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The Ubyssey Mar 8, 1977

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Array Cutbacks force resignation
By CHRIS GAINOR
A UBC sociology professor has
resigned because of education
cutbacks and the university administration's neglect of the
women's studies program.
Dorothy Smith, whose
resignation is effective June 30,
said in an interview Monday
cutbacks have caused sharply
increased faculty teaching loads
and may cause the women's
studies program she teaches to end
this year.
And she said the burden of
provincial government education
cutbacks is being placed on the
shoulders of faculty, making it
more difficult for them to do a
proper job of teaching.
"The over-all problem with the
teaching thing results from the
provincial government," she said.
"It's all dumped on the faculty.
"You're shortchanging
students,"  said Smith.   "That
appears to be the general trend —
at least in the faculty of arts."
Smith, who has taught here for
eight years, said that until two
years ago, two courses and
graduate students were the normal
course load for a professor. Now
the normal load is three courses as
well as graduate students.
"You have to go back to formal
big courses and giving formal
exams." She said professors have
less time to see students and give
individual attention to their work.
Smith said women's studies 222,
which is supposed to be taught by
four professors from different
disciplines, is being taught this
year by herself and anthropology
professor Helga Jacobson, who will
be on leave next year.
Also in the program is a women's
literature course taught by dean of
women Margaret Fulton, an
anthropology-sociology seminar
and a psychology course.
"It looks really unlikely that the
course will be taught. Its future is
in doubt."
The interdisciplinary course is
vital because a general course in
the program forms the heart of
women's studies, Smith said.
"The failure of the university to
treat the course seriously" is the
cause for its decline, Smith added.
"It's been a continued fight to
keep the course going. It's been a
fight with administrative neglect."
The 60-student course has been in
operation for four years.
A big problem is that the course
is interdisciplinary. Releasing a
professor for such a course means
a cut in an individual department's
available faculty members and
few departments will make that
sacrifice willingly, she said.
y§ MWm   i if>^/g^ C*'flCNfc^
Vol. LIX, No. 57
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 1977
^
228-2301
The only remedy to the problem
is to provide adequate money for
the courses and to administer them
properly, she said.
Smith has accepted a job at the
University of Toronto. "I wouldn't
have gone except for the changes
here.
"I really didn't want to go. But it
was going to be more difficult to do
a more proper teaching job."
Fulton, a member of the committee which runs the program,
refused comment on the problems
which forced Smith's resignation.
"There is absolutely no doubt
that this is a serious blow to this
program," said Fulton.
Associate arts dean Peter
Remnant said he assumes replacements will be found for the two so
the program can continue, but said
such decisions are up to the
committee.
Committee chairman Sheila
Egoff was unavailable for comment Monday.
McGeer says nyet
to budget request
CONSIDERING    25    PER
vice-president Michael Shaw,
—matt king photo
CENT SOLUTION is administration
destined to plod along in rain.
By HEATHER WALKER
UBC will not get any more
money from the education
department, education minister
Pat McGeer said Friday.
"We were sure they (the UBC
board of governors) were going to
ask for more money and sure that
they weren't able to get more
money." McGeer said.
The board decided at its last
meeting to ask the B.C. Universities Council for an increase in
funding as an alternative to increasing tuition fees by 25 to 30 per
cent.
The council presents budget
requests from the universities to
the government and then divides
the provincial government grant
between them.
McGeer said education received
a larger percentage increase in its
budget than other government
departments — seven instead of
five per cent.
"If UBC is able to pressure some
ministries to take less, I'd be
delighted," he said.
UBC's budget requirements are
directly related to faculty and staff
wage settlements, he said.
"If faculty and staff are willing
to give up some of their salary
increases, then tuition fees could
be kept down," McGeer said.
McGeer sent a letter to the
Universities Council last month
saying the government could not
pay salary increases of as much as
the maximum allowable under
Anti-Inflation   Board   guidelines.
McGeer said the guidelines have
nothing to do with the amount of
money the government has
available.
"I don't think the AIB guidelines
are related to the government's
ability to pay," he said.
The board plans to cut back
UBC's budget by $1.3 million as
well as increasing tuition fees if the
university's funds are not increased, student, board member
Moe Sihota said Monday.
But, he said, he did not know
where the cutbacks would be
made.
"It depends on how much more
money we can get from the
government," he said.
If the government does increase
the amount of UBC's grant, the
board will have to change its
estimates for tuition increases and
cutbacks, Sihota said.
"It's all up in the air at the
moment," he said.
Sihota said he is optimistic the
government will give the
university more money.
"It looks good for getting more
money," he said. Sihota said if the
board and students continue
pushing the government, the
university will get more money.
Seepage 2: UBC
Support growing
for tuition rally
Support is growing for the B.C.
Students' Federation rally
Thursday against education cutbacks, organizer Lake Sagaris said
Monday.
Sagaris said the BCSF expects
more than 1,500 college, university
and high school students to march
from the Vancouver Vocational
Institute at 250 West Pender to the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre plaza for
the rally.
After the march, which begins at
12 noon, the protestors will listen to
folksingers and speakers at the
plaza. Speakers will include representatives from the NDP, the B.C.
Federation of Labor and the B.C.
Federation of Women, Sagaris
said.
Many high school students are
expected to join the rally because
Club will battle AAAS in student court
The varsity outdoors club is demanding
$30,000 from the Alma Mater Society for the
club's share in the Whistler ski cabin.
The VOC will claim in student court today
that the AMS owes the club $30,000 for construction of the cabin because the ski club and
the AMS have taken over use of the facility.
VOC treasurer Berni Claus said Monday VOC
members built the cabin in 1965 and the club
spent $30,000 for materials.
The AMS gave the club three $5,000 interest-
free loans to build the cabin, but the loans have
since been repaid, Claus said.
The VOC has said the AMS should compensate the club for the time and money it put
into the cabin because the club no longer uses
it. The ski club has operated the cabin since
1974.
The dispute began when the AMS blocked an
attempt by the VOC to sell the cabin to the ski
club, the VOC brief on the dispute says. The
AMS claimed then that it owned the cabin so no
sale was possible.
Since then the VOC has attempted to get
compensation from the AMS for its original
work and negotiate for special privileges for
cabin use, the brief says. But no formal
agreement has been signed.
The VOC originally decided to let the ski club
use the cabin because it no longer wanted a
base in the Whistler area.
"When the idea to build a ski facility in the
Whislter area was first conceived of, no one
could possibly have foreseen the direction
which development would take, in particular
that it would quickly turn into a crowded, high-
priced and fashionable ski resort."
Claus said the ski cabin became too expensive for the club to finance. "It was costing
us in excess of $2,000 per year, just to pay in
surance, light, heat and supply bills, and this
figure was continually rising," he said.
Student administrative commissioner Hector
Mackay-Dunn said: "Legally the cabin belongs
to the AMS but the VOC is claiming that due to
their role in building the cabin and the expenses
they incurred, they own the cabin."
He said the VOC may have an equal interest
in the cabin, considering the work contributed
by club members.
