UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 29, 1966

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126399.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126399.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126399-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126399-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126399-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126399-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126399-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126399-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126399-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126399.ris

Full Text

 What's the
Peak?
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. £LVIII, No. 6
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,  THURSDAY,   SEPTEMBER  29,   1966
t.V, SCP29me
5.000 SIGN PETITION
y ^* I   V-*'   \*M- T
* t
<r»
Largest response
of any campaign
Almost a third of UBC's student population has signed
an Alma Mater Society petition to city council requesting a
temporary relaxation of Point Grey zoning regulations.
AMS president Peter Braund estimated Wednesday the
petition, to be presented Tuesday to city council, has collected over 5,000 student signatures.
A similar petition for Point Grey electors had an
estimated 1,000 signatures at 10:30 p.m. Wednesday.
75 sign in two blocks
Students will continue circulating the petition until tiie
last minute, Braund said.
He said students from Vancouver as well as out of town
were taking the housing crisis
Seriously.
"This campaign is having
the best response of any I have
seen," he said.
Petitioning began Tuesday
when students hit the campus
and the streets en mass.
One student said he collected 75 signatures after canvassing two blocks. He said only
three electors refused to sign.
Braund said  he  is   writing
letters to mayor William
Rathie and each of the aldermen, telling them of the critical housing shortage and presenting the wording of the
petition.
Students can sign the petition or volunteer for circulating it today at a clubs day
display in the armory at noon.
Student councillors will be
in the armory Friday to question UBC president John B.
Macdonald when he gives his
welcoming address.
"We only hope that he will
come out and support us,"
Braund said.
Rally kicks off Monday
—kurt hilger photo
SIN BESIDE THE LIBRARY, if the grass wasn't so goddam wet, is the only answer to
inhuman residence regulations — which forbid, among other things, normal sexual
activity among students.
Macdonald told Braund Tuesday he would take the matter
before the board of governors
for consideration.
He said he would inform students of the board's decision
Tuesday.
A rally set for Monday noon
on the main mall will kick off
Tuesday's city hall delegation.
Speaking at the rally will be
director of housing, Dr. Malcolm McGregor, Vancouver
alderman and MLA Bob Williams, AMS first vice-president
Charlie Boylan and AMS housing coordinator Ray Larsen.
Braund said T. A. Kennedy,
president of the West Point
Grey Homeowners Association,
has also been invited.
The WPGHA is one of the
main groups opposing zone law
changes.
Braund said the rally would
arouse student interest in the
city hall delegation.
"We want as many people as
possible to go," he said.
A small delegation of students will enter the city hall
and present the petition to the
council in session.
The petition will be followed
(Continued on Page 3)
See:   PETITION
BEST HIGH SCHOOL PAPER
Uphill  battle fought to reach peak
Simon  Fraser  Academy's
student   newspaper,   The
Peak,    won    The    Ubyssey
shield Wednesday.
The shield is awarded
each year to the B.C. high
school paper which "best
meets the challenge of producing a newspaper."
The decision to honor the
SFA paper with the award
came after a, long-drawn-out
closed meeting of The
Ubyssey editorial board.
"There was a good deal of
heated discussion and hard
feeling about it," Ubyssey
managing editor Richard
Blair admitted.
"Many of the editors felt
that Lester Pearson (Lester
Pearson   Secondary   School
in New Westminster) should
get it again."
The Lester Pearson paper
has had custody of the shield
for the past five years.
"But I feel I am speaking
for all of us when I say that
The Peak is one of the finest
examples of high school
journalism wel have seen for
a good long time,"' Blair
said.
Editor-in-chief John Kelsey
agreed.
"When you consider the
handicaps they faced—after
all, this was only their first
year of operation — you
have to admit that the staff
of The Peak have really
made a remarkable achievement.
Peak editor-in-chief Mike
BLAIR AND AWARD WINNER
.peaked or piqued?
Campbell was unavailable
for comment.
But photo editor Lloyd
Popoff, speaking on behalf
of The Peak, said that he
was very flattered by the
award.
Ubyssey's Blair said that
he would try to arrange with
The Peak staff for a formal ceremony for the presentation.
"We shall have to work
out something," Blair said.
"Possibly we could make it
part of the high school conference in the spring, as we
have done in the past."
"Then we could impress
the fabulous importance of
this thing on hundreds of
teeny-boppers all at once." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 29, 1966
—kurt hilger photo
DEBATING   UNION   MEMBERS   argue   hotly   Wednesday
about sexual connotations of the frug. Decision was that
the word was a four-letter word for sexual relationship.
(See story page 9.)
Tories go radical
for clubs  day
Clubs Day has added sex
Registration
hike forecast
OTTAWA (CUP) — Canadian
university enrolment will probably reach the quarter million
mark by the fall of 1967.
Dr. Edward Sheffield, former
director of research for the Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada and now
dean of education at the University of Toronto, predicted
an enrolment of 182,000 for the
1965-66 term, but considerably
undershot the mark.
The actual enrolment was
205,888.
This year the Dominion Bureau of Statistics expects enrolment to reach the 136,000
mark, which is 31,000 more
than the figure predicted by
Sheffield.
If university enrolment continues to increase at its present
rate, more than 250,000 students will attend universities
across Canada during the 1967-
68 term.
to the mob scenes this year.
A total of 65 booths representing 75 clubs will be set up
from 12:30 to 2:30 today in
the armory.
Included are a computer
dating club, and a sex-promoting Progressive Conservative
club.
Conservatives say they will
advise would-be Munsingers,
and display Playboy gatefolds.
Also politicking will be
Liberal, Social Credit, NDP,
Socialist and Communist clubs.
Many groups will stage some
type of entertainment. The
musical society will present a
musical comedy—How to Succeed in Business.
Members of the Varsity Outdoor Club will be climbing
walls.
Ten clubs, including World
University Service, will take
part in a "happening."
An AMS group will be on
hand to explain the new Student Union Building to anyone
willing to listen.
A petition concerning the
Housing Crisis will be circulated. .
Last year's Clubs Day pulled
in 7,000 students.
UVic withdraws support
for Centennial festival
OTTAWA (CUP) — The University of Victoria students' council has voted to withdraw its support for Second
Century Week, the mammoth $280,000 Centennial festival
to be held at the University of Alberta next March.
Doug Ward, CUS president, said Monday the decision
was apparently forced by Edmonton's withdrawal from CUS
last week.
NEW  UNIVERSITY
Toronto planners
call for campus
TORONTO (CUP) — A new university to accommodate
5,000 to 6,000 undergraduate students in Toronto has been
recommended by the City's planning officials.
An   official   plan   says   the
says
university will be required by
1981 at the latest, at which
time it is expected Toronto's
student population will be expanded by 10,000 undergraduates, 6,000 to 8,000 community college students and 10,000
polytechnical students.
'^Because of the time it takes
Assistants
hit office
crowding
English department teaching
assistants have blasted a space
assignment that has them
crowded five to a room in temporary huts.
The assistants, who handle
English 100 classes, are required to have office hours, and conduct an interview with each
student each term.
Victor Neuman, one of five
assistants crowded into Hut M-
11, said only one of the five
could hold an interview at a
given time, and that interview
was likely to be interrupted at
any moment.
"I am more concerned about
others trying to work and study
than about having my interviews interrupted," said Fran-
cisic Sabine, another of the Hut
M-ll occupants.
"We've been knocking the
huts for a long time, but they
still haven't fallen down," said
Neuman.
English professor Ian Ross
said the English 100 assistants
were moved from Buchanan
Building, to make room for
professors, who were also
crowded, sometimes two to an
office.
Most of the rooms accommodated four assistants, he said.
"There will be a room somewhere in Buchanan for English
100 teaching assistants to conduct interviews very soon,"
said  Ross.
to organize a new university, it
might well be set up as a college of the University of Toronto, or possibly York University, to take advantage of
existing faculty," the city report says.
The report also urges the
new university to concentrate
on good research and laboratory facilities, since planners
believe science and technology
will be major factors in future
education.
During the next 15 years
the University of Toronto is
expected to expand from its
present 21,000 students to a
maximum of  25,000  students.
Ryerson Polytechnical Institute has plans to facilitate all
anticipated enrolment increases up to 1981, and expects
to enroll 15,000 students by
1971. Ryerson's present enrolment is about 4,000 students.
The proposed university
would occupy the site of existing railway yards located west
of Toronto's Simcoe Street between King and Front streets.
Classical Guitar
Instruction  in  Technique
and  Repertoire
W. Parker, 682-1096 or 874-3547*
Studio   at 2695   W.   Broadway
RE   3-4022
From the
Style Centre
Richards & Farish
LIMITED
7816 Granville
&
THE COLLEGE SHOP
802 Granville
•
YOUR SHOPS
SPECIAL
EVENTS
Dr.
The Lutheran Students
Association
present
George W. Forell
Director of The School of Religion
University of Iowa
\\
Death of God
OR
Death of Man?"
Mon., Oct. 3, Brock Hall 12:30
(fet £i<( Of Ifcm*  TeMfohJ
Have you ever wanted to play a kook, a lunatic, a no*? Open casting for the
most sensational play ever presented on campus —
The Persecution and Assasination of Marat
as performed  by
THE INMATES OF THE ASYLUM OF CHARENTON
Under  the  Direction  of
THE MARQUIS DE SADE
by Peter Weiss, directed by John Brockington
35 mad men and women are needed to participate in this dramatic exercise
in group therapy. This could be the beginning of a great new career.
rACTIMf TlkAE Monday, Oct. 3 at 12:30 p.m.
L./\:> I IIN<-3   -    I 1/V.t   -    Tuesday, Oct. 4 at 12:30 p.m.
