER!)
WLL BORDER THE BL0B3S}WILL GET A BALLOT...
JDMHTJj      "
kWEVE MADE THE VOTING A5£#f ASWECAN.THERE'sJ-.LIKE 77//50^!lJlTH THE X ALREADY
WOVE CANDIDATE, FOR INSTANCE\EVERV BLOmM/r.'UE SUPPLV"EVERYTHING!
L QET A BALLOT.,.;?
WILL i WEN HE SEES THE: ADVANTAGES THAT COKl FROM )
W.RK//VC UITH U516UCH AS A flM TOOTHBRUSH! ^      «
IN THE EMD,THE NUMBER OF \I0TES64STLULL BE THE NUMBER)
f VOTES RM? EAROONAH0M! T=~
 y^ '-=* THEWmiY
Published Tuesdays. Thursdays andl Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press1. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
OCTOBER 26, 1967
- ,       *        , - i
Spirits
The "spirit of the camps" — the much-touted
sense of community that is supposed to take the place
of repairs at Fort and Acadia — is riot long for UBC.
The camps are soon to be demolished and when
their leaky roofs come tumbling down, the spirit of the
camps, alas, will be no more. But although one
spirit is going, a new, different kind of spirit is growing
throughout the UBC residence system this year, with
headquarters in the housing administration offices.
Ihe new spirit is one of willingness to listen to
justifiable complaints and student suggestions.
It's a spirit that says students are adults who should
be capable of self-government in their campus homes.
It's a spirit that says architects and administrators
should, when planning new campus residences, ask advice of the students who are going to live in them.
Those in the know say the man primarily responsible for the new spirit is housing director Leslie
Rohringer.
Rohringer, although employed by the administration,
is widely rumored to be a human being. There's probably
truth in the rumor, for in a few short months as housing
boss he has made his department the most satisfactory
branch of the administration from the student point of
view.
Rohringer's appointment is presently a temporary
one. We hope it becomes permanent.
Were evil
We're evil. All we think about are drugs, sex, blorgs,
and Vietnam. We never do anything constructive.
That's what some people tell us. But they're wrong.
A couple of weeks ago, for instance, a few phone
calls by a Ubyssey reporter got some action started on
the possibility of the campus getting a much-needed
ambulance. Result of the calls could be the donation to
UBC of a fully-equipped, modern ambulance.
And now, after a few more Ubyssey phone calls,
we're going to see a week's trial run of a campus-wide
transport system. Hopefully, the trial run will result in
something permanent, making life happier for C-lot
residents.
See how nice and constructive we axe. And how ineffective the Alma Mater Society executives who pompously claim service, not activism, is the proper business
of student government.
Why couldn't they have thought of these student
services themselves and left us with more time to be
evil and write about drugs, sex, blorgs and Vietnam?
Kid stuff
Science dean V. J. Okulitch says last week's attempt
by science students to spark a spirit of rivalry between
Ihemselves and arts students was just "good clean fun."
But the artsmen refused to play along when science-
men armed with hoses tried to invade the Buchanan
nuilding.
We hate to come out against good clean fun but
we think the artsmen were right. For we simply can't
see the point of encouraging group rivalry between students in different faculties. We especially can't see the
point at a. time when it has become commonplace to talk
about the dangerous gulf in our civilization between
scientists and non-scientists.
University should be a place to bridge, not widen,
that gulf. We urge students in arts, science — and even
in engineering — to try inter-faculty communication and
leave rivalry for the Little League.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman cocky Irvingr  Fetish,   squashing   the
City                                          Stuart Gray green    fairy   with   his   rugby   boots
_.                                       „          _       . as he kicked Ting-a-ling in the.
News   Susan Gransby T         .   _                .         :.           .      .
,                          ..           .. ..,„ Ignoring     rouged     rubber     boots
Managing   Murray McMillan rambling   recklessly   in   the   rough,
Photo     Kurt Hilger the     rugged     rearguard     reasoned.
Associate .... Al Birnie, Kirsten Emmott Mike Finlay tried to get 17 persons
_    , failed, and called them phoney. Paul
Senior   Pat Hrushowy Knos    began    cussing,     but    Steve
Sports  Mike Jessen Jackson,   Norm   ("Bacon")    Gidney,
wira                                  rh.ri«H. u_ir_, Jane     Kennon,      Mark     DeCoursey.
W,r< "-;  Charlotte Haire Laurie   Dunbar,   Hew   Gwynne,   Leo
Page Friday   Judy Bing Tolstoy, Lin Tse-Hsu, Richard Baer,
Ass't. City   Boni Lee Alfred   Hitchcock   and   Jade    Eden
refrained.   Alexandra   Volkoff,   Judy
Both the green fairy and Ting-a- Young and Launne Armstrong play-
ling  tried  very  hard   indeed  to  cut ed oboes.
the bowstring of the Phyfatalphynx Splashing   acid    on    stray   blorgs,
as he whittled his arrow,  but being Lawrence Woodd, Bob Brown, Chris
chicken,   he   had   very   fowl   breath. Blake and  George Hollo  chortled in
Suddenly the Giant strode up to the the  darkroom.
monster  and   knocked   off its   head Tingling in the jock shop were Pio
■   with   a   tremendous   blow   with   his Urin,   Mike   Fitzgerald,   Bob   Banno,
club.   ''Screw   that   noise,"    said   a and John  Twigg.
a-c ,_m»/^ 'Wvrf _x -id
SENATE^ECRECy TESTED
WIDE OPEN!!?
p^CUOU/M'n.E CAMPU5
rFUHlj THE CLOCK ToWER,
4E FlrJAAKlAL REPORT) AD-
, MISSIONS; NED PROftRAnnFS;]gXXo^^_^
C_jRAP STUDIES REPORT}     £T~   £Ol
. EXT&jVSIOM DBlWHEtf^
     REPORT—
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Bad Bongie
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The responses of campus administrators to the proposed
French college demonstrate
the university's unending re-
sistence to change.
If the instruction in Prof.
Bongie's department were not
so inadequate and if departments within the arts faculty
were somewhat more receptive to proposals for courses
in French-Canadian studies,
perhaps the need for a French
college would not be so pressing.
Prof. Bongie reminds us of
the active opposition of narrow-minded British Columbians with which any effort
on behalf of biculturalism and
bilingualism must contend. It
is the duty of a university to
work to reduce such parochialism. Herein lies the value of
the proposal.
Obviously provincial support for such a proposal will
not be forthcoming. This points
out the need to gain private
and federal government financial support for a French college. The federal government
has spent millions studying
biculturalism and bilingualism. It is time that they establish a laboratory for testing
ideas on how Canada could
move toward greater bilingualism and biculturalism. And
what better place for such a
laboratory than in the midst
of the cultural wasteland that
is British Columbia.
EILEEN SAUNDERS
Vancouver
Sad  Stan
Editor,  The   Ubyssey:
Where's your sense of humor, Mr. Persky? If you can't
take a joke, you shouldn't have
joined up.
ROBIN  RUSSELL,
science president.
Adopted  Negro
Editor, The Ubyssey:
My experience with Children's Aid Society in initiating
the adoption of a Negro child
differed markedly from that
reported in your issue of Oct.
17. While experienced social
workers asked searching questions they seemed only to be
looking for assurance of a
home (not house ownership) in
which the child would find
acceptance, care, and love.
Neither my beard, left of liberal views, lack of sterility (as
evidenced by five children),
nor insolvency (from Vancouver's ridiculous housing situation), seemed to upset them.
During the past year only 3
per cent of those applying for
children have been turned
down. It would be tragic if
your article deterred any prospective adoptive parents from
applying and a child thus made
homeless.
If you as an editor are concerned with social problems
in Vancouver, some do exist:
censorship, the steady destruction of Vancouver's natural
surroundings, and prejudice in
housing to name only three.
As evidence of the latter,
consider these two quotations
from a May 1967 lot indenture:
"That the Grantee shall not
sell, assign or transfer the said
lands or any interest therein to
any person or persons of the
African or Asiatic race ..."
and "No person of the African
or Asiatic race or of African
or Asiatic descent (except servants of the occupier of the
premises in residence) shall
reside or be allowed to remain
on the premises." Even though
not court enforceable, these
clauses must have some influence on purchasers.
Your crusading seal is admirable, but don't sack Constantinople in the process.
J. McREE ELROD
head of catalogue division
UBC library
Innocents
Abroad
By BILL  GRAF
Graf,  arts  4,  spent  last  year
studying in Germany.
In the German university
towns you see them in the
pubs and night-spots, in the
fraternity houses and student
clubs, wherever booze and
frauleina are.
They consume conspicuously, spend freely and are most
often found defending the
Vietnam war in broken but
loud German,
They are American Students
Abroad, mostly completing
their junior year on a fully-
accredited exchange program
sponsored by their home universities in the U.S.A.
Paradoxically, these Innocents Abroad represent some
of the best and worst features
of American  civilization.
On the one hand, those I met
epitomized the American ideal
of universal access to higher
education. Virtually every age,
class and mental level were
included.
This contrasts with a highly
selective — or exclusive —
system in Germany where
eight per cent of the population enters a university or
higher educational institution.
SPONTANEOUS
Where an American student
may be as young as 17 or 18,
the typical German freshman
is between 19 and 21, having
completed our equivalent of
the sophomore year before
coming to  university.
American students are generally more spontaneous, less
convention-bound than their
German counterparts. They
are also more obnoxious and
less critical.
In German universities no
exams are written until the
graduating year. This means
that the onus of studying is
enirely on the student, but he
is also free to learn at his own
speed and follow up those topics which most interest him.
A North American, conditioned by exam-oriented diploma factories, is unequal to
this responsibility and seeks
solace in delicious (12 per
cent) German beer.