But, he said, "no one knows exactly what
happened over the last 30 years involving the
sale of the old cabin and who legally owned it,
so the issue is very confused."
The purpose of the student court case will be
to establish what happened during the last 30
years in terms of ownership, and what was
contributed by the AMS and the VOC to construction of the cabin.
See page 2: VOC
they will eventually be affected by
tuition fee increases that result
from cutbacks, she said.
And support for the rally among
post-secondary students is strong
after the UBC rally March 1 that
drew 1,200 students.
"I have been impressed by the
strong response. This issue of
tuition fee increases and cutbacks
has really been firing people up,"
Sagaris said.
Sagaris said student societies at
Douglas College, Capilano College
and Simon Fraser University have
all supported a day-long boycott of
classes Thursday so students can
support the rally.
She said many colleges in the
Interior will hold independent
rallies Thursday against cutbacks.
And colleges throughout B.C. are
donating money and materials to
the rally.
Rally organizer Jhwon Wentworth said UBC students can get to
the rally by chartered bus or in a
car cavalcade which will leave the
SUB traffic circle at noon.
She said the arts undergraduate
society has hired four buses for the
trip and the Association of
University and College Employees, local 1, is considering
hiring another. One bus will return
to campus for students who want to
attend 2:30 p.m. classes.
Wentworth said a decision by the
student representative assembly
not to spend any money on Thursday's rally has meant organizers
have had to spend much of their
time just raising money.
"We are all quite pissed off with
the SRA for supporting the rally in
principle but not giving any
money," she said. Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 8, 1977
UBC budget picture bleak
From page 1
Students have received eight
replies to telegrams asking their
MLAs to oppose tuition fee increases when the education budget
is discussed in the legislature.
"The telegrams say they would
VOC vs AMS
From page 1
The VOC wants the $30,000 from
the AMS which its members invested in the construction of the
cabin. The $30,000 accounts only
for the cost of materials to construct the cabin.
The VOC brief says the AMS
should pay the $30,000 over a 10-
year period.
The student court will meet at
6:30p.m. today in the law building
to hear the case.
CALCULATOR
REPAIRS
ALL MAKES AND MODELS
FREgESTIMATES
CAL-Q-TRONICS
434-9322
4861 Kingsway; Burnaby
like to do their best to ensure the
university gets more money, and
will discuss it with the minister of
education," Sihota said.
And, he said, the Alma Mater
Society will send letters to UBC
deans and department heads
urging them to ask the Universities
Council to press for more money
for the university.
But Universities Council
chairman William Armstrong has
said he is not optimistic the
government will give the
university more money.
"I think we could get $1 million
from the government," Sihota
said.
ECKANKAR
Path of total
awareness.
"Spirituality cannot be taught, but
caught . .. Therefore Man's first
duty is to know himself. We can
worship any God we wish, but our
first duty according to all
metaphysical and spiritual teachings
is to find out who, and what, we
are ourselves."
How does Eckankar compare with
other paths?
Introductory Lecture
Tuesday, March 8
12:30
SUB 213
But, he said, that would not be
enough to prevent tuition fee increases or cutbacks.
Board member George Hermanson said Monday any cutbacks
made at UBC will be shared
equally by all faculties and the
university administration, including upkeep of buildings.
He said he is pessimistic about
receiving more money from the
government, but said any funding
increase would be used to reduce
tuition increases.
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UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
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SCHOOL
DISTRICT NO. 57
PRINCE GEORGE
Will have openings as
of September 1977 for
TEACHERS & ADMINISTRATORS
covering a broad range of the
educational curriculum.
These positions, both in the City of Prince George and
in the surrounding communities of Mackenzie, McBride
and Valemount offer the new graduate the challenge
and the opportunity of becoming involved within the
educational framework of this growing interior region.
Prince George representatives will be on campus to
conduct interviews from Monday, March 14 through
Wednesday, March 16 at the campus Placement
Office, Building F, Ponderosa Annex, near the
Ponderosa Cafeteria.
Students may arrange for an interview by going to the
campus Placement Office and scheduling a time to
meet with one of our representatives.
ALLY
AGAINST TUITION INCREASES AND EDUCATION CUTBACKS
THURSDAY MARCH 10th
Assemblies 12:00 Noon — Vancouver Vocational Institute
FREE Buses and Car Pool Leaving 12:30 Noon from UBC — SUB Parking Circle
JOIN US
On March 1st over 1200 UBC students protested education cutbacks.
Now's the time to join with all other lower mainland students in a united action to increase
the pressure on the provincial government and demand:
STOP TUITION INCREASES!
NO EDUCATION CUTBACKS!
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL 228-2163 Tuesday, March 8, 1977
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
TRIUMF to make money — Vogt
UBC's TRIUMF cyclotron will
make possible a multi-million
dollar business within a few years,
Erich Vogt, TRIUMF
management  board  chairman,
predicted Saturday.
Vogt, vice-president of student
and faculty affairs and a central
figure in developing the $36 million
particle accelerator, outlined
results of the first experiments at
TRIUMF to about 200 people at a
Vancouver Institute lecture.
And he said that although initial
experiments at the accelerator
may eventually yield millions of
dollars, modern nuclear physics is
still at a Stone Age level.
The accelerator produces high
energy subatomic particles which
physicists use to investigate the
structure   of   nuclei   and   which
doctors will use to treat cancer.
Vogt said new kinds of isotopes
can be produced when a beam of
high-energy particles is directed at
samples of various elements. The
variety of isotopes produced
depends on the energy and angle
with which the beam strikes the
sample.
He said the accelerator can
produce neutron-poor isotopes by
"boiling off" neutrons from a
nucleus by bombarding it with
protons.
"We expect the production of
isotopes in this way is going to be a
multi-million-dollar business in the
next few years," Vogt said.
"A nuclear reactor is really a sea
of neutrons. You can create argon
or iodine 131 — that happens to be
an isotope which has sales of over
$10 million in the U.S. In a reactor
you produce a neutron-rich isotope.
"In an accelerator you produce
neutron-poor isotopes. You need
(an accelerator) with tremendous
energy so you can produce commercial quantities. We are the first
people really that are going to
produce this in quantity.
"There's a list of four or five
(isotopes) which seem marketable
at present. I think we'll start with a
couple, mainly iodine and
thalium," Vogt said.
He said TRIUMF can produce
iodine 123, which, like iodine 131, is
used extensively to treat thyroid
disorders. Thalium isotopes are
used to- treat heart ailments, he
said.
Vogt added the university would
probably  not sell  isotopes  com-
AMS decides on closure
of co-op bookstore in SUB
The student administrative
commission has decided to close
the Alma Mater Society co-op
bookstore April 30 to make rental
space available in SUB's
basement.
The co-op has operated since
1970.
The SAC decided March  1  to
close the store because the co-op's
gross profit is only about $1,000
each year. Director of services
Brent Tynan said Monday the
space could be leased to commercial retailers for $12,000 to
$15,000 per year.
