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The Ubyssey Oct 31, 1972

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Array Grits mangent merde
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LIV, No. 14 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1972     <*§!£*4S   228-2301
CALLING   FOR   BALD  NEW
Centre,   urban affairs minister
STEPS to be taken  in Vancouver
Ron Basford yawns over his easy
—kini mcdonald photo
victory  in the riding but scratches another no-growth area about
similar minority position his fellow Liberals find themselves in.
Peak board, staffers end hassle
The Simon Fraser board of
directors and the Peak staff
have resolved problems
concerning the papers'
editorial policy Peak
publications office manager
Phil Dubois said Monday.
The problems arose after a
board of directors meeting on
Oct. 19 passed two motions
affecting the Peak's production.
The first motion restricted
staff meetings to on-campus
locations and during school
time.
The second motion directed
the staff to divide into
autonomous sections to cover
local news.
Peak editor Ron Roth then
resigned in protest.
A  long   meeting   between
both sides Thursday failed to
reach any agreement.
Both groups met again
Friday and finally agreed to
continue publishing the paper
under a desk system. The Peak
will have no editor.
Dubois said desks for news,
sports, commentary, grass
roots (information) and layout
False alarms cost $1,500
Every time the UBC fire department answers a false alarm
it costs about $1500 says deputy fire chief John McKay.
The cost of a false alarm is about $265 per man hour so if a
bunch of gears pull a smoke bomb raid on the Ubyssey office
and a six man team answers the call the cost is $1590.
Even though such fun is expensive, UBC students have
found time to pull two false alarms in the past month.
SUB building manager Graeme Vance.said Monday the fire
department responded to a small smoke fire Saturday in the
food service area of SUB.
The UBC fire department is financed jointly by the
provincial government and by endowment lands taxpayers so
they pay for the false alarms.
By JOHN ANDERSEN
Political chaos — resulting in another election in the near
future — appears likely following Monday's federal election.
Although final results are uncertain, returning officers'
final count for the night showed the Liberals with only a one seat
lead over the Progressive Conservatives.
At last count the Liberals had elected candidates in 108
ridings, a major drop from the 155 seats won in the 1968 campaign of Trudeaumania.
The PC's won 107 seats, up from the 72 seats won in 1968.
The New Democrats increased their representation
from 22 seats to 32 while Social
Credit elected 15 candidates,
an increase of one from the
1968 campaign.
In British Columbia, the
electors sent 11 New
Democrats to Ottawa along
with eight Conservatives and
three Liberals. One seat is
undecided.
Although the vote showed
major gains for the Tories, the
result cannot necessarily be
interpreted as a personal
victory for Bob Stanfield.
Stanfield managed to lose
two seats in his native region of
the Maritimes although his
party still holds 22 seats to the
Liberal's 10.
Stanfield's Tories won
heavily in Alberta and Ontario,
preserves respectively of
Conservative premiers Peter
Lougheed and Bill Davis, both
of whom reportedly have eyes
on the national leadership.
Even though Lougheed and
Davis are now emerging as
major factors in the federal
party, it is unlikely either of
them will attempt to challenge
Stanfield until after the next
election. If Stanfield fails to
increase the number of Tory
seats, there could be a real cat-
fight among the two provincial
leaders and Stanfield for the
top job.
The Maritimes, as usual four
years behind the rest of the
country, appeared to show an
early trend to the Liberals and
it seemed the Liberals were on
their way to at least a minority
government when Quebec gave
them 56 seats, the same as in
the last federal house.
The much-touted campaign
by former Quebec justice
minister Claude Wagner for
the Conservatives proved to be
a dud. Only two PC's, one of
them Wagner, were elected in
Quebec.
The first sign of a major
swing to the Conservatives
appeared in Ontario where the
Conservatives increased their
representation to 45 seats from
17 seats.
The Liberals lost heavily,
plummeting to 35 seats from
the 64 seats won in the 1968
election.
The Ontario New Democrats
won 11 seats, almost doubling
their representation from their
former standing of six seats.
The Conservatives proved
particularly strong in metro
Toronto where they picked up
ten seats from the floundering
Liberals.
The swing to the Tories
continued across the prairies,
where they won 33 seats, including a 19-seat sweep of
Alberta. The Liberals were
reduced to three seats from
their previous total of 11 and
the NDP dropped one seat for a
total of nine.
In B.C. both the Tories and
the NDP made gains at the
expense of the Liberals. The
New Democrats won 11 seats,
and the Conservatives eight
while the Liberals dropped to
three seats. One seat is still
undecided.
See page 6: KEY
have been organized to gather
material for the paper.
' 'This will be more or less as
an experiment for the next few
weeks. If it is successful it will
continue."
Dubois said staff meetings
have been changed from
Sundays off campus to Mondays and Thursdays on-
campus.
He said this will help the
paper cover more campus
news thus complying with the
council's demands.
Dubois said there was a
definite disagreement in the
direction of the paper.
"However, the Peak staff
and the board of directors had
no political disagreements
about the paper." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 31, 1972
TCw contraceptive lias
it where it counts most
By JOSIE BANNERMAN
The TCu contraceptive
system represents a new
principle in intrauterine
contraception and may provide
a viable alternative to the pill,
says health services physician
Robin Percival-Smith.
The copper T is an in-
teruterine device which
derives its effectiveness from
the antifertility properties of
metallic copper, Dr. Percival-
Smith said Monday.
He is conducting a study on
the effectiveness of the TCu in
conjucntion with the International Federation for the
Study of Fertility and Family
Planning.
The TCu is a plastic T-
shaped device with a copper
coil wound around its vertical
arm. When introduced into the
uterus the copper from the coil
raises the level of copper in the
uterus. Although the precise
mechanism of the contraceptive action of metallic
copper is not yet known, it
would appear that the increased level of copper
prevents conception by acting
as a spermicide, said Dr.,
Percival-Smith.
The stickiness of the cervical
mucous is increased, making it
more difficult for the sperm to
reach the uterus and creating a
uterine environment unfavorable for implantation.
Clinical   trials  of  the  TCu
TCu
Horizontal arms
Vertical arm-
TCu ... a viable alternative
device have been running now
for five years. On the basis of.
experimental data collected
over the five-year period the
TCu appears to have many
advantages, he said.
A University of Calif, study
reports the TCus have a failure
rate of .8 per cent. The pill has
a clinical failure rate of .5 per
cent, while the failure rate of
conventional IUds ranges from
1.5 to 8 per cent.
Unlike the conventional
IUDs, the TCu is a suitable
contraceptive device for
women who have not had
children.
Conventional IUDs are
bulky; they prevent conception
by irritation of the uterus and
consequently, they are often
painful. Clinioal trials show
that show that the copper T,
because of its design, has a low
incidence of pain of bleeding,
he said.
From evidence collected to
date the TCu appears to have
few side effects.
He said copper has never
been   reported  as   a   cancer
causing agent.
* "Instances of copper
poisoning, even in suicidal
attempts, are exceedingly
rare.
* "Analysis of blood samples
has shown no indication of
increase in circulating copper
as a consequence of the
presence of a copper T in the
uterus," says a Rockefeller
University report.
* Excess copper appears to
be expelled in the menstrual
discharge, as there is no
evidence that the level of
copper in the uterus increases
with increasing length of exposure to the TCu, the report
says. The copper level in the
uterus drops quickly once the
TCu has been removed.
At present the TCu is known
to be an effective contraceptive for up to two years
after its insertion into the
uterus, the report says.
"If continued contraception
is desired beyond the initial
two year period, a new copper
T device should be inserted."
Because the TCu is still an
experimental contraceptive
method, information on it is not
generally available.
Women and men interested
iln learning more about TCu
and other methods of contraception should contact the
student health service.
THIS TIME IT'S THE CITY
Do you believe that the Vancouver school system'needs
to catch up with the 1970"$? I do, so I'm running for the School
Board with TEAM. But I will need some help in organizing my
campaign, putting up signs, delivering pamphlets, addressing
envelopes. If you have even a few hours to spare between the
middle of November and December 13, please get in touch with
me. I am at home most nights (not Sunday or Tuesday).
Telephone 261-8308.
ELLIOTT GOSE
(English Department)
PLEASED WITH MIDTERMS?
Learn efficient STUDY METHODS
6 sessions — 1 hr./week
Starts Thursday, November 2
Register in advance at *STUDENT SERVICES
I wtindLe*'
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WARNER—fLECTRAATLANTIC
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SD    7241—Full House—
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BS    2631—Greeting* from   LA.