BOOZE LEGAL
And since booze is legally
available to anyone over 16,
the typical You-AU feels compelled to exercise his precipitate status in a daily renunciation of American drinking
laws.
Despite an occasional exam
or essay, the students have
lot of free time to meet the
people, travel or quaff beer.
But best of all are the expenses. You can actually study
a year in Germany, including
transportation there and back,
for less money than a year at
UBC costs.
A total of $400 will buy a
return ticket on a student ship
and another $5 or $10 wil get
you to your university city
by train. A mere $700 will
feed and house you for 12
months, and tuition for two
semesters is about $100. Add
$300 for travel and sundry
expenses and you still como
out a few hundred more
cheaply.
And the Canada Student
loans plan applies to any university in Germany. Thursday; October 26; l^AT
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
MORE  LETTERS  TO   THE  EDITOR
'Angry dissent'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
John Mate, to you and others
who write articles and make
speeches supporting the use of
dirty words, I wish to express
my angry dissent. Your breed
of rebel always argues with
the same cliches, slurs on
people, incorrectly used words
and limited wisdom.
The first reason for disagreeing with you, John Mate,
is your assertion that the connotation of the word offends.
The word does not have any
connotations. It has only accepted denotation: sexual intercourse. Used in any other
sense, as it usually is, it is
meaningless; it is only an exclamation, an expletive or a
curse.
My teacher in Grade 12 English said once that people use
four letter words only when
they have nothing else to say.
Is this your problem, John
Mate? Look through a dictionary, through a thesaurus,
through good literature; go to
the UBC library. Read the marvelous, witty, beautiful and
learned ways men can and
have expressed themselves on
every subject imaginable including sexual intercourse.
The word speaks of ignorance and low breeding quicker than bad grammer, prejudice, biased opinion or limited knowledge. Remember, students that do laboring work
in summers, how tired you become of hearing this word used
as ever part of speech the English language. Sure, I use it,
but only to conform. Tom
Campbell probably uses it but
he is a crass, ill-bred, unlik-
able man. The word is in keeping with his character.
Do you condone writing on
toilet walls, John Mate? Do
you suggest that we duplicate
toilet wall graffiti in newspapers, etc.? What value would
there be in that? Most of the
defacements are symptoms of
a malaise. And your word has
a prominent place on these
walls.
You sound like an advocate
of free love. Proponents of the
use of the word "fuck" often
are.
You represent an interesting
dichotomy: you have the ability
to be in a university where
one wishes to gain knowledge
and lose ignorance yet you apparently have principles which
would negate the benefit to be
derived therefrom.
ROGER SHAW
arts 2
Small grant
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It seem to me that most authors writing about the lobbying function of CUS forget that
education is entirely a provincial matter. (Have a look at
the BNA act.) In recent years
the federal government has
made available a certain
amount of money for education purposes. However, this
amount is so small that it is
only a very small fraction of
the provincial contributions.
The federal government may
be willing to make more
money available. However,
there seems to be a definite
reluctance to enter into the
provincial jurisdiction on this
matter.
My conclusion therefore is
that the place for lobbying
should be the provincial capitals and not Ottawa. It also
occurs to me that the Back
Mac campaign had more impact in government in recent
years than CUS lobbying in 42
years.
The federal lobbying that is
done seems to be annulled completely by the policy statements that CUS has made on
Vietnam, Rhodesia, civil rights,
etc. Our prime minister was
greatly annoyed with Doug
Ward's statement on the war
in Vietnam.
PETER UITDENBOSCH
commerce  president
'Not a  riot'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
RIOT! Do you really think,
Miss Emmott, that the orderly demonstration carried on
by the engineers last weel.
deserves such a distinction?
was there any property damage (other than to the paper)
done in The Ubyssey office?
Was there a big fight, or even
a small one? Were any reporters manhandled or brutally
assauted? No, MSss Emmott,
once again you have erred.
A student paper such as
The Ubyssey has an obligation
to report factually. All students on this campus are entitled to the facts, regardless
of how much it hurts you to
print them. True, it is the editor's prerogative to edit and
produce at his discretion and
I would be the first to defend
his editorial right. However,
when a paper degenerates to
a venomous, one-sided "rag",
it is time to show some disapproval. Hence we choose the
only path open to us. We simply collected the day's papers
and at noon-hour returned
them to their originator. In
doing so we registered our protest. What better way to show
disapproval?
Really, Miss Emmott, a
riot?
Now to get to Mr. ? (staff
psychologist). Truly our educational system must be lacking. How could a learned man
go through university and harbor such ridiculous ideas? I
will readily admit that the
engineers have a rigid society.
Engineering students are
strongly urged to participate
in the extra-curricular program
established by the EUS council. Included in this program
are exchange dances, parties,
smokers, stunts, a hockey league, intra-mural sports, a complement of professional speakers, various charitable drives,
publication of yearbooks, professional magazines and a
weekly paper, full participation in AMS functions and
many other beneficial activities. Although no formal restrictions are imposed on students attending engineering
functions, trouble seldom occurs. To my knowledge we
have never had a brawl at
engineering only functions. The
other allegations in the disputed article are petty generalizations.
The report is either phony
(perhaps the editor is trying to
get even) or we have heard
from an ignorant jackass who
founds "its" way to university
after somehow mastering the
A B C's of grade school. No.
we won't throw rock through
your windows and if you are
really brave and want to leave
your cubicle for lunch or to
satisfy any other human urge,
we won't beat you up.
Whoever you are, come out!
Have a look around and see
how many feet your slipper
fits. Have a look at the true
us. See if your information is
perhaps, slanted!
L. D. SPRAGGS
engineering president
Ed. note: During the riot,
one light fixture was broken
and one pair of glasses was
lost. The psychologist is a prominent member of his department, frequently quoted in the
downtown press. He sincerely
believes, We feel mistakenly,
that he cannot speak his mind
about engineers without retribution.
Foreign  band
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Everybody has been complaining about the racial riots
(UBC vs. SFU) which resulted
when the UBC "Blunderbirds"
failed to make "Clan chowder"
out of the SFU squad, but
most people have ignored the
most vital issue. This, of
course, is the inclusion of a
foreign band and flag at the
half-time show. True, the American band probably felt at
home admist the smoke and
racial riot; and granted, a
Canadian band would be unaccustomed to such "uncivil
disobedience" (there has not
been so much smoke in Vancouver since the pot boiled
over on 4th Ave.); but this
home-like atmosphere does not
justify the use of an imported
group.
Not knowing the details of
the negotiations we feel no
blame should be attached to
the Bellingham band; but we
do insist that Vancouver, which
"OLYMPIA"
PIZZA
SPAGHETTI
HOUSE
2599 W. Broadway
DINING ROOM
Take Out
Service
BUY 3 PIZZAS
GET 1 FREE
is twenty times larger than
Bellingham, could have provided at least an adequate
group.
Of course, one may look on
the bright side. In order to
prevent a recurrence of this
classic orgy next year, we
might dupe the public into attending the stadium and have
the game played at Bellingham College. Then the band
could play "Smoke Gets in
Your Eyes" on friendly soil.
Let's draft their beer not their
bands.
JIM ALLAN
science 4
GRAHAM HOPE
arts 4
Mini Kilts
and
V-Neck Sweaters
Kilft and Kitties
9.95 to 18.95
Sil.i 5-17
V-N.ck Pullovers
6.95 to 14.95
The
J&zt*
Shop
210 OAKRIDGE
SHOPPING CENTRE
AM 1-1034
Tutoring in All Subjects-
Individual
No Contracts
Mr. L j. Leddy
B.A., M.A., B.LS. Director
Canadian Tutorial Contra       7364913
Mononucleosis:
The "Kissing Disease"
Why has this ailment given rise
to many snide remarks, much
unnecessary worry and considerable medical disagreement? In November Reader's
Digest you'll learn how to separate fact from fancy in this
most misunderstood of all
diseases—infectious mononucleosis. How common is it?
Is it increasing? Does it spread
like wildfire? Is it restricted to
teen-agers and young adults?
What is the No. 1 myth surrounding mononucleosis? Read
why experts say emotional factors do not play an important
part in this disease, yet why
you still shouldn't kiss a friend
who has it. Get all the facts in
November Reader's Digest now.
VOLKSWAGEN
DRIVERS . . .
LAST YEAR OUR FACTORY-TRAINED EXPERTS REPAIRED MANY OF
YOUR CARS  . . .
Naturally wo wHI quota on any
repair tarvico bocaut* of our
guaranteed low price*.
AU   WORK   GUARANTEED
Only At
AUTO-HENNEKEN
Specialized   Service
8914 Oak St. (at Marine)
phone Hans — 263-8121
FESTIVAL OF FOLK DANCING
Women's Gymnasium
University of British Columbia
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28th — 8 p.m.
Phi Gamma Delta (Fiji) Fraternity
regretfully announces that their
Homecoming Party at their House
will be restricted to members (both
Active and Alumni) only.
ORIENTATION
TO COLLEGE
FOR ADULTS
An Introduction to Effective Study
Saturday, October 28, 1967
9:30 a.m.  - 4:00 p.m.
Main Branch, Vancouver Public Library
TOPICS:
Adults CAN Learn
Effective Study
Effective Use of Library Resources
The Art of Writing
A Word About Examinations
FEE: $2.00
For information phone
U.B.C. EXTENSION DEPARTMENT
228-2181 (Conference Office) Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 26, 1967
AT U. OF WESTERN ONTARIO
Cars barred after protest
LONDON (CUP)—Student cars were barred
from the University of Western Ontario campus
Tuesday, following a protest park-in.
Campus police put up barricades and turned
awdy student drivers after 225 students parked
their cars on the lawn opposite Stevenson Hall,
the university's main administration building.
Students were protesting new parking regulations and the way they were imposed.