Students who have books for sale
on consignment may collect them
from the bookstore before April 30.
Admin interferes
PENTICTON (CUP) - Members of the administration at the
College of New Caledonia at Prince
George are "disrupting" the activities of the student government,
college students charged Friday.
Student president Randy
Templeton said the administration
is withholding student activity
fees, interfering with the budget,
and said administrators may be
responsible for the theft of files
from the student council office.
Lynda Morgan, student society
secretary-treasurer, claimed the
administration has threatened to
withhold almost half of the
society's $14,000 spring budget.
Administrators are backing an
athletic department suggestion
that council allot about $3,600 to
college teams which played in the
recent Totem provincial sports
conference.
Before the amount of money in
activity fees was known, student
council told the athletics department it would consider a request to
fund the teams. Now administrators have threatened to
garnishee to collect the $3,600, she
said.
And Morgan said the administration still owes the council
about $4,000 in activity fees
collected in December.
"Until we really kicked up a fuss
about it," the administration had
not acted on turning over the fees,
Morgan said.
In a report to the AMS, Tynan
said, "Isee no reason why we could
not stipulate that a future tenant
consider hiring our present
bookstore staff, if the staff so
desired, and we would not be
selling our staff totally down the
creek."
In past years, the store's profits
have depended on "demand
trends, the presence of vendors,
seasons of the year, and the success of summer operations," said
Tynan.
Claiming that the "real sales
season" is only September and
October of each year, Tynan said a
temporary exchange depot should
be set up elsewhere in SUB.
Tynan mentioned Eaton's and
Woodward's department stores as
possible tenants for the space the
bookstore occupies
mercially itself, but work with the
national atomic energy board.
In his presentation, which included short film clips, slides and
music from the film 2001: A Space
Odyssey, Vogt compared modern
nuclear physics with knowledge of
the solar system 4,000 years ago.
"We know the nucleus is an
arena in which neutrons and
protons are the primary components. We know there are all
kinds of forces which take place in
this arena — you can make it
shake, rattle, rotate, vibrate.
"But at present we have no
picture of that in the nucleus.
We're just beyond the Stone Age."
Vogt said TRIUMF, a joint
project of UBC, the University -of
Victoria, Simon Fraser University
and the University of Alberta, is
now operating at about lOper cent
of its full capacity. He said it will
be another year before the
cyclotron operates at peak
capacity.
TRIUMF could also open up the
new field of solid state research by
breakthroughs in muon spin
research.
Muons are particles produced by
the breakup of pi mesons, shortlived particles produced by
smashing a beam of protons into
atomic nuclei.
Vogt said more muons will be
available for research than ever
before, because "the facility will
produce 1,000 times more mesons
than have been available
anywhere else in the world."
Vogt said TRIUMF is more
flexible than similar accelerators
at the U.S. Los Alamos Scientific
Laboratory and in Switzerland.
"The machine here has some
unique features that make about
half the experiments we do here
unique,"   he   said.
Teams of scientists from around
the world are visiting UBC to use
the accelerator for experiments,
Vogt said.
Rally rejected
PENTICTON (CUP) — Cariboo College student council will not join
B.C.'s colleges and universities in a March 10 protest against education
cutbacks, student president Jim Piderman said Friday.
At a B.C. Students' Federation conference in Penticton, Piderman said
the council will not support a class boycott as a "demonstration of good
faith" in the administration.
The BCSF called the March 10 rally last month to protest tuition fee
increases and cutbacks in education spending.
BCSF chairman Gordon Bell said Friday Cariboo's council is overly
concerned with its image with the administration.
"They're worried more about credibility with the administration than
with the students," Bell said.
Piderman said he is conducting a letter writing campaign to protest
cutbacks and tuition hikes rather than "militant-type" actions such as a
walkout.
Piderman admitted a letter writing campaign would be less effective
than a walkout. But, he said the walkout "is not a constructive move. It
might be politically effective, but we're not sold on it.''
,A
CO-OP BOOKSTORE
—matt king photo
to be replaced by big chain?
Panelists disagree about use of nuclear power in B.C.
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
B.C. Hydro chairman Robert
Bonner clashed Thursday with
Greenpeace Foundation vice-
president Patrick Moore and UBC
political science professor Michael
Wallace about the use of nuclear
power in B.C.
Bonner told 200 people at Place
Vanier that B.C. will have to use
nuclear power to make up for a
projected increase in annual
energy use of 8.5 per cent.
"In about 10 years' time we are
going to have to look at nuclear
power," Bonner said.
Wallace, western president of
the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear
Responsibility, said using nuclear
power would be like introducing a
"biological Trojan horse" into the
environment.
And Moore said no biologist will
say nuclear power is safe for
human life. He said nuclear waste
is a serious problem and none of
the waste plants in the U.S. are
working.
UBC physics professor Erich
Vogt said: "I think it would be a
great mistake to transport
plutonium over large distances
arbitrarily." Plutonium is one of
the radioactive waste products of
nuclear power production.
Wallace said Canada is pushing
its Candu reactors "on countries
for whom it is wrong." He cited
India and Argentina as examples.
Wallace said there are places in
India where peasants stir
cauldrons of atomic waste with
bamboo poles.
Moore said 20,000 people occupied an atomic reactor site in
Germany toprevent its being built.
He added the Canadian government has spent more than $1 billion
on nuclear power.
Wallace said if the money had
been spent on solar or wind power
research we would have a working
alternative power source by now.
POWER PANEL . . . discussing future energy sources
-keith brookfield photo
The discussion's moderator,
broadcaster Chuck Davis, cited
parolysis or "garbage power" as
an alternative source of power.
Parolysis is the burning of garbage
to heat water into steam that can
be channelled into large buildings
for heat.
This method heats several large
department stores and Granville
Mall in downtown Vancouver.
Wallace said: "The idea is not to
come up with one magic solution,
but to come up with a variety of
solutions."
During the question period, a
member of the Fusion Energy
Foundation said: "We should
expand energy for use in industry
to prepare for a fusion-based
economy." But Vogt said "fusion
energy has been five years away
since 1952." Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 8, 1977
Smith casualty
of ed cutbacks
The story about sociology professor Dorothy Smith's
resignation is not wholly unrelated to stories The Ubyssey
has run in recent weeks about tuition increases and education
cutbacks.
Smith is one of UBC's most intelligent, innovative
thinkers — the type of first-class mind administration
president Doug Kenny keeps saying UBC needs. But Kenny's
administration is largely responsible for Smith's departure.
As she explained in her interview with a Ubyssey
reporter, she resigned because of education cutbacks, and
because the administration neglected the women's studies
program.
For many of us, the word "cutbacks" is a meaningless
word until we actually begin to feel their direct effects.
Higher tuition fees will be one. Larger classes, and a return to
the formal production-line exams needed to process more
and more students, are other ways.
Smith's resignation is an example of yet another way
the cutbacks hit us. UBC is a pretty mediocre university as it
is, and losing profs of Smith's calibre isn't going to help.