Tim Buckley
EKS 75039—Made in  England—
Atomic Rooster
BS    2602—Black Sabbath IV
MS   2095—Slider—T. Rex
BS    2607—Machine Head—
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A&B price    ^69
Mfg. Sugg. List 6.49 J
C  31044—Sittin' In—Kenny
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C 30035—Leadbelly
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BN 26413—Truth—Jeff Beck
E 30512—Edgar Winter's
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ROLLING STONES—
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DES 18017—In Search of the
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SR 61264—Gasoline Alley-
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OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9 P.M. Tuesday, October 31, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Famous Players, Odeon face wrath of Doug
'NOW LET'S SEE', muses a bewildered voter, shall I vote for
Standstil or for Cowette? What about Barett and that McGovern
fellah? Actually students in the Brock Hall study areas are writing
—ed dubois photo
essays and have little time for Pierre and David and Real and Bob.
Hopefully their theses will contain at least as much meaning as the
results of the election.
Exposure
UBC students and executives
from Famous Players
Canadian Corp. Ltd. and Odeon
Theatres Ltd. will discuss the
theatres' suspension of student
rates for their movies.
Alma Mater Society
president Doug Aldridge said
Monday a meeting this week in
Toronto will be arranged with
theatre management to
negotiate on their policy.
Aldridge will be heading the
UBC contingent to the Nov. 1
Association of Universities and
Colleges Conference in
Toronto.
The National Association of
Students meets Nov. 3 in Ottawa. Aldridge said measures
of possible student action will
be discussed at the conferences.
Aldridge said theatre
management discontinued
student rates due to the use of
student cards by people who
were not bona-fide students.
External-affairs officer
Terri Ball said the B.C.
Association of Student Unions
has been exerting pressure on
local theatre managers since
June. BCASU members have
been writing letters and
meeting with managers, but
with little success.
Concrete steps to be taken by
the BCSU have not been
finalized, Ball said.
"We are considering an
alliance with the old age
pensioners," Ball said.
"Golden age passes are
accepted only at the discretion
of the manager," she said.
UBC is BCASU's
representative at the meeting
in Toronto. Aldridge said he
plans to prove to the senior
management that students are
adversely affected by their
policies.
VAC needs
support
The Vietnam Action Committee is looking for support
for its campaign to end
Canada's complicity in the
Vietnam war. -
A benefit concert, by Spring,
Kathy Stack, Sleepy John and
Behyndman will be held 8 p.m.,
Wednesday at Kitsilano High
School. Admission is $2.
The Committee is also
organizing a protest march
through Gastown for Nov. 18.
Further information is
available from the committee
at 688-1623.
By ART SMOLENSKY
One of the scandals of the recent federal election
campaign surely must be the whereabouts of one
Charles Wolverton.
Wolverton, a business columnist for the
Province newspaper has been in Washington State
for the last two months working for George
McGovern in the American presidential campaign.
While one of the most critical election issues was
the state of our economy and its attending unemployment, we have had less than adequate coverage
from the Province's business section.
Perhaps it is time that the Province paid a little
more attention to the affairs of Canada and hired
itself some writers (editors) who at least were interested enough in this country to be around during
our elections.
There are plenty of young competent Canadian
newspaper reporters who I'm sure would fit the job.
* » «
Over the past five years there have been
numerous attempts at setting up food co-ops in the
university area (Point Grey, Dunbar and Kitsilano).
A few have even existed for a short time.
Finally it looks like one is getting off the ground
that looks solid, permanent and serious.
Going under the name of the Vancouver Food Coop, its nucleus is a number of UBC staff members
centred in the arts faculty.
It costs to join but if you're planning to stick
around Vancouver for a while it will probably be
worth it.
Interested types should contact Mike Frimer, 4024
West 31st, 224-4123 or 278-5727.
* * *
This month's Vancouver Food Co-op newsletter
shows food price comparison between Safeway's (4th
and Vine) and the CAS Co-operative (Burnaby).
One of the more interesting items in the survey
was the price of Vancouver Fancy Sausage
Hungarian Salami. The manufacturer's list price if
69 cents. C.A.S. Co-op price is 54 cents while this
particular Safeway prices the same item at 70 cents
(covering the suggested list) or almost 15 per cent
over list price.
You've heard of "Resdan, a great Canadian
dandruff fighter." Well, Justine, there's a reason you
can't buy it in the U.S.
Whitehall Laboratories in 1970 could not prove to
the U.S. government that Resdan was at all effective. The result — a hot-shot ad agency plays on
Canadian nationalism to dump a product considered
useless in the States.
* * * .
"An alert real estate salesman should learn how
to express himself well and to use psychology. Here
are a few proven sales tips recommended for expressive application: Don't say 'down payment'; say
'initial investment'. Don't ask for a 'listing'; ask for
an 'authorization to sell'. Don't say 'second mortgage'; say 'perhaps we can find additional financing'. Don't use the word 'contract'; have them sign
a 'proposal' or 'offer'. . .. Don't use the word 'lot';
call it a 'homesite'. Don't say 'sign here'; say 'write
your name as you want it to appear on your deed', "
The Sonoma County Realtor, publication of the
Sonoma County Board of Realtors, Santa Rosa, Calif. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 31, 1972
Ho-hum
Who would have thought it.
We mean the Liberals losing 40 seats.
The election results, an apparent dead heat for the
major parties lead to all sorts of idle speculation.
A coalition between the Liberals and New Democrats,
a coalition between the Conservatives and the Creditiste, or
some sort of temporary working agreement are just some of
the possibilities.
Providing a government can be and is formed the NDP
is in the best position, holding the balance of power.
However, whether or not they can handle this power
without selling out or causing deeper splits is another
question.
The most serious consequence of the election is the
Ontario-Quebec split. A Conservative government could not
even pretend to represent Quebec; the Claude Wagner
experiment failed.
Separatism seems a lot closer now. The Parti-
Quebecois couldn't have wished for more this federal
election. The rejection of the Liberals in the west and
Ontario indicate dissatisfaction with Trudeau's concessions
to Quebec.
What kind of concessions can they expect from a
Tory government?
Not too much. Take the Ottawa West riding for
instance. It was won by Peter Reilly a Conservative who
opposed bilingualism in the civil service.
The polls told us we were bored by the election.
There were not clear issues, few inspiring candidates
and the result was a switch by many of the country's
uncommited voters from the Conservatives to the Liberals.
But no even enough of them switched to indicate
much of a trend.
There will be much analysis of these results, of the
youth vote, and the unemployed vote, and the corporate
welfare bums vote, but what trends are found will probably
be obscure.
Perhaps this will be the election that will make John
Turner prime minister. Or Peter Lougheed. Or Bill Davis.
One thing is sure. They'd better get going. The last
badly split minority, the 1957 112-105 Tory-Liberal deadlock, lasted only eight months.
This one may only last as long as it takes to raise the
$40 million necessary for another campaign.
As for this election we must turn to the words of our
prime minister: "Whether or not it is clear to you no doubt
the universe is unfolding as it should."
Control
It's nice to see the university health service promote a
birth control device to replace the Pill.
We're speaking of the new copper interuterine device.
(See page 2).
It's nice because relatively little is known about the
overall and long term effects of the Pill.
The T Cu, as it is called, is also effective for women
without children which certainly is a boon to most
university women.
However, what disturbs us is the lack of research into
male contraceptives. We seem to be stuck with condoms
and vasectomies. Neither of which are totally satisfactory
for most people.
We suspect the lack of research into male
contraceptives has a lot to do with structures of our society.
Doctors and scientists are predominantly male and
traditionally child care, child rearing and child prevention
has been left up to the woman.
So it would be even nicer if health service could tell us
they now have a new contraceptive for males.
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 31, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university
administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The
Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial  departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O'Brien
Pencils in hand and press cards in hat, the enquiring reporters dashed
out to cover the victory of the know-nothings over the vegetarians. Kent
Spencer and Gary Coult gritted their teeth while Ryon Guedes tried not to
tary and Steve Morris, Ken Dodd, John Andersen, and Jan O'Brien
reflected that it was difficult for Vaughn Palmer to make a pun out of the
NDP. Big winners: Mike Sasges, Ed Dubois, Kini McDonald, Lesley
Krueger, Sondra Marshall Smith, Josie Bannerman, Simon Truelove, and
Brian Murphy. Big loser: Berton Woodward, as usual. But not Marise
Savaria.
Letters
Trudeau
I was quoted in Friday's paper
as saying "... the PM said the
federal government couldn't do
anything about a proposed
superport facility for Squamish."
This is incorrect.
What I did say is that Trudeau
said the feds couldn't do anything
about the supertanker port being
constructed at Come-by-Chance,
Newfoundland for a New York
company.
The point is still valid: of
course the PM lied,. since the
federal government did announce
the next day that the Squamish
development would be halted as
the department of transport has
authority over navigable waters.
Svend Robinson
student senator
P.S. Your editorial on typing
was rather stupid- reminds me
too much of the profs who sternly
advise us to type essays, etc. What
if (a) you don't type (b) you
don't have a typewriter (c) you
write well. Come off it!
We_ don't ask people to type
letters for esoteric or autocratic
reasons. We ask them to type
letters because they have to be
typed for the printers to read the
copy. There are a lot of
typewriters in The Ubyssey office
for anyone's use as well.
