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The Ubyssey Nov 16, 1965

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Array —dennls gans photos
FOOTBALL BIRDS wrapped up 1965 season with 18-6 victory over Oregon Tech Owls Saturday at Varsity Stadium. Game was last varsity football match
scheduled to be played in old stadium. Next year opponents will be hosted in new stadium currently under construction south of Totem Park residences.
UBC finished season with 2-5-2 won-lost-tied record.
—norm betts photo
UNTYPICALLY IMAGINATIVE ENGINEER experiments with
"powered blacktop surfing," an advanced form of sidewalk surfing. Surfer clutches rope trailing from sportscar
and "takes off." No fatalities have been reported to date.
Love, marches and idealism
debated at Symposium
ROSARIO BEACH, Wash. — Love, student marches,
and idealism were argued over beer and dancing at Fall
Symposium here over the weekend.
Sixty UBC students and faculty arrived in two buses
to discuss the scheduled topic Commitment and Beyond.
The idea of commitment to oneself took up much of the
discussion time. Commitment to political parties, protest
marches, and marriage also came up.
Speakers were Dr. Suichi Katso, Asian Studies, Leon
Getz, Law, and Dr. G. F. McGuigan, Economics.
A dance was held Saturday night.
Vol. XLVIII, No. 24   VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER  16, 1965
CA  4-3916
Fee holdback sunk
by 61 per cent vote
Referendum held as board
hints  fees to  stay even
Three thousand students Wednesday voted 61 per cent
in favor of paying second term fees.
The   referendum   was   held
after a petition calling for it
was signed by 1,000 students
earlier this fall.
The referendum asked students if they would be willing
to withhold fees if the board of
governors did not come
through with a hold the line
policy on fees.
1,159 YES VOTES    .
In the referendum, 1,159
students voted yes, and 1,833
voted no. There were eight
spoiled ballots.
Unknown to most students,
Wednesday the board of governors issued a statement the
day before the referendum outlining its policy in connection
with tuition fees.
The statement was a reply
to an Alma Mater Society request made in August.
BOARD'S POINTS
In a point explanation of its
position, the board said:
• The board does not contemplate any increase in fees,
subject to implementation of
the Bladen recommendations
on financing of the universities.
• In line with the Bladen
recommendations, fees are expected to remain at the present
level.
• The board strongly supports the Bladen proposal that
an adequate system of student
aid be implemented promptly
in order to ensure accessibility
to university independent of
financial considerations.
• The  board  will  consult
with the Alma Mater Society
in advance of any decision regarding a change in the general
level of fees.
UBC president John Macdonald told The Ubyssey Monday it was impossible to say
how far the Bladen report
would have to be implemented
before a fee hike could be
avoided.
FEDERAL GRANT KEY
He said the federal per
capita grant would have to be
increased, formula financing
implemented, and there would
have to be a provincial government grant increase.
Under formula financing, a
university receives financial
aid on the basis of the number
of senior and graduate students
it has rather than the overall
number of students.
Macdonald, however, was
optomistic about the implementation of the Bladen recommendations.
"Formula financing will occur," he said. "It has occurred
in other provinces already."
NO SUPPORT
AMS president Byron Hendf r
said Monday night council
could not have supported the
withholding of second term
fees even if students had supported it in referendum.
"The minute we refuse to
pay our fees we are no longer
members of the Alma Mater
Society — according to its constitution," said Hender.
JOHN MACDONALD
. . . replies to letter
Existence
of executives
justified
By DOUG HALVERSON
Ubyssey Council Reporter
The Alma Mater Society executive had to justify its existence Monday night.
The executive was replying
to a request by undergraduate
society presidents Nov. 8 that
each executive member submit a report to council explaining what he has done in
accord with the constitutional
requirements of his office.
(See pages five and six of
this issue for excerpts from the
reports).
Commerce    president    Rick
McGraw,   spokesman   for   the
(Continued on Page 3)
See: EXECUTIVES Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 16, 1965
—powell hargrave photos.
FLYAWAY HAWK - actually a Prairie falcon - returned
to UBC student Wayne Nelson, science III, after absence of
several weeks. Nelson said bird was out hunting
engineers.
Kings lifts ban
on teach-ins
HALIFAX (CUP) — Dr. H. D. Smith, president of
King's College has lifted the ban on teach-in's at his campus
provided they are "well motivated, impartial, and academic
in the best sense of the word."
The ban was placed on teach-
in's following a session on
higher education at which university officials were hissed
several times when they expressed disagreement with the
idea of free education.
Dr. Smith had been critical
of a "sometimes rowdy, sometimes pseudo-intellectual" element at the piped in version of
the Toronto teach-in, who attacked the United Sates and
her foreign policy.
His ban, proclaimed Oct. 21
and lifted Nov. 3, had resulted
in criticism from students,
faculty, and the Halifax newspaper.
In a mimeographed pamphlet distributed Nov. 1, King's
student council objected
strongly  to  Smith's move.
John Cleveland, president of
the King's council stated that
the council is not engaged in
a vendetta against Dr. Smith.
He went on to say that lifting
the ban "was not enough" and
that "Dr. Smith must apologize to those he has offended."
Accident takes
student's life
A 24-year-old UBC woman student died in Vancouver
General Hospital Sunday after she was found lying on the
bathroom floor of her off-campus home.
Dead  is  Rosabelle
Hebrew Scholarships
Canadian students have been
invited to apply for one-year
scholarships at Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Interested students are asked
to apply to American Friends
of the Hebrew University, 11
East Sixty-ninth, New York.
is
science    IV
of
Gardner,
1484    West
Tenth.
Police said Mrs. Gardner's
husband, Hatim, said his wife
had gone into the bathroom to
wash her hair and when he
heard no sound, he went in and
found her on the floor.
Gardner told hospital authorities his wife had probably
struck her head on the bathtub when she fell.
Hospital records show Mrs.
Gardner was admitted to hospital at 6:35 p.m. and died 25
minutes later.
Earlier in the day she had
suffered a heart attack but
had been  revived by  doctors.
Mrs. Gardner originally
came from Trinidad.
An autopsy has been ordered.
Creepy noises
bug  students
Two students said they
heard strange noises coming
from a Brock basement wall
Monday.
Annie Brokonsky, arts n,
and Mabel Jones, arts III, said
they were standing in the
North Brock basement stairwell when they heard what
they described as a "pounding
noise" coming from the south
wall.
"It was kinda creepy," Miss
Brokonsky said.
AMS officials said they
would  investigate.
NTlfc
HIGH and
HANDSOME
\m    Glenayr
6271*92
SWEATERS,
SKIRTS,
SLIMS
High on our fall
fashion list, we're sure
F this handsome ensemble
will find a place in
your Kitten collection!
PULLOVER—100%
English Botany wool,
with full-fashioned
raglan shoulders—
heavy ribbed turtle-neck,
long sleeves, moth-proof,
shrink-treated, in new
exciting fall shades.
MATCHING SLIMS
—100% pure wool
worsted slims, woven
from 100% superfine
English Botany wool—
dry-cleanable and
dyed-to-perfectly -match
all Kitten Botany
wool sweaters.
At all fine shops
everywhere.
Without this label
it U not a genuine KITTEN.
