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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 28, 1975

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Array Authors of left-wing Red Rag a mystery
UBC engineers are still pondering today the
mysterious appearance Monday of an apparent
alternative Red Rag.
The paper, which appeared on campus shortly
before noon, apparently took the "red" of its title
literally, trumpeting leftist analysis of UBC complete with a front page denunciation of administration president Walter Gage.
Gage was termed a "Machievellian father-figure
secretly manipulating the most visible and vocal
segment of the student body" in a statement attributed to engineering undergraduate society
president "Don Brynildson."
However, Brynildsen, whose name was spelt
incorrectly in the paper, denied any knowledge of
the Red Rag's publication.
"We (the engineers) had nothing whatever to do
with it," Brynildsen said. He declined further
comment.
The Ubyssey was unable to officially determine
who is responsible for the Rag's publication.
Spokesmen for the various undergraduate societies
denied any knowledge of the paper's production.
However, Brynildsen has accused The Ubyssey of
doing the stunt.
Ubyssey editor Lesley Krueger declined comment on Brynildsen's allegations. But it is known
the alternative Red Rag was produced at College
Printers, the same company that prints The
Ubyssey.
It is believed the "red" Red Rag closely
resembles the official Red Rag in front-page design,
but Brynildsen refused to release a copy to The
Ubyssey Monday.
The official Rag comes out Wednesday afternoon.
Speculation Monday centred on a number of
See: page 2: AGGIES
WHAT
DO VOU
THINK
IHE RED RAG
. . . OF THE
REV AS
A WHOLE
VANCOUVER, B.C.-ENGINEERING WEEK 1975
UBC ENGINEERS DENOUNCE GAGE
Paternalistic president no longer friend of the people
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THC UBYSSEY
Vol. LVI, No. 43 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1975     <-€lJ^>48    228-2301
—kini mcdonald photo
GORDON BLANKSTEIN SUPERSTAR is resurrected near SUB Thursday after crucifixion on the red cross
of UBC's engineers. Disciples pull down grimacing remains of Alma Mater Society president after he tried,
and failed, to walk on library pond. An outraged crowd, sensing a phony lord, grabbed Blankstein and put
him on the cross as punishment for his crimes. He later made a Pit appearance, billed as the second coming,
at which he told a group of gears: "Forgive them, Father for they know not what they do."
Sex enters
AMS election
as slates final
By RALPH MAURER
Student politico Joan Mitchell
charged Monday she has been
dumped from the Students'
Coalition slate as presidential
candidate for the upcoming Alma
Mater Society elections because
she is a woman.
Mitchell, internal affairs officer
for the current AMS executive,
said she was replaced by current
AMS external affairs officer Gary
Moore when other slate members,
all male, decided a woman leading
the slate would hurt their chances
of victory.
Mitchell's charges came as both
Students' Coalition, the conservative group currently in
power, and a new, left-leaning
group, Student Unity, firmed up
their candidates for Wednesday's
nomination deadline.
The election, to be held Feb. 5,
will replace the seven AMS
executive members and the ex
officio ombudsperson.
The Student Unity slate is
headed by former Ubyssey staffer
Jake van der Kamp, arts 4, as
presidential candidate.
Mitchell had been nominated by
Students' Coalition to run as
president on its slate, but slate
members overturned their
decision Friday and nominated
Moore.
She said she stayed on the slate
for a short time as candidate for
co-ordinator, but then decided to
withdraw from the slate
altogether.
Besides Moore, the Students'
Coalition slate comprises: Johan
de Rooy, vice-president; Greg
Heenan, treasurer; Rodney Cox,
co-ordinator; Greg Peet, external
affairs; Tom Manson, internal
affairs and Ellen Paul, secretary.
Challenging them is the Student
Unity slate made up of van der
Kamp and David Van Blarcom,
arts 4, vice-president; Jennifer
Fuller, nursing 2, internal affairs;
Dave Theesen, commerce 3,
treasurer; David Fuller, grad
studies 8, secretary; Lynne Batten,
arts 2, co-ordinator; and Stew
Savard, arts 2, external affairs.
Mitchell said Peet, a senator-at-
large, had told her would join the
slate only on the condition that
Moore would head it.
Razzle dazzle UBC tour fizzles out
By MARK BUCKSHON
B.C. Universities Council
members were given an expensive
guided tour of UBC Monday which
some members said taught them
nothing new.
The cost to taxpayers for the
UBC administration-controlled
tour, lunch at the faculty club and a
public meeting in the afternoon
was more than $2,000, taking into
account the $180-per-day-per
member salary and added expenses.
Arnie Myers, chief public
relations officer for the UBC administration, told a Ubyssey
reporter when he first met the tour
group at a Physical Plant office
that he was not welcome.
"This part of the Universities
Council visit is not public," he said.
"The press can come to the public
meeting in the afternoon."
The reporter asked Universities
Council executive consultant Eric
Green if he could follow the council
members around. Green said he
could. From that point, the senior
staff of  the  university's   public
relations agency, Information
Services, all co-operated in
providing the reporter with information about the UBC tour.
Council members were shown
oceonagraphic research facilities,
a new geology building, huts used
for some education faculty
programs,        a renovated
See page 3: FRASER
At the Friday meeting, she said,
he asked the other members of the
slate whether they had checked the
resistance on campus to running a
woman as presidential candidate.
Mitchell lost the subsequent
nomination re-vote, 3-2.
The only people who could vote
were those already on the slate but
not involved in the nomination
race. Heenanfi Peet, de Rooy, Cox
and Manson voted, the same
people who originally nominated
Mitchell.
Mitchell then ran for the coordinator nomination and won.
However, later Moore contacted
her at home and told her to "cool
it," according to Mitchell.
See page 8: MITCHELL
Student
ski trip
goes hungry
Food services has refused to
supply food to a group of 100
residence students who are going
on an annual ski trip even though
the students have already paid for
the meals they will miss.
The university administration
run service has supplied food for
the last two ski trips but because of
policy change it is refusing to do so
this year. Food services director
Robert Bailey has offered to sell
food to the ski party.
"We don't feel that we should
have to pay for food twice," said
Rick Thompson, science 4,
president of the Cariboo house
residence association which is
organizing the trip.
"We don't feel that we should
have to take this kind of shit from
Bailey when we have to eat it every
day," Thompson said in an interview.
Thompson said the handbook
given to all students who live in
residence states "bag lunches are
available for field trips, noon hour
lectures, or other university-
sponsored functions."
He said the ski trip is a university function because it is made up
entirely of students from the
university residences and is being
conducted under the auspices of
the Cariboo house and Place
Vanier residence associations.
The ski trip was supplied with
food last year and the year before,
but was refused this year by
Bailey. Bailey, however, offered to
sell them the food, Thompson said.
He claimed Bailey's stand is
unjust, because all people on the
ski trip are students who have
already paid for three meals a day.
Bailey was unavailable for
comment Monday. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28, 1975
Aggies, AUS, Woodcock
Red Rag perpetrator?
From page 1
campus groups other  than The
Ubyssey as possible masterminds
of the "red" Rag.
Number one on the list was the
agriculture undergraduate society,
which recently held a dance attended by about 1,000 people. This
means the society would likely
have the required slush fund
available to finance the Rag.