Ticket
I would like to call your
attention to a few things
happening on campus which I
don't think too many people
know about.
It seems that a potentially
hazardous traffic situation exists
on University Boulevard, at the
parking kiosk. The traffic must
drive in the left lane to stop at the
kiosk and then turn right, across a
lane of traffic to the parking lot.
There have been near accidents
between bicycles and cars turning
right, but the situation hasn't
improved as yet.
I was riding my bike down this
same stretch of road on Oct. 25,
and rode past the kiosk without
stopping, just as everyone does.
There was an RCMP car near there
at the lane at the time and I was
pulled over. Naturally I was
mildly shocked but could
understand why because there was
a stop sign and I did go through it.
But the shock was yet to come.
He wrote out a traffic violation
for $25.
"But," I thought to myself,
"UBC vehicles don't stop at that
sign, nor do B.C. Hydro busses
stop there. They just go right on
through."
They, of course, are the real
hazard, but I got a $25 fine for
going through it on a bicycle.
That's one for Ripley's Believe It
Or Not.
Deryl Mogg
P.S. I ■ would like some
information on court proceedings
in a case like this as I would like
to take the matter to court.
Phone: 224-9726.
Yoga
A great deal of correspondence
has recently been published in the
Vancouver Sun, some of it
reflecting incredible ignorance and
prejudice, on the subject of yoga.
Yoga is presently being
introduced in the secondary and
even primary school system, a
policy which reflects a welcome,
though very belated realization by
school authorities that not all of
the wisdom of mankind was
produced in Europe. Indeed, there
is nothing in western civilization
which compares to yoga, the
science of integration of the
physical with the spiritual being.
The purpose of hatha yoga is,
by means of a great variety of
physical exercises— most of
which are simple, common-sense
and feasible for anyone, without
consideration of physical shape
and condition— to achieve
mastery over one's senses and
one's mind. Yoga does not divorce
the spiritual from the physical;
this is why it is even practiced
today by some Christian monastic
orders: to practice yoga has
nothing to do with conversion to
Hinduism. Like many others, I
can testify to the general feeling
of well-being the practice of yoga
can generate in a person's physical
and mental health.
It is therefore inadmissible that
in our day and age physical
education students, who will be
responsible for the health of
future generations should remain
ignorant of even what yoga is. It is
furthermore surprising that at a
time when yoga is being
introduced in the curriculum of
our schools, it should be kept out
of UBC, because of the prejudiced
opposition of one man. Yet, this
is what is happening.
Bina Nelson, director of the
Vancouver Yoga Fitness Institute,
has offered to teach yoga in the
school of physical education at
UBC. This spring she submitted a
lengthy and very detailed
description of her projected
course. I understand that this
course was approved by the
curriculum committee, but vetoed
by professor Robert Obsorne,
head of the school of physical
education.
I believe that physical
education students and the
university community in general
should be informed of those facts:
let them decide whether this is
fair and is in conformity with the
spirit of academic
experimentation and freedom, to
which the university is dedicated.
Rene Goldman
Asian studies
P.S. This is a personal letter
and in no way involves the
department.
Amicable
The article in Friday's Ubyssey
on the English department, and
the somewhat hysterical editorial
preceeding it, require at least
passing comment.
I have no personal complaint.
Gary Coull reported me fairly, as
did Sandy Kass the week before,
except that the form of
departmental division he sets out
is not quite accurate, and is only
one of several kinds advanced
during  amicable   discussions  on
See page 5 Tuesday, October 31, 1972
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
From page 4
forms any future re-organization
might possibly take.
The point is that discussions on
this and other matters were
amicable, and hence have become
an object of anguished reproach.
Where are the battles of
yesteryear, and the wonderful
copy they provided for aspiring
young journalists with the Sun in
their eyes? Apparently our
attempt to heal self-inflicted
wounds by a measure of sense and
sobriety is a sinister betrayal of
the media, even though it will best
serve the interests of the
department and the university as a
whole.
One recalls the dissenter's
nostalgia for "all the zeal and
activity" brought out by collisions
with the Church, and Matthew
Arnold's reminder to him of "all
the nonsense" which the fruitless
years of contradiction has
produced.
I may seem to be overstating
the case. But how else can I
interpret the threat to compose
"speculative articles" based on
what you "feel" about
"knife-in-the-back scenes", even if
these exist only in the
imaginations, or by the
contrivance, of anonymous
informers? Or the innuendo,
under a photograph of the head,
discrediting two accurate
explanations for his study leave?
Or the larger photograph of an
earlier scene, implying that things
go better with partisan fervour?
The answer to that last is that
they don't. To have everybody
including students in on personnel
decisions, for example, instead of
representative committees, would
make impartial evaluations based
on informed discussion not
merely difficult but impossible.
To make it a grievance that a
university department should shift
from "vocal discontentments" to
"discussions and evaluation" reads
strangely like Alice Through tne
Looking-Glass. I would hope that
the Comic Spirit caught you
unawares with that headline, and
that a hopeful humanism informs
your conclusion: to wit- "The
faculty is tired of arguing loudly
around in circles," and "The trend
now is towards talking softly with
direction." It is certainly a process
you can assist, but not by
emulating the witches in Macbeth.
W. Robbins
acting head English dept.
We're afraid we don't have
space to answer all the innuendoes
and general speculation contained
in your letter.
However, we feel the editorial
was summed up by the last
sentence, which stated in part:
"... if we feel that articles are
warranted because of various
knife-in-back scenes in' the
department, we will print articles
based on whatever facts we can
get rather than print no articles at
alL"
BELLY   DANCING
The   Dance  of  the   HareemJ
taught by a professional.
Phone ASMARA
2545676
rUShANtI
i™ CAMERAS     *'
4538 W.10 224-5858
NEVER UNDERSOLD!
But this is really beside the
point. The point is that students
have a right to know, and have a
say in, what is going on at the
university.
Whether or not this makes
"things go better" is another
matter entirely. Any authoritarian
regime can make things go better
but we doubt whether the
increased efficiency is worth the
sacrifice of,democratic principles.
Apathy
I cannot refrain from telling
you how I am disgusted and
depressed by the UBC academic
staff and by the mediocre
mentality of most of the students
of this campus.
To know that, on the one
hand, a widely advertised
referendum for a covered pool has
resulted in the acceptance by an
apathetic majority of students of
a fee increase of $5 for 20 years
and a debt of $2 million is
depressing enough when you are
aware of the numerous problems
plaguing this university but, what
is most incredible and unbearable
for me, is that, on the other hand,
the Alma Mater Society student
council has decided to modify
(sic) the reading room in the SUB
main floor and to cancel all the
subscriptions to the newspapers
and journals available in the past,
however too few there were.
These subscriptions amounted to
$1,500 and were cancelled for
lack of money or because they
could be better spent!
In my opinion, this reading
room with its foreign journals was
the only civilized part of this
campus, the latter which is more
related to an international chain
motel than to a high place of
learning and intellectual
discussion.
This most stupid saving of
1,500 miserable bucks must be
compared with a $2 million debt
for a covered pool that will not be
used by a majority of students.
In the meantime, the students
will go on eating the repulsive
food offered (please, laugh!) by
the administration, will not have
any large-scale co-operative
bookstore, no co-operative food
store, no cheap day care facilities.
There will be no active
participation of the students,
graduate and undergraduate, at
departmental meetings. Poor
teaching and research staff will go
on plaguing this campus. And
most important no real
democratization of the studies
will be. done because the poor
family origin students will go on
having much difficulty to survive
on this campus or dropping out
for lack of financial support.
The students have the
university and the student
government that they deserve.
The UBC teaching staff is a mirror
image of the student population.
Mffis
CRAFTS
leather belts & bags • batik
I pottery • jewellery 9 macrame^
stained glass 9 candles
DISCOUNT WITH AMS CARD
& THIS AD
Mon -Sat 10:30-5:30
Fri 'til 9:00
1124 Robson St       688-3979
Let us conclude this letter by
an average discussion between a'
teacher    of   this    campus    and
students:
Teacher (three master's
degrees, a PhD from different U.S.
universities): "I bought a new
Chrysler with auto trans., power
steering, power brakes and radio,
so now my wife has a Datsun 510,
for shopping, Cathy, my daughter,
drives a Triumph TR-6. I am
better off than in Great Britain,
you know!"
Student (male): "That is
nothing! My dad has an Impala,
my mother a new Chevelle
Malibu, I have a horse of $7,000
and I just bought a brand new
Fiat 124 coupe, the best selling
car in Europe, you know!" (at
least, the student remembers TV
commercials).
Student (female):
"Woodward's sells new pants and
I need new eye lashes. Eatons has
a better choice, do you not think,
Dr. XX..."
Name withheld
grad studies 9
See page 8
SUB FILM SOC PRESENTS'
BREWSTER
McCLOUD
with
Bud Cort
Sally Kellerman
Michael Murphy
Stacy Keach
Directed by
Robert Altman
•
S.U.B.