Engineers:
COME AND LEARN ABOUT US
WHERE? Room 201, Civil Engineering Building
WHEN?
WHAT?
WHY?
Wednesday, November 17
12:30 -1:25 pjn.
A brief slide talk on our operations
throughout B.C. Both permanent and
summer employment will be discussed.
To acquaint you with the scope and
challenge of a career with our company, and provide the basis for a personal interview at a later date.
Be there November 17th, and learn for yourself why
the exciting engineering opportunities today are with
&
COLUMBIA CELLULOSE
COMPANY, LIMITED
1030 W. Georgia St.
Vancouver, British Columbia
Whatever "became of:
Lucy Borgia,
CLASS OF '02?
It is a tribute to our Home Ec. course
that the name of this little girl is celebrated
wherever food is eaten and wine is drunk.
Lucy, early in her course, gave unmistakable evidence that food to her was not
merely a means to an end but an end
in itself. Herself a sparing eater, she
encouraged guests to enjoy each meal as
if it were their last. With a few simple
ingredients, Miss Borgia could produce
a banquet to end all banquets. Her
Omelette a la Fine Toadstools is still
talked about in hushed voices. The few
contemporaries who survived her, often
recalled this gentle lady diligently tending
her little kitchen garden of Deadly Nightshade, Foxglove and Hemlock. You don't
find cooking like Lucy's in the college
cafeteria these days.
The safest recipe for keeping your finances healthy is found inaBof M Personal
Chequing Account. Open yours today.
Bank of Montreal
THE BANK THAT VALUES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS
Your Campus Branch:
Th* Administration Bufldmg:       G. F. PEIRSON. Manaaer Tuesday, November 16, 1965
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Pete puts EAP head
on block for approval
DECORATIVE BUNNY Maureen MacDonald hops up ladder
to help with decorations for Phrateres 'bunny' dance in
Brock Saturday.
By   CAROL-ANNE   BAKER
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Education Action Program
chairman, Peter Braund, put
his chairmanship on the line
when he submitted a list of
EAP members to council Monday night.
"Do you realize the type of
people you have here?" forestry undergraduate society
president Dave Parker asked
Braund, who is also AMS
second vice president, after
checking the list of the 22
members of the new EAP voting committee.
The committee includes five
members of the defunct ad hoc
committee.
"I hope you can handle them.
Be sure you can step on the
right Joes at the right time,"
Parker warned.
"What will happen if this
list doesn't pass?" Parker asked
Braund.
"I will relinquish my chairmanship if this doesn't pass,"
Braund replied.
"About these resignation
threats," said George Wooten,
graduate student association
president.
"If you don't like it when
this council rejects your EAP
committee ideas, are you going
to resign?"
"I will bring up EAP committee majority opinions a t
council. If council rejects them,
my chairmanship is at stake,"
Braund replied.
Council approved the new
committee.
Last week, council suggested
the EAP committee be reorganized to consist of seven vot
ing members: Peter Braund,
chairman, three AMS council
members (Dave Williams,
Chuck Campbell, and Mike
Sommers) and three non-council members.
Monday night, Braund returned to council with the following list of EAP voting
members for council approval:
Chairman,   P e te r   Braund;
secretary, Jeane Riley; treasurer, Mike Sommers; Ed Lavalle; Gary Tayler; Mike
Bickerton; Wm. Young-Soon;
Gary Lauk; Chuck Campbell;
Steve Tick; Dave Williams;
Nancy Corbett; Tom Mason;
Andrew Horvat; Garth Brown;
Bob Schultz; Charlie Boylan;
Randy Enomoto; Hank Poulus;
Bob Cruise; Peter Cameron;
Rick McGraw.
Electronic
links UBC
'board
USA.
PAUL THIELE
. . . Radsoc head
Thiele wins
grand award
A partially sighted UBC student has been awarded the
D o n"a 1 d Buckley Memorial,
Bursary  of  $1,000.
Paul Thiele, grad studies I,
will use the money to continue towards his MA in comparative literature.
The bursary was established
in 1956 by the Canadian National Institute for the Blind
in memory of Donald Charming Buckley, a UBC forestry
professor who continued t o
teach after his loss of sight.
The bursary may be awarded annually to a blind student
who shows ability and promise.
Thiele graduated from UBC
in May.
He is president of UBC
Radio.
Travel
moves
garble
counci
I
By CAROL ANN BAKER
Travel talk had council really moving Monday night
— right out of the council chambers.
When Rick McGraw, commerce undergraduate society
president, began to deliver a report by Kyle Mitchell, last
year's AMS treasurer, on UBC charter flights to Europe at
council Monday night. McGraw found most of the councillors had wandered out.
McGraw   finally   gave   up
trying to talk louder than the
personal discussions of councillors. Art Stevenson, engineering undergraduate society president, suggested the
seven page-report be accepted
in principle so council could
adjourn for coffee.
However, before coffee
break, absent councillors returned to hear a Canadian
University Students Overseas
worker state that no children
have been born to unmarried
CUSO workers in the field.
She said even married
CUSO volunteers were not
allowed to have children
while working in foreign
countries.
Three rules for CUSO workers in the field are: no involvement in politics, no involvement in religion, and no
riding Hondas unless you
wear a helmet, the CUSO
worker said.
UBC medics will be linked by an electronic blackboard
to a seminar at the University of Washington today.
Director of medical illustration, Victor Doray, will use
the new device to transmit on
the spot drawings to a seminar
in Washington.
Drawings will be projected
onto a ten-foot screen to illustrate the seminar entitled
"Adventures in Teaching."
It will be the first time the
device has been used internationally.
The transmission will take
place at the UBC medical building at Vancouver General
Hospital at 4:30 p.m.
The Vancouver audience
will hear a talk from Washington.
Arts  reaches
concensus
They've finally reached a
Consensus  in Arts.
First issue of Arts Undergraduate Society's bi-monthly Consensus appears this
week.
"We want to present provocative opinions on matters
of interest to Arts students,"
said   editor   Nancy   Corbett.
There will also be a literary section and news reports
from the arts faculty, she
said.
Co-editor is Peter Cameron.
undergraduate president's
meetings which organized the
report demand, said he thought
the reports had accomplished
their objectives.
McGraw said the purpose of
the report was threefold:
"As a communicative device
between the executive and
council and anyone who may
wish to read the reports;
"As a subtle criticism of the
general activities of the executive;
"To require of each execu-
EXECUTIVES
(Continued from Page 1)
tive member a self-evaluation
of their activities to date in
relation to their consituional
responsibilities."
"A cursory examination reveals an apparent failure —
with the exception of education policy — to deal with the
major issues confronting students,"   McGraw said.
'iHowever, the report also
reveals the society is growing
at a tremendous rate and the
executive is being forced to
deal more and more with administrative detail.
AMS  president Byron Hender   suggested   they   continue
the  discussion  at the  council
coffee break.
~~...,~. —powell  hargrave  photos
FOLKSINGERS BUD AND TRAVIS returned to UBC Tuesday to do charity show for UBC's
ailing sound system which preventing homecoming dancers from hearing their armory
show.  Proceeds from  audience  jammed   in to Brock went to buy new audio equipment. mutism
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242.
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16,  1965
"Nobody shoots at a dead duck."