True, Kenny isn't wholly or even largely responsible for
education cutbacks. Credit for them must go to education
minister Pat McGeer and that coalition of wealthy, insensitive
fools in power in Victoria.
But Kenny is responsible for setting the administration's
spending priorities. His decision to make the women's studies
program low priority means it is one of the first programs to
suffer when education cutbacks hit.
Kenny's treatment of women's studies indicates his
preoccupation with symptoms of sexism. Women's studies,
which tries to shed some light on causes of discriminatory
attitudes towards women and to remedy them, has been
neglected by the administration.
As Smith points out, departments are reluctant to let
professors contribute their time and effort to the women's
studies because it means a cut in each department's available
faculty members. Thus, the rules discourage profs from
contributing interdisciplinary programs such as women's
studies.
Let's hope Smith's resignation focuses some attention
on her reasons. Doug Kenny is wrong when he says big
salaries are needed to keep the top people here. Most people
work for more than just money. Making them feel their work
is vital and worthwhile is just as important.
VflfcflKU. OLD MA//) i
«^H_-»>      •*-/<»
M WrTCOOPif^
'1iV\
Letters
Skelly article 'inaccurate' reporting
What does the Ubyssey staff
have against NDP MLA Bob
Skelly? I ask this question because
of the inaccurate remarks attributed to Skelly by Frank
Kuerbis in his article in the Friday
Ubyssey entitled Expect oil spill a
day, says NDP MLA. This article is
ridiculous as well as inaccurate.
For example:
• Skelly said to expect an oil spill
every four years — not one oil spill
a day as the title of Kuerbis' article
suggests;
• Skelly is  MLA  for  the con
stituency of Alberni — not Port
Alberni (people from that area are
fussy);
• Skelly said a cargo ship sank in
Barkley Sound, B.C. — not
Barkeley Sound, Wash., and
• Skelly was talking specifically
about an aircraft carrier, not oil
tankers in general, when he
referred to a v essel that would take
10 miles of water to turn in.
Besides this inaccurate job of
reporting, The Ubyssey also attempted   to   foil   Skelly   by   ad-
THE UBYSSEY
MARCH 8, 1977
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301;
Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
"Boy," said Sue Vohanka to Marcus Gee. "I'm sure glad there are
only nine issues left this year." "Yeah —"Kathy Ford began, but was
Interrupted by Ralph Maurer. "Ten, Sue," he said. "Eight? How do you get
eight?" sneered Vohanka as Heather Walker and Geof Wheelwright rolled
their eyes and sighed. "I said 10, if you'd been listening, Vohanka," said
Maurer, as Matt King and Rob Little dodged for cover. "Don't yell at me.
How'd you get 10?" she said as Tom Barnes called the police. "Well,
including this one, it's 10," Maurer said as Doug Rushton and Frank
Kuerbis consulted with Paul Wilson and Shane McCune In the UN security
council. "Who's counting this one? It's hit the streets," said Vohanka as
Chris Gainor and Mike Bocking straffed the area with handbills urging
people to vote. "Fuck off," Maurer said. "You always have to have the last
word, don't you?" Vohanka said. "Yes," Maurer said. "In mastheads
anyway."
vertising the wrong room in which
he was scheduled to speak.  He
spoke in SUB 115 — not SUB 215.
Come   on   gang,   how   much
punishment can one man endure?
Bob Willcox
physical education 4
Clearer still
Re: Mist clears, my letter of
Feb. 18.
I respect The Ubyssey's right to
edit letters for brevity, legality,
etcetera, but I would have
preferred the substitution of "a
student" rather than "some
creep" for the name of the person
involved in the library thefts. He
may well be "a creep," but this
isn't a word I would have used and
I think it is a judgment which
should be left up to the reader.
Julie Petersen
education 5
PF refreshes
Congratulations to the artists
who contributed to the latest
edition of Page Friday. How
refreshing it was to sink for a while
back into the realities of the human
person and remove myself from
the sick societal substitutes of big
bucks, painted ladies, disco
druggies and prostituted ideals
characteristic of this energy era!
Richard Mc Marion
engineering physics 2
Prisoners' plight
Now that it is publicly recognized that "every effort should
be made to ensure that
prisoners emerge no more antisocial than when they went
inside," we can look forward to
some positive results from the
shattering revelations being
exposed by the present
parliamentary committee investigating the Canadian
penitentiary system.
Would it not be a measure of
justice that those who initiated
this enquiry should not • be
punished for having done so?
The seven prisoners who took
two hostages at the B.C.
Penitentiary  in September,
1976, releasing them entirely
unharmed, did so for only one
reason — to bring the public in
to see what had become unbearable. They now face additional years of imprisonment
as punishment for their efforts.
It is to be hoped that sufficient
public pressure will induce
solicitor-general Francis Fox to
intervene on their behalf.
From one who spent 80 hours
inside the B.C. Penitentiary
during that disturbance, as a
member of the Citizens' Advisory Committee.
Claire Culhane
Prisoners' Rights Group^
Selfish driver explains
I am so bloody selfish!
In The Ubyssey recently a grad
student thought that all those
people who drive to school each
day are selfish in that they do not
offer a ride to hitchhikers.
I do agree with Stefan Moch-
nacki that it is pointless for
everyone to waste the seats that
they have available for riders, and
that there is not enough room for
every person to bring their own
cars, and park them on campus,
but there is another side to the
story.
People like myself work practically full-time, so it is to my
personal  advantage,   and  to  my
health to utilize my own vehicle for
my own purposes. Also, I do not
believe that those who pay for the
services of their own vehicles
should be expected to provide
services to those without cars.
However, I do not mind giving a,
person a ride if an arrangement
has been designed, but those who
hitchhike should realize that some
students have worked hard for
their own cars, thus they deserve
the privilege to use their car
however they choose. You're a
good man, Mochnacki — if I could,
I'd buy you a bus so you could pick
up everyone!
BUI Kolida
commerce 1 Tuesday, March 8,  1977
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
Let's cfo it again on Morcfi 10
By CHRISTINE McCLEOD
Remember March 1? We were out there
telling administration president Doug
Kenny, the board of governors and
ultimately education minister Pat McGeer
what we thought of any cutbacks in
education funding.
We shouted at them clearly, "Send the
budget back," because the University
Council was (and is) $10 million short the
amount needed to keep the three universities operating at their present level.
We knew then, and know now, that the
government could pay for our education.
After all, McGeer can say to the colleges,
"Up the tuition fees and I'll match the
amount you increase your revenue by:" to
do the matching he's got to have funds in
reserve.
And again, if the Socreds weren't giving
$77 million in tax cuts to the resource industry this year and if they'd collect the $28
million in succession duties next year they'd
be a lot more than the necessary $10 million
for the maintenance of the universities.
They'd even have enough to fully fund other
government agencies presently suffering
cutbacks, such as the health ministry and
human resources.
We were shouting on March 1 to show our
anger and concern to the board, the people
at UBC who have the power to accept or
reject McGeer's budget. We said, "Don't
talk about how to implement this budget.