Krueger estimated that a four-
page paper using the College pasteup crew would cost about $500 for a
5,000-paper press run. The "red"
Rag carried no advertising.
Another possible perpetrator of
the stunt was the arts undergraduate society, long an
enemy of the EUS. Arts also is
believed to have the financial
capability of putting out the paper.
The AUS also is currently
managed by a left-leaning
executive, whose acting president,
Stew Savard, said Monday he will
run as a candidate with the activist
Student Unity slate contesting next
month's Alma Mater Society
executive election.
The Rag could have been an AUS
production with a three-fold objective: get the engineers, spread
leftist propaganda and hype
Savard's candidacy in the publicity
surrounding the ultimate
disclosure of the Rag creators'
identity.
The next candidate could be
members of the creative writing
department, who would have little
problem mastering the technical
difficulties of producing the rag
and would also have access to
financial backing.
Well-known writer George
Woodcock, who is associated with
the department, is known to have
been upset at his portrayal in a
Ubyssey story in which he
allegedly scanned a Patty Hearst
poem during her clandestine visit
to campus.
It is conceivable Woodcock could
have helped create the Rag in a
complex plot to dupe the engineers
into wreaking vengeance on The
Ubyssey under the mistaken impression Ubyssey staffers were to
blame.
A further possibility, deemed
far-fetched by some, is that of an
intricate attempt to discredit Gage
and take power by someone in high
administration office.
BCIT staff
In apparently undermining
Gage's support from the most
vocally-partisan group on campus,
the way could be paved for several
varieties of palace coups.
It could be an attempt by an
extreme right-wing group of officials to create an atmosphere in
which a soft-touch administration
like Gage's is replaced by a get-
tough policy under a new administrator.
Gage retires June 30. He is
scheduled to be succeeded by
former arts dean Doug Kenny.
But Kenny is unlikely to be
capable of the extreme hard-line
tactics such a group would want.
Therefore, the Rag may be the
opening shot in a volley directed at
moderate administrators, including Kenny.
The same analysis could be
made in the other direction for a
liberal or leftist coup of the administration top spot.
And in a corollary theory, some
observers see the Rag as the
outward manifestation of intense
internal struggle within the
pharmaceutical science faculty's
top echelons.
Bernard E. Riedel, dean of the
faculty, was appointed acting
president during Gage's recent
hospitalization   Anti-Riedelites
within the faculty, sensing a new
elevation in Riedel's prestige, may
have wanted to chop him off in
mid-rise.
By discrediting the man who
appointed him, this theory goes,
Riedel's enemies would bring him
down in the same way close
associates of China's discredited
official, Lin Piao, were dragged
down with their mentor.
Speculation has also centred
around political science students
and members of the Communist
Party of Canada (Marxist-
Leninist) as initiators of the rag.
However, detractors cite the
malaise and moribundity afflicting
the former and the abject penury
and inability to write short sentences shown by the latter.
One final theory has a clandestine group of engineers actually
producing the rag, because,
theorists say, they were trapped by
one of their own fundamental
engineering principles.
The principle: every action
within a given body creates an
equal and opposite reaction.
APPLICATION
FOR GRADUATION
Application for Graduation cards are now being mailed to
students registered in the graduating year of the following
Faculties: Arts, Fine Arts, Commerce, Licentiate in Accounting,
Elementary Education, Secondary Education and Science. Any
student in the graduating year of one of these Faculties who does
not receive cards in the mail should confirm with the Registrar's
Office that his/her local mailing address is correct.
Students in the graduating year of all remaining Faculties, except
Graduate Studies, may obtain their "Application for Graduation"
cards from their Faculty Offices. Students on the Graduate
Studies Programme may obtain their Applications from their
graduate'advisors.
"Application for Graduation" cards are available in the Office of
the Registrar.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the students to apply
for their degrees. The list of candidates for graduation to be
presented to the Faculty and to the Senate for approval of
degrees is compiled solely from these application cards.
NO APPLICATION-NO DEGREE
THE UBC SKI CLUB
is meeting
TODAY AT NOON
in ANGUS 104
U.B.C.   ITALIAN   CLUB
ANNUAL DINNER/DANCE
Feb. 1 — 7:00 p.m.
GRADUATE CENTRE
RES:   ITAL.  DEPT./228-2268
Tickets: $7.50 per person
$2.00  Dance Only  (9:30)
"NO JEANS"
Hewlett Packard
Calculators
Now Available
At Discount Prices
HP 35 Reg. $297   OurPrice$199
HP 45 Reg. $429   OurPrice$285
HP 55 Reg. $499   Our Price $472
HP 65 Reg. $1049 Our Price $944
HP 70 Reg. $363   Our Price $326
HP 80 Reg. $521   Our Price $469
Phone Rick 266-8169
or 325-4161
SALES REPRESENTATIVE
FOR VANCOUVER, VANCOUVER ISLAND AND MAJOR B.C. CITIES
If you have the desire for a future in management, you could realize it very quickly with
Xerox of Canada Limited. The position involves the marketing of Xerox products to
major customers in business and government. It's a high level job analysing customer's
needs, devising systems and introducing new products to facilitate their operations. Because
of our growth, you can not only advance in your initial assignment, but also move rapidly
into headquarters marketing or sales management.
• We pay you salary ... commission ... and bonus.
• We provide a comprehensive training programme at full salary.
e    We offer an almost unlimited potential in a company with an exciting future in the new
world of communications.
e    Sales territory in Vancouver, Vancouver Island and major B.C. cities.
If you are completing your MBA this year and you wish to learn more about Xerox and how
you can be part of it, come to the Xerox Open House Wednesday, January 29, 1333 W.
Georgie, 9th Floor, Vancouver, B.C.
Xerox of Canada Limited
XEROX
SUPPOrtS ip~5»5»B«5
move
The B.C. Institute of Technology
staff association voted Friday 86
per cent in favor of strike action if
necessary in hopes of hastening
negotiations on a first agreement
with the administration.
Patrick Thomas, vice president
and chief negotiator for the
association, said Monday he hoped
the administration would read the
298-48 vote as indicating the
association not only has the support of the membership but is
"determined a decent kind of
negotiating should be carried on."
"We don't expect there will be a
need to exercise the strike vote,"
Thomas said, "but what we have
here is a 'militant . moderacy'.
We're determined but
reasonable."
Thomas said he thought most of
the negative votes could be accounted for by department heads
in the membership, most of whom
would "likely" have voted against
strike action.
Including a 10 per cent membership increase in the week before
the strike vote was taken, 91 per
cent of the association's members
voted.
GIGANTIC
STUPENDOUS
CONTEST
To Rename The Alternate Facility
THE WHAT!?J
You know, the place behind the info desk in SUB that is open Wed., Thurs., and Fri. (5 p.m. - 11 p.m.)
every week, is much nicer than the Pit, serves hard stuff and is very intimate.
IF YOU CAN COME UP WITH A BETTER NAME THAN THE ALTERNATE FACILITY (YECCH!) YOU
CAN WIN
100 PIT TOKENS
Turn Entries into the Executive Secretary - SUB 246 before Feb. 14, 1975 Tuesday, January 28, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Grad fee rebate 'ultra vires'
By CHRIS GAINOR
Two members of the grad class
council plan to go to Alma Mater
Society student court over
allocation of money from
graduating class fees.