-W. A. C.  Bennett, Nov. 5, 1965
A fine fair
We'd like to extend a pat on the 'back to the organizers and participants who helped create the 12th annual
International Fall Fair.
We didn't have a chance to mention it last Tuesday,
but the Friday and Saturday night Fair was a 2,500-
visitor success.
And anyone who sat drinking one of 20 different
types of coffee in the Greek exhibit on either of those
nights, couldn't help but feel it was a smash.
Altogether, 14 countries had exhibits — all tasteful,
all fun, all filled with a happy crowd.
Sounds of the high calibre stage shows, plus recorded music kept the armory filled with an aura
decidedly non-Canadian.
And yet — and this is what we found most fascinating — many of the participants in the booths or performances were Canadians, "proud of their own unique
cultural heritage" — as the saying has it.
We couldn't help wondering what kind of distinctly
Canadian booth one could set up — with all these other
14 nations (and more) so integral a part of all of us, now.
And if, out of the varied strands of national background, there will ever be woven a truly "Canadian"
rope.
If there is, then there are two things we hope:
That the rope shall not loose a particle of the color
and life that was exhibited in the contrasting modes
of living shown us by- the International Fair.
And that when the rope is woven, it is woven to
music — like the folk songs and folk dances shown us by
the International Fair.
For a glimpse of what we mean, we can only suggest you take a look next year if you missed this year's
fun.
Or the fun of the past 11 years.
All in all, it makes quite a show.
"Whatdyamean, 'International
. . . from George Wallace . . .
George Lincoln Rockwell . . ."
censure'? Just look at these congratulatory telegrams
from Robert Shelton . . . from Dr. Verwoerd . . . from
LETTERS  TO THE   EDITOR
Ex-wheel spins off at mouth
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
"The   tigers   of  wrath  are
wiser than the horses of instruction."
This  clarion  call  on  The
Mike Coleman, Law I, was
formerly arts president and
general big wheel around
Brock. His letters to The
Ubyssey in the past have often expressed a unique and
fascinating viewpoint of campus life. This is his first formal letter this year.
Ubyssey   masthead seems   to
have   been   wholeheartedly
"flbe c\dveiifu:
*Mm? AT MAU^ sPirit $®* &W
AS YOU  WILL   KBTAIX, UteT W£6K   BtKCAJ,HEMPgP  WAS BElAJfr   ASSASS1MATEP.
rm, ^yMum^M^l^J^y^LS^^
MAOArl* he was nut
FOtKeFUUV .MT-
'CUUTW6,   THE
STUPENT VOKC.  ,     =t_±_^
(E WAS  (WAWt/iEi < iESki
THE Key  gSflrSj
VT UBC! HE WIAS
UKAK   ON LEAOE*
SHIP.'   HE VMS
■tar REsnxoiib
VJHt NE\W,MORE
FORCEFUL   STOOI
Body! he was f"
OUT OF TOUCH L
WITH  THE NEwl
TW&sr tev&ts.'l
NOT   BMI&    M
adopted by both the campus
newspaper and the Brock politicians.
I'd like to redress the balance by putting in a good
word for the horse (sort of a
plug for the plug).
The columns of your high-
circulation low-competition
journal are constantly filled
with the continuous back biting and bickering which
seems to be a congenital defect of our so-called "student
leaders."
The once great Ubyssey has
itself degenerated into a
hodge podge of vituperative
vilification. Snide and vicious
editorial shafts are aimed at
Prime Minister Pearson, UBC
president Dr. Macdona Id
comes in for virulent but often vacuous verbosity.
And in campus politics, we
find a minor AMS functionary named Lavalle attempting to play Diefenbaker, becoming a self-styled "savior
of the students" by pointing
a querulous finger at the iniquitous AMIS President Byron
Hender, who has "failed" because he's "weak" and "unaware of the key issues."
Tm no apologist; but while
Our Hero has scored the lack
of policy, he has not noticeably presented any viable alternative.
Perhaps by the same token,
Our Hero is more concerned
with personal politics than
with public policy.
What does all this have to
do with "tigers" and "horses"?
For purposes of this analogy, "tigers" are naturally
vindictive, concerned largely
with brutal politicking, ambitious for advancement and
primarily selfish.
'Horses" can work together
in harness for the general
good.
"Tigers" can't.
This campus deserves responsible leadership, both
from AMS officials and from
The Ubyssey's embroyonic
journalists.
As an ardent advocate of a
more participatory democracy, I think in both areas
we need more "horses of instruction" and less "tigers of
wrath."
MIKE   COLEMAN
Law I
MALCUM TALKS
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Last week the columns of
The Ubyssey advocated:
(a) tuitionless   education;
(b)the return of the alumnae to support the University's teams.
So far as (a) is concerned,
the professors may be grateful. As to (b), let us hope that
the alumnae will not feel out
of   pace   with   Mr.    Reams-
bottom's gladiators.
Please do me the favour
of spelling my name correctly.
"MALCOLM MCGREGOR"
Head,
Classics Department
WATCH FOR -THE FURTHER   BfciTiM^  ACVEA/TU*ES   OF OUR  HERO   NEXT vJEBK!
EDITOR: Tom Wayma*
Ron Rlter
Qeorge Raamabottom
Al   Donald
Norm   Betts
■d Clark
Dan Mullon
Richard  Blair  Robbi   West
Ass't City          Danny Stoffman
■•aoe Friday John Kolasy
Managing
Features .
CUP
Ian Cameron
Mlks Bolton
Don Hun
To the few who toiled for 16,
pages Monday, thank you. Vivian
Gigun, Terri Brown, Anne Slipper,
Pat Hrushowy, Dick Taylor, Sue
Gransby, Doug Halverson, Carol-
Anne Baker, and Claudia Gwinn
burned up typewriter ribbon to
get  this issue  out. Tuesday, November 16,  1965
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
Brock types give word
on what they've done
The following are excerpts
from reports presented to
AMS council Monday night
by this year's executive "outlining the action each has
taken this year in line with
his constitutional duties", to
quote  the  directive  given.
The council minute asking
for these reports came out
of an in-eamera meeting Nov.
8 of undergraduate society.,
presidents, who expressed
some concern as to the direction of council this year.
The in-camera meeting was
called by commerce president
Rick McGraw.
BYRON HENDER,
AMS president
The primary function of
this office as I conceptualize
it is to direct the day-to-day
affairs of this Society, in consultation with other members
of the executive.
In the two years prior to
my occupancy of this office,
there has been a viable agreement within the executive as
to the direction and policy we
should formulate.
In the past, the executive
has met on occasion, but not
on a regular basis.
The situation within the
executive this year has been
substantially different. The
two vice-presidents have held
strongly divergent points of
view on not one, but several
matters of concern to this
council.
While I appreciate full discussion of the point of issue,
I expect, and demand, unity
once a decision is reached.
The situation within a voluntary association such as the
executive is different than an
employer-employee   situation.
The president, constitutionally, does not have the power to remove a member of
this council.
The onus, as has been
pointed out on several occasions, is on the individual to
resign if, once a decision has
been reached, he cannot abide
by it.
*     •     •
There has been some discussion as to the strength of
leadership that I have exercised.
Let me only say that experience is a great teacher.
Many of the incidents
which have arisen this year
have not occurred on this
campus before.