PLACE - FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
COME ONE
COME ALL Thursday, September 29,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
—kurt  hilger photo
FOLK SINGER strumming it up in Brock Wednesday was
UBC student Ann Mortifee, Arts 2. Eight hundred  people
jammed the lounge to hear her sing.
Psst! Wanna buy
good used spider?
By VAL THOM
Do you need 44 copies of
1964 Encyclopedia Britannica
Dedication
for campus
centre soon
The Lutheran Campus Centre will be officially opened
Sunday.
Due to the size of the chapel
two dedication services will be
held.
Dr. John Zimmerman of the
Lutheran Church in America
and Dr. Theodore Jacobsen of
the American Lutheran Church
will attend an 9:30 a.m. dedication.
Pastor William Runch of the
Lutheran Church in Canada
(Missouri Synod) will officiate
at an 11:00 service.
On open house is planned for
Sunday afternoon.
The $150,000 centre was
financed entirely by Lutherans.
It contains students' discussion and study facilities, seminar rooms, a lunch area, a library and a chapel.
Pastor Robert Pearson emphasized that all students are
welcome at the centre.
the.Scientific American or the
, at less than half price ?
Check the campus notice
boards.
Scattered about campus,
they offer a variety of articles
wanted, for sale, for rent and
for hire.
Bewildered English 2 0 0
students lost in Chaucer can
buy translations of the General Prologue.
Confused Chemistry 101
students can crib with A Guide
To Chem 101 Labs.
For students interested in
committing suicide there is a
Honda for sale at $225.
A set of pistons for a 238-
bore is going cheap at $65. If
scuba diving is your hobby,
a single hose regulator is offered.
Parts are available in a
student-written play, Red
Magic. Cast of characters include a fat spider, his thin
wife, and her praying mantis
lover.
And if you want to get away
from it all, applications are
available for teaching positions in Switzerland or for the
Student Exchange Program in
Japan.
Toronto students march
to protest aid program
Special to The Ubyssey
TORONTO—-More than 2400
University of Toronto students
marched on the legislative
buildings yesterday afternoon
to protest the Ontario government's Student Aid Program.
Student's council president
Tom Faulkner termed the program   "more   of   a   deterrent
than a help to university students."
The marchers walked three
to five abreast in a half-mile
line from the University to the
steps of the  legislature.
They won the promise of
Ontario's Minister of University Affairs, William Davis,
that the entire plan would be
HIGH ON LIST
Mac squelches
library claim
By  TOM  MORRIS
University president John Macdonald has denied that
the library has low priority among university projects.
In a statement Wednesday,
Macdonald said: "The library
in operating budget has a high
priority."
The statement is in answer
to chief librarian Basil Stuart-
Stubbs' claim last week that
the library had low priority.
'But," said Macdonald,
"library shortages will plague
UBC for some time."
Space shortages are caused
by a fast rate of growth in
collections and rapid increases
in enrolment at a time when
no new capital funds are in
sight, he said.
Stubbs warned last week
the space situation is acute
and likely to get worse.
"With our inadequate staff
we can't keep the circulation
and reference desks manned,"
Stubbs said.
"The situation is approaching a crisis, and because of the
money shortage little can be
done."
Macdonald said priority is
determined by:
• Rate of growth of a field
or activity.
• Degree of crowding.
• Quality of current facilities.
• Urgency of strengthening
an academic activity.
• Continuing support of
strong programs.
• Availabilty of special financing arrangements.
He said the library budget
has increased from $682,000
to $2,700,000 in four years.
No priorities have been established for the period 1969 to
PETITION
(Continued from Page 1)
Wednesday with a brief to
Premier W. A. C. Bennett explaining the problem and the
demands of students.
Boylan said the brief was going to the premier because the
provincial government had failed to provide the university
with enough funds to pay for
adequate campus housing.
"We should also demand that
the federal government consider lower interest money
and together with the provincial government work out a
joint scheme for subsidized
student housing," he said.
MacDONALD
.  .   .  continuing   plague
1974, the next five-year building program, he said.
Macdonald also commented
on a possible new bookstore.
"The administration is
studying the question of adding to the present bookstore
or building a new bookstore
on another site."
reviewed before the next
academic year by a special
advisory committee.
Davis said he would appoint
a committee of university administrators, faculty and students to examine the program
and make recommendations
for its  improvement.
Under the program, which
the Toronto students refer to
as SAP, the students need is
assessed by a government
board with the help of a four
page, detailed means test.
The students, accompanied
by several faculty members,
demanded immediate changes
in the program.
The students must pay the
first hundred and fifty dollars
of their assessment.
The next 60 per cent of the
aid must be a bank loan and
the remainder is a bursary.
-Any .scholarships they may
win are deducted from the
bursary portion of their aid.
The federal government
underwrites the loan portion
of the aid under the Canada
Student Loan Plan and the
Ontario government pays the
bursary portion.
In a resolution presented to
the government, the Toronto
students demanded the bursary portion of the awards be
increased.
They also ask for a simplified means test, removal of a
provision that says any unmarried undergraduate must
be supported by his parents
and campus financial aid officials be allowed to adjust the
government  grants.
During his 10-minute ad-
cdress, he was heckled by students with shouts of "Why
don't you stop talking and say
something."
Experts sniff at idea
of smell difference
The female smells different
from the male?
SUB chairman Lome Hudson revealed Monday the biuld-
ing would have separate quiet
rooms for men and women.
"Men have different smells
than women — women would
not want to lie down in a room
with men," he said.
Expert opinion Wednesday
refuted Hudson's claim.
Not so said Dr. D. H. Copp
of UBC's department of physiology
"There is no sexual difference in sweat from the male
or female," he said.
"The smell depends on how
much you sweat. It's a matter
of personal opinion — honest
sweat has its own fragrance."
Vancouver doctor Pamela
AldiS concurred.
"I very much doubt it," she
said. "A man may be able to
sniff out a female but she does
not have a distinctive smell."
UBC students differ widely
on the subject.
"I like the way men smell,"
said a female student who refused to give her name.
"Good honest sweat smells
great. If it's a few days old,
however, it can be offensive.
"Women stink — that's why
they have always used perfume
and cologne to cover up their
body smell."
"And I am sure older women
smell much stronger than older
men — it's that way in our
family anyhow," she added.
Margaret Newell, Science II,
said: "Definitely they do, it's
a matter of cosmetics and habits."
"After a hard football game
I can hardly stand to drive myself home," said a second year
Arts student.
TB test will get
under  your  skin
UBC Health Service will
test students for tuberculosis
Oct. 4, 5 and 7.
The skin tests at Wesbrook
will be followed by x-rays if
there is any sign of infection.
The program is part of a
national research project to
lower the increasing rate of
tuberculosis.
A total of eight new cases
occurred in the Lower Mainland in 1965. . WP3
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member, Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash. (
The Ubyssey  publishes  Page  Friday,  a  weekly  commentary  and     review;
and   Focus,  a   weekly   news   magazine   of  world   university   affairs.   Prop.,
Ubyssey News Service (UNS).
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday,   loc.   24;   Focus,   sports,   loc.  23;   advertising,  loc.   26.   Night   calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
SEPTEMBER  29,  1966
The happiness of society is the
end of government,
—John Adams, 1776
Service station views
BY GABOR MATE
Nominations close today for the 26th
and final student councillor — second
vice president — which makes now the
time to take a hard look at the Alma Mater
Society.
Ca.ll the AMS a service station bureaucracy, because it meets every week—all
26 councillors—to decide how to spend
just 16 per cent of its budget.
The rest of the AMS's $451,800 net
income is non-discretionary — councillors
can no more decide what to do with it
than freeze hell to win a bet.
Service station council attracts people
with service station think. Councillors are
congenitally unable to create and carry
out an action program.
Look:
In 1963, the Back Mac campaign, which
collected 150,000 signatures on a petition
to the B.C. legislature and staged a mass
march for education, was organized but
not evolved in any way by council.
In 1964, the Academic Activities committee,, now one of the most valuable student programs on campus, was formed—by
outside pressure on student council.
In 1965, the MaTch of Concern for
higher education tramped over council's
dead body — because student pressure
demanded it, although councillors fought
against it.
This year, council was willing to evolve
an action program on housing, but only
after students told it what to do and when.
In sum, council always follows, never
leads.
We suggest there is something wrong
with the basic structure of student government when it attracts only followers,
and somehow excludes the kind of minds
which can originate ideas.
The structural wrong is the service
station—it must be that people with ideas
don't want to waste their time operating
services and fussing with bumf.
To continue the portrait. Council is 26
students, 18 of whom are undergraduate
society  presidents.
Undergraduate societies exist to provide services to their members.
And so the undergraduate society
president, worthy though he may be to
his society, is not likely to be able to
evolve policy,  is unlikely to be able  to
think cteatively of the campus at large
and still fulfill his responsibility to his
undergraduate society.
The work of student council today is
services — it has no money for anything
else, and councillors have not the will for
anything else.
An undergraduate society president
who was not serviceOriented would be a
bad one.
We believe council is doing the wrong
kind of work. It must do more than provide services—it must also lead students
who are concerned about what kind of
place the university is.
That includes acting to get more and
better housing, bigger and better libraries,
new curriculums — generally., acting for
all students in the whole operation of the
university.
Student council cannot do this work
as it is now structured because the
machine kills and alienates the people who
can cope with a larger, creative policy.
And it cannot do this work when its
whole budget is devoted to services.
Therefore, we suggest the old portrait
be erased and a new one drawn to fit
the new work of council.
We suggest a parliamentary student
government, the lower house to contain
undergraduate society presidents and
service committee heads.
It can wiffle and waffle, piddle about
with dances, charter flights and undergraduate society programs as a good civil
service should.
The upper house would be a smaller
policy body, say, 10 people, elected at
large from the whole campus.
It would exist only to set general AMS
policy and to evolve action programs for
more housing and better libraries and revised curriculums.