AUD.
50c
Nov. 2-5
Thur.,7:00
•
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7:00 and 9:30
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I^^^C^Cr;^^^g^^^g^g;g;^^j^gpg;^g Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 31, 1972
Dividedwestand
SEATS
AFTER
ELECTION
POPULAR
VOTE
1972
SEATS
BEFORE
ELECTION
NET GAIN
OR LOSS
IN SEATS
POPULAR
VOTE
1968
[Percentage]
LIBERALS
108
38.2
147
-41
45.5
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
107
35.5
74
+33
31.4
NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY
32
17.4
25
+ 7
17.0
SOCIAL CREDIT
15
7.6
13
+ 2
4.4
OTHER
2
1.3
1
+ 1
1.7
VACANT
4
Key in Lewis' hand
From page 1
Nationally the Liberals won
a majority of the popular vote,
with 38.2 per cent of the.
electorate supporting them.
However, this is a major drop
from the 45.5 per cent they
attained in the glory days of
1968.
The Tories won 35.5 per cent,
compared with 31.4 per cent
last time. The NDP share of
the vote increased only slightly
from 17 per cent to 17.4 per cent
while Social Credit won 7.6 per
cent, a sharp increase from the
1968 total of 4.4 per cent.
The proverbial balance of
power rests with David Lewis
and the NDP.
Lewis said Monday he would
support the Liberals provided
certain conditions were met.
He said: "There is a price
they must pay for our support.
They must take action on
taxes, inflation and unemployment. If they don't take
this action we will not support
them."
Social Credit leader Real
Caouette also indicated he
would be prepared to support
the government provided it
was prepared to implement
Social Credit policies.
However, Caouette's 15 seats
are not enough to give a
majority to either the Liberals
or Conservatives.
Neither Pierre Trudeau nor
Stanfield were prepared to
make major statements until
the final results are known.
Trudeau made a statement
about as meaningless as the
campaign.
Quoting from the reputed
piece wisdom known as
Desiderata, he said: "Whether
or not it is clear to you no doubt
the universe is unfolding as it
should."
Stanfield said he would go
back to sleep until final
returns are tabulated.
However, he said he was
ready to form a government if
the Liberals resign.
Under the British North
America Act, the Liberals are
not required to resign even if
they are defeated in the
election.
If Trudeau feels he can
govern with the present party
standings, he can continue to
do so.
However, it would be an
incredible political juggling
act if he was to continue for
more than a year in this
position as he would have to
consult with at least one of the
other party leaders to be
guaranteed support for any
particular piece of legislation.
If Trudeau does decide the
present situation is intolerable,
he has the option of informing
the governor-general he is no
longer in a position to govern
or he can ask the governor-
general to call a new election.
In the former case, the
governor-general would
almost certainly choose
Stanfield as the new prime
minister.
It is evident that the 25-percent undecided vote which had
the opinion poll pundits puzzling last week went mostly to
the Conservatives, with some
slop-over for the NDP.
An example of this is Ontario, which showed increases
for both the Conservatives and
the New Democrats. The
province had an extremely
heavy turnout of 90 per cent of
eligible voters.
If the mental paralysis had
continued until election  day,
many    voters    presumably
would have stayed away from^
the polls.
However, the high turnout in
Ontario and in most regions of
the country indicates that most
of the previously undecided
voters opted for "change."
The number of women in
parliament increased as five
women were elected.
Previously, the only woman in
parliament had been NDP
member Grace Maclnnis. She
retained her seat of Van-
couver-Kingsway without
difficulty.
The election proved
somewhat a disappointment
for NDP hopes east of the
Quebec-Ontario boundary. The
New Democrats had been
hoping to pick up one seat in
Quebec and one in Nova Scotia
However, they were blanked
again even though they increased their electoral votes in
the Maritimes by a few percentage points. The NDP
electoral total in Quebec
decreased by 0.5 per cent from
the last election.
The election destroyed any
pretensions Social Credit may
have towards being a national
party. The only province they
succeeded in being elected was
in the backward rural townships of Quebec. However, they
did surprisingly well in the
Quebec popular vote, almost
doubling their previous percentage.
The results above all can be
regarded as a personal rebuke
to Pierre Elliot Trudeau. He
ran the least effective campaign of the four leaders and
potential leadership candidates such as finance
minister John Turner likely
are already taking aim at the
top spot.
DAVIS.
n<
Riding
Burncbv-ieymcur
Coost Chilcotin
Comox-Alberni
Esquimolt-Socnich
Fraser Valley East
Fraser Valley West
Kamloops-Cariboo
Kootenay West
Nanaimo-Cowichan-The
Islands
New Westminster
Okonagan-Boundary
Okanagan-Kootenay
Prince George-Peace River
Election re
Liberal      Conservativ
'Ray PerrauH
Robert Chown
Louis Lindhcii.
Oscar Austrinq
ten Morchond
Paul Moroso
John Reynolds
John Ra*e!
Donald Munro
Alex Patterson
frevcr Arms?rcng
Roy Hewson
Bob Brisco
Surrey-White Rock
Vancouver Centre
Vancouver East
Voncouver-Kingsway
Vancouver-Quadra
Vancouver Soutu
LIBERAL HEADQUARTERS ... glum chums.
—kini mcdonald photos
Northwest Territories
Yukon Territory
I     Greg Basham
I     *Bruce Howard
I     *Douglas Stewart
•Robert Borrie
John Mitche'l
Ed Carlin
*Ron Basford
John Minichiello
Ed Bodnarchuk
*Grant Deachman
Gordon Gibson
Don Branigan
George Whittaker
Frank Oberle
Everett Stevens
•Robert Thompson
John McDona'd
John Baian
John Fraser
Allan McKinnon
*Erik Nielsen
■*}■ v,K- Tuesday, October 31, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
B.C. Grits lose 13 to NDP, Tories
nication
On June 25, 1968, B.C.
Liberals could report to their
new leader Pierre Elliot
Trudeau victories in 16 ridings.
Monday night a beaten
Liberal party could only come
up with three seats.
And one riding, Okanagan-
Kootenay, is still up in the air.
The biggest winners in this
province were the New
Democratic Party — taking 11
seats.
The Progressive Conservative's took eight  seats.
Urban affairs minister Ron
Basford said Monday he ex-i
pected the Liberals would do as
badly as they did.
Basford said he was pleased
with himself in going against
the trend and retaining his seat
against PC hopeful John
McDonald and youthful NDP
candidate Ron Johnson.
Environment minister Jack
Davis told a small crowd of
party supporters at the
Bayshore Inn the Liberals
failed to communicate with the
electorate.
"We were running on our
record.   I  guess   it   wasn't
enough to win the election," he
said. "We might have won
handily if we had chosen one
central issue for the campaign."
Davis told the stalwarts he
believes Trudeau would be a
better man to lead the country
than Conservative leader
Robert Stanfield because the
next few years will be crucial
for Canada economically in
terms of the Canadian dollar.
But, he said, the economic
situation would depend on the
response of Richard Nixon and
his executive to international
monetary matters.
Davis said he doubts he will
be able to legislate some of his
rumored "tough policies" on
pollution because of a minority
or coalition government.
"The policies won't lend
themselves to the majority of
members," said Davis.
Although the Liberals
managed to keep two cabinet
ministers, the riding of a third,
retired minister was lost to the
Tories.
Gordon Gibson couldn't keep
former veterans' affairs
minister Art Laing's riding in
Vancouver South.
John Fraser was feted as a
kind of giant killer at Conservative headquarters at the
Hotel Vancouver.
Fraser, after being carried
into the room, told the crowd of
300 he took the Vancouver-
South riding because Laing
was not running and because of
the end of Trudeaumania.
Fraser said in French
"strong" Conservative policies
also helped him.
He had also been criticizing
the government and saying it
doesn't have any answers, he
said. "I know now the people
were listening."
Defeated Vancouver-South
Liberal Gord Gibson joked
about "Trudeau's dialogue
with the Canadian people
campaign theme" saying it
was dialogue in which the voter
had spoken.
"I've given no thought to
what I'm doing tomorrow
morning except that I'm
sleeping in," said Gibson, a
former Trudeau aide, when
asked if he plans to rejoin
Trudeau.
And in the campus riding
another Liberal incumbent fell
to the Conservatives.
The Liberals have held
Vancouver-Quadra federally
for years and roughly the same
area has gone Liberal
provincially.
This time Bill Clarke took
Grant Deachman.
Deachman conceded the seat
shortly after 8 p.m.
"I can't imagine the
Parliament being stable for
very long," he told supporters.
"I think we're in for a troubled
period until Canadians decide
which government they want
to govern."
Deachman said "this is the
end of the Liberal era."
However, he called on youthful supporters not to become
disenchanted.