The park-in was directed by members of a
newly formed parking committee, who stood at
the entrance to student parking lots Tuesday
morning urging students to detour to the Stevenson Hall lot.
The barriers came down in the afternoon.
A protest rally held Tuesday afternoon beside the campus' central parking lot attracted
about 600 students, who were urged to sign
petitions and refuse to buy parking permits put
on sale last week.
At issue is a new controlled access parking
system to be put into effect November 1 with
$12 fees for students and $37.50 for faculty and
staff.
The university's faculty and staff associations
have both instructed members not to pay the
fees. .
Speakers at the rally said the main issue was
the undemocratic way the regulations had been
announced, without negotiation with staff,
faculty or students.
"If this isn't our university then who the
hell does it belong to?" one protestor asked the
cheering crowd.
University administrators maintained there
had been participation of students and faculty
in a parking sub-committee of the board of
governors.
Action committee members said further
demonstrations would depend on the administration's willingness to negotiate.
Cars parked opposite the administration
building were not disturbed, but city police
tagged cars and motor bikes illegally parked
outside the gates after the barriers went up.
Western has never had parking fees.
Arrested editor
blasts
OTTAWA (CUP) — The RCMP committed
a serious breach of civil liberties and freedom
of the press Sunday, according to Tony Seed, an
underground press editor.
Seed, editor of the Canadian Free Press, and
a former Carleton student, made the charge today after his arrest last Sunday on a narcotics
charge.
RCMP officers entered his apartment after
dawn Sunday morning. They arrested Seed, and
confiscated personal correspondence as well as
photos and editorial copy from the files of the
Canadian Free Press.
They apparently had a "blanket" search
warrant which allows them to enter anywhere
at any time if they suspect they will find
narcotics.
Jack Neelin, another resident of the apartment, said he overheard one of the RCMP officers say "make sure you get the pictures", as
they searched through the newspaper files.
The pictures, Seed claims, showed the RCMP
making an arrest on the Sparks Street mall, a
meeting place for the city's hippies.
A list of items taken from the apartment was
not provided, and none has as yet been returned,
Seed said.
Evidence for the narcotics charge was a hooka
pipe alleged to contain marijuana, he added.
Seed contends the pipe contained only
tobacco and aspirin> a mixture he had heard
caused highness.
"It's only good journalism to try it out
before we pass the information on to our readers," he said.
Seed was freed Monday on $300 bail.
WORK WHERE THE ACTION   IS!
m   ENGINEERS   *
required by
PAN AMERICAN PETROLEUM CORPORATION
CALGARY, ALBERTA
Interviews tor Regular and Summer Employment
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1967
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1967
with
Postgraduates, Graduates, & Undergraduates
in
ALL DISCIPLINES OF ENGINEERING
Pan American is a major producer of oil, natural gas and sulphur. The Company's operations now embrace British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Yukon,
North West Territories, and the Atlantic and Pacific coastal waters.
We can offer excellent salaries, benefits and opportunities for advancement.
For Company and position information, contact your Placement Office.
Hear a World-famous Platform Speaker
and Highly Touted Author
Bishop Stephen Neil
World Christianity or
NONE AT ALL !
FRIDAY NOON, ANG. 110
Sponsored by the University Religious Council
Dine with music till two a.m.
1312 S.W. Marine Dr., Vancouver 14, B.C.       -      261-7951
Engineering & Science
Graduates are invited to discuss career opportunities with
Canada's  leading  forest products company
MacMillan Bloedel Limited
Interviews will be held on Campus.
OCTOBER 30, 31   AND   NOVEMBER   1
for graduating students interested in design, process, research, development production and marketing opportunities.
For information and appointments please contact your
STUDENT        PLACEMENT        OFFICE
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers, rubbers and
umbrellas.
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay Ihem a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10%  discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10TH - 738-9833 Thursday, October 26, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag«l 7
LOVE LETTERS
TIMES A-CHANGING
70 THE UBYSSEY   internationalists
Editor, The Ubyssey:
How can you call this a student paper ? A student paper
should present articles and information relevant to the majority of the students with
something in it of interest to
everyone, as well as being a
medium through which different views on the same subject
could toe expressed.
The Ubyssey fails miserably.
Every issue is devoted to entirely the same thing:
(a) smearing engineers:
What's the purpose of Rae Mos-
ter's Grade Three level cartoons
depicting engineers as hoods
wearing Nazi swastikas? What's
the purpose of a front page article toy some unnamed pyscholo-
gist spouting off on "Neanderthals" most likely at the
prompting of one of your staff?
Who wants to pick up a copy
of The Ubyssey and read the
same drivel day after day about
"the boorish red hord"? Why
don't you print a special edition
on running down engineers and
get it over with ?
(b) war in Vietnam: Obviously it is a subject in need of
world wide attention but why
must you incessantly print article after article toy one radical
or another ? The Ubyssey is so
saturated with this propaganda
it ranks second only to the Peking Daily for content and the
Oakridge News for interest. The
number of articles appearing on
Vietnam leaves any potentially
interesting one buried in a sea
of garbage.
ANOTHER
LETTER
7 suggest'
Editor,  The Ubyssey:
Last Monday's football game
(debauch) begs the question of
the role of extra-mural sports
in this university. It is painfully evident that our program, as it now stands, is both
inadequate   and   inept.
Money (mine especially) is
being thrown away for no
apparent reason. The choice
we the students (who pay for
these fiascoes) have to ponder
is whether this program should
be continued. I say obviously
not.
Either we should become a
large-scale sports power or
else we should spend this
money on intramurals where
a greater amount of people
stand to benefit. My position
is obviously the latter and it
is supported for negative reasons, unfortunately. Big-time
college football in the United
States has made a farce of
higher education (our ostensible reason for being at university) with slush funds, preferential treatment, simple
courses, a fierce partisanship
that seems perilously close to
psychotic hatred and unquestioning loyalty.
Of course, athletics will not
be cut, but it is obvious that
this money could and should
be spent on activities of greater benefit to the student body.
DAVID LEVINE
arts 4
Because of the uselessness of
this so-called newspaper I propose that the entire editorial
and management staff be removed and replaced with responsible and intelligent people
who are concerned with something else other than smearing
engineers and pushing Vietnam.
If this can't be done then stop
altogether and redirect funds
allocated to it to more worthwhile ventures such as SUB or
a grant to the Arts Undergraduate Society. Nobody wants to
see a portion of their AMS fees
go to a minority group intent
on berating their faculty.
Let them go publish their rot
with their own funds and under
another name, not that of The
Ubyssey.
RALPH ZBARSKY.
applied science
Editor, The Ubyssey:
After two years in this institution of higher learning I have
finally reached a point where I
can no longer accept a university newspaper which is completely oriented to one small
minority of students. A newspaper which is at least in part
paid for by a large grant from
the Alma Mater Society should
hold itself responsible to represent all groups of students, not
the extremely limited minority
of conforming non-conformists,
characterized by their long
hair, body odors, and funny
cigarettes. You may invite all
to come down to dear old north
Brock basement to slave away
for the hippie and arts council
cause, but how many non-members of your clique are going to
be accepted by the clique, and/
or going to be able to work
with funny smelling smoke
swirling around them.
A campus newspaper should
be revolutionary, this I gladly
concede, but is it really necessary to become bolshevik ?
Slanted writing, propaganda,
and obvious mistakes and inaccuracies are so evident in The
Ubyssey as to be bordering upon the ridiculous. Surely you
do not expect any university
student to be so naive as to
believe the majority of the
trash you print.
I, for one, regret that $16,200
of the Alma Mater Society's
budget is assigned to an irresponsible rag, rather than being used to assist many other
AMS organizations which make
worthwhile contributions to the
university encironment.
Although somewhat paradoxically, The Ubyssey seem to
have entrenched itself as an immovable, bureaucratic institution on campus. For this reason
it seems that demonstrations of
the type enacted last week by
the red-coated members of the
faculty of applied science may
•be of great service to the general population of the university by bringing about some
sort of reform in your nonprogressive "establishment".
Either change the paper's
name to the "Hippie Arts Council Daily" and earn support
from your own ranks instead of
the 85 cents you got from myself and all other university
students via the AMS budget,
or truly and responsibly represent UBC as The Ubyssey.
GEORGE SHINDLER
arts 2
Left-wing reforms pushed
BAINS
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
Ubyssey Associate Editor
FIRST OF A SERIES
Universities, our ex-president to the contrary,
have traditionally been the birthplace of ideas
of social reform.
The middle-class student typically enters with
a naive view of the world and gradually becomes
aware of certain flaws in a society he'd always
thought worked pretty well.
Students who think about changing the society we live in generally decide to join a group.
This could be anything frone
a Campus Crusade for Christ
to the Liberal party.
The emergence of the New
Left makes a number of alternatives available: the now-reorganized Student Union For
Peace Action, the Communist
Party (for more advanced revolutionaries), the Trotskyite and
socialist groups. And in a pinch,
one can always start a new group.
Internationalists began about four years ago
with a dynamic young bacteriologist named Hardial Bains. Its original members are scattered
now, and Bains went to Trinity University in
Dublin, Ireland to teach. The spirit of the group,
however, lived on in law student Bob Cruise.
Cruise remained in close touch with the Dublin branch of Internationalists and last year,
UBC's group revived. It was a discussion group
to begin with.
Professors were invited to meet informally
with students. A labor leader spoke. Gradually
the leftist political outlook of the leaders became
estabished.
The first issue of the Internationalist publication, Words, contained attacks on American foreign policy as well as analyses of the university
power structure. It was the beginning of the
group's two-sided development: politically anti-
imperialist and concerned with improving university education.
On a higher level, these two seemingly unrelated fields were tied togther in Marxist analysis by Peter Cameron, now with the Progressive
Workers Party.