It could attract the people who now
consider the bumf irrelevant, those thinkers who only appear when there is a
crisis, push their ideas, and then disappear
into the library or the caf again.
It could channel student money down
to ad hoc action groups working to solve
problems in the whole university context.
It could do the work that must be
done, work our present council cannot
and will never do.
We save old newspapers
Almost nobody noticed, but UBC's
long-ailing yearbook Totem faded to the
banker last spring and expired with only
a gasping debt to mark its passing.
Pretty fitting, we thought, fot something which took a $5,000 beating every
year and still has back copies stored in
A garlic ring
AMS treasurer Lome Hudson, who
designed SUB's sexually segregated nap
rooms, says men smell different than
women and therefore women wouldn't
want to sleep in the same room as men.
To Mrs. Lome Hudson, condolences
and a nice hot water bottle.
unopened boxes dating back as far as
1948.
Then we got prematurely nostalgic, and
mused about what it would be like in 30
years, with nothing but memories to remind us of our Good Old College Days.
Wow. Potent stuff, that nostalgia.
So we phoned a bindery, and discovered we could have a year's worth of
Ubysseys bound into handsome volumes
—and make a profit if we sold them for
$6 each.
Old newspapers are the best kind of
nostalgia, we mused, and we started to
tuck away a memorable heap of Ubysseys
every day.
We'll be taking orders for them until
the end of next week in the publications'
office, main floor, North Brock.
Tripping out
with Wolfgang
I ran into my friend the
addict yesterday. "Hello,
Wolfgang For Short,"I said.
(His name is actually Josephine, but his friends call him
Wolfgang For Short.)
I   could  see   that   he   was
tripping out again. He put his
hand   on   my   shoulder   and
.looked  at  me  with  sorrowful eyes.
"So you think you lost
your love," he began. "Well,
I saw her yesterday. It's you
she's thinking of, and she
told me what to say. She says
she loves you ..."
"Stop!" I yelled, but he
continued.
"... and you know that
can't be bad. She loves you,
and you know you should be
glad. She loves you. Yeah."
"Yeah?"
"Yeah!"
Wolfgang For Short, d will
call him Wolfgang For Short)
is a Beatlehead. You have
heard of acidheads (them that
use LSD), potheads (them
that smoke marijuana).
Well, Wolfgang is a Beatlehead. He gets high by listening to Beatle records. He
trips out about once a month,
and he is usually high for
two, three days in a row. At
such times he is completely
non-functional, and it is impossible to get through to
him.
"Yesterday," he said, "all
my troubles were so far
away." Tears came to his
eyes. "But now it looks as if
they're here to stay. Oh, I
believe in yesterday. Suddenly," he yelled, "I am not
half  the  man I  used  to be
"Stop it, stop it, stop it!" I
screamed.  "Listen, Wolfgang
For Short, some day you are
going to go too far. You will
trip out, and never return to
normal. You will be doomed
to mumbling Beatle lyrics for
the rest of your life. You will
end up in an asylum. The
police will confiscate your records. Listen man, take care
of yourself. Think of your
poor aunt ..."
"But I don't have an aunt,"
said Wolfgang.
"All the more reason why
you should take care of yourself. Not even an aunt to take
care of you ..."
"Thanks pal," he replied.
"But what do you do? You
go to class, you study, you
work, you watch TV, you
study some more. What a
drag. But if there is anything
that you want, if there is anything I can do, just call on
me and ..."
"Help!" I screamed. "I need
somebody. Help! Not just
anybody. Heeelp-"
And then I ran away before he started singing "I
Want To Hold Your Hand."
EDITOR: John Keboy
Managing Richard Blair
News Carol Wibon
City Danny S luff wan
Photo Powell Hargrave
Pago Friday Claudia Gwinn
Focut Goorgo Reaimbottom
Ass't City - Rosemary Hyman
Ass't Newt...Pat Hruthowy, Anno BaH
Ass't Photo Dennis Gans
Al Birnie edited copy, praising
the triumphs and damning the
mistakes of Bryce Howard, Tom
Morris, Blake Ford, Allan Neane,
Sheila Campbell, Maria Giardini,
Katherine Keate and John (Loot)
Appelby. Mary Ussner and Norman Gidney turned in an almost
line story. Val Zuker unsmiled.
Kris Bmmott councilled and Bob
Wieser .rugged. Polackman observed the scene from great
heights. Angela Ottho was there
too. Stoff had his masthead ghostwritten.
LETTERS
Housing in more huts
Editor, The Ubyssey. Six:
In view of the present critical housing situation, and in
view of the apparent lack of
action by anyone other than
those stricken with the ailment commonly known as
verbal diarrhea, I feel it is
about time students pressed
forth in a concerted effort to
do something concrete; to set
a specific aim and work toward it rather than destructively criticize the shortcomings of any given group.
A suggestion is to use the
barrack blocks of the old Kitsilano air force base as temporary accommodation for
students until other permanent solutions have been provided. Here is a report of investigation into the proposal:
1. The barracks are in good
condition—much better condition than many of the
rooms presently used by students living in private homes.
2. There is sufficient space
for study halls in the buildings.
3. Three of the barrack
blocks alone will accommodate between one hundred
and one hundred and fifty
students —  two people  per
room (approximately  12 feet
by 15 feet).
4. An estimated 300 additional beds could be accommodated in certain other existing buildings, but this
could not be confirmed as the
police would not allow further inspection.
5. According to the office
of properties and insurance,
city hall, arrangements have
been made to turn the area
into a park, although as yet,
no contract has been let for
the destruction of the buildings.
6. Tom Berger, NDP, MLA
for Vancouver-Burrard, has
said he will act officially on
the matter provided he has
an indication from UBC students that they will give solid
support to the plan.
These are the facts! At present the AMS is working on
the project, and I am sure
you will all give them your
utmost support if and when
the time comes for action on
the student level.
 R. D. PESKLEVITS
MORE LETTERS
(See Page 11) Thursday, September-29,  1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
SUB: history and whither
By RICHARD BLAIR
The Student Union Building — a multi-million
dollar white elephant or a badly needed replacement for an obsolescent Brock Hall?
If built will it stand as an unused and unwanted monument to a series of misguided Alma
Mater Society presidents?
Or will SUB be a vital part of student life as
well as a monument to the foresight of those
same AMS presidents?
For nearly seven years SUB has been the annual campus wrangle and the ordinary morning
coffee topic.
Mostly, the Brock bureaucrats favor the building, but some — headed this year by AMS first
vice-president Charlie Boylan — are severely
critical of it.
They argue about the advisability of starting
a $4.8 million building now when UBC students'
housing is so short.
The money, they say, should be channeled into
the construction of student owned housing.
A new Student Union Building is usually
credited to a particularly imaginative leadership
conference in the autumn of 1960.
Brock inadequate
Student leaders fully realized the present facilities of Brock were inadequate for an expanding
commuter campus.
Their discussion revolved around plans for an
eight-storey tower to cost $3 million. This building, they thought should also include a winter
sports arena.
The move was hailed by students at the time
and in October 1960, council approved a site for
the building.
In February, 1961, included in plans for winter
sports centre were plans for a SUB including
food services, lounges, recreation, an art gallery,
club lounges and offices and administrative
offices.
Cost of the combined buildings was estimated
Chairman
McAfee tried
to railroad
SUB onto
construction
tracks over
union foes
Consultant
Porter Butts
shof down
$800,000
SUB, planned
multi-million
dollar union
building.
at $1.2 million and the administration agreed to
pay $450,000 of this cost.
On March 17, 1961,students voted 80 per cent
in favor of the combined SUB-winter sports arena.
A completion date of September, 1962, was set.
The build SUB movement stalled during the
summer of 1961 and any hope of meeting this
completion date was killed by student council
bickering. It was not met.
Unable to wait for the SUB, the student-built
winter sports arena moved on and the ice was
in use by late 1963.
Another blow hit the building in January
1962, when students appointed planning consultant Porter Butts, at $100 a day fee.
He said the proposed $800,000 SUB would only
be a start in meeting UBC's ultimate student
facility needs.
Butts raises cost
He said the new union building with 40,000
square feet of floor space would provide only
about three square feet per student—25 per cent
of the minimum requirement shown by U.S.
surveys.
Thus, with one swat, Butts, director of the
University of Wisconsin's union 'building, knocked down 1961-62 AMS president Alan Cornwall's
plan for a cafeteria-sum-SUB suitable for making additions to.
Following Butt's analysis, student council
decided to spend $2.8 million on the building.
For more than a year the SUB question was
again kicked around the AMS offices and the
campus at large.
But no decision was reached until November
22, 1963, by which time estimated cost had risen
to $3.8 million.
A referendum was held that day, and 7,187
students voted 75 per cent for the Student Union
Building.
At the same time, they voted down a referendum  to  raise  AMS  fees  by  $5  to   finance  the
building.
Disappointment over the defeated $5 AMS fee
raise turned, to happiness for SUB-fan Roger McAfee, on February' 28, 1964, when students voted
78 per cent for the building.
McAfee, 1964-65 AMS president, was a big
mover for SUB. After his year as AMS president
he became SUB chairman, a post he held until
spring, 1966.
Plans for the new building were chosen in an
international architectural competition . won toy
Winnipeg's K. R. Snider in late 1965.
His design provided for a two-storey building
covering the old football stadium on East Mall
with a total floor area of 176,000 square feet.
Drawings done soon
Progress continued on the building and final
working drawings are now being developed.
But during the year 1965-66, the SUB plans
were subject to an intensive study by The
Ubyssey.
Under the direction of rabidly anti-SUB editor-
in-chief Tom Wayman, The Ubyssey, once a
strong SUB supporter, began to question the need
for a "playpen SUB".