Science rep Ron Walls and arts
rep Frank Tichler termed "unconstitutional" the motion of arts
rep Nancy Carter to grant funds to
undergraduate societies which
passed at Thursday's grad council
meeting.
Carter's motion was a continuation of past practice to give
money to undergraduate societies
who apply for the money. The
money would be given to the
societies on the basis of $3 for each
student graduating out of the
faculty or department represented
by the undergraduate society.
Walls and Tichler contend that
all money spent by the graduating
class must be okayed by a vote of
all the students in the grad class or
a general meeting of the grad
class. The grad council has no
authority to spend any money, they
charge.
"Whether it's a good thing or a
bad thing, it's unconstitutional,"
Walls said.
The two grad council members
said the money has always been
CKLG jocks
will strike
anytime       *
Workers at CKLG radio station
are ready to strike anytime for a
first union contract with no notice,
a Canadian Union of Public Employees organizer said  Monday.
Richard Hughes said in an interview that disc jockeys and
technicians stayed on the job past a
Sunday midnight strike deadline
because they were surprised by
CKLG. owner Don Hamilton's
statement earlier in the weekend
that he would bring strikebreakers
to work at the station.
Hughes said union members are
awaiting meetings with their
lawyers and national organizers,
partly to discuss alleged threats of
plans by Hamilton to "blacklist"
them from jobs at other Canadian
radio stations.
Negotiations broke down after
Hamilton    rejected    Jan.     10
Canadian Labor Board recommendations for a settlement.
Hughes said Hamilton has never
tried to bargain in good spirit with
union representatives.
He said Hamilton "has no intention of obeying the law." Hughes
said Hamilton has said he had "no
time" to read the labor board
report when he received it.
Hughes said CKLG management
is spearheading a campaign by the
Canadian Association of Broadcasters to break strikes and
prevent unions from organizing at
stations across Canada.
given to the well-organized undergraduate societies because they
are the only groups who apply to
the grad class for the money.
They charged that this practice
discriminates against students
from faculties with poorly
organized undergraduate societies
such as arts or science. Walls and.
Tichler said grad students have no
control over the spending of a large
portion of their $7 graduating class
fee.
The two grad council reps will
take the motion to student court for
a ruling on the constitutionality of
Carter's motion as soon as they
consult with a lawyer, they said.
The grad council constitution
says money can be spent only after
a vote or a general meeting of the
graduating students, they claimed.
Walls and Tichler suggested that
if the allocations for the undergraduate societies continue,
students from the faculties whose
societies have not applied for funds
should also be able to receive a $3
rebate on their grad class fees.
They said the undergraduate
society allocations should be on the
ballot with the various projects the
graduating class students vote on.
They also charged that Carter's
motion favors small undergrad
clubs over the large undergraduate
societies. Carter's original motion
called for money to be spent on
composite photos of the graduating
classes in the various faculties and
departments in addition to the
allocations for undergraduate
unions.
But the grad council did not pass
the provision for composite photos
on the grounds that it would cost
another $3 per student, they said.
Walls and Tichler said the
motion is unworkable because of
an unintentional wording error
which   makes   the   undergrad
society money "nondiscretionary"
but does not give the money a
purpose.
Walls said grad council head
Tom DeWolf told him the arts and
science undergraduate unions
have not applied for the grants for
15 years.
He contended arts and science
students should not have to subsidize parties for the engineers or
education students.
The grad council is still accepting applications for projects
for the grad class money until Feb.
19. Graduating students will then
vote by mail on the projects.
BLOOD DONOR John French, commerce 2, gets needle from Red -kini mcdonald photo
Cross clinical assistant Kathryn Cannon at clinic in SUB conversation      and follows last fall's record donation by UBC students of 2,137 units
pit Monday. Clinic lasts for two weeks from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.      of blood in one week.
Fraser not enlightened by tour
From page 1
metallurgical   engineering
building,     and     portions     of
Sedgewick and main libraries.
Member Bob Schlosser, International Woodworkers of
America western Canada region
secretary treasurer, said in an
interview: "We're not going to see
everything we should see."
"I probably would be more interested in what kinds of programs
are going on here," he said.
The tour was arranged at the
request of Universities Council
chairman William Armstrong but
choice of buildings for council
members to see was left to UBC's
administration.
"This is the worst building," a
council member said after she left
one of the oceonagraphic huts.
"They chose the worst building."
Council member Dorothy Fraser
said she wasn't discovering
anything really new in the tour.
"You can't see everything," she
said. "If you go into any
programmed tour you've got to
take what they show you."
UBC information officer John
Arnett said the buildings were
chosen to reflect areas of priority
interest in the administration's
building plans.
Council member Rita MacDonald said she questions the
amount of money she was getting
paid for the tour itself. "I don't
think we're getting much out of
this," she said.
But she said the $180 per day
payment to council members could
be justified because it makes it
possible for lower income persons
to be members.
"The    problem    is    having
Students, faculty seek support
Students and faculty
representatives asked the B.C.
Universities council for moral and
financial support for their plans at
a meeting Monday.
But several faculty members
warned that there are dangers in
the council interfering too greatly
in the internal operations of the
university.
The meeting, organized by
council chairman William. Armstrong, is the first of a series at the
province's three public universities.
Economics professor Gideon
Rosenbluth warned that the
Universities'   Council   "poses   a
great threat to B.C. universities."
"The only thing standing between us and the reality of the
threat is the goodwill of the council
and its chairman which I hope will
prevail."
"Universities are distinct from
other institutions of post-secondary
education such as dancing schools,
in that they combine advanced
teaching and research facilities,"
Rosenbluth said.
Rosenbluth said excessive intervention by the council in internal operations of the universities may detract from their
"educational quality."
UBC academic planner Robert
Clarke said he agrees with
Rosenbluth that the council should
avoid excessive interference in
internal university affairs.
Student senator Svend Robinson
said change and improvement in
the university "only comes about
because of external pressure."
"You people pay the money that
keeps faculty members to research
at the university," he said.
That enrolment to upper-
middle-class persons, said
Robinson.
Robinson also proposed that the
council investigate ways to extend
UBC's academic year or switch to
a trimester system.
mmmmm
Alma Mater Society grad studies
rep Stephen Mochnacki presented
a brief from the AMS student
housing committee.
The committee noted in its brief
that student enrolment is expected
to increase substantially next
September, but the Vancouver
area vacancy rate will decline
further from its current low level.
The brief suggested building new
residences on campus and subsidizing landlords to build new
accommodation would be the best
solutions. It said, however, the
government should not rely on
private developers to build new
housing near the university.
guidlines," MacDonald said. "I
believe it (the $180) is a bit excessive."
Officers responsible for public
relations within the individual
faculties conducted the tour
through their buildings.
Associate education dean Roy
Bentley said he regretted that more
students and profs could not be
introducted to the council members. The members were whisked
through some research huts and a
few basement rooms in the main
education building — not talking to
any students or profs in ordinary
classrooms along the way.
"At least you were able to have
the flavor of the education faculty
and its problems," he said at the
end of the tour.
Institute of oceonography
director George Pickard showed
the council members through a
series of old huts and offices the
institute uses. He said the institute
has 85 students and researchers.
The university enrollment is
slightly more than 20,000.