Don't discuss tuition increases as opposed to
cutbacks in services. We can't pay the increases and we won't accept an inferior
quality education."
We told the board, "Be the representatives of the students, staff and faculty who
are rallying here. Inform the provincial
government that the post-secondary
education budget is unworkable — send the
budget back."
What happened? We demanded to speak
to Kenny, he finally showed up. Was he
willing to vote in accord with our demands
and needs? No! He was still posing the
question as "cutbacks opposed to fee hikes"
— which isn't our question at all.
A lot of the demonstrators became angrier
seeing this flagrant disregard of our
position. Two attitudes arose in the crowd.
One was "Let's go in there and give the
board hell;" another was "Let's build for
March 10, for the next action. This time we'll
join with the other campuses and tell
McGeer and the Socreds what the BoG
won't. Quality education is a right that
students, teachers, and working people are
going to fight for; it is not the privilege of a
rich few."
Both the orientations were acted on. Some
people did go into the meeting. Supposedly
the board appreciated these demonstrators'
responsibility and commitment in their
expression of anti-budget acceptance, but
the board made its budget policy decisions
after the protestors left.
And what did they decide? That tuition fee
increases of 25 to 30% were a good idea and
that perhaps the board could cajole a little
more money from the Socred government
by a meek request to Universities Council.
The board expects the Universities Council
— an administrative arm of the government
— to relay the polite statement of UBC's
need to McGeer.
McCleod is on the March 10 rally
organizing committee.
282:77
Do we students trust the board to work
with the Universities Council and McGeer to
straighten out the education budget so that
we don't have to pay more for 1977-78
tuition? We're foolish if we do. After all
remember what Kenny stated at the rally —
tuition increases are an okay solution in his
opinion.
Remember what William Armstrong,
Universities Council chairman said March 4
— he doubts there'll be any more money for
UBC. Remember how Clive Lytle, a board
member during the NDP years and now a
representative of the B.C. Federation of
Letters
Labor, described the present board to the
rally He characterized them as "docile,
downtown businessmen."
Thursday is the next step in the fight. UBC
students should be at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre squareby 1 p.m. that day. We'll join
with other students, instructors and support
staff from SFU, the Vancouver Vocational
Institute and Lower Mainland colleges and
high schools in making a protest aimed
directly at McGeer.
We'll show the BCSF that they are the
leaders of students who are not apathetic;
we'll show them that we will act when they
We should be prepared to pay for school
As an education 2 student who is in the
same economic boat as Ruth Lawther I
would like to debate her views of Ken Piv-
nick's recent letter on tuition fees, in which
she claims that he is ignorant, lacks insight
and is totally committed to denying her the
right to education.
Education is a valuable commodity in
today's world. Through education you are
able to pursue the professional goals of your
choice. Education is an expensive process,
and if you feel that the results of a high
standard education are valuable, you should
be prepared to contribute monetarily to its
development.
You complain because you have had to
take a year off and work at summer jobs to
get through school. If it isn't worth it to you
why do you persist?
University is open to all those who can
afford it or are prepared to make a little
personal sacrifice so that they can afford it.
You appear to be upset because you are one
of those persons who must make some
sacrifices; you seem to think that everyone
attending UBC should be brought up to the
economic status of those who don't have to
work in the summer.
If education was free I am sure you would
still be complaining that many people attending school could afford to live in better
accommodations than you. I imagine you
would want the government to do something
about that too, perhaps pay you to go to
university?
Further, when you finally manage to
scrimp and scrape your way through school
I hope you will teach your students to react
to someone else's opinions with a bit of
diplomacy, not by pronouncing them
"ignorant," "inferior" and "unscholarly."
Before you dismiss me as someone who is
saying these things because I too am in
league with Pivnick, McGeer and all their
cronies in a massive attempt to deny you an
education I should inform you that:
• I am now completely broke;
• I work every summer;
• I have already taken a year out to make
money so I could attend school in the first
place;
• I intend to take next year off in order to
make enough money to complete my next
two years of study;
• I also fall asleep in class (no real
relevance to the discussion, but I felt you
should know we have been sleeping
together), and
• I also love education and for that reason
am prepared to work for it.
Rod Carmichael
education 2
call rallies and other protest actions. When
they realize this they should become a more
efficient, unafraid leadership.
On March we at UBC gave our council a
mandateto spend the remainder of the rally
budget on Thursday as the initial step in our
struggle, because we realized that actions
like March 1 had to be continued. Council
only endorsed our recognition- of the
Thursday rally's significance. They held
back on the money.
That is a complete abdication of their
responsibility to act on students' dictates. It
makes a lot of us who have organized and
protested very angry. It signifies that there
are definite leadership problems on this
campus and it also creates a problem in
publicizing and organizing UBC's participation in the rally. Whether the student
representative assembly's disregard of the
March 1 mandate depends on the inexperience and particular personalities of
those voting or whether it is related to the
character of our student government is
something we'll have to explore later. Right
now we have to overcome the problems of
organizing Thursday's rally.
Interested students have already found
funds for this second rally. The arts undergraduate society, external affairs and
social work students have come up with
money for publicity and buses. The grad
students and the women's centre are investigating whether or not they have funds
that they can donate. The Association of
University and College Employees continues to give us support in our actions.
Now what's needed is a lot of individual
interest. Go to theSRA workroom (SUB 230)
at noon today. Get some posters and put
them up right away. If you have questions or
ideas go to either SUB 230 of SUB 224, find
oneof the people who are already organizing
and speak with them.
Talk to your friends and your classes
about the rally.
Organize a car pool and come to the Queen
E plaza as a part of a contingent leaving the
traffic circle on the north side of SUB noon
Thursday. If you have a car and aren't part
of a pool by Thursday, come to SUB traffic
circle with your empty car and pick up
students at noon. Free buses are also being
provided, leaving the traffic circle at noon.
Be in Queen E square at 1 p.m.
Tell McGeer — no education cutbacks, no
tuition increases! Page 6
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 8, 1977
&m$m&MMmmM&mmmmmmm<mm&<&\ £3&-«&%«&i«»
'Tween classes
TODAY
NEWMAN CLUB
General   meeting,   noon,   SUB  205.
ECKANKAR
Introductory    lecture,    noon,    SUB
213.
AMS ART GALLERY
PROGRAMS COMMITTEE
Exhibition, A Stitch In Time, 11:30
a.m. to  2:30  p.m.  until   March  18,
AMS art gallery.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Instrumental   group   practice,   7:30
p.m., International House.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 207.
UBC CANOE CLUB
General   meeting,   noon,   SUB  211.
WEDNESDAY
NEWMAN CLUB
Bible study, noon, SUB 215.
PSFG  KUNG FU
Practice,   4:30   to   6:30   p.m.,
party room.
CSA AND CVC
Free   Cantonese   class,    noon,
316.
SAILING CLUB
Lecture,     coastal     navigation,
preparation for spring cruise, noon,
SUB 205.