The same question still rocks the AMS boat,
but seems unlikely to tip it considering the previous storms through which council has safely
ridden.
And, as AMS treasurer Lome Hudson points
out, delaying the building costs the students $500
Ubyssey chief
Tom Wayman
". . . called
SUB a white
elephant and
clashed hotly
with McAfee."
a day because of inflation and rising construction
costs.
Hudson also says the building is desperately
needed on campus, and must go ahead now before rising costs make it completely impractical.
Considering that an original $800,000 building has already grown six times to a $4,881,343
structure, Boylan says junk the whole idea.
Meanwhile students continue to pay half their
Alma Mater Society fee — $15 each per year —
into building SUB that still exists on paper alone. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 29, 1966
Students get cheap fags
from Brock weed machine
The cigaret vending machine in north Brock sells
the weed for forty cent a pack.
But all other cigaret machines on campus charge
45 cents a pack.
The Brock machine is serviced by The Bay, while
all the others are operated by West Coast Canteen Co,.
Brock proctor John Wilson said Monday.
"They forgot to change it, so let's not tell them,
eh ?" Wilson said.
"I told the man and he said, 'I got no orders to
change it', so until they get orders, I guess nothing
will happen."
—powell hargrave photo
STUDENTS CRAMMED  into  aisles of Hebb  Theatre Tuesday to hear American economist
John   Kenneth   Galbraith   tell   them   how   they are losing their economic power to giant
corporations.
Committee heirarchy
runs modern business
Power in modern business
has changed from those who
supply capital to those who
supply talent, American economist John Kenneth Galbraith said Wednesday.
"Decisions now lie in a complex of corporate decision
making," he told 500 students
at Totem park's common
block.
The former U.S. ambassador
to India said individual men
can no longer control the state
Or the economy because of this
group decision making.
NO SINGLE MAN
"The scientific and technical
requirements of modern industry mean no single man can
master all the topics necessary, for efficient production
of, say, an automobile."
Galbraith said industry today is a lot of people each
with limited specialized knowledge — "Men who are informed narrowly but very
deeply.
"And   all   their   special talents   are  combined  for  work
on each project."
NEED  CO-ORDINATION
Therefore, said Galbraith,
the prime need in business is
for co-ordination between all
these specialized talents.
"The modern business organization   is   a   heirarchy   of
committees and management
—■.. and thus power — consists
of assigning talents to the right
committee, as well as in passing information found by the
committees through the right
channels."
He said committee group
action is not per se inferior
to individual action because
quite often "a man who appears to be in deep thought is
doing nothing at all.
GROUP DECISIONS
"A lot of highly trained men
sitting around a table are not
necessarily wasting more time
than one would waste all by
himself,"  Galbraith said.
He said the committee process of decision making allows
all the group to reach decisions where no single individual has all the necessary
knowledge.
"Power lies down deep in
the organisation among those
who have specialized knowledge."
WELCOMING
ADDRESS
to
STUDENTS
by
President
John B. Macdonald
UBC ARMORY
12:30 NOON
FRIDAY,
Sept. 30th
55cc HONDA
Step    thru    with    windshield
Almost New $185
VARSITY CYCLES
CA 4- 1034      4357 W  10th
FORMAL
AM)
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sales
Tuxedo, tails, whit* dinner
jackets,■ morning c o'a t s.
Formal and informal business wear — complete
size range.
McGUISH
FORMAL WEAR
LTD.
STUDENT RATES
2046 W. 4st - Ph. 263-3610
SPECIAL
EVENTS
Buffy
presents
Sdinte
Marie
Ticket Prices
Students
$1.50
Others
$2.50
(The Sound System in the gym
was   completely   redone
over the summer.
The ceiling is covered with
Accoustic Tile  &  there  are
no 'dead' spots)
Advanced Tickets
for Reserved Seats
At A.M.S. Office
or
Vancouver Ticket
Centre
IN CONCERT
Tues. Oct. 4, War Memorial Gym at 8 p.m. Thursday, September 29,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
WHO'S GOING NEXT?
New game shrinks CUS
By DON SELLAR
CUP Staff Writer
OTTAWA — Student government is playing a new
game on Canadian campuses
this fall.
The name of the game is
Quitting the Canadian Union
of Students.
Any number of student
unions can play, although
the number still eligible for
the pastime has been steadily
decreasing in recent weeks.
'NO PROFIT'
Here's a brief, historical
guide to The Game, which is
being played for fun and not
for profit across the country
these days.
The origin of Quitting CUS
is vague, having its roots
back in the fall of 1964,
when Canadian student leaders of an earlier generation
weer grapling with The Quebec Problem.
That fall, three Quebec
universities stomped out of
CUS during the 28th Congress. They were Sherbrooke
University, U n i v e r s ity of
Montreal and Laval University.
TIES BROKEN
All three French-speaking
student bodies have since
committed themselves to
1'Union Generate des Etudiants du Quebec (UGEQ)—an
organization whose address
frequently gets lost in the
Ottawa office of CUS these
days. Having successfully
broken all ties with CUS, the
French-Canadians still manage to carry on a "useful dialogue" with their English-
Canadian     counterparts.
The Game was suspended
. . . but only temporarily.
Three weeks ago, Quitting
CUS was revived on a grander scale, when tiny Marian-
opolis College announced its
withdrawal from the 170,-
000-student organization in
favor of joining UGEQ.
Few eyebrows at the 30th
CUS congress were raised
when another Montreal institution — this time Loyola
College followed suit, and
announced it was going to
hold a referendum on
whether to join UGEQ or rejoin CUS.
And when Memorial University's student president,
Rex Murphy, said goodbye
forever to CUS later on in
the congress, the only tears
shed by delegates were born
in mirth. Murphys withdrawal speech was eloquent,
earthy, almost funny.
LICK WOUNDS
Then Mount Saint Vincent
University walked the plank,
and left the good ship CUS.
The congress ended. Student politicians returned to
their campuses to lick their
wounds and vent their energies on those whom they represent.
Enter Branny Schepanovich (students' union president from the University of
Alberta) into The Game. A
vociferous and longtime critic
of CUS, the Edmonton president had tried unsuccessfully to change CUS policy to
one of non-involvement in
societal and global affairs.
But at congress's end, he
still found himself at the centre of a minority viewpoint
—and still in CUS.
Lennoxville union
may follow suit
LENNOXVILLE (CUP) — Students at Bishop's University here are being advised by their students' council
to leave the Canadian Union of Students.
They will have an opportu-
Edmontons
withdrawal
prophetic'
EDMONTON (CUP) — A
former University of Alberta
students' union president said
Monday he thinks Edmonton's
withdrawal from the Canadian
Union of Students will eventually result in isolation and a
breakdown of inter - campus
communication  of ideas.
In a prepared statement,
past president Richard Price
said: "It appears that Alberta's
'conservative' political views
are in a distinct minority.
"It is my view that the student government here has
claimed too much for its own
position, and then in self-righteous fury, it has withdrawn
from CUS.
"In several years we will be
able to look back on this action as being either very prophetic or as a backward step
in the history of our student
government," Price said.
nity to decide whether to retain CUS membership, when a
referendum is held in mid-October.
If they decide to withdraw,
the 850 students will be the
sixth student body to leave CUS
since the beginning of September.
Meanwhile, McGill students
have "absolutely no intention"
of withdrawing from CUS, McGill students' society president
Jim McCoubrey told Canadian
University Press Monday.
The Daily story said the society's executive had signified
its intention to prepare a brief
calling for the abandonment of
CUS political commitments.
McCoubrey said Monday no
such brief is being prepared.
McCoubrey said that while
McGill may consider itself "in
opposition" to some CUS policies, the students' society there
prefers to remain in opposition
until its viewpoints become
widely-accepted CUS viewpoints.
Few' observers could have
predicted what followed.
Edmonton's council voted 12
to 4 to sever its ties with
CUS—at least until a March
3, 1967 referendum.
Then, Bishop's University
joined the ranks of the disenchanted, but chose the
Loyola referendum method
of opting out of CUS.
RUMORS  CIRCULATE
All this gamesmanship produced were rumors, which
began circulating across the
country. Reports circulating
at McGill University and
University of Saskatchewan,
Saskatoon campus, had those
institutions abandoning the
union.
One student newspaper
editor who shall go nameless
decided the jig was up. In his
news columns, Edmonton had
left a "crushed and reeling"
CUS — a view to which few
persons subscribe to these
days.
For down in the CUS office at 45 Rideau Street in
Ottawa, President Doug
Ward and his associate secretaries are huddled over a
slightly-diminished budget.
'NOT THE SAME'
They say there will be no
cutback in CUS programs
this year as a result of The
Game, and point to a fund-
raising program and recent
fee hikes as proof of this
statement.
Yet, no one can argue that
CUS is not the same as it
was three weeks, let alone
two years ago.
Ward puts it this way:
"We're a smaller and tighter
union now."
And it's obvious The Game
is to blame.
Opening Monday — Limited Engagement
The Internationally Famous
PL A TTERS
Liberty   Gold   Records   int'ltidiiiK:     "Only   You."     "The   Great
Pretender."   "I'm Sorry,"   "My Prayer," "He's .Mine" nnd other.
10 Course Chinese Smorgasbord
Noon-12:30 & 4:45-9 Doily
NO COVER CHARGE UNLESS
STAYING FOR SHOW
m
IMfflMn
THEATRE   RESTAURANT
Women's InterColl. Athletic Practice Sched.
Turn Out For Your Sport !
Sport
Regular Practice
Times & Place
Starting Date
Badminton
Mon. Eve. — W.  G.
Wed.   Eve.  —  Van.
T.B.A.
Lawn   Tennis   Club
Basketball
Sr.—Mon.-7:00-9:00
Mon.,  Sept  26—6:30-
—W.   G.   Thurs.—
8:00 — W.  G.