This is, however, a sign of
the times.
Future councils may expect
more and more of the type
of activity that we have seen
this year. They will no doubt
learn from our, (and I use
the word our advisedly), mistakes.
In conclusion, I have had
the complete support from the
executive with the exception
of the two vice-presidents on
all matters.
This is not to say that the
vice-presidents have created
strains on all occasions, but
on several.
As far as following my constitutional duties, I have done
so to the best of my ability,
and I believe that is all one
can ask.
As   an   afterthought,   perhaps some comment on what
some members of the executive do on a day-to-day basis
may be in order.
Last week, for example,
Messrs. Vance, Sommers and
I discussed at some length
the existing agreement with
the Musicians Union.
It had not been renegotiated since 1958 and was out of
date.
BOB  CRUISE
... EAP
Subsequent to that, we
spent two hours with the
Union representatives discussing the agreement and any
proposed changes.
Mr. Vance and myself also
met at some length with the
fire marshal's department
with respect to the capacities
of several campus buildings
used as halls.
Friday afternoon from 4 to
9 p.m. was spent on behalf of
the society at the International House Fall Fair, and
a reception for the Lt. Governor.
As a matter of passing interest, the executive signed
some 150 cheques, each requiring some scrutinizing.
I personally have been
working on two or three long-
term projects. One of these
is the establishment of a permanent rowing course near
the campus.
These all take time, and if
the society is to continue to
grow and expand, someone
has to keep working outside
of the day-to-day area of administration.
ROBERT CRUISE,
first vice
The following is a point
form summary of work done
this fall for the AMS:
1. Co-Cordinator of the Fee
Increase Committee: (1) Joint
paper with second vice-president, June 7; (2) Joint paper
with second vice-president,
June 14; (3) Joint paper with
second vice-president, June 21
(Outline Of  draft  brief  to
Board of Governors); (4) Joint
brief 'Tuition fees and student
financing' with second vice-
president Aug. 11, 1965.
2. Alumni Board of Management: (1) Board of Directors meeting over summer and
in fall; (2) Two meetings with
the alumni president to discuss such things as the formation of a student-alumni committee to execute a "brain
capture" program for high
school students.
3. CUS Congress (Lennox-
ville, Que.): University Affaires Commission.
4. Education   Action    Pro-
BYRON HENDER
. . . direction
gram: (1) Working as co-
chairman to draw up 18-point
program  for 1965-66  session;
(2) Arrangement for fee rally;
(3) Acadia residence seminar
and several orientation meetings; (4) Preparation of the
tentative budget; (5) Worked
with the second vice-president
on preparation of first month
of EAP projects.
•      •      •
The following are a list of
projects I anticipate doing at
a   minimum   in   the   coming
year:
1. As chairman of the constitution revisions committee,
I will be striking a committee
after Christmas to investigate
such questions as:
a) Referendums: their binding force on council; their requirements; changing of wording.
b) Non-Substantive Changes:
keeping the wording of the
constitution up-to-date.
2. Special Events and CUS
Liaison.
3. Residence survey:
After the results of the residence opinion survey are
run through the computing
centre and compiled, it will
be necessary to draw up reports (one for each residence)
and submit the reports to the
AMS, residence councils, and
the administration.
After the reports are completed it will be necessary to
initiate investigations into the
areas which indicate the greatest need for improvement.
PETER BRAUND,
second vice
The public relations staff and
/or budget have handled public relations in toto or in
part for the following up to
this date: AMS brief to Board
of Governors — Aug.. 11,
1965; fee increase rally —
September; UBC's 50th anniversary; reaction to BJaden
Commission; referendum on
march — National Student
Day; B.C. universities teach-
in; National Student Day;
reaction by the Board of Governors to AMS brief; Prime
Minister Pearson's sod turning for SUB and speech.
Attended several luncheons
from May to November, representing AMS.
Gone on radio for the AMS
FOR MORE
FOREGROUND
SEE PAGE 6
We're Growing
We are experiencing an outstanding
— Growth of net assets
— Growth of cash income
— Growth of total  sales
— Growth of opportunity for career seekers
Pacific Petroleums Ltd. now ranks fifth in the Canadian oil industry. To continue the rapid growth
and development within our industry, we require university trained personnel capable of assuming responsibility and making contributions which will  further our objectives.
In   1966  We   Have  Opportunities  Available
Geology
Geophysics
Engineering
Commerce
will visit your campus within the next 2 weeks.     Check with your placement office  for the
date and time. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 16,  1965
MORE  FOREGROUND
Here's more wheel  reports
(Continued from Page 5)
on   several   occasions   discussing most of the above events.
Attended three conferences.
Joint paper with first vice-
president to fee Increase committee — June 7, 1965.
Joint paper with first vice-
president to fee increase committee  — June  14,   1965.
Joint paper with first vice-
president — Brief to the
Board of Governors "Student
Financing and Tuition Fees"
— Aug.  11, 1965.
Joint paper with first vice-
president on Education Action
17-point  program.
Chairman National Student
Day.
Co-chairman Education Action Programme committee
(and later sole chairman).
Three more AMS councillors try to explain what they
have done that was constitutional, in accordance with a
request from undergraduate
society  presidents   Nov.   8.
These are more excerpts
from reports presented to
council Monday night.
GRAEME VANCE,
co-ordinator
The duties of the co-ordinator are clearly laid down
in the constitution.
As you are probably aware,
this description is very brief
and cannot hope to explain
the scope or complexity involved in co-ordination and
the chairmanship of the
Brock management committee.
I feel that within the limits
imposed by time and practicability, these duties have
been fulfilled, hence I shall
not provide a resume of the
myriad details and tasks involved in the office of coordinator.
If required, this could be
forthcoming as a separate report.
The constitution makes no
reference to the duties of the
co-ordinator as an executive
officer.
I believe that the place
for argument is the floor of
the council chamber and so
I have not hesitated to state
my views.
Once a majority decision
has been reached, I have endeavoured to execute this decision to the utmost, even
though it has not always been
my own personal view.
I intend to carry on implementing council's policies
and to assist the president
in his duties as chief executive.
If an issue should arise on
which I cannot agree with
council or the president then
I feel that my only alternative is to resign and state my
views   outside   of   the   AMS.
JOAN CURTIS,
secretary
In 1963 an executive secretary was engaged by the AMS
to record the minutes of meetings of the students' council.
The secretary of the AMS
retains the responsibilty for
these minutes, is consulted if
theije are questions regarding
the - wording of motions, etc.
and these functions have been
performed this year.
The secretary has been responsible for correspondence
addressed to the secretary and
the correspondence referred
by other members of the executive, particularly the president, to the secretary.
The correspondence of the
student council such as applications for positions, notification of appointments, requests for information, etc.
have been handled by the
secretary.
The secretary has acted as
student council liaison on the
Women's Athletic Committee
which has involved extensive
consultations, part icularly
having to do with straightening out the women's position
in intramural sports, (plus an
understanding of their budgetary position).
The secretary is a member
of the constitutional revisions
committee which has been set
up under the chairmanship of
the first vice-president.
In addition, the secretary
has acted as chairman of the
eligibility committee.
The secretary, as chairman
of the Elections Committee
has been involved in much
organizationl work (e.g. polling stations, counters, rules
and regulations) because of the
referendums held this term.