A representative of the geology
department showed the council
members through the new
geological sciences building, which
he said is pricipally restricted to
graduate students and industry-
sponsored research. Council
members were shown a $170,000
electroprobe (used for examining
minute mineral formations) and a
mining industry supported data
gathering section. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28, 1975
On with
the glorious
struggle
It's rather amazing, but somehow it rings true.
It appears at least a faction of the engineering
undergraduate society has changed its political thought and
has become socialist.
Bravo, we say, bravo.
It's about time they recognized the engineers have too
long exploited women and the working class to their own
particular ends.
It's about time they recognized that the reason the
administration has always played so chummy with them is
that the sort of pranks the engineers are prone to play
distract attention from the more serious reform movements
on campus.
So we support this faction, whatever they want to call
themselves.
Although we must say, we have certain reservations.
The language used in the liberated Red Rag is a trifle too
dialectical.
As people have long observed, it's the recent converts
who become the most fanatical.
The slogans they used are in fact direct translations from
the Chinese, and while it might sound alright in Chinese,
frankly it sucks in English.
It just tends to sound like sloganeering and turn people
off completely.
So they should learn a little moderation in their use of
the English language.
But aside from that, we support the dissident leftist
faction in the engineering undergraduate society.
May they indeed help in putting imperalism in arrears.
F0R6IVE   THEM,
Gono, for wey wa*/
VOT   k/H/tr  THEY  DO...
Letters
Evans
replies
I would like to comment on the
story by Jake van der Kamp in The
Ubyssey of Jan. 21, concerning the
fact that I was denied tenure by the
faculty of commerce.
I object strenuously to the implication that I was not given a fair
hearing by my faculty in this
matter. Nothing could be further
from the truth. I have followed a
course of action in my career
development which I believe to
have been appropriate for me
personally.
My colleagues on the appointments, promotions and tenure
committee evaluated this course
carefully and decided that it did
not meet the faculty's -
requirements.
The requirements against which
my -performance was evaluated
were determined by the faculty in
an open and democratic fashion.
I may differ with certain of these
requirements, as is my right.
However, it is the right, indeed the
responsibility, of the faculty to
evaluate its members in the light of
these requirements, once they
have been established, irrespective of the opinions of the individuals involved.
I would like also to clarify the
generalizations made by van der
Kamp with regard to applied vs.
theoretical research. Both types of
research are conducted in, and are
valued by, the faculty of commerce.
Most important, I would like to
publicly apologize to my
colleagues in the faculty of commerce for any comments which
could be construed as derogatory
in respect of the treatment I was
afforded by the faculty committee.
John L. Evans
assistant professor of commerce
Library
Locating the proposed library
processing centre in the green belt
adjacent to SUB would represent a
major blunder by the planning
committee.
This university enjoys a fine
reputation for an environment of
spaciousness and natural beauty.
To destroy this with the "concrete
jungle" mentality is ridiculous.
The university shouldn't be
mimicing the downtown
developers by choking the core
with buildings, but should lead the
way in planning by keeping a
people-oriented environment.
UBC showed that is is possible to
compromise location and environmental quality when it built
Sedgwick library. Most students
appreciate the fore-thought of the
planners that left the area with
some trees and openness. The area
on the SUB side of main library
should be treated with the same
consideration.
The students have already
sacrificed part of our open area on
the south side of SUB in order to
provide the university with an
indoor swimming pool. Don't make
us sorry we gave up that area by
boxing us in with your building on
the north side of SUB.
Use of one of the alternative sites
such as the parking lot behind
Brock Hall for the processing
centre so this university can retain
an important open space that
really contributes to making UBC
a more livable place.
Don Seaton
commerce 2
Housing
Housing is a problem at UBC,
and it is going to get worse.
The housing administration has
decided to drop the $25 application
deposit.
THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY 28,1975
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial  departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Editor: Lesley Krueger
Duh, O.K., youse guys, let's put us out a paper here, shouted head gear
Gary Coull. Yup, yup, good idea, chimed in house floozy Lesley Krueger.
Right on! chanted Jake van der Kamp, who was promptly evicted from the
office for the duration. Hey, what's this machine here with all the keys?
asked the third cogs from the left, Doug Rushton, Mark Buckshon and
Chris Gainor. That's the janitor, responded chief reactionary Berton
Woodward, as "Big Red" McDonald drooled quietly onto his shoulder.
Hey, what's a dummy sheet, cried Debbie Barrons, Susan Cardinal and
Greg with the kinky hair (and tastes). Gary Lenney's bedclothes, yelled
Denise Chong and Michael MacLeod. John Spraque and Ralph Maurer
contented themselves with following around Old Hack Carl Vesterback,
while Sue Vohanka dallied near Cedric Tatzel and Tom Barnes. Marcus Gee
said with glee Stu Lyster's fainted between Marise Savaria. It was that kind
of day.
This virtually ensures that with
Vancouver's critical housing
shortage, even those only remotely
considering residence living will
apply.
Assignments will be made according to the priorities housing
has established; the basic principle being "take care of B.C.
residents first."
According to the October 1974
statistics, 91% of the approximate
3,500 bed residence population are
students from B.C.
It is easy to see that the increased provincial demand will
soon consume the other 9 per cent
(out of province students and
foreign students). And just
because you have a room in
residence now doesn't mean you'll
get one next year!
It makes sense that UBC should
support its taxpayers and provide
housing for B.C. residents first.
But is it fair to someone from
outside the province who wants to
come to UBC?
A person from Deltacan easily
drive in sometime during the
summer and arrange accomodation in Vancouver.
Does someone from Ontario have
this opportunity? One last
question, does the university
mention in its housing booklet,
calendar or whatever method is
used to solicit students (especially
graduate students) that there is
virtually no hope of them obtaining
accomodation in residence?
Brian Dougherty
Commerce 3
Blarney
I enjoyed meeting with members
of your staff at the MLA's tour of
the UBC campus.
As you no doubt are aware, in
past years the members of the
UBC community have travelled to
Victoria to meet with MLA's and,
at the suggestion of our caucus, the
format was changed to bring the
MLA's to the campus.
I am certain that all the members of our caucus found this
format to be far more useful, and I
have written Dr. (Doug) Kenny to
suggest that he continue inviting us
to the campus for future sessions.
You may wish to know that Hugh
Curtis had hoped to attend the tour
but represented the caucus at the
funeral of Ned DeBeck and was
unable to attend.
W.R. Bennett
Socred
Quality
I must inform you that
sometimes I am a bit disappointed
with the quality of writing in your
newspaper. A case in point is the
review in Friday's paper of The
Philanthropist, now playing at the
Frederic Wood Theatre.
I am not about to take issue with
the reviewer's opinion of the
production; reviewers are always
entitled to their own misapprehensions, even about which
character is being described at any
given moment in the play. What I
object to is being described at any
given moment in the play.
What I object to is the style in
which the review was penned. It is
an obvious attempt at Hampton-
style wit, but the result is a series
of plagiarisms, uniformly
misapplied in true Braham
fashion.
I must remind fledgling writers
of this sort of work that they must
take caution — the game goes both
ways. May I draw their attention to
the character in the play who was
"not expressing (himself) very
well"? I recall there was also a
"critic" who was informed that he
was "too stupid by a half."
I hope you will take this "constructive criticism" in the manner
in which it was given.