4:30-6:30—M.   G.
J.V.—Thurs. 5:30-
Mon., Sept. 26—6:30-
7:00—W.  G.
8:00 — W.  G.
Curling
Wed.   8:30   p.m.—
Arena Sat. 12:45
Wed., Oct. 12, 8:30—
p.m.—Arena
Arena
Field-Hockey
Varsity — Thurs.
12:45-2:15   &   one
other noon  hr.
Thurs.. Sept. 22
U.B.C.—same as
Thurs.. Sept. 22
varsity
Fig .-Skating
Thurs. 6:15-8:15
Arena. Sun. 5:00-6:00
Thurs.,  Oct.   16
Golf
Details    to    be    announced.   If interested call Marilyn Palmer  at   261-0017.
Gymnastics
Tues.   12:30-1:15 App
Gym.  Thurs.   12:30-
2:15   M.   G.
Tues.,  Sept.   27
Skiing
Tues &  Thurs.   6:30-
Meeting — 12:30
8:00—App.   Gym.
Mon.,  Sept.   26—
W. G.
Swimming
Thurs. 1:00-2:00 CYC
Thurs.,   Sept. 29
(Syn'd.)
Pool. Sun.  11:30-1:00
YMCA
Swimming
M.W.F.  4:30-5:45
Sept. 28. If interested
(Speed)
call Marie Bourhis at
985-3861.
Track &
Meeting—Sept. 27 at
Tues., Oct.  4
Field
12:30 Rm. 211—M.G.
6:30-9:00  — F. N.
Volleyball
Tues.. 7:30-8:30 M.G.
Tues.,  Sept. 27 —
Thurs.  1:00-
M. G.
2:15 — W. G.
T.B.A. — to 1
be anounced      M.G. —  Memorial  Gym
W.G. — Women's Gym          App. G. — Apparatus Gym
F.H. — Field House
Sign Up Lists are posted in W.G. for both
Intramural & Intercollegiate Athletic Teams
NOTE: Women students Who wish to play for non-univer
sity teams must apply for an athletic release. Applica
tion  forms  are  available  at the  office  of  the Women's
Athletic  Director — No. 2, Women's Gymnasium.
RECORD SALE
RpKfttfR:
FAMOUS
Gvh*>£
LABEL
■■+ ".
Our Entire $4.20 Group
NOW
ONLY
each
Thousands to Choose From
Here are a few examples:
• Bob   Dylan    • Blues   Project
• Elvis Presley • Simon & Garfunkel
• Jose Feliciano    • Josh White
• Peter, Paul & Mary    • Animals
All the Greet Artists—Latest Hits—
Broadway Musicals—Rock and Roll—
Popular—Folk Music, Etc.
Hurry down — pick out your fovourite record
and save. Choose from Paps, Classics, Showtunes.
All  are   now  in  stock  ot our  Record   Department.
LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN
ABSOUND
Open Friday Until 9 p.m.
571  GRANVILLE   (at Dunsmuir)
MU 2-4846 Page &
THE      LTBYSSEY
Thursday, September 29, 1966
OLD FOGEYS
Alums name senators
UBC alumni association has
named two businessmen and
a lawyer to the university
senate.
The three, who will represent the association on the
senate until 1969 were chosen
by a 44-man committee. They
are Vern Housez, B.Comm.,
1957, a department store personnel manager.
E. Douglas Sutcliffe, B. Sc,
1943, construction company
executive.
David Freeman, B.A., 1932,
lawyer.
All three are Vnacouver residents.
Alumni association secretary Tim Hollick-Kenyon said
TIM HOLLICK-KENYON
. . . who problem
Thousands stolen
at McGill union
MONTREAL (CUP) — McGill University's student union
has introduced a tight new
security system this fall.
, The new security measures
were introduced after it was
discovered that enterprising
students were stealing thousands of dollars of students'
society money.
'lLast year this place was
wide open," commented building manager John Jones.
"Master keys were easily obtained, and a person could get
into any room if he put his
mind to it."
And students apparently did
put their minds to it.
Illegal long distance telephone   calls   totalled   $12,000.
Library staff
to agitate
for solidarity
UBC library assistants want
union solidarity, but part-time
assistants will be barred from
membership, the chairman of
the Library Assistants Association said Wednesday.
Mrs. Pat Lavack said 40 of
the 60 or 70 full-time staff are
in favor of forming a union,
which will be the first of its
kind in North America.
She said, however, that students working part-time in the
library are inexperienced and
do not have the same responsibilities as regular assistants,
and will be denied membership.
As there were wage increases this year, relations
with the university authorities
are good and there would be
no immediate demands, but
the union will serve as a basis
for any future action, she said.
In 1965, an application for
union status was turned down
by the Labor Relations Board
because of lack of members.
But with a majority of assistants now in favor of unionization, another application
will be submitted this year.
Bookstore shrinkage amounted almost $20,000.
Temporary measures taken
to date have uncovered more
than $100 in unauthorized
calls from one office alone.
Hopefully, things will
change this year. The only
master key in existence is the
one in Jones' back pocket. The
one set of sub-master keys is
passed from porter to porter
as they change shifts.
Club presidents must sign
an inventory list accepting responsibility for contents of
their office before receiving
keys.
"Many students see the new
rules as a useless inconvenience," said Jones, "but we
are only trying to protect the
students'  interests."
r
o— 	
vPQrH
_______!»  '~*^^V_____ii________________ria1___H
-Q
V
A ''"<W^»
-A
0
From the
Style Centre
Richards & Farish
LIMITED
786 Granville
&
THE COLLEGE SHOP
802 Granville
YOUR SHOPS
the nominations committee
considered many names for
the senate posts.
"We did quite a bit of
searching," he said, but would
not say how many alumni were
considered.
Hollick-Kenyon said the
committee considered appointing a grad student to one of
the senate posts.
"But the problem was who,"
he said.
Hollick-Kenyon said a student could be appointed by
the senate itself to represent a
group — preferably the AMS
or grad student assocition.
None of the new senators
were available for comment
Wednesday. Their appointments take effect immediately, Hollick-Kenyon said.
MAX DEXAIL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers, rubbers and
umbrellas.
What ever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — ladies' and men's — and ask for the 10%
discount.
Better Shoes for Less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10TH - 738-9833
ATTEND A  DEMONSTRATION  OF
"Effective
Reading"
* Effective Reading is the ability to vary both your reading rate and technique according to the style, purpose,
importance and difficulty of the material being read.
READING DYNAMICS is a reading improvement course—designed to teach you to
read more effectively. We will teach you to become more flexible in your ability
to recall and comprehend what you have read.
Any student following our directions, who, after completing the minimum class
and study requirements, does not at least TRIPLE his reading efficiency as
measured by our beginning and ending tests, will  be errfjtled to a  refund.
HERE ARE SOME RESULTS ACHIEVED BY MEMBERS OF OUR LAST GRADUATING
CLASS IN VANCOUVER: ("Comp." designates comprehension)
Reading
Reading
Speed
Comp.
Speed
Comp.
Name
Occupation
Start
Start
Finish
Finish
Rupert Urquhart
Van.  Magistrate-
Court
365 WPM
65%
1804 WPM
79%
Walter Marsh
Freelance   actor
207 WPM
75%
2092 WPM
86%
Morag Machlachlan
School Teacher
369 WPM
70%
1318 WPM
87%
Sister Marguerite
Head  Nurse-Mt.
241   WPM
55%
1150 WPM
80%
Dumont
St. Joseph's
Hosp.
Fred Robinson
School Teacher
300 WPM
65%
1338 WPM
90%
Richard Ogmundson
Student-
675 WPM
80%
2830 WPM
80%
University of Victoria
Valerie Tearoe
Student
262 WPM
65%
2323 WPM
71%
Barbara   Leckie
257 WPM
73%
1013 WPM
77%
Kathleen  Simons
For further informatic
Travel Rep.
C.P.A.
>n, attend  one of
360 WPM
our  demonsl
80%
rations
3166 WPM
or call   us
90%
at the
number noted below.
Free demonstrations by graduate students of Reading Dynamics as follows:
VANCOUVER - GEORGIA HOTEL
MONDAY, OCTOEER 3rd, 8 P.M.-Queen Anne Room
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5th, 8 P.M.-York Room
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6th, 5 P.M. & 8 P.M.-The Ballroom
EVELYN WOOD
READING DYNAMICS
OF BC LTD
SUITE 210   549 HOWE STREET
VANCOUVER 1 BC    685-2374 Thursday, September 29,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
—powell  hargrave  photo
FAMOUS ECONOMIST J. K. Galbraith makes verbal point
during lecture at Hebb Theatre. Harvard professor
attracted large crowds at both of his campus speeches.
Camp backers call
for leaders ouster
By ANGELA OTTHO
The UBC Progressive Conservative Club is supporting
the party's anti-Diefenbaker national president Dalton Camp.
The   club sent   a  telegram
Wednesday declaring support
for Camp on his call for a
national leadership convention.
Camp recently called for
the convention in direct opposition to John Diefenbaker,
challenging Diefenbaker' s
leadership talents.
As a result of the challenge
the Conservative MP for Winnipeg South - Centre, Gordon
Churchill, has called on Camp
to resign.
The UBC telegram to Camp
reads: "We support your stand
for a national leadership convention. Good show."
"As members of the Progres-
s i v e    Conservative    Student
Federation of Canada, we are
sending a delegate to any convention to support Camp,"
Oscar Johvikas, club president
said Wednesday.
"Diefenbaker has not offered
opportunities for the party to
reaffirm its supporter replace
him," he said.
"And if Camp is not allowed
to speak out, then any future
president becomes a rubber
stamp.
Johvikas said he is speaking
for the club, which feels Diefenbaker has put himself in a
position where only a direct
challenge will determine the
party's stand on leadership.