The secretary is a member
of the SUB committee re religious facilities.
MIKE SOMMERS,
treasurer
This statement is at best
an overview of what the treasurer is required to do for
the   Alma   Mater  Society.
The day-to-day tasks of the
executive are sometimes boring and take up much time
but are essential for the
smooth operation of the society.
To date, my largest and
most difficult task has involved the preparation of the
society's  budget.
Since the grants given to
virtually every organization
were drastically decreased, I
experienced a great deal of
difficulty in balancing the
budget and have since had almost as much trouble in trying to force various groups to
operate  within their budgets.
In collaboration with Mr.
Vance and myself, the general
manager has revised the coordination control form in an
attempt to obtain more com
plete information on society
functions.
A number of weeks ago, I
presented the confidential
auditor's recommendations to
council.
I have attempted to tighten
control over expenditures this
year as was recommended by
our auditors.
•      •      •
In an attempt to isolate and
solve problems quickly, I have
set up a "problem tray" in my
office into which all doubtful
transactions <usually cheque
requisitions) are placed.
These must be fully explained by the individuals
concerned before they are
given my  approval.
On Aug. 3, I wrote to the
administration to arrange for
the payment of AMS fees
receivable.
The schedule I suggested
was accepted, with the result
that we are to receive a larger
Broadway Gym Ltd.
Special Student
Rates
Broadway at Kingsway
TR 9-9987
AMS MEMBERS
. . leaders  speak
percentage of the total monies
earlier than we have in the
past.
Some areas that I am presently working on are:—
• A study of the wages paid
by the AMS to part-time
student help.
• A study of the use of photographic darkrooms by AMS
organizations.
• The framework within the
Intramural Committee was to
work was not completely set
up when these activities were
taken over by the AMS two
year ago.
I hope to be able to formalize the group's organization
and put out a policy statement
for the benefit of future
chairmen.
You've had the course—
Now let's get down to business
You're a graduate engineer, or about to become one. You want to
dig in, apply the knowledge you've gained to practical projects that
promise tangible results. Great. We've got just the job for you. In the
plants and research centre of Columbia Cellulose, engineers are now
engaged in dozens of exciting projects aimed at advancing pulp and
paper technology. The possibilities in this booming field are limitless, bounded only by the ingenuity and skill of our people. Right
now we have a 750-ton per day bleached kraft pulp mill under construction at Prince Rupert. We need engineers as never before. You
could be doing vital work for our company in the near future - on a
planned training programme with specific objectives. And you could
be living in one of Canada's great scenic regions. If the idea appeals,
arrange to meet with senior representatives of Columbia Cellulose
when they visit your campus on November 22 to 26.
Appointments can be arranged through university employment office.
e
COLUMBIA CELLULOSE COMPANY, LIMITED
HEAD OFFICE: VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA
DIVISIONS: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT .  PRINCE RUPERT PULP DIVISION  •   PRINCE RUPERT SAWMILL DIVISION
CELSAR PULP DIVISION   •   CELGAR LUMBER DIVISION   •   CELGAR WOODS DIVISION   •   TERRACE WOODS DIVISION Tuesday, November 16,  1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 1
—norm betts photo
ONLY 34 SHOPPING DAYS UNTIL CHRISTMAS - well-
prepared UBC students shun gaping library doors to do
Christmas shopping in downtown stores and bistros.
Calathumps
query tacit
vote decision
The National Non-Conforming Calathumpiums Monday
issued a sweeping statement
calling for implementation.
In a press release to The
Ubyssey, the calathump executive queried "tacit approval
of the momentous and sweeping decision hinted at so strongly by the country's electorate.
"The possibility of alternation of the outcome does perhaps exist," the statement said.
"We expect a wavering in
the outcome amounting to a
whit or two with a few minor
exceptions best left unnamed
for the nonce."
The statement gave the final
decision for the time being on
the controversial "Golden
Mean" issue.
"Application of the principle
of the "golden mean" only
leads us to transigent consideration of the overwhelming
state of prevarication which we
have discerned in the first
rough count of the people's
heads taken one day last
week," the statement said.
Calathumpiums also announced continuation of the
lecture series on the 'Golden
Mean" held variably in past
years.
BY COLEMAN
Don't wait for the breaks
Go after them-
that's how success begins!
At Hawker Siddeley Canada Ltd., success begins with a 5 year training program of challenging work assignments designed to develop
specialist and management skills. Your success may well begin in an
interview with the representative of this all Canadian company
employing over 20,000 people.
Challenging positions are available in their steel, steel fabrication, gas
turbine and transportation industries as well as in their engineering
laboratories. These positions are open to graduates and post-graduates in all branches of ENGINEERING, BUSINESS, HONOUR MATHEMATICS, and PHYSICS. How about you ?
When you join Hawker Siddeley Canada Ltd., you will start on a
satisfying and rewarding career. It could take you, if you wish, to
locations in Halifax .Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver and other urban
centres across Canada. You can be sure the opportunities will be there
for the taking.
On November 18 and 19 the Company representative will be err
campus. Ask your Student Placement Director to arrange ah interview
for you.
Hawker Siddeley Canada Ltd.
7 King Street East, Toronto
Cash councillors'
legality queried
By PAT HRUSHOWY
Student court will decide Thursday if the Alma Mater
Society can legally pay elected officers to do council work
in the summer.
The investigation was scheduled after Mike Coleman, law
I, protested council officers
being paid to do jobs they were
elected to do.
AMS president Byron Hender then asked that the matter
be put before student court.
When asked if anybody ever
complained about the practice,
Hender said: "Only Coleman."
Last summer four student
officers were hired at $400 a
month to do council work.
They were president Byron
Hender, treasurer Mike Sommers, co - ordinator Graeme
Vance and SUB chairman
Roger McAfee.
"If they want me to act as
president in the summer they
have to pay me," said Hender.
Representing the AMS as
counsel  to  the  court  will be
law undergraduate president
Peter Hyndman.
"Although the practice of
hiring student officials for summer work is to be found on a
number of Canadian campuses,
this is probably the first time
its legality has been challenged," he said.
According to the AMS constitution, the society has the
power to engage and hire necessary personnel to carry out
council work.
There is also provision that
certain elected and appointed
officers receive honoraria —
token remuneration for services.
Student court will decide
whether a student officer receiving an honorarium can be
paid for duties in the summer.
Under the AMS constitution
the AMS president gets his fees
paid, and the co-ordinator receives $200.
SPECIAL     EVENTS
presents
Marie-Claire Jamet
et
Christian  Larde
Harp and Flute Duet
Two   brilliant  French  Musicians,   Both  are  featured
soloists with the Paris Chamber Orchestra and  the
French National Orchestra.
AUDITORIUM -  NOON -  NOV. 24
Wed., Nov. 17
Jean-Pierre Ferland
Un  Chansonnier  Canadien   Francais  touring   under
the auspices of Quebec Minister of Cultural Affairs.
NOON      - 25c      -      BROCK
Thurs, Nov.  18
MICHAEL MYERSON
The graduate student from Berkeley who was refused
the platform at the Toronto Teach-in. He has recently
returned from Hanoi and will give the N.L.F. (Viet-
Cong) view point.