Gordon Long
M.A. '74 Tuesday, January 28, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Authority
How one department head exerts
his authority and embarrasses his
uncomplaining secretaries.
TO: All Faculty, Graduate
Students and Staff
FROM: P. Suedfeld
DATE: January 2, 1974
Something needs to be done to
improve the working conditions of
the secretaries in the main office
(R.A. 154). Because of the large
number of people using the main
office to stamp their letters,
discuss accounts or other work, use
the telephones, or just chat,
secretaries are having trouble in
maintaining a high level of output.
In order to alleviate this situation,
the following procedures will go
into effect immediately; I would
appreciate all faculty, graduate
students and departmental employees following these procedures
fully.
1. All mail which needs to be
stamped will be left in the box on
the counter, and will be stamped
by one of the secretaries in the
office prior to mail pickup.
2. Typing and accounts. Faculty
who find it necessary to discuss
work with a secretary should do so
with that person directly, with as
little disruption of the rest of the
office as possible.
3. Telephone. The telephones in
the main office will be used only by
secretaries who are assigned to
work in that office.
4. Informal conversations.
Faculty, graduate students and
departmental staff other than the
secretaries assigned to the main
office will not use either the office
or the hallway immediately outside it for informal gatherings.
Aside from the lounges in the other
buildings, Rooms 183 (the mail
room) or 273 (the coffee room) in
Henry Angus are available for this
purpose. Also, please do not
engage the secretaries working in
the main office in unnecessary
conversations; it is unfair on the
one hand to do so and on the other
hand to expect assigned work to be
done promptly and efficiently.
Secretaries working in the main
office are entitled to a maximal
amount of opportunity to do their
work properly as well as to retain
privacy during working hours.
■ Because of the less than perfect
physical layout of the office, this
has been and will continue to be
rather difficult; but the
cooperation of all members of the
faculty, graduate students, and
non-academic staff of the
Department would help to make
the conditions as favourable as
possible. Your cooperation will be
appreciated.
A non-psychology department
faculty member
Grad class
The Ubyssey, the grad class
council and consequently most
students are blind to the implications of the $3 rebate/given to
undergrad societies from the
•graduation fees lifted from all
fourth year students.
The article in Friday's Ubyssey
states "... a repeat of past
practices." That means a repeat of
a system of elite usury set up so
that certain small organized
faculties can have subsidized balls,
hang composite photos in empty
hallways or buy themselves rings
or pins from money constitutionally directed for "a social
program for the grad 'class
provided by the grad council," or
for a   "gifts/projects  program."
Since it is understood that all
grad students contribute equally to
the admirable gifts donated to the
community or university, it follows
that those students in unorganized
faculties contributed equally to the
social extravaganzas of the
smaller faculties.
The engineers, homewreckers,
education buffs, have again
wormed their way into funds made
available due to the
disorganization of the large
faculties.
Congratulations! on blatantly
ignoring the spirit of giving.
Why can't everyone's graduation
fee go to some worthwhile and
needy cause in the community?
Are the elite students of UBC to be
treated to social affairs because
their need is greater than the need
of crippled children, the mentally
ill, native people on reservations or
some other group of disadvantaged
people?
If arts and science were to apply
for their rebate, the gifts to the
community would drop considerably; it would be easily explained by the economic recession
we are in, but you and I know our
spirit of thankfulness and giving
can be reduced by the greed of
certain clutching faculties.
Frank Tickler
arts 4
Snit snit
Well boys and girls, you let me
down.
In a bastion of ineptitude, you
have proved you deserve a special
place. In my first confrontation
with the paper known as The
Ubyssey (commonly termed a
"piece of shit") I found the staff to
be courteous and helpful, if a bit
vague.
Nevertheless, I trusted you to
handle the matter of an ad in Hot
Flashes or Tween Classes about
the coming Mardi Gras week and
its events, Phoenix '75 and Pit-
nite(sic)
I filled out the neccessary form
to the best of my (regrettably
small but sufficient) ability on two
separate occassions to ensure its
printing.
So maybe you want four or five
applications or 500 signitures, or
writing in blood.
I only wish in my pacifist
lifetime I had developed the ability
to dump shit on people — you'd be
high on the list of deservees.
(Of course most of the shit that
comes your way seems to be incorporated into the main body of
your rag.)
Sandy Winsby
arts 3
We're sorry you're disillusioned
so early in life, but we're afraid we
can't be the scapegoats. First, your
'tween class form asked for Hot
Flash treatment, so we put priority
on that. The way our bureaucracy
works, you need two forms for two
functions.
But this gives a chance to delve
for a moment into the more
universal theme of how 'tween/-
Flashes work. Anyone can put any
event into 'tween classes and
righteously expect to see it appear
at the appointed time.
But Hot Flashes run as space and
immediacy permit. The contents
are our decision, especially since
the items often run in lieu of ads for
poor groups. There is no question
Mardi Gras is worthy of support,
and Voila! Your flash is on page
six, as scheduled.
Lefties
I have been attending lectures
and seminars at UBC since September and in addition to the intellectual stimulation, I have
developed severe pains along the
lower left side of my back. A visit
to my doctor recently diagnosed
my illness as a "strain."
A little thinking and detective
work unearthed the following. I am
a life-long lefty and the lecturer-
room seats at UBC are soley for the
use of righties.
I am doing a survey to determine
the percentage of lefties vs.
righties and as soon as I have some
clear figures, I will formally
petition on the administration to
install the appropriate number of
type of seats required.
Baseball makes gloves for lefties, golf has lefty clubs and so on.
How this ridiculous situation has
continued to exist I cannot fathom.
Let's liberate lefties.
Sam Martz
 arts 1
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) — The
Glorb Lord Supremo commonly
called Gord by the subjects of this
corn oil island kingdom saw fit to
break his age old contract with
Noah J. Peel, ancient redwood
shipping magnate of the locale,
when rabid insurgents pinned his
water-whipped, spoiled-brat son
(the reputed leader of the
moustache mafioso) to a cross and
left him to roast in the unseasonably warm winter winds in
the centre of the capital city under
the watchful eyes of the terrible
time tower.
The Glorb Lord Supremo
shrewdly saw a loop hole in the
contract that disallowed the
flooding of the kingdom by rain and
sent specially-imported Russian
snow makers to the scene of the
pud-letting to slowly cover up the
rabid mobs in a deceptively
delightful mass of unsolidified
fiberglass chips that would cover
the ground and alienate the people
from the land, forcing them to seek
other gardens in which to tramp
and grow noxious olive weeds.
F
ir
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PREVIEW TODAY
*1.00 AT DOOR
U.B.C. Musical Theatre Presents
GEORGE IH!
Jan. 29-Feb. 8
8:30 p.m.
Old Auditorium
Tickets $2.50 & $3.50 ($1 Student Discount)
Vancouver Ticket Centre
683-3255
Matinee - Feb. 6-12:30
$1.00 - AMS Business Office
HAIR IS BEAUTIFUL
and it has a lot to do with
projecting a man's personality.
LET US LOOK AT YOUR HAIR AND BONE STRUCTURE
AND BRING THE BEST OUT OF YOU
Ask us about our protein body waves and any information on how to take care of your hair and skin. We also
retail the very best products on the market for the needs of your skin and hair.
We are located on the U.B.C. Campus. Come and see us. By appointment only —
call 224-5540.