Johvikas said both Diefenbaker and Prime Minister
Lester Pearson are too old to
lead their respective parties.
America's   Exciting   "New   Folk"  Singers
NEW FOLK
Appeared at Ohio State, Minnesota,
Colorado State Un., and other campuses in
San Diego, Newport Beach and Calgary.
BROCK HALL - OCTOBER 6 - 12:30 NOON
FOUR LETTER WORD
Sweet substitute
begins with  f
By BOB WIESER
A four-letter word for a
according to a UBC debater.
Rick Watts arts 4, arguing
for the affirmative that the frug
is a sexual substitute, said: "If
I do a crossword that requires
a four lettered word for sexual
interaction, I think of the word
frug."
Subject of the debate in
Brock Tuesday was resolved
that the frug is a sexual substitute. The resolution was defeated in a voice vote.
"The frug is merely a prelude to sex, not a substitute,"
Derek Cave, law II, argued for
the negative.
Quoting sexologist John
Stanley Powell, Cave said: "It
was found that from the inhabitants of the Congo to pigmies,
dancing acts as a preliminary.
It serves to heat the blood.
"Old men also beat logs as
part of the prelude," he said.
Cave said in a recent study
49 per cent fewer sexual inter-
sexual relationship is "frug"
actions take place in non-frug-
ers.
Peter Watts, law 2, also for
the affirmative, said, ''The
younger generation are not
running to bed.
Watts said that you do not
see married couples fruging.
Only single people frug.
Cave, leader of a rock and
roll group, was defended by
team mate Andy Sandilands,
law 2.
"If we lose this debate, then
my partner could be accused of
selling his body to the teeny-
boppers," Sandilands said.
Sandilands called the opposition Victorian retards.
"After doing the dirty-dog
you are just starting. You get
the same effect playing football.
Those who get a bang out of
fruging should attend a dance,"
Sandilands said.
+5J
«_____.J
Bil__l
E_pfBF
______________k^____5E!^^^________
«,,,-■
F
r
     -*
From the
Style Centre
Richards & Farish
LIMITED
786 Granville
&
THE COLLEGE SHOP
802 Granville
•
YOUR SHOPS
UBC Radio presents
THE
ACCENTS
Friday
Sept. 30
8:30 to
12:30
BROCK
HALL
featuring
DEREK & the Motown Sound of
CAVE  *• Soul Sisters
$1.00
*."*MMS=;/!   A!?.-:'*"'
vJ*. 'f _-*■?!' i«>
We take better care of OUR
university students by offering
FREE delivery any place
on campus
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
5754 University Blvd.
"in the Village"
Phone
224-3202 Page  10
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September. 29, 1966
STATION BLOCKS  VIEW
AMS joins fight,
meets union reps
Student council Monday gave its support to the students
of Simon Fraser Academy who are protesting the erection
of a Shell gas station on their campus.
"The   Shell    Oil   Company
SFA students,
profs, protest
Shell station
BURNABY (UNS) — About
1,500 students and faculty
i members from Simon Fraser
Academy marched Friday to
protest construction of a service station on their campus.
The protest march followed
a massive outdoor rally, at
which the dean of arts and a
prominent faculty member
offered to contribute substantial parts of their salaries toward removal of the station.
The marchers placed a banner reading "condemned" on
the site where the uncompleted
structure now stands.
Last summer, a similar demonstration resulted in a halt to
construction pending discussions among administration,
faculty and students. The negotiations resulted in design
changes rejected by the faculty
association at SFA, but later
accepted by summer semester
students.
In a statement sent Monday
to Canadian University Press
in Ottawa, the student executive council said:
"The manner in which the
negotiations and consequent
students' acceptance was held
suggest a great problem in the
governmental structure of the
university."
The statement announced
the council will now initiate a
campaign to obtain representation on both SFA's senate and
board of governors in an attempt to redress the station
controversy and other student
grievances.
:$
%$&&. ^r^\A*my-'if^f!SrZ.—
i ~-iJ?".: Jr * ._d»«H_s__r^P.1
•..*;
paid for a dormitory at SFA
so they could build their gas
station in that spot," said
Charlie Boylan, who moved
the resolution.
"Nearly all pictures taken
of the campus as a whole will
contain that station. It is an
advertising gimmick."
SFA students are protesting
that the station blocks a beautiful view from the top of
Burnaby mountain.
UNION MAY BE BACK
In other business, union
bands may soon be returning
to campus dances.
The Alma Mater Society,
which terminated its agreement with the musician's union
last spring, is negotiating a
new contract, president Peter
Braund announced at a council meeting.
"The original agreement,
signed in 1958, was terminated
because campus conditions had
changed and students were
not benefiting by it," said
Braund.
Since last spring, union
bands have not appeared on
campus.
TENTATIVE AGREEMENT
Coordinator Jim Lightfoot
and Braund met with representatives of the union and
reached a mutual verbal agreement.
"We are sending a tentative
written agreement to the union
this week for their consideration and reply," Braund said.
"ilt will be brought to council when approved."
The election committee announced that Jim Taylor would
be returning officer for the
upcoming election for second
vice-president.
ARTS
Undergraduate Society
Official Notice
Notice of Election
Nominations are now being received fo rthe positions
of Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, three exec,
members of the Arts Undergraduate Society. Eligibility and nomination forms are available in AMS
Office (S. Brock) or the Arts US. office (Brock Ext.
359). These forms are submitted to the secretary,
Arts U.S., Brock Hall. Nominations will close Thursday. October 6. 1966.
RETURNING OFFICER
Applications are now being received for the position
of Returning Officer. Applications should be directed
to the Secretary, Arts U.S., Brock Hall. Eligibility
forms are available in the AMS office (S. Brock).
NOTE:  FIRST  YEAR  ARTS  STUDENTS ARE   ELIGIBLE   FOR
THESE POSITIONS.
By AL BIRNIE
Eager to properly appreciate Canada's bi-heritage, I
happily plunked down $4.75
in the Field House Wednesday for a brand-new French
110 grammar text.
Since it came from among
the gleaming stacks of virginal verbiage, I naively assumed it to be as yet unbroken.
But lo, turning to the
premiere lecon, I found
some previous owner, in
pen, had added a few words
on the lesson he felt the
text was apparently lacking.
Now, I am not against the
idea of one student aiding
another in getting through
a course, but had I wanted a
text full of helpful notes I
would have paid a dollar to
a friend who took the course
last year.
University bookstore mo-
ghul J. H. Hunter had an
answer to my outraged query.
"If a student brings back
the unused text, along with
a receipt from the booksto-e,
we will refund him the full
purchase price and sell the
book again as new."
So the previous owner of
my book had obviously taken the course for one day,
then decided to switch, and
returned the text for a refund.
So if you have a stack of
new textbooks, gather up
your sales slips and hustle
down to the field house.
It is refreshing to give the
bookstore credit for a bit of
humanity.
HIRE VIRGIN WOOL
Tafloredby
Cambridge
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF ELECTION:
Nominations are now being received for the position
of Second Vice-President of the Alma Mater Society
Student Council. Eligibility and nomination forms
are available at the A.M.S. office (S. Brock). These
forms are to be submitted to the Secretary; Box 54,
Brock Hall. Nominations will close Thursday, September 29th, 1966.
CHARTER FLIGHT DIRECTOR:
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of Charter Flight Director for the A.M.S. Charter
Flight which will leave for Europe May 11, 1967 and
return August 25th, 1967. All applications and inquiries should be directed to Peter Braund, President, Student Council, Box 50, Brock Hall.
STUDENT-ALUMNI COMMITTEE
Students interested in serving on this Committee
are to see Mr. Hollick-Kenyon, Alumni Director,
Brock 252.
RETURNING OFFICER:
Applications are now being received for the position
of Returning Officer. Applications should be directed
to the Secretary, Student Council, Box 54, Brock
Hall. Eligibility forms are available in the A.M.S.
Office (S. Brock).
STUDENT UNION
BUILDING COMMITTEE:
Vice-Chairman — Mature student, experienced in
student affairs with an ability to assume major responsibilities, write final reports, etc. Applicants
should be prepared to sit on the committee for the
next two years of construction with the possible
eventuality of assuming the chairmanship.
3 MEMBERS AT LARGE:
3 Members at Large — To sit on the committee and
assume specific responsibilities and assignments. A
willingness to work steadily on the project throughout the year is required. Preference will be given
to applicants able to serve on the committee over
the next two years until completion of construction.
Please apply in writing to the Secretary Box 54 by
4:00 p.m.. Friday,  Sept. 23.
ASSISTANT TREASURER:
Applications are requested for the position of Assistant Treasurer. This position offers valuable experience in a variety of tasks assigned by the treasurer including a seat on the Finance Committee.
Experience in student affairs and a knowledge of
of accounting fundamentals are helpful, but not
essential Please submit applications to the Treasurer,
Box 53, Brock Hall by 4:00 p.m., Friday, Sept. 23rd.
ems a
soft shoulder
not a
soft shoulder?
When it is not authentic. When it
has been only approximated by easy
adjustments to other patterns, or when
it has been compromised by other
styling gimmicks and constant
seasonal changes.
Soft shoulder is a tradition. It should
be styled, cut and tailored only in ths
traditional manner.
At its best, the soft shoulder suit is
tailored authentically by Cambridge in
selected Pure Virgin Wool fabrics tested
to meet the highest international
Standards.
Let us show you the real soft shoulder
SUitSOOD.
W^W
LTD
2174 W. 41st. in Kerrisdale AM 1-2750
Look for the Woolmark on the label when yon THE    UBYSSEY
i. a :iw»m$!f£ ."*■■ J"Ui" -litf"
Thursday, September 29, 1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Artsmen air gripes
ARTS AD HOC?