NOON     -    25c     -    AUDITORIUM Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 16,  1965
SAYS DEBATER
Sex undeserved'
if it's not free
By SUE
If you can't get sex free,
That's the word from Andy
Sandilans, law I, second speaker for the negative in Debating
Union debate, "Resolved—that
prostitution should be legalized", Wednesday.
He asked 100 students: "Do
you really need prostitutes?
There are lots of nice girls
right in this' room.
"If prostitution were legalized," he said, "it would still
be a degrading profession.
"Venereal disease could still
not be stopped as a prostitute
is only as clean as her last customer.
"Prostitution would relieve
the tensions of the male, but
what about the female?"
Judge Brian Ralph, a member of last year's winning McGoun cup team awarded the
decision in favor of the negative side.
Cliff Smith, arts II, opened
the affirmative position alone
against the combination of Ron
Smith, arts IV, and Sandilans.
"The law has failed to distinguish between public and
private morality," said Smith.
"The law is made to protect
the citizen. As long as an innocent party is not, affected,
prostitution is outside the law's
concern.
"It is a private contract between individuals. An act is not
criminal unless the mind is
guilty."
Smith   said   prostitution   is
GRANSBY
you don't deserve it.
here to stay because of the nature of society.
If sex is thought of as a degradation then "we should be
free to degrade ourselves," he
said.
Ron Smith, the first speaker
for the negative, defined pros-
stitution as the "offering and
receiving of a body for money."
He said: "To legalize prostitution is to deny the validity of
the family."
"The ultimate goal of this
legalization is to release all restraint upon society leading to
complete sexual and moral
freedom."
Minor undergrads
heading  for bar
If the bar interests you,
take note.
The legal bar, that is.
A pre-law society is being
formed at UBC.
An organizational meeting
will be held in Bu. 221 Tuesday noon. At least ten members are needed to start the
group.
Brian Bemnest, arts III,
said Friday a constitution is
being drafted, and the approval of the dean and the
law undergraduate society
is being sought.
"Anyone who is interested is welcome to come," he
said.
@ Westinghouse
WILL BE ON CAMPUS
November 22, 23 & 24
TO INTERVIEW 1966
Commerce Graduates
A well-defined training program is offered to prepare
candidates for positions of responsibility in:
TECHNICAL MARKETING
MARKETING OPERATIONS
MARKET RESEARCH
COMMERCIAL SALES
These positions will afford opportunity for career development to graduates with potential.
Professional salary scale and increases based on performance as well as excellent employee fringe benefit
plans.
Contact the Placement Office for detailed informatoin,
brochures and interview appointment.
Minister must
'think about'
student rep
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Manitoba's minister of education
says he will "have to think
about" a student representative on he province's newly
formed Council o n Higher
Learning.
Dr.   George   Johnston said
the council has already been
formed  and   refused  to comment further.
University of Manitoba student union president Winston
Dookeran said students need a
representative on the council to
maintain communication between students and the council.
Dookeran said students were
not at present asking for a
full voting member on the
council, tout would consider
doing so should it become a
policy making body.
A brief was submitted Oct.
27 to A. S. Leach, chairman of
the council, by Dookeran but
there has not yet been a reply.
Engineers:
COME AND LEARN ABOUT US
WHERE? Room 201, Civil Engineering Building
WHEN?
WHAT?
WHY?
Wednesday, November 17
12:30 -1:25 p.m.
A brief slide talk on our operations
throughout B.C. Both permanent and
summer employment will be discussed.
To acquaint you with the scope and
challenge of a career with our company, and provide the basis for a personal interview at a later date.
Be there November 17th, and learn for yourself why
the exciting engineering opportunities today are with
e
COLUMBIA CELLULOSE
COMPANY, LIMITED
1030 W. Georgia St.
Vancouver, British Columbia
CANADA
EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEWS
Our representatives will be visiting the campus
22nd, 23rd, 24th and 25th November
to interview graduating,  post-graduate  and  undergraduate  students for
positions in 1966.
REGULAR EMPLOYMENT: Preferred Disciplines:
Mechanical Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Electrical  Engineering
Engineering  Physics
Civil  Engineering
Industrial Engineering
"hemistry
Commerce
Business Administration
Arts
Mathematics-Statistics
for openings as:
Development Engineer
Design  Engineer
Maintenance Engineer
Process Engineer
Planning  Engineer
Industrial  Engineer
Technical Service  Representative
Development  Physicist
Technical   Analyst   (Research   Centre)
Process Chemist
Analytical Chemist
Financial & Control Personnel
(at the plants or at Head Office)
Marketing   Research   Representative
Market Analyst
Programmer-Analyst
Statistician
Locations: Montreal, Shawinigan, P.Q.
Maitland,  Kingston, Whitby, North Bay and  Sarnia, Ontario
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: Preferred Disciplines:
1
year
2 yean
3 year*
from
degree
from degre*
from degree
Chemical  Engineering
X
X
X
Mechanical  Engineering
X
X
Electrical  Engineering
X
X
Engineering  Physics
X
Industrial  Engineering
X
Commerce
X
X
Chemistry
X
X
X
for openings as:
(a) Assistants to   Design,   Process  and   Development   Engineers
and
(b) Vacation  relief  in  Production,  General  Plant Office  and
the  Laboratories.
An appointment to see our representatives can be  made through your  Placement Office where information  booklets, application forms and  1966 position
descriptions are also available.
DU PONT OF CANADA LIMITED
PERSONNEL DIVISION, P.O.  BOX 660, MONTREAL, P.Q. Tuesday, November  16,  1965
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 9
ON THE FOURTH ESTATE FRONT
U of M council tubes
socialist bi-weekly'
MONfTREAL (CUP) — Led
by editor Jacques Elliot, the
entire staff of the University
of Montreal campus paper the
Quartier Latin has resigned
following a council vote of
non-confidence Nov. 9.
The paper, that called itself
"the largest socialist bi-weekly
in the world", has gone down
before an attack on its radical
ideology, its treatment of Quebec political figures, its Viet
Nam policy and the quality of
its news coverage.
The motion to fire the editor
was introduced by representatives of the faculty of engineering and was passed 30-10 in
council at the end of a three-
hour debate.
Michael McAndrew and
Louis Legendre, two members
of the U of M student council,
have also resigned accusing
union president Michel Pelle-
tier of shirking his role as a
leader of student unionism,
even though he voted against
MacFadden
holds off
McGill critics
MONTREAL (CUP) — An
open meeting of the McGill
students' society Nov. 8 voted
down a motion to fire the editor of the McGill Daily by a
margin of 357-118.
The meeting was called by a
petition of 317 students who
claimed that "the editor of the
McGill Daily has consistently
used the Daily for his extreme
political purposes."
The move to fire editor Patrick MacFadden was defeated
despite an editorial by McFad-
den urging his supporters to
boycott the meeting on the
grounds that it had no power
to fire him.
firing. The two were secretary-
general and vice-president of
the union and were strong supporters of the Quartier Latin.
The Quartier Latin has ceased publication until a new staff
can be found.
But U of M is not without
a paper. Elliot's staff , assisted
by the two ex-council members, have produced the first
number of the Campus Libre,
a   publication  with  the   same
tone as the old Quartier Latin.