Clarke, at his headquarters,
had nothing to say, only giving
his thanks to the beer-drinking
supporters at his headquarters.
Clarke  refused  to  answer
Suestions on the possibilities of
le Liberals and the Conservatives forming a coalition
government.
For the first time in Quadra
history, the NDP expects to get
its election deposit back.
Nigel Nixon received 23.4 per
cent of all votes, running third.
"There's still a lot of apprehension and reservations
about a possible NDP takeover
of businesses," he said.
Over in Vancouver-
Kingsway NDP incumbent
Grace MacKinnis was
speaking with a victory behind
her.
"It looks like the NDP has
the balance of power," she
said. "We will be able to force
the government to do things we
think important or we can
throw our weight against its
legislation."
The party at the Billy Bishop
Legion was in full swing, where
Ron Johnson, NDP candidate
for Vancouver Centre, was in
good spirits after his loss to
Basford.
"My campaign was a good
one, and I have no regrets.
What happened was that the
Tory swing cut into our votes,
and the three-way fight hurt
our chances," the 21-year-old
Johnson said.
"We were short time-wise.
Our campaign started just six
weeks ago. It was a question of
getting our message across,
and we couldn't do it in time,"
he said.
"Basford hasn't heard the
last of the socialists. We will be
there next time. Chances are
quite good that I will run again,
but not necessarily in Vancouver Centre," he said.
Johnson said the NDP spent
$6,000 for the campaign, while
Basford must have spent at
least $50,000.Johnson said he
would endorse a coalition with
a Conservative or Liberal
minority government because'
little difference exists between
either party.
The student as lemming
By BERTON WOODWARD
Running counter to the Vancouver-Quadra
riding as a whole, UBC students on campus
voted overwhelmingly for the Liberal loser.
Defeated Liberal incumbent Grant Deachman ran away with 1,020 campus votes, leaving
Nigel Nixon of the NDP with 582 and Conservative Bill Clarke with 382.
Socred Edith Garner and independent
Rupert Beebe won about 30 votes between
them.
The final figures for Vancouver-Quadra
were: Clarke, 17,762; Deachman, 15,009;
Nixon, 8,618; Garner, 383; and Beebe, 180.
The University Endowment Lands over-all
retained a distribution similar to the campus
alone, with Clarke beating Deachman by slim
margins in three of the four exclusively
residential polls.
The combined student and residential tally
was: Deachman 1,176, Nixon 606 and Clarke
501.
Students voted 53.5 per cent for the Liberals,
29.3 per cent NDP and 17.2 per cent Progressive
Conservative.
A study of the campus poll by poll shows
student voters in each of the 11 polls were
solidly behind Deachman. Ten of the polls put
Nixon second to Deachman, and in the one that
didn't, South Place Vanier, there is only a
seven-vote margin between Nixon and second-
choice Clarke.
The group that loves Deachman most lives
in the south wing of the Walter Gage towers.
They voted 124 Deachman, 41 Nixon and 24
Clarke.
Deachman had his closest match with Nixon
in poll 208, which encompasses Acadia camp
and the Wesbrook Boulevard fraternity row.
There the vote was 39 Deachman, 33 Nixon
and 23 Clarke.
Other campus polls: combined Acadia
residence polls: Lib—129, NDP—113, PC—56;
combined Walter Gage Towers: Lib—304,
NDP—126, PC—76; combined Place Vanier:
Lib—130, NDP—51, PC—52; combined Totem
Park: Lib—280, NDP—149, PC—92.
What it all means is that students who live
on campus have pretty uniform political
allegiances no matter what part of campus they
live in.
They are not particularly indicative of UBC
students as a whole, however, because almost
all residence students are from outside Vancouver, while most students are from the city.
The frat row-Acadia camp poll that
registered the highest proportion of NDP
support is significant because a greater
proportion of Vancouver-based students live
there — either in the fraternities or in the frat
houses converted to communal and cooperative housing.
Off campus, in the West Point Grey area
west of Alma Road and north of Sixteenth,
there was a seesaw between Clarke and Deachman in most polls, with clear poll wins for one
party balancing those of the other.
Moving eastward the seesaw continued as
far as Ontario Street, the official dividing line
between the west and east sections of Vancouver. Every poll east of Ontario was taken —
usually solidly — by Nixon.
West of Ontario the seesaw took hold, except
for a line of polls running along the northern
edge of the riding between Ontario and Fraser
Streets, which Nixon also won. Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 31, 1972
From page 5
Last night I had the distinct
despleasure of seeing the movie
you so highly recommended,
Everything You Always Wanted
To Know About Sex. I went
expecting not "high-flown
redeeming artistry" or "significant
and socially uplifting satire" but
"a real laugh" or at least a few
"wildly funny and deliciously
obscene" moments. I saw neither.
I can honestly say that never in
my entire life have I been so
totally disappointed and utterly
disgusted by a movie. It was
without a doubt the most putrid,
pathetic attempt at comedy that
these eyes have ever witnessed or
hope ever to witness again.
With the exception of the final
skit which was, amazingly enough,
genuinely funny, the humor was
unbelievably childish and
predictable, in particular the
episode about the sheep, which
was both incredible and
infuriating. One could derive more
enjoyment from watching
Fun-O-Rama (as, apparently, your
film critic does) which at least
does not masquerade under the
outrageous title of adult
entertainment.
The movie, in conclusion, was
not only a disgraceful waste of my
time, but also of $2.50, money
which I consider should have been
paid to me for sitting through that
nauseating spectacle.
It was not, however, a total
loss; the experience served to
renew my faith in human
ignorance and in an age-old
epithet: there really is no
accounting for taste. It is obvious,
in any case, that your film critic
has none. Ron Hughes
arts 1
Service
In our capacity as co-chairmen
of the concerned commuters
committee, we would like to bring
to the attention of the students
some glaring inadequacies in the
bus service from D lot.
Although we appreciate the
service, we have observed some
serious shortcomings. It is our
intention to institute the
following measures:
• In-transit cocktails (We feel
that this is in tune with the
general academic atmosphere of
the campus.)
• In-transit movies (We have a
very good option on a fine block
Letters
of movies starting with "Gidget
Goes to Rome").
• Highjack protection (A
metal detector at the entrance and
an anonymous armed guard on
every run).
We hope that student pressure
can  be  brought  to bear on the
appropriate authorities to resolve
these vital, pressing campus issues.
We remind you, the students, that
only through your action can the
administration   be   shaken   from
their   complacent   attitude   that
shows    an    appalling    lack    of
concern for students' comfort and
safety.
Glenn Kelt
Ken Goersaert
Co-chairmen of
concerned commuters committee
P.S. We hope that The Ubyssey
will not be intimidated by the
political nature of this crusade
and will take a firm stand in favor
of our proposals instead of their
general wishy-washy attitudes.
We're in favor. Drip, drip, drip.
Love
Dear MacKenzie:
There was a young gay called
MacKenzie,
Who voted NDP in a frenzie,
To give pleasure, to dove,
To another young gov
Was    MacKenzie's    idea    of
heavenly love.
I am concerned
Idiocy—6
My criticisms of AMS policies
are getting a surprising amount of
support from the very persons to
whom they are directed. First
Doug Aldridge said one of my
suggested alternate policies — the
credit union — is a good idea.
Now David Dick agrees that
$500,000 is - and I quote him -
a "ludicrous" amount to spend on
the food services takeover. This is
true, but arithmetic convinces me
that the real cost — about $ 1
million — is about twice as
ludicrous, and not less so, as Mr.
Dick suggests. Not only that: to
pursue this policy to its logical
conclusion, not just one, but all
food outlets on campus should be
taken over. Who knows how
ludicrous the final cost might be?
The authors of the takeover
policy believe that service will
improve. Of course, no one can
possibly guarantee that this will
be so; and in any case, those
responsible will have vacated
office by the time a realistic
assessment would be possible. Yet
WATCH A RADIO COMEDY?
IMPOSSIBLE, YOU SAY?
DR. BUNDOLO'S
PANDEMONIUM
MEDICINE SHOW
•
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1
IN THE S.U.B. MOVIE THEATRE
AT 8:00 P.M.
FREE!!!
there appears to be no intent to
incorporate a suitable opting out
clause into whatever agreement
they might reach with the
administration. Without such a
clause, students would be as
committed to an expensive failure
as they would be to an expensive
"success".
Credit unions were a forceful
idea years before I was born,
which is why I disclaimed credit
for originality in my last letter. In
his remarks on this topic, Dick
not only "does not know what he
is talking about" - to use his
phrase — he does not even know
who he is talking about. It was
"well over a year ago" when as an
independent candidate for the
AMS presidency I — and not
human government — proposed
formation of a student owned
credit union. I withdrew, and the
presidency was contested by
Garrod and Lau.
Next, for Dick to brandish the
results of "campus wide
referendums" as a mandate for
any executive's policies is almost
laughable. He has ignored a far
more important issue. He knows,
as I do, that the democratic
process at UBC is sick:
consistently, only 40 per cent or
less of the voters turn out on any
given issue, and an incredible
number of ballots are spoiled.