Meeting to hear student
grievances in Arts Program
with view to form ad hoc student committee on Arts curriculum. Bu. 100 at 3:30 p.m. today.
THEATRE DEPARTMENT
Servant of Two Masters by
Carlo Goldoni  today  12:30 to
2:30 at Frederic Wood Theatre.
Students 75 cents.
IH
Dance I.H. Lower Lounge 8
p.m.    Friday.   Everyone   welcome.
NEW DEMOCRATS
General meeting noon Friday
in Bu. 100.
PROGRESSIVE
CONSERVATIVES
Join the 'P.C. Club at our
club's day booth today from
12:30 to 2:30 in the Armouries.
UBC CHORAL SOC
Sing   Broadway,   spirituals,
classical.     Have    fun — join
Chorsoc today in Armouries.
UBC ORCHESTRA
Practice in Music 104 at 7
p.m. Violinists are especially
needed.
Star watchers
look up, up
to Kobau site
A multi-million dollar star
gazing centre is under construction on UBC land near
Osoyoos.
First stage in the National
Institute of Astronomy's research centre at the UBC site
is a $1 million optical shop.
The shop, expected to be
completed this year, is part
of the $10 million Queen
Elizabeth Observatory project on Mt. Kobau, near Osoyoos.
The astronomical complex
is scheduled for completion
in two years, but the telescope
won't be ready until 1973.
First project in the optical
shop will be to grind the 154-
inch, fused quartz, aluminum
coated mirror for the observatory.
UBC graduate students will
be allowed to use all facilities
at the complex which will
analyse the findings of the
observatory.
PeAr ^A6*"**/
HT d°
n't
C<*re
/.j
e/cr c<
'*_
-£2. -aj-v. ei_-ri*^
******* i<SJc* I
The fr-iav-   oH-
4-+~L$   vj iffih   is
my   he »j Ku*v>e,
P/cosse   ^teol   /\o«/e*-
YUKON P.C. STUDENTS
Organizational meeting noon
today in Bu. 2201. Guest speaker, Dr. J. C. Hibberd, Pres. of
Yukon P.C. Association.
UBC FIGURE
SKATING TEAM
First practice today at 6:15
at  the Winter  Sports  Centre.
New skaters welcome.
THEATRE DEPARTMENT
Auditions. Four original one-
act plays for public performances in Freddy Wood Theatre.
Phone 224-1433 or AM 6-4437.
IH
Social Tea I.H. from 3 to 5
today.     Free    refreshments.
Everyone welcome.
A.U.S.
The remaining lockers in Bu.
and EMA buildings may be
rented at noon in the A.U.S.
office Br. Ext. 359 continuing
until next Friday.
HELLENIC CLUB
The First Educator of Greece
—■ speech given by Dr. H.
Edinger Classic Dept. At IH
Monday 7:30 p.m. Informal
Hellenic Music and Folk dancing follows.
^ucan
mar them
• Never knew what heaven was like
'til I started wearing ERNST ties.
Angelic colors and fabrics, designed
for the most discriminating spirits.
How on earth did I ever get along
without them? Those wonderful
eRnst
TIES.  OF  COURSE
4445 W. 10th
near  Sasamat
2901 W. B'dwy.
d* Mackenzie
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Testimony meeting every
Friday noon Hut 0-12 between
the Ed. Bldg. and West Mall.
Everyone welcome.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Frosh and everyone else welcome to a Coffeehouse Party
Friday at 8 p.m. in the new
Lutheran Campus Centre, Wesbrook and University Blvd.
Welcome Home
Angella
Pardon her Greek, Italian, and
French, but Angella has just returned from her European Beauty
Tour.
SO Book Your Appointment NOW
THE STY1ES ARE BEAUTIFULLY DIFFERENT
Leader Beauty Salon
CA 4-4744
4447 W. 10th Ave.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost ft Found
11
LOST LADY'S GLASSES IN
green leather case. Please phone
CA 4-4163 after 4 p.m.
FOUND POCKET WATCH BY
hitchhiker. Allen Quan, 22S-3192.
Mens  Library.	
LOST BROWN BRIEF CASE NEAR
chancellor with books and important notes. Phone Harley, 922-
6320.   Reward.
FOUND   OVERCOAT    IN    C    LOT.
Phone   874-4430.
Coming Dances
12A
ACCENTS AGAIN? SCANDALOUS
but true. This Friday, 8:30-12:30
in   Brock,   $1.00,	
CAMPUS A GO-GO IS THE
DANCE  FOR YOU!
For your ears, we have:
1. Jason   Hoover   &   The   Epics.
2. The Centaurs. 3. The Shockers.
For your eyes, we have: 1. Three
Gorgeous A Go-Go Girls — Headlined  by  19   yr.   old  Susy  Lauder
-— last years Miss Vancouver!
For your welfare, we have: An
unbelievably small charge for
this fantastic Dance & show —
Only Jl.ffO per person. And here's
the facts: Date: Sat., Oct. 1.
Time: 8:30 p.m. - 1:00 a.m. Place:
Armouries. Remember: No other
dance will ever equal this entertainment   package.
Special  Notices
13
RUGBY DOUGLAS PARK (22nd
and Heather) Sunday 10:30, Tuesday and Thursday, 6:30 Beginners
welcome!
* • ALL CHEM. 101 STUDENTS • *
Now on sale, "Complete Guide to
Chem. 101 labs." Limited supply.
Only $1.95 at College Shop, Brock
Ext.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quailify for our good driving
ates.   Phone   Ted  Elliott,   224-6707.
SURF   LONG   BEACH,   THANKS-
giving  weekend.   Phone   Bill  Pat-
tinson,  244-9953.	
GIRLS! GIRLS! RECEIVE A 10%
discount on your new fall shoes.
Visit a wonderful world of fash-
ionwise footwear. The Pump
Room,   548   Granville.
ENTRY FORMS ARE NOW
available from homecoming office
for parade Oct. 22. Cars and floats
must be registered by Fri., Oct. 7
FREE SHOWINGS OF RESNAIS'
"Hiroshima Mon Amour". Fri.,
Aud., 12:30 noon and 8 p.m.	
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life, so
we are selling 1964, 1965 and 1966
issues for only 50 cents — Publications   office   in  Brock.
CURLERS! SIGN UP FOR MIXED
leagues today in Armouries. Girls
needed! Beginners welcome!
Transportation
14
TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS?
—Lease-A-Honda, $28.95' per mo.
Includes helmet, insurance, service.  Phone  682-7912.
TRANSPORTATION URGENTLY
needed for student In wheelchair
from Nanaimo and 12th. If interested please phone George
Starcevic, 876-2387 to discuss payment   and   other   details.
URGENT: RIDE M-F 9:30-4:30 12th
Arbutus,   733-9726.
CARPOOL NEEDED VICINITY
16th & Burrard. Can drive 1 day.
Phone 733-4620.
PASSENGERS OR DRIVERS
wanted for 8:30 from 49th and
Granville,  6 day week. Phone AM
1-4476.
RIDE NEEDED FROM WEST
end for 8:30's M-F. Phone Janice
684-6953.
RIDE WANTED FROM BRIG-
house area, leave for 8:30, return 5:30, Tues. and Thurs. 277-
1783.
2 GIRLS WANTING RIDE FROM
35th and Dunbar area for 8:30's,
phone  Elanor,   AM  6-7926.	
I NEED A RIDE TO CALGARY
for Thanksgiving. Will share
driving and expenses. Phone 224-
3112, ask  for Dave,   Rm.  233.
TRANSPORTATION
NEW FEMALE STUDENT WISH-
es ride on Wednesday mornings
in time for 8:30 class. From New
Westminster. Phone Linda, 624-
3016.
WANTED: CARPOOL RIDE FROM
West Van, location 22nd and
Marine, earliest lecture 9:30, but
don't mind going at 8:30. Phone
Sandy,  926-2254. 	
RIDERS WANTED FROM KING
Edward and Ontario area and
along   route.   Dave,   876-3197.
RIDERS WANTED FOR 8:30's.
From area of Oak and 41st. Morn-
ings   only,   call   Dennis,   261-7102.
DRIVER NEEDED, VICINITY
41st and Arbutus. Phone Marty,
266-6313.
RIDE WANTED FROM AREA
around 51st and Rupert arriving
at 8:30 a.m. and leaving at 5:00
p.m.   Phone   Sheila  at  HE  3-6619.
RIDE WANTED, LEAVING UBC
5 p.m. to 41st and West Boulevard or vicinity. Phone Doreen,
AM 1-7824. '
RIDE WANTED: VICIN. 41ST &
Knight. Classes 8:30 - 5:30, J4°n.-
Fri. Contact Dave or Ron, FA
5-3931.
RIDE WANTED FROM WEST
End (Davie and Denman) to UBC.
Phone MU  3-4001.
RIDE WANTED. M-S 8:30. VICIN-
ity Boundary and 45th. HE 1-
0401,   Anne.
TRANSPORTATION REQ'D FOR
three persons to 8:30 classes.
M-F from the corner of 41st Ave.
and S.W.  Marine Drive. 261-5572.
WEST VAN CARPOOL REQUIR-
es drivers, phone 922-5504 (Harvey) or 922-4382 (Charlene) between   7-9   p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE   ft MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1959 MGA 1600. REAL LEATHER
Int'r. Mech. Good cond., had new
clutch and brakes. Here is your
chance to freeze through the winter real cheaply. Eves phone: RE
1 8503, Early a.m. or eves.	
'51 METEOR FOUR DOOR, GOOD
riming condition, new tires, excellent transportation, $150. 224-
7116.
1964    MORRIS    1100.    EXCELLENT
condition.   Phone   WA  2-7684.
'56 HEALEY, GOOD CONDITION,
$650 or offer. Dave 224-9073. Phi
Delt   House.    224-9073.