ECKANKAR
Discussion, noon, SUB 211.
voc
General   meeting,   elections,   noon,
Chem. 250.
SIMS
Introductory      lecture      on
transcendental    meditation,    noon,
Bu. 313.
ECONOMIC STUDENTS SOC
Liquidity     trap,     7:30     p.m.     to
midnight, SUB 212.
Sub
Bu.
in
THURSDAY
REC UBC
Swami  Vishnu  Devananda lectures,
yoga   and   meditation   in   practice,
noon, Bu. 202.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORG
Testimony     meeting,    noon,    SUB
117.
jJr.TM   Reasonable
Big or Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
& YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
"MARYKE"
fact
CORKY'S
—        v     T     v
Back by Popular Demand
Make Your Appointments Now
731-4191
CORKY'S
HAIRSTYLING
3644 West 4th Avenue
at Alma
SCHOOL DISTRICT
NO. 56 (NECHAKO)
School District Representatives will be conducting
interviews with prospective
teachers for the District at
and on the following:
University of British Columbia
MARCH 17 & 18
Hyatt Regency
(During Northern
Zone Spring Recruiting)
MARCH 28, 29 & 30
Campus candidates are asked
to arrange for appointments
through their respective
campus agencies. Candidates
wishing a specific
appointment time for the
Hyatt Regency should
contact in writing:
Wm. Maslochko,
District Superintendent
of Schools,
P.O. Box 680,
Vanderhoof, B.C.
V0J 3A0
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Daniel Overmyer lectures on Taoist
views of life, noon, Bu. 106.
YOUNG PROGRESSIVE
CONSERVATIVES
MP John Fraser speaks, all
welcome, noon, SUB 111.
PLACE VANIER
NFB film, Forecast for Survival, 8
p.m., Place Vanier residence
canteen.
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Investments and securities, a
parable, noon, Chem. 250.
SIMS
Weekly club meeting, noon, BuTo.
297.
CPSC soc
Vern Dettwiler speaks, noon, Old
Civils 201.
ECONOMIC STUDENT SOC
General meeting, elections, noon,
Bu. 204.
FRIDAY
NDP CLUB
Tommy Douglas speaks, noon, SUB
auditorium.
PSYCH STUDENTS SOC
Guest lecture, noon, Angus 223.
THE CENTRE COFFEEHOUSE
Hard Times Two returns for  more
folk, $1 cover, 8:30 p.m., Lutheran
campus centre.
VOC
Special  slide show on Nepal, noon,
Chem. 250.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
IS 9 gG]B|B]i]G]ElB]E]E] G]G]G]G]E]G] ggggggggggggBjEjEjEjBjEjgE] |£j
IS
IS
IE)
IE)
ig
ta
is
la
CANDIA TAVERNA
FAST FREE PIZZA DELIVCRY
Call 228-9512/9513
4510 W. 10th Ave., Open 7 Days a Week 4 p.m. - 2 a.m.
\S BlalglaElalaEEtaSESIalalalaESEIsIaEls EEEEEIsEEIaEEEE |g
NURSING UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Nominations Now Open For
March 14/77 Elections Of:
Vice-President
Secretary
Social Coordinator
Sports
EUS Rep
HSCC Rep
GOBBLE, GOBBLE
HEY TURKEYS
(SCIENCE STUDENTS)
Did you know that each one
of you is being charged
one dollar next year!
Don't let us waste YOUR
money! Come to the
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
(S.U.S.)
GENERAL MEETING
MARCH 16th at 12:30
HEBB THEATRE
AMS JOB OPPORTUNITY
EDITOR INSIGHT 77
DUTIES: To produce the editorial content
of the student handbook.
PERIOD: Contract basis for approximately
8 weeks.
COMMENCING:        March 14, 1977.
QUALIFICATIONS: 1) Must be familiar with A.M.S.
Structure
2) Knowledge of campus activities
3) Ability to write and
communicate effectively
APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE
S.U.B. 226 - 246
DEADLINE
March 9, 4:00 p.m. - S.U.B. 266
INTERVIEWS
Thursday March 10 - 12:30 - S.U.B. 260
CUSO
Information Session
Slide-Tape Show
Thursday, March 10-8 p.m.
International House 402/404
CUSO needs experienced health, education,
technical and agricultural personnel.
EVERYONE WELCOME
TOMORROW - ANGUS 104
DALE ALEXANDER
^                 "The Codfather"              "N
w#
Come hear — Eminent
Nutrition Scientist
DALE ALEXANDER
speak on
SEX, GOOD HEALTH
f*n
Wtt
& COMMON SENSE
met
n*
Author of—
"Arthritis & Common Sense"
"Good Health & Common Sense"
"Healthy Hair & Common Sense"
"The Common Cold & Common Sense"
**st
t«ft
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9th
7:30 P.M.
LECTURE HALL 104
Henry Angus Bldg., U.B.C.
FRtt
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines,  1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Off ice, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
COLLECTIBLES    AND   ANTIQUE    FAIR
at the Bayshore, 1601 West Georgia,
Vancouver, B.C. March 11, 12 and 13.
Admission: $2.50; (Students 91.50);
Advance Tickets, $2.00; Children tut
der 14 admitted Free. Student group
rates available. Phone 874-8981. Daily
door prizes. Sponsored by Ben ZVI
Chapter of Hadassah.
THE UBC FENCING CLUB'S annual
general meeting, gym E, Friday,
March 18th. Members please come
at 7:00 p.m.
10— For Sale — Commercial
THE GRIN BIN — Largest selection of
prints and posters in B.C. 3308 W.
Broadway (opposite Super Valu) Vancouver. 738-2311.
11 — For Sale — Private
FUJICA ST601 w/case, Fujinon 1:22 f55
lens. 1 year old. Ph. 732-5002.
65 — Scandals
TURKEYS AGAIN! Cases of beer tor
door prizes at SUS (Jen. Meet, Mar.
16 — Hebb Theatre.
70 — Services
PIANO TUNING — Expert tuning and
repairs to all makes. Reduced rates
to students. Call Dallas Hinton 286-
8123 anytime.
WEDDINGS, THREE MINUTE passports.
Adams Photography, 731-2101, 1450
West Broadway at Granville Street
85 — Typing
30-Jobs
NEED TYPISTS to transcribe tapes
this week at S4 per hour. Call Sue
at 228-2301 or come to SUB 241K at
noon today.
WANTED: ART MAJOR graduating this
semester. Must be available to start
working in April 1977.
Requirements: typing, own car, good
appearance, pleasant personality, will
versed in contemporary art. Preferable: Bilingual. Please call 084-1813
for interview.
35 — Lost
LOST — HEWELETT PACKARD HP27
calculator on Friday, Feb. 25. Buchanan or Angus Bldg. Reward. 277-
2861.
LOST AVIATOR style prescription
glasses. Photo-Gray. Feb. 17. 228-9644.
Reward.
COWICHAN INDIAN tocque. Mar. 1,
Tues. morning. War Memorial Gym.
Call  Doug,  876-2973.