Cameron's article in Words about the business
interests who control the university has been
widely reprinted.
Gradually the memibership grew until over
100 people were turning out to hear Professor
William Willmontt's discussion on Vietnam, student Alex 'Bandy's view of the Hungarian and
Cuban Revolutions, professor Clive Ainsley's
talk about his trip to Communist China.
The group also involved itself with university issues: fee fight and AMS elections were
examples.
A seminar took place early in the summer at
Simon Fraser. All the city's leftist groups took
part.
With the return of Hardial Bains to Vancouver, a split developed in the group. Some were
dedicated revolutionaries others only mildly interested in student activism and suspicious of
Marxist doctrines. In between were a large number of students content with a centre-left position.
The latter grew alarmed at the group's growing similarity to purely revolutionary factions,
while Bains and others were content with no
less.
After Cruise and Bains left, polarization took
place. Internationalists continues with a much
smaller membership: the rest of the group formed
a new group (temporarily named The New
Group) and thrashed out a political basis.
What was finally agreed upon was similar to the platform
of the Internationalists of old.
Interested students all have a
common opposition to imperialist government tactics, and are
dedicated to democratizing the
university.
Within that context, one of
the most positive actions possible will prabalbly be the resumption of the lecture series.
New Group members Gaibor Mate and myself
saw the academic senate as a first step toward
student democracy. Group members approved of
our platform and were generous with campaign
help.
More meetings will undoubtedly produce a
crop of other ideas. Meanwhile, students concerned with the state of their society have an
outlet for their energies that require not so much
an advanced political position but the desire to
learn and work.
CRUISE
Mobil
will be on campus
October 31
& November 1
to interview students
for regular and summer employment
in the
Geology, Geophysics, Engineering
Financial and Land* Departments
* Regular only
Appointments may be made at the Placement Office
Mobil Oil Canada Ltd.
Box 800    -    Calgary, Alberta Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 26, 1967
'B.C. making a  mistake'
—housing critic Perrault
— kurt hilger photo
FOR TEN DAYS this summer, first and second year architecture
students created paintings and sculptures down by the seaside. The results of this workshop will be on sale Monday
through Friday next week in Lass 205.
ATTENTION
GRADUATES
The Noranda Group of Companies offers a wide range of
opportunities to university graduates with ability and initiative. Broad diversification promises successful applicants
unusual scope to develop skills and gain experience in their
fields of specialization. The policy of the Group to select
personnel from within our companies to fill key positions
as they open up, makes it possible for a trainee to travel
widely and, over the years, to get exposure to a great
variety of job situations which will help prepare him for
supervisory and administrative duties.
A Noranda Group representative will be on campus here
October 31 to interview applicants from among prospective
graduates. Appointments can be made in advance through
the University Placement Office, phone 228-3811.
NORANDA MINES GROUP OF COMPANIES
^1
* I *
* m|m .
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
The B.C. government is committing a monumental error in not accepting federal housing
aid, Liberal leader Ray Perrault said Wednesday.
He and Municipal Affairs Minister Dan Campbell discussed each other's party policy on housing before 80 persons in a noon debate in Ang.
110.
"Aid has never been refused any province.
B.C. never asked for it," Perrault said.
In spite of Bennett's disinterest, the federal
government has provided assistance through the
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation for
urban renewal, student housing and low interest
loans, Perrault said.
Campbell agreed with Perrault that housing
was a provincial responsibility, but denied that
financing was also up to the province.
"The small flow of credit money from Ottawa
is one cause of the problem,"
Campbell said.
Responding to Perrault ridicule of a small portion of the
provincial budget allocated to
housing, he said: "We have
greatly extended the original
sum of two and a half million
dollars to over four million."
Total B.C. budget is $450
million.
Perrault said an insufficient     PERRAULT
housing budget  did  nothing to  prevent  social
problems   which   caused   government   welfare,
health department and penal institution expenses.
"Twenty-five per cent of B.C.'s population
exists on less than $3,000 annually," he said.
"It is not good enough to say we have socialism
for the wealthy and free enterprise for the
poor."
He agreed with a federal recommendation
that no family should pay over twenty per cent of
its income for housing.
"We need a housing corporation to give direction and meaning to B.C.'s housing program.
We also need research into housing. Why don't
we have a decent research program for this here
at UBC?"
Perrault had to cut his remarks short when
students abruptly filed in for their 1:30 p.m.
class.
Govt holds purse
The Ssskatchewan government has announced
it will assume direct financial control of the
University of Saskatchewan.
In making the announcement, premier Ross
Thatcher said that although the government will
financially control the university, it will not
interfere with internal operations.
"In essence, the university will be obliged
to make its financial requests to the legislature
in the same manner as any other department."
The university is fast becoming one of the
government's largest spending departments, he
said.
"Our government is concerned by the fact
that today, elected representatives of the people
have virtually no control over university spending," he said.
This year, the government must find $28
million for University of Saskatchewan, and the
campus population is growing at a rate of more
than 1,200 students a year.
1) Theological Colleges - Parking Lot - 9
p.m. 2) Fort Camp Women's Residence -
9:10 p.m. 3) Fort Camp Huts - Corner
Marine Dr. & Fort Rd. - 9:25 p.m. 4)
International - Panhellenic House - Parking
Lot - 9:35 p.m. 5) Totem Park Common
Block - 9:50 p.m. 6) Lower Mall Common
Block - 10:15 p.m. 7) Library • 10:30 p.m.
8) Brock Hall - 10:40 p.m. 9)Fraternity
Houses - 11:00 p.m. 10) Acadia Camp -
Corner Acadia Rd. & Agronomy Rd. - 11:30
p.m. Thursday, October 26, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
DEMOCRATIZATION
Senates suggest students
— kurt hilger photo
ALREADY-ALREADY, I know its mid-term time, but a fellow
just has to have a little sleep now and then. Anyway, I'm not
sleeping,  I'm  meditating — it's much better than sleep.
OTTAWA (UNS) — Two more Canadian universities have moved toward democratization of
their governing structures.
A board of governors committee of the University of Saskatchewan at Saskatoon and a
senate committee of Sir George Williams University at Montreal have recommended four
student seats each on their senates.
U of S student senators would be appointed
by the student council. Sir George Williams recommends student senators be chosen by a committee dominated by student leaders.
U of S students would be appointed to one
year terms with provision for a one year extension. The standard senate term is three years.
Although Saskatoon's student council last
year agitated for senate reform no demands have
yet been voiced by this year's council.
Current recommendations came as a surprise
to many council members.
If the Saskatoon committee's report is approved by the board of governors it must then
go to the provincial legislature for ratification.
The Sir George Williams committee also
recommends two students be placed on each
faculty council.
The recommendations must yet be approved
by the senate at its Friday meeting but student
president Jeff Chipman says he is certain they
will go through.
The committee, which included three students, recommends students have full voting
rights and responsibilities.
Tha students asked for no representation on
the board of governors saying the senate was
more important.
Term of office will be one year. Half will
assume office in January, the other half in June.
French college
cornerstone in
MONTREAL (CUP) — Annoyed at Quebec
government procrastination, 250 Quebec students
took matters into their own hands recently and
laid the cornerstone for a second French language university in Montreal.
The students, led by Union Generale des
Etudiantes du Quebec president Pierre LeFran-
cois, assembled in a field which is rumored to
be the proposed site of a university.
The university has been accepted in principle
by the government ,but so far no concrete plans
have been made public by the government.
LeFrancois said University of Montreal, the
only French university in the city, will have a
capacity of 25,000 students by 1975, while it has
been calculated that by 1971 there will be 26,000
students seeking admission.
This makes a second university a necessity
he said.
English-language Montrealers have a choice oi
three degree-granting institutions — McGill, Sir
George Williams, and Loyola College.
Three want
Windsor trip
Three students have applied
to be the UBC delegate at two
seminars in Windsor, Oct. 30
to Nov. 3.
Regionalism and Power
Structure is the first of the
seminars.
Economist J. K. Galbraith
and U.S. secretary of defense
Robert McNamara are featured at the second seminar,
Threshold to a World of
Change: Canada and the
United States in a New International Setting.
Interested students may still
apply today to Penny Cairns,
secretary, Alma Mater Society.
Miss Cairns said she felt
well Wednesday.
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Vancouver
684 - 7341 Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 26, 1967
'■X
— lawrence woodd photo
TRINKETS AND toys from far away exotic places go on sale
next week at International House's annual Treasure Van. All
the goods, such as the little man held by Heather Newbold
are brought in directly from their point of origin especially
for the sale.
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UNIVERSITY'S PLACEMENT OFFICE
By DENNIS GANS
Trying to shut down the pentagon and the
draft iboards by any means, violent or nonviolent,
is more than protest or dissent.
Protest by marches, rallies and demonstrations merely expresses opposition. Its purposes
are to influence the government and the people.
Since protest is unlikely to end the war, people
are turning to direct action against the war
machine.
Direct action, violent as at Washington, or
nonviolent as at the draft board blockades is
more than protest; it is treason tooth in the
dictionary and U.S. constitutional sense of the
word (under the constitutional definition even
protest could conceivably be considered treason).
However the Allies punished Germans at Nurem*
berg for not committing treason, that is, for not
disobeying their government.
Obviously, laws against treason cannot be
justified. When Al Birnie says the U.S. government will not allow effective protest he is probably right, but it is absurd to expect it to allow
direct action of any kind.
The only sensible violent action is to blow
up the pentagon and the supply trains. To rush
6,000 armed troops is foolish, to bring guns to
the next march is akin to the Vietcong informing
the Marines of their attacks in advance.
But for nonviolent action to be effective, large
numbers of people must participate. That won't
happen until the anti-war movement stops talking to itself and goes out and convinces people
individually that the whole of the war is wrong
and they must act to stop it.