This is nothing less than a
crushing indictment of candidates,
their policies, and the political
environment. Student politics at
UBC will continue to be a
laughingstock until real issues are
presented, and students are
encouraged to become active in
the political process.
Dick states that the stand of
the various executive members on
AMS policies is "irrelevant". I
don't think so. I think that any
student politician who thinks he
can breezily disassociate himself
from the policies he supports is
out of touch with the opinions of
his constituents and especially his
opposition. So I ask once again
that the council members who
support the covered pool and
food services takeover publicly
indicate their positions.
In my opinion the policies and
actons of this executive
demonstrate an astonishing lack
of political instinct. I interpret
this as atrophy brought on by lack
of a vigorous political opposition.
This, I hope to change.
Leo Fox
science 5
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SIX CHARACTERS IN
SEARCH OF AN AUTHOR
by Pirandello
November 1-11     8:00 p.m.
Directed by Raymond Clarke
Setting & Lighting Designed By Richard Kent Wilcox
Costumes Designed By David Lovett
Box Office
Room 207
Student Ticket Price:     $1.00
• FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Support Your Campus Theatre Tuesday, October 31, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
New psych head
UBC should extend psych
facilities to community
New psychology head Peter Suedfeld says
he would like to augment the clinical services of
this department.
Hungarian-born Suedfeld, former professor
and chairman of the psychology department at
University College, Rutgers University, the
State University of New Jersey, was welcomed
as the new psych head this fall.
He said he believes as a provincial university
UBC has a responsibility to extend its facilities
to the community.
These services will also assist approximately 15 campus graduate students
specializing in clinical psychology.
Suedfeld's influence is being felt in other
directions as well.
Margaret Fryer, chairperson of the psych
graduate association said student requests are
now being examined and considered.
Although students have been represented on
departmental committees in the, past, often
meetings were held without notification and
students were not advised of proceedings.
Another inquiry about evening and weekend
use of the graduate library is presently being
tried on an experimental basis.
A further change in attitude is reflected by
the creation of a student /faculty lounge soon to
be available.
When asked about his views on American
professors in Canadian schools, Suedfeld said
he viewed academic life as the last refuge of
trans-nationalism.
He said he feels "people should soft-peddle
their nationalities." Although he said he can
understand the concern of overloading an institution with foreigners he prefers the
'medieval university' model in which scholars
with special skills and talents travelled to
colleges which required them.
It has been a thorny three years with three
separate selection committees to find this new
departmental head.
Repeated attempts by The Ubyssey to locate
Hawthorne, chairman of these committees, to
ask about criteria used to evaluate applicants
were unsuccessful.
USED TEXTBOOK
CLEARANCE SALE
ALL HARDCOVER TEXTS IN STOCK
y2 REuGsur Price
THREE DAYS ONLY
THURS., FRI., SAT. - NOV. 2, 3, 4
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10th (Near Varsity Theatre)
Open 11 a.m. - 8 p.m 224-4144
MHWM
NOW ON STAGE
Marxist no spy—Mackasey
MACBETH
A ROCK OPERA
by Richard Ouzounian and Marek Norman
Oct. 25 — Nov. 4
U.B.C. OLD AUDITORIUM - 8:30 p.m.
INFORMATION - 228-3176  - RESERVATIONS
OTTAWA — (CUP) —
Manpower and Immigration
Ministry Bryce Mackasey
denies "he called Marxist
scholar Istvan Meszaros a
Russian spy.
He again refused to
elaborate on the charge that
Meszaros is a security risk.
Mackasey was speaking
during an interview on CBC
radio.
He had earlier been reported
as having told two reporters
that Meszaros was a Russian
spy, but the two newsmen later
denied the story.
Mackasey spent as much
time as he could on the interview repeating the denial.
He claimed it was the "central
issue" in the Meszaros dispute.
Hungarian-born Meszaros
was rejected by Canadian
authorities when he applied for
landed immigrant status last
June, after accepting a
teaching post at York
University.
He is now in Canada where
he applied a second time, but
the Trudeau government is
trying to have him deported.
Mackasey said he had been
willing to go to England where
Meszaros has been teaching to
check the security report.
"But this unexpected
complication arose,''
Mackasey said, referring to
Meszaros' arrival in Canada.
He implied he refused to
review the case while the
professor was in Canada.
"I was prepared to let him
stay here for a year because of
the excellent representations
made on his behalf by members of the academic community for whom I have the
greatest respect," he said.
"I don't particularly care if
he's a Marxist scholar. That's
a question of philosophy."
But Mackasey said he had to
follow the advice of his officials
unless better advice was
supplied.
"No decision pleases
everybody and there is a
procedure that I have to follow.
But due to the excellent quality
of representation on his behalf
I said I would be pleased to
double check and triple check
so that any element of doubt
could be removed," he said.
He confirmed that he had
said: "I am a compassionate
man, I hope he's not guilty."
CIVILIZATION
FILM SERIES
Now TWO showings every
Wed. noon SUB Auditorium
12:35 - 1:25 p.m. and
1:35 - 2:25 p.m.
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125  W.   10th  at  Arbutus
31 openings
London
We have at least thirty-one openings
in two categories. Both involve the
planning and selling of life insurance
programs, not just policies.
We are interested in interviewing
any graduate from any discipline,
but only if you're at least
open-minded enough to explore a
sales career. (If you're not, see
page 48 of the new Employment
Opportunities Handbook. Available
free at your placement office.)
We will be on campus
atU.B.C.Nov.7&8 Page 10
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 31, 1972
Ubyssey
pleads
The Ubyssey is still looking for
great minds to adorn its blank
spaces with typewritten
masterpieces and paeans to the
journalistic art.
Drop by the office, SUB 241K
Mondays and Thursdays at 12:30
or at the Thursday 1:30 p.m.,
staff meeting. Bring your fingers.
Democracy
C.B. Macpherson, University of
Toronto political scientist,
lectures on "The Sounding Model:
Hot flashes
Protective     Democracy"     noon
Thursday in Buchanan 104.
This lecture is the first in a
series of four on the "Life and
Times of Liberal Democracy" by
Macpherson as part of the Cecil H.
and Ida Green Visiting Professor
lectures.
Women and II
Lynn MacDonald, McMaster
University sociology professor and
author of the first report on the
status of women at universities,
will speak twice in SUB Thursday.
The first lecture will be on
Women in University, noon in the
SUB ballroom.
The second lecture will be on
Criminology and Deviance, 7:30
p.m., also in the ballroom.
Three fives
Three Lives, a film by Kate
Millet, will be shown 7:30 and
9:30 p.m. tonight in the SUB
auditorium.
Admission to the film is 50
cents.
Karate Club
A revised schedule of practice
times for all members of the
Shito-Ryu Karate Club is available
at the Speakeasy office in SUB's
main foyer.
Tween classes
TODAY
WOMEN'S STUDIES
"Three    Lives",    a    film    by    Kate
Millet,   will  be  shown   at  7:30 and
9:30     p.m.     in    SUB    auditorium.
Admission: 50 cents.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Rene Goldman on Marxism in SUB
111 noon.
GERMAN CLUB
General meeting noon International
House 404.
ANTHRO SOC UNDERGRADS
Super   mammoth   business  meeting
Henry Angus 303 at noon.
NEWMAN CLUB
Noon   meeting   in   SUB   105B   and
bible   discussion   in   St.   Marks   at
6:30.
CUSO
CUSO   information  on  East Africa
7:30   p.m.   in   International   House
402.
ABORTSOC (poor taste!)
Meeting SUB 237A noon.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Lecture  on  sailing test  noon  SUB
205.
WEDNESDAY
SMC
Benefit Spring in concert and Cathy
Stack,    Sleepy   John,    Behyndman
Kits high school auditorium 8 p.m.
and organization meeting SUB 215
noon.
PREDENT SOC
Dr.   Yeo  on  dental admission SUB
211 noon.
IL CAFFE
Coviello   on   Sardinia   behind   the
stage at International House noon.
VOC
Meeting Angus 104 noon.
FREESEE
Now — two showings (of what they
didn't tell us but it sounds obscene)
12:35 and  1:35 in SUB auditorium.
ONTOLOGY
Dale     Miranda     on     Your     Divine
Identity noon Buch. 216.
THURSDAY
ROWING CLUB
Films on competitive rowing, room
211 Memorial Gym at noon.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
SUB 207-209 noon.
DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH
Poetry reading by B.C. poet Patrick
Lane noon Buch. 100.
CCF
Fellowship meeting noon SUB 111.
CHARISMATIC
Dessert      party
Campus Centre.
7:30      Lutheran
rushant
■* CAMERAS     *
4538 W.10 224-5858
NEVER UNDERSOLD!