2144 WESTERN PARKWAY, UNIVERSITY SQ. (The Village)
Nobs Parlons Franqais
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or call 325-4161 eves. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28, 1975
Hot flashes
Mardi Or as
kicks off
Dance or drink for the
handicapped.
The Mardi Gras society kicks
off Phoenix '75 at 7:30 tonight in
the SUB Ballroom, with dancing
to Lyle and the Group, games,
raffles, gambling and prizes.
More carousing is planned for
Saturday night at the Pit, when
the society will sponsor a Pit Nite
beginning at 8 p.m. All proceeds
to the Cystic Fibrosis Fund.
Publi€ TV
The second lecture in a series
about public television will be
given Wednesday at noon in
International House. Bill Nemtin
will speak on "Commercial
programming versus the consumer
society."
'Tween classes
U.S. writers
"Games American Writers
Play" will be the topic of a lecture
Wednesday by Prof. Tony Tanner,
a fellow at King's College,
Cambridge and visiting scholar at
Standord Behavioural Sciences
Centre. The talk will be at noon in
Buchanan 2239.
TROCKIM' MV BLUfcS AU/Ay.'
333918833!^
students,
is   speaking   on
noon,     Hillel
Brock
TODAY
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Discussion     by    medical
noon, IRC 1.
IMMRAN DANCE GROUP
Group presents free performance of
contemporary   dance,   noon   today;
noon   and   8   p.m. Wednesday and
noon    Thursday,    all    in    SUB    art
gallery.
UBC SKI CLUB
General  meeting, noon, Angus 104.
UBC LAW STUDENTS
LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Free   legal   advice   olinic,   12:30 to
2:30 SUB 234.
NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
HILLEL HOUSE
Rabbi    H.    Rubens
Reform     Judaism,
House.
HAMSOC
General     meeting,
Extension 358.
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Weekly fellowship, noon,  Lutheran
campus centre, conference room.
SHITO-RYU KARATE
Practice, 7 to 9 p.m. today and 7 to
9  p.m.  Thursday,  all  in SUB 207.
New members welcome.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
UBC KAYAK AND CANOE CLUB
Organizational   meeting   for   skiing,
skating and curling, noon, SUB 212.
WEDNESDAY
ONTOLOGY CLUB
Discussion     with     Bill    Wilkinson,
Heaven    and    Earth   Can    Be   One,
noon, Bu. 216.
SAILING CLUB
General   meeting   and   sailing   film,
noon, SUB 207 and 209.
NDPCLUB
Film: Why We Boycott, story of the
California     farmworkers'     struggle
with growers and Teamsters, noon,
SUB 205.
CITR
Comedy     hour     featuring     Monty
Python's first album, 6 and 7 p.m.,
on Radio 650.
DEAN OF WOMEN'S OFFICE
Freesee   —   The   Ascent    of
12:35     and      1:35     p.m.,
Auditorium. Free.
UBC KARATE CLUB
Shotokan     demonstration,     i
SUB ballroom.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Testimony    meeting,     noon,
212.
SIMS
Group meditation tapes, noon
seminar room G65.
CAMPUS CYCLISTS
Bring beefs about biking on campus,
noon SUB 215.
Man,
SUB
SUB
IRC
Subfilmsoc presents
"A STYLISH COMEDY,
THAT IS BRILLIANT
AND IMAGINATIVE!"
—Rex Reed, Chicago Tribune
—New York News Syndicate
"A BRILLIANT FILM-
STUNNING'"
-Judith Crist,
New York
Magazine
JAN. 30-FEB. 2
Thu. & Sun. 7:00
Fri.-Sat.
7& 10 p.m.
(Note
change in "*'
Show
Time)
JOSIPHC UVM PDESENTS
uussBuCKwaxjcu*
FOR KEEP (IMS LID
PETER 0T0fll£
ALAS1WRSIM
ARTHUR LOWE
THE
RULING
CLASS
75c
-SUB theatre
please show AMS card
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
Hour   recital   with   Eugene   Wilson,
cello,   and    Robert    Rogers,   piano,
noon, music building, recital hall.
FRONTIER COLLEGE
Information meeting: interviews
follow Wednesday p.m., noon,
Bu. 100.
THURSDAY
UBC LIBERALS
Meeting for those interested in
going to Parksville Research
Advance, noon, SUB 237.
PRE-DENTSOC
Meeting for all members for
demonstration on impression
technique by Dr. W. Wood, noon,
JBM Lounge.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENT UNION
Rep  reports, elect department rep,
noon,   Philosophy Common   Room,
Bu.
HILLEL HOUSE
Film: Everybody's Prejudiced,
noon, Hillel House.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Informational meeting on
post-graduate programs, honours
program and employment for grads,
12:30 to 2:30 p.m., Angus 104.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Thena Ayres speaks on the issue of
Equality, noon, SUB party room.
SATURDAY
UBC GYMNASTIC TEAM
Against Eastern Washington State
College, 2 p.m., P.E. Complex Unit
11.
HILLELPRESENTS
A Discussion
with
RABBI H. RUBENS
on
REFORM JUDAISM"
12:30- 1:30 P.M.
Tuesday, January 28
(Hillel House is Located on
Campus Behind Brock Hall)
OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH
- PERSPECTIVES JEUNESSE -
SUMMER 1975
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS
IS FEBRUARY 21st
An O.F.Y. Project Officer will be on campus Thursday, Jan. 30
and Friday, Jan. 31st at the Student Placement Office. Please
make an appointment through the Placement Office at 228-4327.
IDEAS AND QUESTIONS WELCOMED
m -A^     Main-d'oeuvre
■ ^r     et Immigration
1+
Manpower
and Immigration
CVSO
INFORMATION NIGHT
TECHNICAL TRADES
The Ottawa Recruiter reports
on job opportunities
WED., JAN. 29th - 7:30 p.m.
Room 402 - 404 INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
For further information ring 731-0153 or
228-4886 (9:30-1:30)
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
NOTICE OF REFERENDUM
FEBRUARY 5, 1975
Referendum:  Proposed Amendment of AMS By-Laws to Allow
the A.M.S. to Deposit Funds in a Credit Union
Are you in favour of amending AMS By-Law 4 (4)(f)(ii) by
inserting therein the words "or Credit Union" in the manner
indicated below to allow the A.M.S. to deposit funds in a credit
union?
The By-Law would then read:
"He (the Treasurer) shall immediately upon the receipt of
any funds deposit them with a chartered bank or credit
union selected by the Students' Council."
MARK BALLOT   X
(    ) YES (    ) NO
FREESEE
Sponsored by the Dean of Women's Office
With the support of The Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation
Presents J. Bronowski's
THE
ASCENT OF MAN
Remaining   six   of   the   series   of   thirteen   fifty-minute   films
produced by the B.B.C.
SUB Auditorium
Every Wed. Noon
12:35 and 1:35 p.m.
Free     Free     Free
All students, faculty and staff are invited.
WS CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional lines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Off ice, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
FREESEE: THE ASCENT OF MAN, now
showing every Wed. at 12:35 and
1:35 p.m.   SUB Aud.   Free.
15 — Found
35 - Lost
65 — Scandals
ENGINEERS: Two shy girls wish to
attend ball with two shy gears. Ph.
228-5473 Tues.   6:00-9:00 p.m.