VARSITY RELIGIOUS COUNCIL
sponsors
BISHOP STEPHEN C. NEIL
Friday, Oct. 27 - 12:30
Angus 110
68 ENGINEERING GRADS
An engineering career in Canada's Public Service offers the engineering graduate a spectrum of opportunities unmatched elsewhere in Canada. The broad base of engineering
activities provides a challenge for every interest in the following fields:
NATIONAL  DEVELOPMENT INSTRUMENT DEVELOPMENT
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NAME          	
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CITY	
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PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF CANADA,
OTTAWA 4, ONTARIO Thursday, October 26, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page IT
SDS  seeks  democracy  for  the  individual
by FRANK BRAYTON
Special to
Canadian University Press
Students for a Democratic
Society is an organization
which represents more than
any other group the thinking
and philosophies of the new
left.
There are about 200 chapters of SDS spread throughout
the VJS. and the organization
has grown steadily since its
founding in 1962 at Port
Huron, Michigan.
Its primary objectives are
outlined in this excerpt from
the founding manifesto, The
Port Huron Statement:
We seek the esablishment of
a democracy of individual participation governed by two
central aims: that the individual share in those social decisions determining the quality and direction of his life;
that society be organized to
encourage independence i n
men and provide the media for
their common participation.
THE ISSUE
Two national organizers of
SDS 'ware in Montreal last
week for the purposes of research and discussion of SDS
policies with local activists.
Greg Calvert of the SDS
New York office and Dee Ja-
coben, National Draft Resistance Co-ordinator based in
the Chicago office, discussed a
wide range of topics and their
feelings on specific issues are
as follows:
A true student voice in the
running of universities will
not be achieved through representation on various committees as many universities
are now establishing. Committees are devices of the administration and are used to prevent students from gaining ultimate control.
But student representatives
sitting on committees do serve
a useful function because they
become disenchanted and later
demand true representation.
They are led to a realization
of their impotence and apathy
follows.
REPRESENTATIVES IMPOTENT
Those sitting on the Board
of Governors of universities
are business men who are only
interested in seeing that there
is an adequate number of graduates to fill positions in the
management of large corporations in order that the present corporate structures will
prevail in the future. They are
moulding students to fit their
image of what a person should
be and what functions he
should perform. But this will
not continue as more students
opt out of their sociey and can
envision a better one in which
values are altered from tho'se
of the present production oriented society.
That is why these management executives and government bureaucrats cannot tolerate dissent, because they can
sense a danger to their own
way of life. As a consequence
they try to impose their authority on students but this
will not be tolerated much
longer. Already there is a massive movement of resistance
developing in the United
States.
DRAFT-DODGERS
Resistance to the draft is one
manifestation of student confrontation with authoriy. Although the movement is relatively small in terms of numbers, it is significant because
it is the first resistance of this
type since World War II. It
represents a direct confrontation with the corporate and
military power elite in America.
Draft  resistors  are not en-
@ Westinghouse
will be on Campus November 6, 7 and 8, 1967
to interview 1968 Engineering Graduates
ELECTRICAL - MECHANICAL - PHYSICS
A well-defined training program is offered to prepare candidates for positions of responsibility in:
DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
FACTORY ENGINEERING
SERVICE ENGINEERING
FIELD INSTALLATION
QUALITY CONTROL AND TEST
TECHNICAL MARKETING AND SALES
These positions will afford opportunity for career development to graduates with potential.
Professional salary scale and increases based on performance as well as excellent employee fringe benefit plans.
Contact the Placement Office for detailed information,
brochures and interview appointment.
couraged by SDS to come to
Canada, again because the opportunity for confrontation is
lost and there never will be a
mass migration to Canada.
Their alternative is draft dodging rather than resistance and
will never be a long-range solution to the draft problem.
Only by developing a large-
scale resistance will the power
elite realize that they do not
have support for the war. People can be radicalized through
struggle, once they have experienced coercion.
Individuals who are now involved in student government
leave the university prepared
to maximize their positions
and will inherit the reins of
power. The National Students
Association represents this
more than any other group.
ORGANIZE PRESSURE
The recent revelation that
the CIA was providing funds
to the NSA proves that the
power elite is using student
rhetoric to sell the product.
Where will NSA executives be
in ten years? Probably in some
management o r government
bureaucratic  position.
What the U.S. needs now is
a national student union to represent real people on real campuses involved in real struggles.
Pressure has to be organized
on university campuses but in
new ways so that change can
be brought about in the academic community. Apathy, as
such, does not exist among university students. Rather, non-
participation results from the
unconscious recognition that
institutions do not  really re
present them. Consequently,
what you demand is control.
Control is the final issue and
all other issues are used to
bring this about.
Students have little or no
control over their own education and as a result experience a sense of alienation,
either consciously or unconsciously. Newspaper editors
must become sensitive to the
under - currents of alienation
on campus and establish an editorial policy that reflects it.
Campus issues must be related
to  this   central  problem.
THE NEWSPAPER'S ROLE
But newspapers are one aspect of the control of people's
lives. What people read affects
their daily activities and habits. It is one aspect of the
volume of material that people
internalize daily. Newspapers
are usually useless when it
comes to effecting significant
social change because people
participate in p"ress campaigns
passively. Issues raised by
campus newspaper are experienced second-hand by the students. It is more important
that these people become involved in resisting authority
themselves which is the purpose of campus organizing. In
the long run, this is a more
effective way of achieving
social reform.
Society, today, is incredibly
authoritarian. It can probably
be best described as "benevolent fascism." Hippies can
be very effective in forcing the
power structure to reveal this
authoritarianism, because it
cannot cope with hippies.
Such programs held at some
American universities as "gentle Thursday" force the controlling powers to reveal their
weakness in this respect. They
become intolerant and use
force to repress such acts by
the students they are trying
to mould.
A NEW CHAPTER
They are witnessing the end
of a chapter in American history, that of American Empire.
A   new  one  is  being  written
now that may take twenty
years to complete.
This is evident from the
number of forces working
against the American social
structure as it presently exists.
Among them are such forces
as the urban guerilla warfare,
Vietnam, the recent Organization of Latin American States
Conference in Havana and the
latent fascsim that exists in
the U.S.
The U.S. government has recently contracted several large
corporations to employ computers in the production of
model programs that will enable them to cope with student
radicalism. Despite the $75
million that is being used for
this purpose the whole thing
will prove useless, because the
models are being built on inaccurate information. The
minds of the men feeding information into the computers
are structured in such a way
that will not enable them to
grasp the concepts behind the
new radicalism. They may be
brilliant men, but they are
just not capable of understanding the motives of the new
left.
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It** Page  12
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday* October 26, 19*7
NtF  VISITORS
Too few to go around?
OTTAWA (CUP) — What
ever happened to the Vietnamese National Liberation
Front students who were supposed to visit Canadian Union
of Students campuses?
Nobody knows for sure, but
there are two explanations of
where plans ran amuck.
The first explanation is that
two groups of students were to
come to Canada—one for CUS
campuses and the other for the
Union Generale des Etudiantes
du Quebec. But CUS doesn't
know what happened to their
group.
The second explanation for
a confused and fuzzy situation
is that all Canadian students
were to share the three NLF
representatives presently in
the country.
Assuming this possibility,
and assuming UGEQ would
give them up a week, CUS
set up the following tentative
itinerary: Oct. 8 in Ottawa
area; the ninth in Toronto;
Oct. 10 that they would visit
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Waterloo and Hamilton, was
possible; and they would speak
in Winnipeg on the 11th and
Calgary on the 12th.
They would head back east
through Montreal on the 13th,
with the possibility of a stop
a Dalhousie on their way back
to Prague, where they would
arrive on the 15th of October.
However the visas of the
NFL reps expired Oct. 11 at
which time they must be out
of the country. CUS badgered
Canadian Embassy officials
for an extension of these visas,
but their efforts were unsuccessful.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
Washington peace ralivers
meet clubs and bayonets
— bob brown photo
DID YOU SEE what I saw? I seen a bunch of foresters sawing
through a log in Buchanan Wednesday. The sawyer did a
good job of sawing up the log but you should have saw the
forestry queen.
CUS offers alternative
to Duff-Berdhal report
OTTAWA (CUP) — Will the real Duff-Berdhal please stand
up?
Such a scene is likely to occur Saturday when two separate
groups meet simultaneously to discuss the aftermath of the Duff-
Berdhal report on university government in Canada.
The original program organized by University of Toronto
education professor E. P. Sheffield includes a Friday night dinner
at U of T with Sir James Duff and Robert Berdhal, the report's
authors.
But the Canadian Union of Students, upset at the structure
and form of the Sheffield program, have organized their own
alternative program for the same time — and on the same
campus.
The CUS program, which conflicts with the Saturday afternoon part of the Sheffield program, will consist of presentations
followed by discussion periods.
In a letter to Sheffield, CUS president Hugh Armstrong expressed strong reservations about the agenda, saying it was overcrowded, wastes too much time, and restricts participation from
the floor.
The Duff-Berdhal Report, released in January 1966, covers
the student role in academic government.
g) Westinghouse
Will Be on Campus November 7, 1967
to Interview 1968 Commerce Graduates
(Marketing and Industrial Administration Options)
A well-defined training program is offered to prepare candidates for positions of responsibility in:
COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS
PRODUCTION
These positions will afford opportunity for career development to graduates with potential.
Professional salary scale and  increases  based on   performance as well as excellent employee fringe benefit plans.
Contact the Placement Office for detailed information, brochures and interview appointment.
By WALTER GRANT AND PHIL SEMAS
Special to Canadian University Press
WASHINGTON (CUP-CFS) — Well over 100,-
000 demonstrators who came here Saturday to
call for peace in Vietnam were met at the pentagon by about 2,500 federal troops armed with
clubs and rifles, some with bayonets attached.