CLEAN '59 VOLVO. MECHANI-
cally sound. 6 new tires. Radio,
heater, ph. 433-3622 evenings
& weekends. 2960 Nanaimo. $600.
Ask for Bruce.
GEORGEOUS RED 1964 VOLVO
544.   Phone  6:00   733-2839,   $2000.00
'65 CORVAIR MONZA. 4spd. Bkt.
seats, Radio, W.W., Deluxe Interior,   etc.   224-5979.
AUSTIN A40 — 1961, CITY TEST-
ed,   reliable,   $450.   Ph.   255-5585.
FOR SALE: 1964 TRIUMPH CON-
vert. (Spitfire). Radio. Economical & mechanically Al. A steal
at  $1150  or offer.  Ph.   224-6857.
1957 ZODIAK 4 DOOR, 6 CYL.,
w.w., radio. Excellent condition.
Only  $350.  Phone 731-8962.	
DESPARATION SALE. '59 PON-
tiac sedan. New engine & auto,
transmission, R., & H. $600 or
offer.  Phone Rick, YU 5-445$.
•57 PLYM SEDAN. CLEAN, MECH.
sound,   $200.  CY   9-4874.
Motorcycles
27
'66 HONDA 250CC SCRAMBLER.
Two helmets, windshield, only
3800   miles,   $599.   922-3497.
Orchestras
35
EXPERIENCED BASS GUITAR
player wanted for local band.
Phone 228-8657.
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC BASS-
ist required immediately for R&B
band.  WE 6-2067.
WANTED: GIRL DRUMMER FOR
R&B group. Phone 733-0362
after 6 p.m.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriters ft Repair*        42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
60 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
ENGINEERING AND FORESTRY
students. Summer Essays typed.
(Summer Essay Specifications
maintained) ARDALE GRIFFITHS LIMITED. 70th & Granville.   263-4630.
ATTENTION PROFESSORS. FUL-
ly experienced in the typing of
your papers, theses, or books.
Electric typewriter. Call Inger
at   987-4186. 	
STUDENTS—WILL TYPE YOUR
essay, thesis, or term paper at
reasonable cost. Electric typewriter.   Call   Inger   at   987-418*.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents from Phrateres
or publications office, Brock Hall.
Deluxe 40" ELECTRIC FRIGI-
daire range. Excellent condition.
$50.   RE  3-3085.
MEN'S BICYCLE, 10 SPEED
gear. Ex. con''. ALSO looseleaf
ring  binders.   .i.iris.   224-3479.
PURE COCONUT OH. — TJPP1B--
Tenth Barbers & Toiletries. 4574
W.  10th.
RENTALS  ft REAL  ESTATE
Rooms 81
SLEEPING ROOM, MALE, $40.00
per month, breakfast extra. Ph.
266-7062, 5402 Trafalgar St., Van.
13.
Room ft Board
ROOM,     BOARD,     REASONABLE,
. near bus for female student. Ph.
eveninge,  733-4610
room .&   breakfast;   malE
student sharing, available Oct.  1.
2427  W.   3rd  Ave.   731-6062.	
RM.  & BOARD FOR MALE. EAST
Hast.   Ph.   254-5570.   $90.00.
ROOM & BOARD FOR MALE ON
campus, 5 minutes from class.
224-9660, ask for Barrie.
Furn. Houses ft Apts.
WANTED GIRL TO SHARE
Apartment. Close. Reasonable.
Phone  Carol  736-4829.
SENIOR STUDENTS WOULD LIKE
to share apartment with same.
Phone   261-5286.
FURNISHED SUITE $45 MONTH,
share with grad student with car.
Kitsilano, Hut A-3, Room 11 or
733-4962.	
WANTED: SENIOR OR GRAD
student interested in sharing a
West End apt. Phone Alan TR
6-8112 after 6.
BSMT.   STE.,   PTE.   ENT.,   $50.   W.
48th. Phone AM 3-8778, sg.le. pers.
SHARE APARTMENT AVAIL-
able at gate. For senior faculty
member.  Joel Brenner,  ext.  2265.
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE
spacious West End apt. with two
others. Own bedroom. V^ry reasonable. Call 684-2036 after 5.
Unfurnish. Houses ft Apts.    84
WANTED GRAD STUDENT TO
share apartment. See Ernest
Becker, rm.  100. Henning 228-3898
BUY - SELL -  RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Thursday, September 29,  1966
THE    UBYSSEY
;^*N«»«i
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
14  new suites
The Editor, Ubyssey, Sir.
It's September 29, 1984.
City council today completed zoning law reforms. The
entire lower mainland west of
Chilliwack is now zoned for
industrial or commercial use,
or for high-rise apartments
and one-family dwellings.
"Good thing, too," commented one Point Grey homeowner. "We could still smell
some of those students in
New   Westminster."
Student housing co-operative administrators predicted
14 new suites will go up on
campus in the next two years.
"That should take some of
the pressure, off," a member
was quoted as saying. An
average of 47 students live in
each of the 88 suites now
completed, Ubyssey research
revealed.
In other news from the
housing front, five more co
eds were found on women's
residence barbed - wire entanglements this morning.
A Ubyssey reporter asked
perennial tzar Angus Mc-
Greek whether this showed
increaseckneed for heterosexual facilitiear'after SUB closing hours.
McGreek: No comment.
And  don't  write  that  down.
Ubyssey: Do you have a
suggestion for a substitute
activity which would prevent
these needless deaths?
McG: The Greeks had a
word for it.
1 This year's increase in the
number of lodgingless students
means upwards of 500 cars
end several truck-mounted
campers now stay on lot C
each night. Baron von Ouv-
recht will up parking fees
five dollars to cover cost of
digging latrines, he said.
Tent cities in the woods
surrounding the   golf  course
GOOD LIBRARY
UBC scores high
in book survey
The UBC library has scored high in a cross-Canada
survey of library resources in science and technology.
The    survey,   Science-Tech-
continue. RCMP and faculty
discount rumors of moral
degeneration under primitive
conditions said to exist.
"You can't make LSD over
a campfire," commented police. Asked about the meaning of a pig's head found impaled on a sharpened surveying stake near the Engineering encampment, the Red
Fort, English professor Rando
K. Enomura replied, "Boys
will be boys."
ANTHONY  BUCKLAND,
Science 20.
Non  compos
The Editor, Ubyssey, Sir:
I have a cup of coffee for
page four Artlessly Yours any
day he wants to come and
talk to me.
How odd that page two's
article, Arts students' ~Views
aired, should have escaped
his friendly notice. Can it be,
Mr.   Editor,   that   you    have
walls and bulkheads and page
four doesn't know what page
two is doing until your excellent paper hits the street?
If that surmise, based admittedly on pretty slim evidence, happens to be right, I
have a cup of coffee for you.
D. M.  HEALY
Dean   of  Arts
survey,
nology Literature Resources in
Canada, by Prof. George S.
Bonn, showed in almost every
category of literature measured by questionnaires, the
UBC library had the strongest
collection in Canada.
Of 48 libraries tested across
Canada, only UBC had all 17
subject literature guides, organization directories and periodical lists on Bonn's list.
Only UBC, Toronto and
Windsor had all five biographical directories on the list and
UBC and Alberta tied for first
place among universities for
dictionaries  and handbooks.
The university library had
Canada's strongest collection
of journals in mathematics
and ranked second in its collection in physics, bacteriology, mechanical engineering
and plant culture.
Prof. Bonn recommended
that more libraries devoted to
various areas of science, parallel to the Woodward Biomedical Library, be constructed on
Canadian campuses.
GIRLS!   GIRLS!
Receive  a
109b DISCOUNT
On your new fall shoes.
Just present your A.M.S. card when visiting
our wonderful world off fashionwise footwear
This offer good unf.. Sept. 30, 1966 only
*
<M*#fe
Ladies and Teeners Highstyle Footwear
548 Granville St.
Tory urges student seats
in Ontario government
TORONTO (CUP)—A Progressive Conservative member
of the legislature proposed Sept. 21 that Ontario universities elect their own representatives to the legislature.
Thomas Wells, member for Scarboro North, told the
University of Toronto Progressive Conservative Club that
four university constituencies should be established as part
of a program to involve young people more in the total life
of the community.
Mr. Wells also suggested students ibe elected to the
boards of governors of universities.
Voters in the four university constituencies all would
be students or members of the faculties of universities.
Candidates would also have to be students or faculty
members, he said.
10% Discount on
Corsages & Wedding
Bouquets
Vogue Flower Shop
2197 W. Broadway 736-7344
TYPEWRITERS
SrKCIAI-    STUDENT    RATES
3 Months $18.00
AM   Makes,   Standard  or portable
Consolidated   Typewriters
Ltd.
534 W. Pender    MU 5-6371
Announcing
FREE SHOWINGS OF
RESNAIS'
"HIROSHIMA MON AMOUR
12:30 NOON
8:00  P.M.
AUDITORIUM
Cinema 16
CA 4-1455
Get that
"king-of-sport
feeling in our
Go casual with great style. With softer tailoring.
Natural comfort. Fabrics that express you perfectly.
Rough and tweedy. Smooth and politic. Subtle and
underplayed. The Daroff Touch does it... all the way.
Set the pace whenever it's Sport Coat time ... in
famous 'Botany' 500 ... with coordinated slacks.
Sport Coats from $49.50 Slacks from $25.00
Natural Gentleman '
Sport Coats
come on strong!!
go all the way with
'BOTANY' 500*
tailored by Daroff
#&&
Linings Sanitized" treated for hygienic freshness.
DISTINCTIVE MEN'S STORES
4445 West 10th Ave. —        East of Sasamat
2901 West Broadway at Mackenzie

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126399/manifest

Comment

Related Items