The new paper is in no
way affiliated with the student
council.
On Oct. 28 several thousand
engineers burned half the copies of the Quartier Latin in
protest against what they called the "morbid negativism
and intransigent anarchism" of
the publication.
Sherbrooke editor
quits  over  strike
SHERBROOKE (CUP) —
The editor of the student newspaper at the University oi
Sherbrooke resigned Nov. 2 after a dispute with the student
council.
His resignation was accepted by a vote of 3-0 with 13
abstentions.
Hercule Gaboury, editor of
the Campus Estrien, had planned to issue an expanded edition of the newspaper in support of a strike by employees
of La Tribune, is also president
French-language daily in the
Eastern Townships.
Paul Desruisseaux, publisher
of La Tribune, also president
of the board of trustees of the
University of Sherbrooke, and
was formerly dean of commerce, as well as being a director of numerous corporations including the Royal Bank
of Canada.
The council Oct. 29 refused
to allow publication of an extra 3,000 copies of Campus
Estrien for city-wide distribution to explain the strikers'
position.
Council president Albert
Dupuis offered his resignation
after the Oct. 29 meeting when
a large group of students protested  his   refusal  to   support
the strikers. The students demanded he resign because he
had no philosophy of student
unionism and did not represent the students.
Dupuis' resignation was rejected by the council Nov. 2
by a vote of 14-0 with two
abstentions, after a petition
bearing more than 1,000 signatures asking him to stay on
was presented.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Fall Symposium
Applications are  available in the AMS Office
Subject:    "Commitment and Beyond"
Place:    Rosario Beach, Anacortes, Washington
Time:    November 12, 13, 14.
Cost:    $6.50 all inclusive.
Deadline:    November 10th.
Students Court (Constitutional Hearing)
Date: November 18, 1965
Time:..12:30-p.m.
Place: Council Chamber, Brock Hall
Please be advised that the Students' Court will hold
a hearing on the constitutional validity of Students'
Council's practice of hiring student officers for employment.
Any parties interested in appearing upon the hearing
must notify the Court of their intention to do so by
Tuesday, Novemebr 16 at 4:30 p.m. Clerk of the Court,
Box 54, Brock Hall.
BAY
Lili
Leslie Caron   -   Mel Ferrer
plus
Song of Bernadette
Jennifer Jones - Lee J. Cobb
STUDENT RATE 75c
DELTA
Nov. 19 & Nov. 20
The Ugly American
Marlon Brando
Sandra Church
plus
The Son of Captain
Blood
Sean Flynn - Ann Todd
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
(Regular and Summer)
ACCOUNTING
(Commerce Majors)
and
GEOLOGY
(Honors and Arts)
with
PAN AMERICAN
PETROLEUM CORPORATION
(Calgary, Alberta)
for
Post Graduates
Graduates
Undergraduates
Interviews:
Monday & Tuesday, Nov. 22 & 23,1965
Pan American, a member of the Standard Oil Company (Indiana) organization, has several challenging
career openings in the Canadian Division Office in
Calgary.
We are a rapidly growing major oil company offering
attractive salaries and benefits in addition to opportunity for advancement.
Appointments for interviews are being made at the
Student Placement Office. Company and Job information booklets are available there.
Department of Theatre
Frederic Wood Theatre
MOTHER COURAGE
and HER CHILDREN
by Bertolt Brecht
English Version by Eric Beatley
Student Performance, Mon., Nov. 22,7:30 p.m.
TICKETS 75c
Brecht's great anti-war play in the Epic Theatre style with
Marjorie Nelson, noted New York actress in the title role.
Tickets Available - Room 207 - Frederic Wood Theatre
NOTE: Some tickets at 75c each will  be available for
Tues., Nov. 23, Wed., Nov. 24 and Thurs., Nov. 25.
SUPPORT YOUR OWN CAMPUS THEATRE Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 16,  1965
U of T head asks
fee compensation
TORONTO  (CUP)  — University of Toronto president
Claude Bissell has indicated he would favor elimination of
tuition fees if government and private donors would guarantee compensation for universities.
If   the money   were  made
available, he said, "there would
be no sound argument against
the abolition of fees. Until such
assurance is given, the universities will retain fees, while
seeking through increased student aid to eliminate them as
economic barriers."
• •      •
Bissell    was    addressing    a
meeting sponsored by the U. of
T. School of Graduate Studies
and Ontario College of Education.
Although his remarks were
at variance with the recommendations of the Bladen commission's report, he said:
"The real question, which
the Bladen Commission recognizes, is to make sure there is
adequate student aid to insure
the full accessibility that is recognized as a basic principle.
• •      •
"In this province we have a
primary obligation to reduce
the disproportionate emphasis
that has been placed upon student loan money as a result of
the sudden and unplanned
availability of such resources
through the Canada Student
Loan Fund."
Referring to student involvement in the issue, he commented:
"The question of free tuition
has been elevated into a great
symbolic battle between students and administrators."
exhilarating
elegance
for MEN
JAQE
EAST
COLOGNE
4oz.
$4.25
AFTER
SHAVE
4oz.
$3.75
Discerning men find luxurious
pleasure in the subtle masculine scent of Jade East...worlds
apart from the ordinary.
OPINION
BY TOM FLETCHER
Council  out of touch'
Our AMS councillors have
lost touch with student opinion.
This fact was made painfully evident by the recent
march debacle.
The councillors vetoed the
idea of a march. The student
body opposed the Brock types
in the referendum. Why was
council oblivious of student
opinion ?
The answer is explained by
the type of representation
found on council. Every fac-
UNION COLLEGE professor
George Tuttle will speak on
"The growing edges in a
newly independent nation,
Kenya" noon Thursday in
Bu. 100.
Tom  Fletcher   is   a   first-
year   law   student    and   a
member of the campus Liberal Club. He is an occasional     contributor     to     The
Ubyssey.
ulty has one representative.
This means that one man
represents 5,300 artsmen,
while another speaks for 2O0
aggies. Each faculty has one
vote.
Two hundred aggies can
negate 5,000 artsmen on any
given issue. This is democracy ? This is effective government ?
The power of opinion has
little force in this type of
"representative"  government.
Councillors can pass their
own biases off as student
opinion and then we are all
misrepresented.
The system invites the formation of various committees
to make the ignorant council
members aware of student
opinion. This is what the ad
hoc  comimittee did.
This is a dangerous situation. Several such committee can be formed by a relatively small group of extremists.
Our system is  tailor-made
for    weirdie    beardies    and
other social groups.
Proportional representation
would solve the problem.
Large faculties should be
split into years, with perhaps
each year having a voice on
council. This plan would
give the faculties of arts,
science, and education the
voices they need.
Each representative, being
responsible for fewer students, would be better able
to discern individual student
opinion. Power hungry
minorities would be left out
in the cold.
Referendums would be unnecessary  .
Councillors would know
whether we wanted to march
and would act accordingly.
What we need is a campus
redistribution.
Satin/ine door by Canadian Pittsburgh industries Limited
Nickel stainless steel closes the door on corrosion
Manufacturers keep finding new uses for nickel
stainless steel. Here's one of them. Quality doors
for office buildings and stores. They are strong;
have a lustrous beauty that will last for years;
they are highly resistant to corrosion, and maintenance costs are very low. Today, nickel stainless
steel is used for so many different products. And
in all of them, nickel's contribution is quality.