The troops and U.S. marshals used clubs and
tear gas to hold back the demonstrators who
broke through police lines in an effort to reach
and enter the pentagon itself.
More than 400 were arrested. Some were injured seriously and carried away from the pentagon with bloody faces. Several hundred more
received minor injuries.
About 20 demonstrators actually made it inside the pentagon but they were quickly thrown
out by troops waiting inside the doors.
Late Saturday night one of the MP's defected
to the demonstrators. He put down his gun and
walked from his position in the line into three
groups of demonstrators amid a loud cheer.
Though there was no confirmation of this from
the State Department, at least one reporter said
he witnessed the defection.
There were wide descrepancies in the estimates of the number of demonstrators. The defense department claimed there were about 30,-
000 to 35,000 and police put the figure at 55,000.
But it was obvious there were well over 100,000
people at the demonstration, and leaders of the
National Mobilization to end the war in Vietnam
said there may have been as many as 200,00.
The peace march started at the Lincoln Memorial at about 1:30 p.m. and marchers were still
filing into the pentagon parking lot at 6 p.m.
Several demonstrators were arrested, including two helmeted leaders and novelist Norman
Mailer. Later Saturday night, Dave Dellinger,
chairman of the mobilization committee, was
also arrested. After the initial confrontation, most
of the demonstrators moved on up the hill from
the parking lot in an attempt to enter the mall
area in front of the pentagon.
A single line of federal troops guarded the
entrance to the pentagon as the demonstrators
'began to gather peacefully in front of them.
There had been no incidents when about 50
federal troops carrying rifles with bayonets
attached ran from the front door of the pentagon
and lined up behind the first line of troops.
The new troops pointed their bayonets at the
demonstrators. After about five minutes they
were ordered to unsheath their bayonets. The demonstrators were still standing peacefully when
this order was given.
After about 10 more minutes of pointing
their bayonets at the crowd, they were ordered to
take the bayonets off their rifles. The pentagon
claims that no bayonets were unsheathed and
they were always carried in an upright position,
never pointed.
After this new waves of demonstrators began
coming toward the pentagon from various points
in the mall. The troops formed lines to keep the
new demonstrators from the steps of the pentagon.
Hippies threw flowers at the police.
Several incidents occured when demonstrators
tried to charge the steps toward the pentagon
porch through the police lines. Police fought the
demonstrators back with clubs. The military
police seemed to be satisfied with merely holding
their lines but federal marshals brutally beat
some of the marchers with their clubs.
Officials of the defence department's office
of public affairs said none of the guns wielded
by the soldiers had bullets in them.
The major move toward the pentagon doors
occurred about 5:45 p.m. when a group of several
hundred demonstrators broke through police
lines and charged toward the northeast side of
the building.
About 10 of the demonstrators ran through
a door which was open for members of the
press. The door was quickly closed and locked,
and the 10 demonstrators sat on the floor inside
the building.
But two companies of troops carrying bayonets and with gas masks were waiting in the
hall right inside the door. They quickly shoved
the demonstrators from the 'building, and federal
marshals joined in with their clubs to beat those
who had made it inside the building.
After the demonstrators were forced from
the building, the troops lined up about 10 deep
in front of the door. Those who had broken
through to the porch of the pentagon started a
sit-in in front of them.
Though pentagon officials deny it, several
newsmen on the scene reported the troops were
using tear gas to disperse the crowd. The pentagon claims the tear gas came from the demonstrators. Troops were equipped with gas masks.
The demonstrators left with the coming of
night, in buses which had brought them to the
pentagon earlier in the day.
By 10 p.m. Saturday only about 2,000 people
were left at the sit-in. At 3 p.m. Sunday afternoon those of the sit-in group Who had remained
were replaced by a contingent of about 1,000
demonstrators held in reserve.
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THE HARBISON
a Distinguished Resort at Harrison Hot Springs, British Columbia Page  14
THE      U BYSSEY
Thursday, October 26, 1967
Notice Re Scholarships
If you are entitled to a Scholarship,
Bursary or Provincial Government Bursary please call at the Cashier's wicket
in the Administration Building, main
floor, to collect the cheque. All
awards not called for will be cancelled and the funds returned to the
donors.
Try Cuisine Francaise
CHE1 VICTOR
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614 Davie
DINNER    BY   RESERVATION    ONLY
Phone 688-1822
Bring this ad and get a Dinner for
two at half price before it expires
November 1.
FALL SPECIAL!!
BRING  THIS  AD  AND   GET
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ON ALL TUNEUP WORK,  PARTS AND  LABOUR
UNIVERSITY SHEU SERVICE
4314 W. 10th 224-0828
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1967-68
Effective September 29, 1967 to April 14, 1968
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS —
SUNDAYS   —
12:45 to_2:45 pjn.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
♦Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
November 10, 11, 24, 25.
December 1, 2.
January 12, 13, 26, 27.
February 23, 24.
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c.
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. — Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or  224-3205
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Charter Flight Director
Applications are now being accepted for the position of
A.M.S. Charter Flight Director. The appointee will be
responsible for arrangement of flight. He or she will
co-ordinate promotion for the flight and be responsible
for the sale of seats. Letters of application should be
addressed to Penny Ann Cairns, A.M.S. Secretary,
A.M.S. mailbox number 54. Applicants will appear at
a meeting of Students Council, Monday, October 30,
1967, at 7:00 p.m., at which time the appointment will
be made.
Committees
Applications are not being accepted for the following
committees:
—Education Action Program
—Constitutional Revisions
—Student Housing
But anyone interested in getting involved in what
their Student Government is doing in these <or other)
areas can see Dan Munton, 1st Vice Presidents office
across from South Brock Cafeteria, or drop a note in
Box 5.
Canadian-American Seminar
A student is required for the Canadian-American seminar to be held in Windsor, Ontario, October 30 to November 1. Regionalism and Power Structures in North
America will be one of the topics discussed. Students
are invited to submit applications to Penny Cairns,
A.M.S. Secretary, Box 54 by Thursday.
^'z&J&f*^V vti^**# ^-<-'^__k_5i^>' - -.^W
Lee Wright of UBC tries to one-hand the ball in a match with Spain held earlier this year.
IN FIELD HOCKEY
UBC hosts Aussies today
Eric Broom is not predicting a win for the
B.C. seconds when they host the Australian
National field hockey team today but admits
that the team he will coach stands a good
chance.
"What will make the difference," said Broom,
the head coach of UBC's field hockey teams, "is
how mad the Australian team is."
Traditionally, India and Pakistan have been
dominant in world field hockey, but in 1964
Australia came close to beating India and they
are now preparing for the next encounter in
Mexico City in 1968.
Australia finished third in the Tokyo Olympics of 1964 but managed only a sixth place
finish in the recent pre-Olympic tournament
held  in London, England.
Twelve teams competed in the tourney and
Australia had a record of two wins, two losses
and one tie.
"The team has to be disappointed over this
showing, and will probably be going for good
wins against our B.C. teams," said Broom.
As well as playing the B.C. seconds today at
3 p.m. on Spencer Field, the Aussies meet the
B.C. firsts at 2:30 p.m. on Saturday at Brockton
Point.
John McBride, who  captained Australia  in
the 1965 Olympics and now lives in Vancouver,
will captain the B.C. 'A' team.
Six of the seconds' players are UBC students
and there are seven UBC students on the firsts'
squad, although only two of them play for the
Thunderbirds.
The reason for Broom's optimism about the
chances of a B.C. win today is the record of
the New Zealand team in the London tournament.
When the New Zealand squad played the
seconds, prior to going to England, the B.C.
team scored two goals against the New Zealan-
ders in a 6-2 losing cause.
In London, while playing the best field
hockey teams in the world, New Zealand had
only one goal scored on them in five games.
The Australians are renowned for their fitness, their speed and their hard hitting. Seven
of the players coming here are veterans of Tokyo.
Don McWatters, the captain of the Australians, is their big gun. He is a corner-shot expert
and his booming shots always threaten to go
through the net or any player who is in the way.
If you want to see a good field hockey game,
especially if you've never seen one before, why
not come over to the field next to Thunderbird
Stadium at 3 p.m. today?
.■■■______I!J^^^.%(J||^[.^){J*-, i-
IN FIELD HOCKEY most of the action centres around the goal as this photo shows. Here Canada attacks the Argentine goal during the recent  Pan American Games  held  in Winnipeg. Thursday, October 26, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Luftwaffe takes nose dive
on account of weatherman
The Luftwaffe barely got off the ground Oct. 21 at Abbots-
ford.
The UBC Luftwaffe, or parachute club, that is.
Eight club members took their initial training on Saturday,
but none jumped as the weather was rotten.
Four determined club members jumped Sunday, but the
weather was poor for chuting, with rain and wind.
As a result, half of the jumps missed the drop zone.
One other would-be jumper, Bill Burr, had his liability
release cancelled by his parents the night before he was to jump.
The four successful jumpers were Ron Davis, Val Pratico,
Bruce Chapman and Al Bowers. Sponsor Larry DeFehr did not
go to Abbotsford on the weekend.
There will be another meeting today in chemistry 126 at
12:30. All interested persons are urged to attend or contact
Larry DeFehr in chemistry 107.
There will be another training session on Saturday at
Abbotsford, but only six more people can be trained, so hurry!
Cross country team on trophy run
at junior championships in Duncan
For only the second time in 15 years, the UBC cross country*
team will attempt to win the B.C. Junior Championships.
"We have the trophy to show for our one win," says track
and field coach Lionel Pugh.
They won it last year but it's up for grabs this time in
Duncan, site of the meet.
"We really should retain it," he said, "but our fourth and
fifth runners will really have to push it."
The team is composed of Ken French, Dave Greening, Tom
Howard, Barry Klet, and Vern De Melt. The first three ran
last week for the senior team at the B.C. Senior Championships.