IS YOUR MIND
BOGGLED BY
PROFESSORIAL
OBFUSCATION?
IF SO, CALL THE
U.B.C. TUTORIAL CENTRE
- A PROGRAM OF THE UBC ALUMNI ASSOCIATION IN
CO-OPERATION WITH SPEAK-EASY. - THE CENTRE WILL
BRING TOGETHER STUDENTS AND TUTORS.
A REGISTRATION FEE OF $1.00 WILL BE CHARGED IN AN EFFORT
TO MAINTAIN THE CENTRE AS SELF-SUPPORTING, SHOULD THE
CENTRE BE UNABLE TO FIND EITHER STUDENTS FOR TUTORS
OR TUTORS FOR STUDENTS, THIS FEE WILL BE RETURNED.
TUTORING RATES ARE ARRANGED BETWEEN
THE TUTOR AND THE STUDENT
SPEAK-EASY
S.U.B.
228-4557
ANYTIME
12:30-2:30 p.m.
TO REGISTER
WEEKDAYS
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
In November two Canadians pre-eminent in the fields of political science and geo-physics
will visit UBC to lecture as Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professors. The visitors are Prof.
C.B. Macpherson, a political scientist from the University of Toronto, and Dr. Harold 0.
Seigel, President of the Scintrex Company, of Concord, Ontario. The Scintrex Company, in
addition to offering world-wide consulting services for the development of mineral and water
resources, is the manufacturer of pollution monitoring equipment. Listed below are the
dates and locations of the lectures to be given by the Visiting Professors.
PROF. C.B.MACPHERSON
Prof. C. B. Macpherson will give a series of four lectures under the general title "THE LIFE
AND TIMES OF LIBERAL-DEMOCRACY." All the lectures will be given in ROOM 104 of
the BUCHANAN BUILDING at 12:30 p.m. Titles are as follows:
Nov. 2: "The sounding Model: Protective Democracy."
Nov. 6: "The Moral Model: Developmental Democracy."
Nov. 8: "The Mid-20th Century Model: Equilibrium Democracy."
Nov. 9: "The Emergent Model: Participatory Democracy."
PROF.  MACPHERSON  WILL ALSO  ADDRESS  THE  VANCOUVER  INSTITUTE ON
SATURDAY, NOV. 4, AT 8:15 P.M. IN ROOM 106 OF THE BUCHANAN BUILDING ON
THE TOPIC "CAN PROPERTY SURVIVE DEMOCRACY?"
DR. H. O. SEIGEL
Dr. Seigel will lecture as follows:.
Nqv. t6 — "Canadian Geophysics as an Exportable Commodity." Room 106, Buchanan
Building at 1:30 p.m.
Nov. 39?— "Some Frontiers of Geophysical Exploration." Room 2000, Biological
Science* Building at 3:30 p.m.
DR' SEIGEL WILL ALSO ADDRESS THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE ON NOV. 18 AT
8:15 P.M. IN ROOM 106OF THE BUCHANAN BUILDING ON THE TOPIC "PLAYING
THE ODDS IN SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTING."
CLASSIFIED
Rates:
Campus - 3 tines, 1 day $1.00; additional tines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional Unas
35c; additional days $1*25 &.30& .
\   Classified ads are not -accepted by telephone ami ant payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241S. U.B.. UBC. Van. 8. AC
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
Lost 8c Found
13
Special Notices
15
DISCOUNT STEREO, EXAMPLE:
AM-FM receiver, turntable, base,
cover, cartridge, two speakers, 2-
year guarantee, list 1200, your
cost $125. Carry Akal, A.G.S.,
Zenith TVs.  Call 732-6769.
NO. 5 ORANGE STREET, MAIN AT
POWELL is having a Junk Contest! JUNK! Like stop signs, airplane wings, toilet seats, and as
original as you can get, cuz if we
pick your junk as a winner, you
too can win a dinner for two at
the White Lunch, a Free Bus Ride
to Burnaby, a gift certificate at
the Army & Navy, and many other
swell stuff. What will we do with
this Junk you ask? We're going to
plaster our walls, ceiling, and all
available places with it so that you
can point to a wrinkled stained
bedsheet for instance, and proudly
tell your friends "I did that."
So, starting when you want, start
bringing It in. Bring as many
as you can, but securely tie your
name, address and phone number
to each piece, so we'll know who
to contact. And don't forget, we
got second, third and fourth prizes
too, like 2 dinners for 2 at the
White Lunch, and 6 Free Bus Rides
to Burnaby. OKAY?
DON'T MISS THIS GIANT BAZAAR
and Thrift Sale featuring door
prizes, handicraft and other gift
items, new & used clothing and
appliances. Novelties at exceptionally low prices. Sponsored by the
Scottish Women Association ' at
Scottish Auditorium, 12th & Fir
Street. November 4, 1-6 p.m.
LIVE CBC RADIO COMEDY —
Doctor ' Bundolo's Pandemonium
Medicine Show, Wednesday, Nov. 1,
8:00   p.m.,   SUB   Theatre.   FREE!!
$75 FOR 75*
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY   YOURS   TODAY!
Bookstore and SUB
Travel Opportunities
16
ASSOCIATION OF STUDENT
Councils Travel Service, Room
100-B,   SUB,  224-0111.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
i960 FORD FAIRLANE. CITY TEST-
ed.  Call Pat after 4 p.m.  224-0127.
'65 ROVER 2000. GOOD CONDITION.
Radio.  $1,000. 224-6288.
Automobiles—Parts
23
2 SEMPERIT SNOW TIRES 5.50-12,
bias ply with studs, like new, $40.
261-8486.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
te^L ^en£i m* gutter"
Camtrai
Now! For The First
Time In Vancouver
ft W Unicolor Paper
BAW  Unicolor Chemicals
Have you also tried the Unicolor Developing & Printing
Kits? It makes color work as
easy as can be.
3010 W. Brdwy.    736-7833
Photography (Cont.)
35
v the 3UnS anb gutter
Camera*
DARK ROOM
SPECIAL
Until Nov. 10th, 1972
Gray—tab Timers 33.95
Dia Enlargers for 35mm or
2%-nMfrs. Sug. List 89.95
- OUR PRICE   55.00
3010 W. Brdwy.     736-7833
Scandals
37
C-90 CASSETTES WITH PLEXI-
glas case. Buy minimum of 6 at
$1.50 each — get 3 FREE! Guaranteed against defects. Pickup point
on campus can be arranged. Call
732-6769.
DON'T MISS AN EXPERIENCE
you'll never remember! Doctor
Bundolo's Pandemonium Medicine
Show, Wednesday, Nov. 1st., 8.00
p.m.,   SUB Theatre.  It's FREE!!
Typing
40
PROMPT, EFFICIENT TYPING
(electric machine) of theses, essays,
examination papers, etc. Phone:
688-4027.
TYPING — FAST, EFFICIENT —
Essays, Papers. Theses. 41st and
Marine   Drive.   266-5053.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
FEMALE SALES CLERK FOR
delicatessen, Saturdays 4-12, or
Sundays 12-8:30 p.m. Apply 848
Granville St.
GIRL AS MOTHER'S HELPER, 2
or 3 mornings per week ex. Sunday;
one mile from gates. $1.75 per hour.
Phone Mrs. Andrade, 224-7658.
INTERESTED IN  SELLING?	
Then why not be an advertising
salesman for the Ubyssey? This
part-time job offers an opportunity
to gain experience and to earn
worthwhile commissions. Reliable
2nd or 3rd year business-minded
student who will work hard for 10
or 12 hours weekly Is needed. Must
have transportation. If interested
apply to Publications Office, Room
241,  SUB, after 2 p.m..
CROSS COUNTRY SKI INSTRUC-
tor required for Mt. Seymour Ski
School. Phone 684-2494.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Tutoring Service
83
BOGGLED MINDS AND WISDOM
Heads: Call the Tutorial Center,
228-4557 anytime or see Doug Brock
at Speak-Easy, 12:30-2:30 p.m. to
register.
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
OWN ROOM IN TWO BEDROOM
apartment, $42 & one-third utilities
in West End. 681-0849.  Nov. 1st.
ROOM — CAMPUS. HOT PLATE.
Male grad preferred. 224-1690.
Room & Board
82
CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD, 5785
Agronomy Road. Sauna, color TV,
good food, recreational area. Phone
224-9684.
Communal Housing
85
MALE STUDENT WISHES ROOM
with cooking facilities. Prefer coop house. Phone 261-6626. Ask for
Darcy.
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Tuesday, October 31, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
Soccer
A 2-1 defeat for the UBC
Thunderbird soccer team was
the result of Sunday's game
against Victoria West United in
Victoria.
. The 'Birds started the
scoring with a goal from Joe
Iacobellis, the only goal to be
scored in the first half as the
'Birds failed to cash in on other
scoring chances.
UBC played a good defensive
game to maint the one goal
lead but sloppy midfield play
allowed the Victoria to tie the
game with a goal from George
Pakos in the second half.