70 — Services
ELITE ESCORT SERVICE provides a
Friendly dignified escort, hostess service and we now require young
ladies. For more information. Phone
681-8171.
SOUND RESEARCH — thousands of research papers — Custom Research —
Student Resume Services. 1969 West
Broadway. 738-3714. Office hours, 1:00
pm.-5.-00 p.m. Mon.-Sat.
85 — Typing
EFFICIENT    ELECTRIC    TYPING.    My
home. Essays, Thesis, etc. Neat Accurate Work. Reasonable Rates. 283-
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Phone Sandra 738-1261.
TYPING — Essays, Theses, Financial
Papers. Telephone 731-9427. Ask for
Gerry.
90-Wanted
STUDENT HELPER WANTED for working mother. Free Room and Board.
261-0746.   After  6:00  p.m.
99 — Miscellaneous
WRITERS
Send entries for
CHRONICLE CREATIVE
WRITING CONTEST
To: U.B.C. Alumni Association, Cecil
Green   Park,  6251   N.W. Marine   Dr.,
Vancouver V6T 1A6.
Final   Deadline — FRIDAY,  JAN.  31 Tuesday, January 28, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Goalie holds hockey to win, tie
By STU LYSTER
Ask Coach Bob Hindmarch. Ask
assistant coach Bert Halliwell. Ask
Brian DeBiasio. Ask Keith Tindle
or Brian Penrose.
They will all tell you they're glad
they won't have to lay their eyes on
Huskie goalie Kevin Migneault
again this season.
With the 'Birds caught in a
struggle for the second and last
play-off spot, they met a brick wall
named Migneault, Saturday and
Sunday, and came away with a win
and a loss that left them tied for
second spot with Calgary.
In Friday night's 5-3 win for the
'Birds, Migneault was the difference between a five goal performance and hat tricks for the
whole team.
Bill Ennos and Rick Jackson
traded goals in an evenly played
first   period.   Both   teams   were
—cedric tetzel photo
'BIRDS FIND KEY to lock put on Saskatchewan net by goalie Kevin
Migneault. Bruce Brill's (4) shot was tipped in by Brian Penrose (5) in
second period Saturday to tie game 1-1. Migneault faced 58 shots as
Saskatchewan went on to win 4-3. The 'Birds won 5-3 Friday night.
UBC hosts ski meet
UBC will host the annual Elwood
Peskett Memorial and Intercollegiate Race this coming
weekend at Grouse Mountain.
Peskett, who skied for UBC, died
on Christmas Day 1968 as a result
_ of injuries sustained in a ski ac-
* cident a few days previously.
Peskett had his first taste of
competition at the Okanagan
Alpine Championships Dec.  1963.
In 1967 Nancy Greene of the
national team asked Peskett to join
the national team on the basis of
"his tremendous potential in
downhill skiing. Peskett, however,
declined the offer in order to
concentrate on his studies.
In memory of this fine UBC
athlete the Elwood Peskett
Memorial Race and the Elwood
Peskett Memorial Scholarship
fund were established by his
family and friends.
This year seven university teams
from Alaska, Washington and B.C.
will be competing for the intercollegiate  title.
Racing for the UBC women will
be Joan Corcaran, Mary Finch,
Anne Gaines, Kathy Snowball,
Dianne Varner.
Their male counterparts will be
Ron Ozanne, Steve Vajda, Dan
Irwin, Dave Pugh, Bruce Goldsmid, Andy Alley, and Fred Gook.
unable to get unwound until UBC
took command after Ennos' goal.
Despite the scores, that
demination was to last the whole
weekend.
Brian Penrose then put UBC in
front at 0:16 of the second,'
deflecting a Bruce Brill shot from
the point past Migneault. Jackson
got his second of the night to tie it
on a shot that changed direction at
the blue-line. UBC goalie Dave
Andrews was going the other way
and was cleanly beaten.
Despite the heroics of Migneault,
UBC managed to put the game
away with three straight goals
through the third period. DeBiasio
got one, after being robbed by the
Huskie goalie off a loose puck in
the crease. Sean Boyd got what
proved to be the winner and Bill
Ennos got an insurance goal in the
third Doug Novian rounded out the
Huskie scoring with 27 seconds left
in the game.
The statistic that summed up the
game best, was the 110 shots the
'Birds attempted in the game. 39
were stopped by Migneault, the
rest either went wide or in the net.
Saturday's Saskatchewan win
belonged to Migneault. The first
period should have finished 7-1 for
UBC.
It finished 1-0 for the Huskies.
Typical of the goaltending
Saskatchewan has received all
season, Migneault turned back two
powerful UBC power-plays almost
single handedly.
With his team two-men short and
the 'Birds shooting at will, he shut
them out and kept his team in the
game.
Brian Penrose evened it halfway through the second from
DeBiasio and Brill with a tip-in
reminisant of his goal the night
before.
Both Gary Slucinski and Penrose
got their second of the game a
minute apart for each side to keep
the game deadlocked.
Then with 'Bird Rod Hare in the
penalty box, John Rooney capped
off Saskatchewan's only sign of
offensive life at 19:58 with a goal
that put the Huskies ahead to stay.
Migneault saw to that.
Pat Rooney got the winner at
4:33 to give Saskatchewan a two
goal lead, taking some of the
starch out of the 'Bird attack.
But the 'Birds came back.
DeBiasio was the only one who was
able to find some space between
Migneault and the net for the rest
of the game.
The 'Birds pressed for the tying
goal. DeBiasio had one hop over his
stick as he stood before an open
net. Bob Sperling hit a post.
Penrose's muscle act in front of the
net cleared the way for more UBC
chances.
Commenting on Migneault and
the Saskatchewan team, 'Bird
coach Bob Hindmarch said, "They
drove us nuts, and gave us nothing
but trouble all year. I'm glad to get
rid of them."
Total shots on goal for the two
games, UBC 102, Huskies 40.
'Birds skunk U of Lethbridge
By CARL VESTERBACK
It was like the guns of Navarone
vs. the pea shooters of the Dunbar
Park Gang, or King Kong vs.
Cheetah the Chimp. Such was the
nature of the mayhem administered the University of Lethbridge by UBC Thunderbird
basketball team at War Memorial
gym Saturday night.
The 'Birds won 114-58. The game
was a disaster, both artistically
and from an excitement-content
point of view. Behind the sharp-
shooting of Steve Pettifer and
Blake Iverson, the 'Birds built a 23-
3 lead and coasted from there.
Peter Mullins yanked the first
string after 10 minutes of the first
half, but the slaughter continued,
as everyone but manager Clarence
Mahovlich fattened his scoring
average.
With the subs in for most of the
game, turnovers and errant passes
became distressingly commonplace. Three Lethbridge
starters fouled out, and their
replacements were, in a word,
abominable. Everyone was glad
when the game was over.
High scorers for UBC were Steve
Pettifer and Blake Iverson with 22
and 18 points respectively. Brian
Sutherland-Brown had 14. Richard
Foggo had 20 points for Lethbridge.
Friday's game was another
loser. The 'Birds came out listless
and flat, with the result that Lethbridge stayed close and, in fact, led
for most of the game. It wasn't
until late in the second half that
UBC finally awoke and built up a
substantial lead, finishing with a
72-49 victory. Pettifer finished with
27 points to lead UBC scorers and
Phil Letham, with 14, was high for
Lethbridge.