"If anybody folds up, we've had it," Pugh added, "because
our entire team is made up of these five runners."
Pugh said he wouldn't be surprised if French won the race
because he did well in the senior meet last week.
Secret attack planned
for first football win
Thunderbird football coach Frank Gnup is planning several
surprises for the  Saskatchewan Huskies at the  Homecoming
game this Saturday at 2 p.m. in the new Thunderbird Stadium.
Gnup says he will inject some secret tactics  and  a new
offence into his team to overcome the Huskies.
He did not elaborate further, but the team does have
the ability to beat the Huskies, as the
Huskies defence has given up an average
of 18 points in six games against Western
Canadian Universities, the worst record
of the five teams in the league.
Gnup's revamped offence will not
include speedy halfback Vic Iwata, as he
has a broken rib. Don Lumb is also a
doubtful starter.
Saskatchewan appears to have a poor
passing attack if their recent game against
University of Alberta has any bearing,
as the Huskies had two passes intercepted
and returned for touchdowns. The Huskies are also a weak offensive team, having scored only 63 points in six games.
It looks as though the new stadium could see a new and
improved version of the Thunderbirds this Saturday.
Because attendance is limited by seating capacity, students
are asked to pick up a free ticket at the Alma Mater Society
office or the athletic office in War Memorial Gym.
The Junior Varsity plays its last game of the season on
Saturday in Monroe, Washington. The Jayvees are fired up
after their 7-0 win over Brandon University last weekend, and
coach Nestor Korchinsky's team is looking forward to another
victory.
Page 15
: .*;'
»:>.
.* *■■. \'V-
FOR BASKETBALL
BY BOB   BANNO
Sizeable year ahead
If basketball is a game for the big man, someone forgot to tell UBC Thunderbird hoop mentor
Peter Mullins.
All five of his starters this year will be guards
under 6'3".
A pair of fine backcourtmen, 6'1" Ian Dixon
and 6'3" Neil Murray will start at forward, while
another capable guard, University of Calgary
transfer Ken Shields will open at center.
Starting in the backcourt will be 6'3" Bob
Molinsky and Phil Langley.
"We'll full-court press a lot
to make up for our lack of
height," he said.
Birds pressed their way to
a respectable 15-13 won-lost
record last year and managed
to finish second in the nation.
"We won a lot of games
simply because of our press,"
he added.
MULLINS According to Mullins, the
Birds should win even more games this year.
"I think we're stronger this year because
we have more experience and depth," he said.
Dixon, Murray, Molinsky, Langley and forward Dave Rice return from last year's squad.
North Vancouver product Dixon is probably
the finest UBC guard since Ken Winslade performed heroics back in the late 1950*8.
Last year Canada's Most Valuable Player,
Dixon is capable of matching jump shots with
most U.S. college guards and is a remarkable
rebounder for his size.
The former New York Yankee bonus baby
has a fine variety of shots and has the brute
strength to bull his way under the basket.
"He's our best player," said Mullins.
The   Birds   most   consistent   competitor   is
senior Neil Murray, a physical education major.
The Magee product needs little time to unleash his potent jump shot and, like Dixon, has
the strength for the infighting under the boards.
The Birds' only major loss from last season,
center Morris Douglas, was a poor shooter and
his spot will go to 6'3" Shields, former B.C.
high school all-star from Prince Rupert.
"Douglas was a good rebounder and good
defensively but Shields is a much better scorer,"
said Mullins.
The speedy Shields was a conference all-star
last year.
If Mullins goes through with plans to start
Langley and Molinsky at guard, the Birds may
be hurting in the backcourt.
Langley, a junior, is smooth and attained
second-team all-star status last year but is disconcertingly erratic and lacks the strength to
drive in for lay-ups.
All-star Molinsky is an in-between size and
may not be fast enough for backcourt duty.
Delbrook's Dave Rice, sixth man last year,
is a strong though slow forward.
Up from the Junior Varsity are Derek Sankey,
a capable utility-man and guard Ed Richmond.
Look for great things from rookie guard
Joe Kainer, a hard worker who may break into
the starting lineup before the end of the year.
Mullins' ace-in-the-hole is Simon Fraser transfer Frank Rotering, a 6'5" center.
SFU's second-best rebounder last year, the
raw but willing Windermere product may be
the answer to Birds' height problems.
However, Rotering has a wonky knee which
may keep him out of action for some time.
Birds open their season Nov. 3rd at War
Memorial Gym with an exhibition match against
UBC grads.
Summary: Mullins team characteristically
can shoot and play defence and this year's learn
will be no exception. Lack of rebounding
strength may hurt. Most of his players lack the
speed and tenacity necessary for a good press.
Look for Rotering to crack the first five and
Dixon to shift to guard where he is more comfortable.
-___^__fe_   1
Athletic scholarships a  must/
says basketball coach Mullins
IWATA
UBC Thunderbird basketball coach Peter
Mullins wants athletic scholarships for UBC.
"I can't compete with Simon Fraser University for good high school players because I can't
offer them anything," he said Friday.
He warned unless he can recruit with
scholarships his basketball teams won't be able
to compete with SFU within two or three years.
'I'll be able to get the odd good player —
like Ron Thorsen this year — but they'll be the
exceptions," Mullins said.
He cited UBC's humiliating defeat to SFU's
football team as a portent of what will happen
in basketball.
Simon Fraser crushed Frank Gnup's grid
Birds 32-13.
Mullins also added that Gnup plays to win
as much as anyone else.
"It's a complete fallacy that his coaching
philosophy is to have fun and show his boys a
good time," he said, "but what can he say under
the circumstances?"
Intramural intercourse info
HOMECOMING WEEK
ATHLETIC SCHEDULE
Here is the schedule for athletic events during Homecoming
week:
Today — 3 p.m.. Australian National field hockey team vs B.C.
seconds at Chris Spencer Field.
Friday —  6-9  p.m..  Homecoming  Family Jamboree  in  War
Memorial Gym.
Saturday  —   12:30   p.m.,   UBC   rugby  Thunderbirds   vs   Kats
at Wolfson Field.
— 3 p.m., UBC football Thunderbirds vs.  Saskatchewan
Huskies at Thunderbird Stadium.
Ask any student which UBC organization
could, most use a good public relations man.
After EUS he will probably rate intramurals.
Yet this rarely heard of program has more than
3,500 participants representing more than 40
organizations' in sports ranging from touch football to bowling.
The program presents a great opportunity
for potential Walter Mittys to show their untapped! abilities. The bar on extramural players
from playing in the same sport intramurally
keeps the competition fair and even.
Apart from the social aspects of playing in
the program there is no much else to be gained unless you are good and a team coach
decided to watch this game.
Points scored in competition are awarded
to the organization being represented and total
scores at the end of the year determine the overall winners.
Trophies are not usually given.
An example of the popularity of intramuals
is a cross country race scheduled for Nov. 9
with 500 people expected to run around the
university golf course.
Games are easy to attend since they all take
place on campus (unless you want to ski) and
only a few sports take your money.
Bowling, curling, hockey and golf require
nominal fees.
General .manager Bill McNulty has a budget
of $2,400 to work with so although there are
no free trips to Edmonton you do get referees
and proper facilities. But then the love of the
game is the thing. Right?
People interested should see the sports manager for their faculty, club or fraternity. Page  16
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 26, 1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Science soothes century
DEBATING UNION
Science is the opiate of the
twentieth   century   —   debate
today, noon, Bu. 217.
COMPUTER   SCIENCE   CLUB
First free annual meet bet-
tween   the   computing   centre
staff   and   club,   today,   7:30,
grad centre.
CAMPUS  CAVALIERS
Dancing today, noon, hut L.
PRE  SOCIAL  WORK
Important   field-trip    today,
noon. Meet in school of social
work, lecutre hall B.
ARTS US
Important   general   meeting,
today, noon, Bu. lounge.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau: What is wrong
with  Canada?  —  Human Nature, today, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Bu.
202.
MUSSOC
Musicians wanted for production   of   Half   a   Sixpence.
Hairy Women?
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
Hairy green blorg women of
this island kingdom today
marched on the obsolete supermarket in the town of Blah.
The weaker-sexed blorgs, who
leave the child-raising to the
children on the island, were
protesting the high price of
lireta, a red-colored slop
which has long been a favorite
dish of King Ognap.
Sign list in Green Room above
auditorium.
SAILING   CLUB
Needed: bodies interested in
Sunday rowing and work parties. Meet today, noon, Bu. 104.
COLLEGE LIFE
Meeting    tonight    at   Place
Vanier lounge, 7:17 p.m.
SLAVONIC  CLUB
Regular     meeting,    Friday,
noon, IH music room.
CIASP
Executive   meeting,   Friday,
noon, Bu. 2201.
WOMEN'S BIG BLOCK
CLUB
Tickets   for   the   big   block
alumni banquet, Nov.  1, must
be    purchased    Friday,   noon,
women's gym.
PSYCHOLOGY  CLUB
Dr.   Conrad   Schwartz   will
speak  on  drugs,   today, noon,
Ang. 207.
STUDENT ZIONISTS
Rene Goldman speaks on the
Chinese    Jewish     community,
today, noon, Hillel House.
EL CIRCULO
Conversation    group    today,
noon,   IH   402   and   404.   All
CIASP members welcome.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Gary Porter, national secretary of the young socialists,
speaks on the challenge of
socialism, today, noon, Bu. 204.
VCF
Hear   Bishop   Stephen   Neil,
NOW ON SALE $1.00
BIRD CALLS
1967-196t
THE UNIVB5JTY Of BRITISH COLUMBIA STUMKT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
Publications Office, Brock Hall
or UBC Bookstore
Pre-Sale Ticket Holders Must Claim Their Books
at Publications Office.