In the closing minutes of the
game Jim Irvine scored for
Victoria to round out the
scoring.
Irvine was a player in the
Canadian Soccer Championship team that was
coached by Joe Johnson of the
UBC soccer team.
In other Coast League
North Shore 1-0, and New
Westminster Blues lost 5-1 to
Paul's Taylors.
Rugby
Once again it was the
Vancouver Meralomas turn to
play with the UBC Thunderbird rugby team as they
beat UBC 19-15 Saturday at the
Brockton Oval field.
That is the second time this
season the 'Birds have lost to a
very determined Meraloma
side.
The 'Birds played a very
uninspired game, seeming to
rely on past glories to somehow
pull them through. The
momentum belonged to the
Meraloma scrum throughout
the game — they dug for every
ball and usually won it.
The UBC backs seemed to
bobble away any decent
possession the scrum could get
them. UBC's only try of the
game came off a loose ball
sitting on their goal line which
Spence (Spike) McTavish
picked up and streaked 110
yards for an electrifying try.
Ray Banks kicked the
convert as well as three
penalty kicks for 11 points.
Will it be the Trojans turn to
surprise the 'Birds next
Saturday?
Women's sports
The UBC women's varsity
field hockey team continued its
winning ways Sunday by
defeating Vancouver Ramblers 2-0 in Women's League
Action.
The Vancouver Rowing Club
will be showing films on
competitive rowing in
Memorial Gym, rm. 211 at
12:30 p.m. Thursday, for both
men and women.
It is hoped that a women's
rowing team can be developed
at UBC.
UBC loses 20-4
By BRIAN MUCPHY
"They beat the hell out of
us," said Thunderbird
assistant coach Norm Thomas
Saturday after the football
team fell 20-4 to the University
of Saskatchewan Huskies.
For the first half of the game
the 'Birds and Huskies
engaged in an even and
practically defenseless battle
as both teams were able to
move the ball practically at
will in the mid-field area.
However, the second half
was the 'Birds death knell.
After the half break for some
inexplicable reason they
returned to the field listless
and practically incapable of
effectively executing
assignments.
One of the many problems
that plagued the 'Birds, and
has plagued them all season,
was the ail-too frequent
defensive lapses. The team
seemed to lose its concentration at times with the
almost inevitable result of a
touchdown for the opposition.,
Saturday the two most
notable were a 32 and 85 yard
touchdown plays.
The UBC offensive backs did
well despite their very small
stature as all averaged more
than five yards per carry. As
usual the work horse was Gord
Penn who lugged the ball 14
times for 74 yards and a 5.3
yard average.
Henry Thiessen also had a
good day in the unaccustomed
role of a ball carrier by
sweeping the ends five times
for 43 yards.
Tough little Bruce Grist
ground out 33 yards in six
attempts.
The good work of the backs
leads one to question the offensive strategy when the
'Birds fell as little as one
touchdown behind. The
strategy displayed was simply
to make many long pass attempts (which resulted in
three interceptions) instead of
staying with the ground game
which had such success.
After' all, this season's
passing record has been
dismal having been plagued
with dropped passes, poor
throws, and many interceptions.
The much-heralded return of
Jim Tarves to the lineup was
also somewhat of a disappointment. It appeared that the
long injury-recovery period
affected both his anticipated
passing sharpness and his
ability to find the uncovered
secondary receivers, who ran
short pass patterns just beyond
the line of scrimmage.
The game was a disappointment to players, fans, and
coaches alike because the
team blew a game they should,
and could, have won.
The loss left the 'Birds in a
last place tie with the Huskies.
Both teams have identical 2-5
win-loss records.
In other conference action
the University of Calgary
Dinosaurs defeated the
University of Manitoba Bisons
14-13 in Calgary to tighten the
contest for conference
supremacy.
BE6INNERS'
SKI SPECIAL
Ski Set No. I
• Fischer SKIS—imported from AUSTRIA
• Buckle BOOTS, Colin POLES,
SALOMON 404 safety bindings
with safety straps
TOTAL PRICE	
85
.00
Ski Set No. II
• St. Anton SKIS — imported from AUSTRIA
• Buckle BOOTS. Colin POLES,
• TYROLIA step-in bindings
with safety straps
TOTAL PRICE	
70
00
flrffe.
336 W. Pender St. 681-8423, 681-2004
OPEN FRI. NIGHTS 'TIL 9:00
FREE PARKING AT REAR OF STORE |
UeLP
STaWQuT
sirs.
rVHUKS
cyancouver
oAlpine Ski School
■* Directors: Roy Ferris, Alan White and Wayne Booth
Invites you to :..
SKI BEFORE XMAS
Special Courses for beginner, novice, intermediate
and advanced skiers.
FOUR SUNDAYS — NOV. 19, 26; DEC. 10 and 17, 1972.
(No classes DEC. 3 —Grey Cup finals)
TWO 1Vi hour sessions of instruction each Sunday by
certified professionals — members of the Canadian Ski
Instructors Alliance.
LESSON TIMES— 11:00.a.m. AND 1:30 p.m.
Course will be held at
MT. BAKER, WASHINGTON
Instruction Fee $22.00 — Lifts extra when required.
Return chartered bus transportation will be operated from
the following districts for an extra charge of $18.00
for the four weeks.
Park  Royal, West  End,  Kitsilano, KerrisdaH, Lougheed Mall,
Richmond and U.B.C.
Please register me for:
Please return to:
Beginner                 □              Instruction fee enclosed ....
Novice                         □
Intermediate            □              Instruction fee plus transportation
Advanced                 n              fare enclosed	
$22.00   □
$40.00   □
cyancouver
oAlpine Ski School
Starting Sunday, NOVEMBER 19, 1972
470 Granville Street
Vancouver 2, B.C.
NAME                                                                                   	
(Block letters)
Phone: 684-2494
AnnRF<;<;                                   *                   	
(Block letters)
TELEPHONE     (Home)                   -----    -- - -    (Office)-  	 Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 31, 1972
U.S. defence department spends
$34 million here in research
MONTREAL (CUP) — The
United States department of
defence awarded Canada $34
million in research funds from
1967 to 1971, more than half the
amount granted to all foreign
educational and non-profit
organizations, states a report
on Canadian - American
military relations.
And some 348 companies in
Canada received direct
military contracts from the
U.S. department of defence
during that time.
Entitled How to Make a
Killing, the 250-page study was
conducted by seven students at
McGill University under the
direction of political science
professor S. J. Noumoff. The
group calls itself Project Anti-
War.
The report quotes a U.S. Air
Force publication as saying
"granted funds are always
used to achieve maximum
contribution to the new
knowledge essential to the
continued superiority of the air
force operational capability,
and it is assumed that grantees
and principal investigators will
always direct their efforts to
this end."
McGill University received
$831,415 from the Pentagon
from 1967 to 1971 and more
than $663,000 was for prime
military contracts. The rest
went toward basic scientific
investigation.
In developing the study,
Project Anti-War referred to
American and Canadian
government records, and
wrote to the private cor-,
porations, inquiring whether
they had received Pentagon
contracts.
Four companies that replied
they had nothing to do with the
Pentagon were found to indeed
have contracts. The included
Canadian General Electric,
North American Rockwell and
Canadian Westinghouse,
whose parent companies do
extensive work for the defence
department; and Okanagan
Helicopters, which received
contracts valued at $23,000.
The Canadian government
itself is also extensively involved in the war industry,
subsidizing production of
materials destined for use by
U.S. forces in Indochina.
The study shows that the
department of trade and
commerce awarded a total of
$4,458,643,906 to 154 companies
in Canada "to develop and
sustain its (the defence industry's) technological
capability for the purpose of
defense export sales arising
from that capability".
Of the 154 companies
receiving   grants,    45    are
American-owned, and they
obtained $224,492,428 or 47 per
cent of the total.
Not only does the Canadian
government fund American
companies for war research to
be used in the U.S., but it also
pays one-half the cost of new
equipment used for plant
modernization.
The Canadian government
also prints two catalogues
listing military supplies
available from Canadian industry. Canadian Defense
Commodities is published by
the department of trade, industry and commerce, and
Canadian Defence Products is
printed by the department of
defence production.
"Presence in the catalogue
does not necessarily mean that
sales have been made, but it
indicates the willingness and
potential for producing the
advertised equipment," says
the study.
The Production Sharing
Handbook — also published by
the department of defence
production — provides explicit
information on how to obtain
American defence department
contracts. Most contracts are
placed with Canadian Commercial Corporation, a crown
corporation which acts as an
intermediary between the
American government and the
Canadian producer.
Project Anti-War, pointing
out that its study is
preliminary and only indicates
rushant
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minimum amounts, says the
other $30 million awarded by
the Pentagon to foreign
educational and non profit
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went to 56 countries.
During the research, project
workers discovered that
classified Canadian data is
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