LOST DOG. Large red male retriever
with white spot on forehead on UBC
campus.   Reward.    738-6243;    736-6891.
EXPERIENCED     TYPIST     for
term   papers,   etc.   Reasonable   rates.
My home. North Vancouver. 968-7228.
EXPERT TYPING. Thesis, manuscripts,
term papers, IBM. Experienced and
qualified.  Irene,   734-3170.
EXPERIENCED, ACCURATE and fast
typing of essays, theses, etc. North
Shore. 988-9386.
THESIS, ESSAYS ET AL. Professional
electric typing. 70c each double spaced page. 684-4084.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. Reasonable
rates. Call Monica Thompson, 983-
8124.
FAST,   EFFICIENT   ELECTRIC   TYPING
on Campus with grammatical editing
also available.  Phone 224-7524.
90 - Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI WHISTLER
Bent cabin day/week.  731-0174 «*•■.
40 — Messages
BILINGUALS
Personnes bilingues CFrancais-
Anglais) interessees a participer a
une experience en psychologie. Remuneration $10. pour 2 heures.
Priere d'appeler Dr. R. Frender.
228-2469.
HELP — IF YOU SAW a late 1950s car
hit my red Chev. station wagon as I
was parking in Crescent Road in
front of the Faculty Club, please
call me at 228-1340 (home) or UBC
local 4358 or send a note to P. Busch,
Political Science Department, UBC
Please! I must have a witness.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, March 8, 1977
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 7
Bears defeat 'Birds in hockey final
By ROB LITTLE
_ The University of Alberta Golden
Bears hockey team claimed the
Canada West championship in the
third game of a best-of-three final,
defeating the UBC Thunderbirds 8-
3.
'Bird coach Bert Halliwell said
his team "ran out of gas" after
defeating the Bears 5-4 in overtime
Saturday night.
The Sunday afternoon game was
never in doubt. The Bears opened
scoring and led 3-1 after one period
and 6-2 after two.
Clark Jantzie, playing his first
game of the season for the Bears,
scored one goal and contributed
three assists and was named the
game's first star. Primeau and
Devaney scored twice while
Broadfoot, Offrim and Rolin added
singles for Edmonton.
Marty Matthews of UBC scored
two and Bill Ennos added a single.
Saturday Peter Moyls scored in
overtime to force the Sunday affair.
The 'Birds had overcome a 4-2
second-period deficit before Moyls
scored the tiebreaker. Dan Lucas
had a big night for UBC scoring
three times while Tom Blaney
added one. '
In Friday's contest the Bears
squeezed by the 'Birds 4-3 much as
they had done throughout the
regular season.
Randy Gregg, Jim Carr, Bryan
Sosnowski and Dave Hindmarch
scored for the Bears while Jim
Stuart, Matthews and Lucas
handled the 'Bird scoring.
Ron   Lefebvre,    chosen   as   a
SCHOOL
DISTRICT
No. 28
(QUESNEL)
School District Representative will conduct interviews
on Campus Monday,
March 14th and Tuesday
March 15th, 1977.
Prospective teachers are asked
to contact the office of
student services on the
University of British
Columbia Campus for
appointment time and date.
District Superintendent
of Schools
450 Bowron Ave.
Quesnel, B.C.
Camp Fircom ...
Is looking for summer staff.
Positions available include:
2 cooks, 1 boating and 1
swimming supervisor, 1 outtriping
and 1 crafts director, 4 resource
program workers, 1 nurse.
Persons acceptable for summer
staff will be on site from June 20
to August 25 with one day off per
week. Room and Board provided
as well as salaries ranging from
$805$ 1,300.00 for the period
depending upon position.
Interviews will be held beginning
late March.
For more information and
application forms contact
First United Church
320 East Hastings Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
V6A 1P4 or call 681-8365
conference all-star, continued his
excellent play in the UBC net.
The Canadian final, to be held in
Edmonton this weekend, will
feature the Golden Bears, the
Thunderbirds, the University of
Toronto and St. Mary's of Halifax.
The 'Birds will play the
University of Toronto Friday and
Saturday in a two-game total point
series. The Bears will play St.
Mary's in a similar series. The top
two teams will advance to the final
to be played Sunday afternoon.
St. Mary's needed three games
to upset Concordia. The third game
was decided in overtime when the
Huskies scored after eight seconds.
The University of Toronto
needed only two games to dispose
of the University of Manitoba
Bisons. The Blues have been
national champions in eight of the
last 12 years and must rank as
favorites with 10 returnees from
last year's team.
But Edmonton will be a force to
be reckoned with, as they have the
home ice advantage.
UBC games can be heard on
CITR radio (650 AM) at 8 p.m.
Friday and 6:30 a.m. Saturday.
The national final can be seen
Sunday afternoon on television.
SPORTS
More sports on page 8
somewhere to go
after class
after the show
... after anything!
ESPRESSO—,
<Lfl <BOCfl SflR
WEST 4th AVE. & COLLINGWOOD
— 731-8522 —
Open Early and Late Every Day
A.M.S OMBUDSPERSON
1977-78
APPLICATIONS WILL BE RECEIVED
at A.M.S.  Business Office, Room 266, S.U.B. until
4:00 p.m. March 9th, 1977.
Applications available at S.U.B. 246 & 266.
BILLBRODDY
Secretary-Treasurer
WHEN YOU LOOK GOOD
SO DO WE . . .
PRESCRIPTION
OPTICAL
Thinking
of
teaching?
The University of Victoria Is Offering
a Secondary Internship Teacher Education
Programme in 1977-78
ELIGIBILITY Candidates must have an acceptable undergraduate degree
from  a recognized University, have the necessary subject preparation in
two approved teaching areas for secondary schools, be prepared to work in
Alberni,   Nanaimo,   Courtenay  or  Campbell   River  School   Districts,  and
show evidence of commitment and skill in working with young people.
Applications  are  encouraged  from   individuals  with  life experiences  in
addition to their formal education.
PROGRAMME Academically admissible candidates will be interviewed by
University   and   participating   School   District   personnel   in   late   May.
Forty-five selected candidates will then attend a week's orientation in their
school district in early June, attend UVic for July and August course work,
train in their school district from September, 1977 to April,  1978, and
complete their academic work on UVic campus during May/June, 1978.
Successful candidates are then recommended for a Teaching Certificate.
FINANCIAL  AID   Interns  will   be  eligible  for  existing  student  aid as
administered by the University's Financial Aid Office. A grant to cover
tuition  costs  and  some financial  assistance for the summer months is
anticipated.  In addition school districts will provide a stipend to Interns
during their 8-month residency.
TO   APPLY   For   detailed   information    and    application    forms,    write
immediately to:
The Co-Ordinator Secondary Internship Programme,
Faculty of Education, University of Victoria,
P. O. Box 1700, Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y2
Applications post-marked after midnight April 30th, 1977, will not be ac-
capted.
A free* gift to you when
you buy an SR-52.
A Library of Amusements,
If you've ever needed an
Entertainments and Diversions
excuse to buy an SR-52, here it is.