Friday, noon, Ang. 110, on
world Christianity or none at
all.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Rev. A. H. Mjorud concludes
his series on Christian renewal,
today, noon, in Bu. 202.
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
CAT BALLOU
with
LEE MARVIN JANE FONDA
TODAY
AUDITORIUM
12:30-3:30-6:00-8:30
Adm. 50c
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL. UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DON'T MISS THE POST-HOME-
coming special coming November
4th; Night Train Revue and United
Empire Loyalists /Armouries 8:30-
12:00/Preview by special arrange-
ment next week watch this section.
PHUNNY P.H. PHACTOR IS
phreaky! Phly down to Retinal Circus and meet phriendly people at
Friday & Saturday's dance. Seeds
of Time, Painted Ship, P.H. Phactor-
9-2   a.m.   Phar  out!
Greetings
12
HAPPY BIRTHDAY  ON YOUR 21ST
today Linda.  Al.
Lost & Found
19
LOST: IN H.A., BROWN BOOK,
"Retail Locations", R. A. Ratcllff,
phone   Sharon,   327-6621.
THE STUDENT WHO MISTAKEN-
ly? took a nylon U.B.C. jacket
from outside Hebb 30 physics lab.
Please put it on same hanger next
Tues.   or   phone   922-9617.
Automotive  & Marine (Cont.)
HUNTER-SKIER SPECIAL VW VAN
Insulated,   propane   heater,   224-3190.
1964   MORRIS   OXFORD.   2   OWNERS
$550  O.N.O.   Ph.   224-7593.	
'64 CORVAIR MONZA RADIO,
heater, bucket seats. 32,000 miles.
Good   cond.,   $1200.   Phone   987-4046.
1959 PORSCHE 1600, SILVER COUPE
healthy condition, 2250 Wesbrook,
224-9662.    $1,395.	
20 FOOT SLOOP WITH CABIN.
Very seaworthy. Not glass. Phone
Leigh,   AM   6-9397  evenings.
Motorcycles
26
1965   HONDA   90   immaculate   condition,   5000   miles.   Offers,   266-5002.
Miscellaneous
32
FOUND FRIDAY ON RENFREW
bus 3 p.m. "The Portable Faulkner". Owner please call Sheila
266-4842.
FOUND — BROWN RIMMED LAD-
ies' glasses. Owner can claim at
Publications   office.
LOST MAN'S GOLD SAPHIRE SIG-
net ring.  Reward call Roy 922-5575.
THE 2-EDGED SWORD McKENZIE
left in Richmond car please phone
or   bring  Arts  I   office.
LOST — WATCH WITH DIAMOND
shaped crystal, black strap, also
wide gold hoop ^earring for pierced
ear.   Contact  Pat   AM  6-8414.
LOST PSYCHOLOGY 100 TEXT.
Possibly in Brock Lot. Phone Trish.
AM   3-8833.
FOUND — SUM OF MONEY IN
South Brock—Contact Norma Jean.
Ph.   253-8014.
Rides & Car Pools
 14
FAT COMEDIENNE WITH NICE
hair requires ride from Main &
Marine.   Phone   526-4086.
WANTED RIDE FROM RICHMOND
Bridgeport and No. 5 Rd. Phone
Ed.    278-6101.
RICHMOND    5    &    CAMBIE    AREA.
Share   driving.   8:30   classes.    Doug
278-5951.
Special Notices
15
GSA WILL HOLD ITS GENERAL
meeting for fall on Thursday, October 26, 1967, at 12:45 p.m., in the
Lower Lounge of the Graduate Student Centre. Plans for Centre expansion and consequent fee increase
will be discussed.
WHOLESALE  PRICES TO ALL UBC
, students on trans, radios, tape recorders, record players, watches,
jewelery, etc., at THE DISCOUNT
HOUSE,   3235  West   Broadway,   Tel.
732-6811.
STATIONERY - ART SUPPLIES -
Gift & Party Shop. See Walter's
Stationery, 2910 W. Broadway. Ph.
733-451S.
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE BE-
tween 30% and 50% on Engagement
Rings. For appointment call 261-
6671   anytime.
Typing (Cont.)
"EXPERT    TYPEWRITING
Fast  professional  service
738-7756"
Essay  and  thesis  typing,   electric
Campus   pick-up
Mrs.   Hall 434-9558
EXPERIENCED     TYPIST—ESSAYS,
term   papers,etc.   25c  page.   Campus
pickup.   277-0782.
•GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST IS
available for home typing. Please
call  277-5640."	
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffith Limited, 8584 Granville
Street   (70th  &  Granville).   263-4530.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Male
52
INSTRUCTOR: PRE-SKI CONDI-
tioning classes, Tuesday and Friday evenings, Nov. 7 to Dec. 8.
Call  Burnaby YMCA 299-6411.
DUNBAR COSTUME RENTALS,
costumes for all occasions, 5620
Dunbar St.   Phone  263-9011.
4 PLAYHOUSE STUDENT TUES-
day season series tickets left.
Phone   Steve   Chitty   684-5361.
Orchestras
33
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
CAT BALLOU RIDES' INTO THE
Aud. on Oct. 26. 12:30, 3:30, 6:00,
8:30.   Adm.   50c.
GUESS WHAT ELSE YOUR AMS-
CUS card does for you? With it
and the CUS Student Discount Service you get 10-25% off at several
Vancouver firms. See lists up on
Campus, in Bird Calls, or phone
CUS Office for infor.— 224-3242,
local 43.
DON'T MISS THE POST-HOME-
coming Special coming November
4th; Night train Revue and United
Empire loyalists, Armouries 8:30-
12:00. Preview by special arrangement next week. Watch this section.
TOM JONES STARRING ALBERT
Finney in the Aud. Nov. 9, 12:30,
3:30,   6:00,   8:30.   50c.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IN THE
Village. Now 3 barbers. Open Weekdays 8:30 - 6 p.m., Saturday 'til
5:30.
PSYCHEDELIC COLORING POST-
er Contest—Colour this week's and
last week's Retinal Circus posters
printed in Ubyssey and get in free
November 10th trippy prizes for
most  colourful   entry.
Travel Opportunities
16
ANYONE TRAVELING TO SAN
Francisco via air Dec. 22 Jan. 3
willingto accompany 2 children age
5 and 8 for remuneration please
contact Sherrill Perry 73B-9582
after   6   p.m.	
VI K K I,     I'M    WORRIED.     THINK
about  what  it  means.
Male or Female
53
Maths. Tutors, 4th year or graduates,
GRADES  7  to  13
736-6923  —  4:30   -   7:30   P.M.
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
63
Tutoring                                     84
FRENCH, ENGLISH, HISTORY,
Russian lessons given privately by
B.A.,   M.A.,   B.L.S.   736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
LOOKING
For clean, used, guaranteed appliances.
Also   complete   repair  service  for all
makes  and  models.
McIVER Appliances  Ltd.
3215  W  Broadway—738-7181
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Busy B Books, 146 W. Hastings.
681-4931.
CAMPING EQUIPMENT, SKIS,
portable stereo and radio. Phone
224-3190. 	
CHESTERFIELD/DOUBLE BED 1
yr. old. $95'. 5 piece dinette $50. Ph.
224-7593.	
GET MONO KLH 10 HI-FI SPEAK-
er,   $45.00.   733-3163.	
FULL LENGTH WHITE LEATHER
coat. Good condition. Size 10. Half
price.   Call   688-4157   or   688-9994.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
NO STAMPING OF THE LITTLE
foot this day, huh ? May the dim-
inutive   one   really   blow   her   cool !
TO THE CAT'S MEOW — YOU'RE
the greatest — may allyour dreams
come   true.
FOR   SALE   TWO    CANNONBALLS.
Phone AM 6-0017 ask for Ford.
TURN YOUR MIND INSIDE OUT!
for San Francisco's P.H. Phactor
Jug Band. It's what's happening
Friday & Saturday night at Retinal
Circus. 1024 Davie. Phriendly
Phreaks.
Typewriter Repairs
39
SAN FRANCISCO GOOD TIMES
sound Retinal Circus Friday & Saturday evening. Phantastic. Ph.
Phactor, Painted Ship, Seeds of
Time. Strobes, Light Show. Come
&  dance.   Phreaky !	
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
ANDERSON   TYPEWRITER
SERVICE
TYPEWRITERS
ADDING  MACHINES
NEW    AND    RECONDITIONED
REPAIRS TO ALL MAKES
Free   Estimates Reasonable  Rates
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
185   West   Broadway 879-781B
Across from Zephyr Motors
Service  Centre
ROOM FOR 2 MEN, POINT GREY
single beds. Study facilities, break -
fast.   Call  733-0632   evenings.
MALE STUDENT SHARE LARGE
double room!, ktch.-sitting room,
bathroom S-ent. 4583 W. 11th. 224-
6748. 	
SLEEPING ROOM,   KITCHEN PRIV.
Girl only,  $45.Dunbar Tiist.  733-5922.
Room & Board
82
BURNABY STUDENT-S.F.U. STU-
dent will exchange UBC priv. room
&   board.   224-9236.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS
available now. Phone Don, 224-9665
after  6 p.m.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
Typing
40
1956 ZEPHYR SIX CYL. PREFECT
mechanical order with radio. Best
offer. Phone 261-2904 after 5:30 p.m.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST — ELEC-
tric.   Phone   228-8384  or  224-6129.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL DO
essays & thesis at home. 25c per
page. Hay. 3963 Bond St., Burnaby.
433-6565  after   5:30   p.m.
STUDENT TO SHARE APT. AT
1076 West I4th. Phone 731-9677
after 5 p.m.	
TWO ROOM FURNISHED ■ SUITE
now available, Dunbar district.
Phone   731-3545.
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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