The two wins left the 'Birds tied
for second place with the Alberta
Golden Bears, both with 8-4
records. UVic, 11-3 still leads the
league.
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"When we play like this, there's
no one in Canada who can touch
us," said Thunderettes' coach
Susan Evans following UBC's 73-29
bludgeoning of Lethbridge
Saturday night.
There's certainly no one in the
Canada West league who can do it.
Second place Victoria beat Lethbridge by only 10 points earlier in
the season, and is the only team
with any kind of hope of
overhauling UBC for first.
"We should handle them easily,
too," said Evans.
It was the same old story in
Saturday's game, the one common
to every Thunderette home game
since the season began. Led by
Carol Turney and Kathy Burdett,
the Thunderettes pressed for most
of the game, forcing the flustered,
frustrated Lethbridge team into
countless turnovers. The Alberta
team was no match for the taller
UBC forwards under the boards,
and couldn't penetrate the
Thunderettes' defence.
"I feel a little sorry for the teams
we play," said Evans. "It's getting
to be a little embarrasing^to win by
so much every time."
Friday's game was little different, the final score being 79-26.
Carol Turney had 18 points,
followed by Kathy Burdett with 12.
The two wins left UBC still in
first place with an 11-1 record.
Next home games are Feb. 7 and 8
against UVic.
UBC visits Alberta next
weekend, then returns home for
games against the University of
Victoria Feb. 7 and 8.
Oregon takes three from
UBC wrestling team
The wrestling 'Birds spent five days in the unfriendly state of Oregon,
dropping three of four matches to strong American college teams.
UBC opened the trip by dropping Lewis and Clark College of Portland
40-13. It was the only match the 'Birds were to wrestle under the
familier Olympic Freestyle rules, the others were played under the U.S.
Colleigate rules.
The 'Birds were to subcumb to the three schools they played under
these rules. Southern Oregon whipped them 27-7, Oregon Tech edged
them 20-15 and then South West Oregon polished them off 24-15.
Thunderbird coach Bob Laycoe chalked the trip up to experience, a
valuable commodity for the young UBC team. Laycoe felt that if the
matches had been held under freestyle rules UBC could have won over
Southwest Oregon and Oregon Tech.
George Richey lead the way for the 'Birds with four wins, all by pins.
Craig Delahunt continued to improve, winning three and losing just
one match, that only a single point decision.
Gus Romanelli seems to have put his injury behind, as he won two
matches, tied one and lost one.
Laycoe said that on the whole it appeared the 'Birds weren't in as
good a condition as their opponents but that they are aiming to peak for
the Canada West Championships, to be held later this term.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28, 1975
Mitchell dumped by SC
as Moore heads slate
From page 1
"He told me that Gord (current
AMS president Gordon Blankstein)
had told Cox to run independently
against me for co-ordinator, so I
quit," she said.
Moore denies having talked
about the matter to Cox, who
denies having discussed it with
Blankstein.
Blankstein also denied having
urged Cox to run against Mitchell
as an independent.
Mitchell said she could not now
support the Student's Coalition
slate, either by running on it or by
voting for it.
"I couldn't work with any of
those people," she said. "There are
no name people running, except on
the other slate."
Heenan denied Mitchell had been
removed as presidential candidate
because she was a woman.
"We found we could get more
support for Gary as president, but
it wasn't a sexism thing," he said.
"Let's just say we had a few
policy conflicts,"
He refused to say what those
conflicts were, but denied that
Mitchell's being a woman and
Peet's pressure to dump her had
been factors.
"Peet would have run in any
position on the slate," he said.
Earlier Peet had told The
Ubyssey he would join the slate in
any position except as secretary.
Heenan said they had wanted
Mitchell on the slate, and that
when he heard she wouldn't be on it
at all, "it was a bummer."
Moore, who replaced Mitchell as
presidential candidate on the slate,
also denied sexism was involved in
the move.
"It was just decided that I would
be a better candidate for the
position," he said.
Ellen Paul, who became the
seventh member of the slate after
Mitchell's departure, is a senator-
at-large.
Student Unity's presidential
candidate, van der Kamp, covered
AMS council and related activities
for The Ubyssey for almost two
years.
THEESEN
, current treasurer
Van Blarcom is assistant AMS
treasurer to Thessen and secretary
of the UBC psychology club.
Theessen will attempt to retain
his position as treasurer, a position
he has held since September when
he replaced Pemme Muir, interim
treasurer appointed by the
executive after Students
Coalition's George Mapson
resigned the position in August.
He had earlier said he was not
going to run in the election.
David Fuller has been grad
studies   representative   on   AMS
van der KAMP ... old hack
council for 1 1/2 years and was
active in last fall's unsuccessful
anti-pool campaign.
Jennifer Fuller, his wife, is
nursing rep on council.
The slate will also support Eileen
Brown's attempt to defeat incumbent ombudsperson Roy Sarai
in the election, Theesen said.
This will be the first time in three
years the position will not have
been won by acclamation.
Theesen said the slate, if elected,
will present a new constitution by
Nov. 1 which would decentralize
the AMS.
The plan calls for the elimination
of the executive, to be replaced by
a 10-member directorate, elected
at large from the student body,
vote on council. The directorate,
however, would be responsible to
council and would have to be
present at council meetings.
Student money would no longer
be under the direct control of the
AMS, but each student would pay
his AMS fee directly to the un-
Evans to
stay at UBC
unless...
Commerce prof John Evans,
recently denied tenure by his
department in a dispute about
applied versus the oratical
research, said Monday he will stay
at UBC until a better position
comes up.
Evans said he will be looking for
a job "in the government, another
academic position or private industry." But meanwhile, he'll stay
at UBC.
Evans said he doesn't plan
further protest of his denial of
tenure, since "nothing could be
done."
But the matter shouldn't be
dropped, he said. Instead, tenure
criteria should be pursued as a
"general issue.
He said students should take
action to ensure student input into
decision-making. While the
commerce faculty has agreed that
students should be included in the
process, the provisions for doing so
haven't been implemented, he
said.
Commerce rep on Alma Mater
Society council Peter Bull refused
to say if he had any plans to take
action on the issue of student input.
He did say he plans no further
action about Evan's tenure.
It's gone too far," he said.
"They're not going to reconsider
it."
Council in pit
Students will note a slight addition to the usual amount of litter in the
SUB conversation pit Thursday.
Often known as the Alma Mater Society council, this amateur
debating society that wilfully spends your money will come out of its
usual plush conference room on the SUB second floor and wilfully
mingle with the people at a noon-hour meeting.
The wisdom of the event's timing is cast somewhat into doubt when it
is remembered that this is engineering week. There has been no agenda
released for either event, but certain high-school hijinx can logically be
expected.
dergraduate society to which he
belongs.
Voting members on council
would be comprised of one person
elected to council by each of the
undergraduate societies, plus one
person from the directorate.
Meanwhile, Rick Longton, who
unsuccessfully sought the
Students' Coalition nomination for
president, said he has already
decided on running as an independent, running on a partial or
full slate, or not running at all, but
"you're not going to find out about
it now."
Nominations for the seven
executive positions and the
position of ombudsperson close
noon Wednesday. The election will
be held Feb. 5 with advance polls
on Feb. 4.
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