Texas Instruments
tA $29.95 value
Yours Free *
When you purchase
an SR-52 before
March 31st, 1977.
Prolan' Manuaj
Texas Instruments
/
*SimpFy: I. Return your special serialized Customer Information
Card (packed in the box). 2. Along with a dated copy of proof of
your purchase showing serial number of SR-52 Calculator to: Texas
Instruments, P.O. Box 545, Richmond Hill, Ontario L4C 5G4.
AVAILABLE AT
the bookstore
UNIV. of B.C.
228-4741
Brain Teasers:
Number Guesser
Hi-Lo
Interchange
Code Buster
Star Buster
Test your Skill:
Mars Lander
Phantom Ship
Mortar Fire
Sea Battle
Amusements, party fun:
Biorhythm Compatibility
ESP Evaluator
Day of the week
Monopoly   Banker
Tight Competition
Nim
Baseball
Basketbal
Football
Parachute
Handheld Card
Programmable
Calculator
SUPER
SPECIAL
OFFER
APRIL 1-7
15 demos
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
MODEL T1-5050M
Portable Electric
Printing Calculator
with Memory Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 8, 1977
Fencing team wins Canada West
By PAUL WILSON
The UBC women's foil fencing
team won the Canada West
University Athletic Association
Fencing championships held Feb.
26 and 27 at UBC.
TJhe team was led by Frances
Sloan with a clear first in foil. Jane
Milton placed third and Barbara
Hislop rounded out the title with a
fifth.
The   University    of   Alberta
women's team placed second in the
competition and the University of
Saskatchewan came in third.
It was the first time in over four
years that UBC has fielded a
women's fencing team. In fact two
of the three team members, Hislop
and Milton were in competition for
the first time. Sloan, though, is an
experienced fencer having many
matches under her belt including a
B.C. championships title.  She is
Women bowlers tops
The UBC women's bowling team
won the Canadian Western
University Bowling Championships this weekend in Calgary,
winning by 180 pins over 12 games.
The UBC women defeated the
University of Alberta taking the
lead in the final two games. The
women's defending champions, the
University of Calgary, participated as well but were
generally not in contention for
most of the year. Bowling for UBC
were Marilyn Hynes, Barbara
Miodzik,  Karen  Meyers,  Judy
Hickman, Brenda Lupik and Diane
Soles.
Hynes responded to the pressure
of the close competition by striking
out in a sensational final game to
take the trophy for women's high
average with a score of 215.13.
Hynes also won women's high
three for the tournament by
bowling a total of 720 over three
games. Women's high single was
305, bowled by Laurie Finnerty of
the University of Alberta.
The UBC men's team, the
defending champions, lost by only
98pins to the University of Alberta.
HILLEL HOUSE presents
ISRAEL WEEK AT UBC
TUESDAY 8 MARCH -
Guest Lecture — Zvi Levanon on Israel
WEDNESDAY 9 MARCH -
Israel dancing, food—felafel
THURSDAY 10 MARCH -
Movie. "Casablanca" — A Love Story
All programmes start at 12:30 p.m. and will be held in Room
207/209 in the SUB.
N.B. Because of Israel week, the B'nai B'rith Free Lunch will be
held on Wednesday 16th March at Hillel House.
U.B.C.
SAILING CLUB
Annual Skating Party will be held on Friday, March
11th at 9:45 p.m. on the main rink at the Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre. Everybody is welcome, and bring
a guest! Also, we'd like to remind all members interested
in going on the Spring Cruise to come to the Wednesday
meeting between now and March 30th. We are having a
big General Meeting on Wednesday, March 16th, to elect
a new executive. Please be there! New Members
Welcome!
Student Administrative
Commission
1977-78
Applications will be received for the
positions of:
-DIRECTOR OF SERVICES
-DIRECTOR OF FINANCES
-COMMISSIONERS OF SAC. (8 positions)
at the A.M.S. Business Office, Rm. 266, S.U.B.
Applications close 4:00  p.m.  on Wednesday March 9th,  1977.
Application may be picked up at Rooms 246 & 266 S.U.B.
BILLBRODDY
Secretary-Treasurer
more experienced than most of the
male members of the UBC team.
The UBC men's team placed
third in the same competition.
Men's foil was won by the
University of Alberta with a very
strong team. They swept two of the
three men's events. The other
victory was in epee. The University of Saskatchewan grabbed a
first in the sabre event and placed
second in each of the others.
The individual winners were
Tom Freeland of Alberta sweeping
the sabre and the foil individual
prizes. Nick Brampton of UBC won
theawardin the epee event. Sloan,
of course, won the title in the only
women's event, the foil.
Membersof the UBC men's team
are Brampton, Jim Koropatnick,
Rob Margolis, Don Lee and Jurek
Kaminski.
The strong UBC team is
preparing for their next meet, the
B.C. Championships to be held
March 19 and 20 in Victoria.
"We have a good chance this
year of coming away with a good
showing or possibly a title from the
B.C.'s," said Sloan. "This year the
team really has it together. The
women's program has developed
remarkably fast."
The B.C. championships will be
the team's last event of the term.
Next year they hope to enter more
tournaments with increased
financing from the athletic office.
More sports on page 7
SUBFILMS presents
Jack Nicholson
Marlon Brando
Discover FRANCE
and EUROPE.
Travel by train.
Anti-inflation Student-Railpass and
Eurailpass as well as point to point
tickets and reservations for travel in
France and in Europe are available
through your travel agent or our
Montreal or Vancouver offices.
FRENCH NATIONAL
RAILROADS
Room 436, 1500 Stanley Street.
Montreal. (514)288-8255
Room 452. 409 Granville Street
Vancouver, B.C.    V6C1T2
(608)688-6707
Q   THE MISSOURI  P
H      BREAKS"      C
GRAD STUDENTS
NOMINATIONS OPEN
SCHOOL DISTRICT
NO. 50
FOR THE FOLLOWING G.S.A. POSITIONS
QUEEN CHARLOTTE
-INTERNAL AFFAIRS
Applications   are  invited
from    student    teachers
interested in teaching on
the    Queen    Charlotte
-SECRETARY
-TREASURER
- SOCIAL COORDINATOR
Islands.     District
Representatives   will   be
conducting interviews on
March 24 and March 25
at U.B.C. Please arrange
for    interview    appointment     through    the
placement    office    on
NOMINATIONS CLOSE MAR. 14
ELECTION MAR. 23
Nomination Forms Available
In The Grad Centre
campus.
For More Information Call 228-1650
CHARGEX
WE CURE
ALL sick bugs
VOLKSWAGENS TOO! \ •      ,'"•,
U.B.C. STUDENT ^"S>-\
DISCOUNTS     ^ <^f
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J 12 Month Warranty \       V«_>/
12,000 miles (Bugs Only)
$265 For 35 H.P.
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$335 For A V.W. 1500
$355 For A V.W. 1600
'S BUG STOP
1897 BURRARD     731 -8171 4D

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