THE INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
55 YONGE STREET, TORONTO Tuesday, November 16, 1965
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
JOHN MOVED INTO BROCK
EUS  PRESIDENT   ART  STEVENSON
"for the .asses in Brock"
Notice to Students Holding
Pre-Sale
"BIRD CALLS"
Tickets
Pleose present your tickets
to the Publications Office in Brock Hall
THIS WEEK
for the supply of directories
will soon be exhausted.
One hundred and fifty engineers moved John into
Brock Hall Wednesday.
Roaring their song about
beer, the engineers, each carrying a toilet seat, stormed
Brock and deposited their trophies on the Brock lounge
stage.
They carried signs proclaiming "Engineers rule the
world."
An engineering spokesman
said the seats had been
brought specifically for the
use of "the asses in Brock."
Monday and Tuesday, the
engineers removed all the
toilet seats from all the men's
washrooms on campus.
"There were only 154 toilet
seats on campus, excluding
the engineering building, faculty and women's," the
spokesman said.
The stunt concluded, the
engineers left in a quiet mob.
Bank manager quits campus
after 17 years  service
After 17 years on the campus, the manager of UBC's
Bank of Montreal branch has switched from student loans
to square yards.
Merle Kirby, who managed the bank from 1948 until
last summer has gone into the real estate business with
a Vancouver firm.
"I wanted to work on my own time," he said in an
interview. "And there's no retiring age in real estate."
Kirby, who spent 43 years in the banking business,
said he'll miss UBC.
"It's the nicest bank branch you can work in," he
said. "You don't get any deadbeats after loans."
Kirby took a UBC real estate course during the summer.
Rona  to read
Enchanted Adder
UBC graduate Rona Murray will read from her recently published book of
poems The Enchanted Adder
noon Thursday in Bu. 217.
The reading is part of the
weekly poetry readings sponsored by the arts undergraduate society.
The
Christian Science Organization
Cordially invites you to attend  a challenging
Lecture on a Practical Religion
"Awakening To Newness
Of Life'
it
by Florence C. Southwell
on
Thursday, Nov. 18th
Buchanan 106 12:30 p.m.
Here is an opportunity to gain first-hand information
about  the   religion   which   teaches  that   the  spiritual
laws of God can be understood and applied to human
problems of every kind.
You can't beat
the taste of
Player's
Player's... the best-tasting cigarettes. Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 16, 1965
NO CONSULTATION
Alberta students
hit  right denial'
EDMONTON ,(CUP)  — The  student  council of the
University  of Alberta   (Edmonton)   has   passed  a motion
expressing its "strong disapproval" of the way in which the
University Act affecting their campus is being reviewed.
Council has decided to peti
tion Alberta Premier E. C.
Manning to demand student
representation on the university's board of governors.
Council president Richard
Price said students are taking
action for two reasons:
They were not included in
the government committee
studying changes in the Act;
The committee has thus far
failed to give students an
opportunity to make a verbal
presentation of views already
expressed in a brief.
"This action denies the fundamental right of student government — which is the right
to consultation," he said.
Two years ago the Edmonton  student  council   issued a
Past  AMS  pres.
pranged in crash
KINGSTON, (UNS)—Former AMS president Malcolm
Scott is off the critical list
in general hospital here after
his car went off Highway
401 and overturned four
times  early  this month.
Scott suffered a brain
concussion and punctured
lung. He was driving alone
on the divided freeway to
Toronto  from   Montreal.
Scott is vice-president of
Canadian Union of Students
at Ottawa.
DIAMOND      RINGS
SONNET
.   .   FROM $100
FIRBANKS
599   Seymour  •   Brentwood
and Park Royal
Ask about your student
Discount
report recommending there be
one students' union member
on both the university's general faculty council and the
board of governors, but no
action ensued.
This fall, the council voted
nine to six to accept in principle
a brief advocating 25 per cent
student representation on the
board of governors.
The petition to the premier
will outline the students' reasons for the 25 per cent demand.
Dr. Walter H. Johns, university president has refused
to comment on the student proposal.
He said the council scheme
will not be discussed by the
administration until plans for
the revision of the University
Act  are complete.
Profs backed
California
riots 8-1'
TORONTO (CUP) — Faculty
members at the University of
California at Berkeley approved of last year's student "revolt" by an 8-1 majority according to I.D. Currie of the
University of Toronto's
sociology  department.
Currie, a student at Berkeley last year, said that in California the state laws free the
university of all "political and
sectarian" responsibilities. The
board of regents at Berkeley
have used this to prohibit any
expression of "moral, political
or religious" points of view
on campus, he said.
The result is that the regents
judge what is controversial
and have at times inflicted
"double punishment" on students, whd have faced expulsion after conviction of court
of civil offences, according to
Currie.
The problem is clearly constitutional, he said, and the
university has no right to limit
the students' civil rights.
@ Westinghouse
Requires
PATENT AGENT TRAINEE
Electronics Engineering graduates (1966) with an interest
in patent work are invited to attend interviews on campus:
NOVEMBER 22, 23 & 24
Trainee selected shall assist in preparation and prosecution
of patent applications in the Canadian Patent Office, perform validity and infringement studies, learn patent law
and practices with a view to eventual registration as a
Patent Office.
Contact the Placement Office for detailed information and
interview appointment.
WE NEED ENGINEERS EAGER AND
ABLE TO ADVANCE THE 'STATE
OF THE ART IN THE BROADENING
FIELD OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS
CONSIDER A CAREER IN THE BELL,
If YOU ARE GRADUATING IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
The Bell's technical progress is vital, ever growing. New electronic devices ... more advanced
switching systems for local and long distance
services ... advanced carrier systems and a host
of related developments offer highly interesting
challenges to engineers.
DISCUSS YOUR CAREER
in
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
WHEN THE BELL
EMPLOYMENT REP.
WILL BE ON CAMPUS
NOV. 29 THRU DEC. 2
Informative Career Booklets are available from
your Placement Officer.
Bell Canada Tuesday, November 16, 1965
THE      U BYSSE Y
Page  13
—dermis gans  photo
BIRD'S LINEMEN went Owl hunting Saturday in football game against Oregon Tech Owls.
Frightened   Oregon   succumbed   18-6   as   Birds wrapped up final game of season with
victory at Varsity stadium. UBC's Morris Hayden   (67)   has   Owl   pinned   down   while
Glen  Brandt (37) hovers above.
—powell hargrave photo
UBC'S ALDO VERNIER shifts into overdrive as he spots
hole in line during Saturday's game between Birds and
Oregon Tech.
UBC clings
to second
in soccer
The UBC Thunderbird soccer team, although picking
up only one point in thejr
last three games, are still
clinging to second-place in
the Pacific Coast League.
On Remembrance Day,
'Birds went down 3-1 to league-leading and red-hot Firefighters.
In Victoria Saturday, UBC
overcame a two goal deficit
to tie the tough Victoria
United crew 2-2.
Russ Hillman netted 'Birds'
first goal ten minutes before
half time and with eight
minutes gone in the second
half Jim Berry scored the
equalizer.
In junior action Saturday,
UBC Tomahawks tied North
Shore United 4-4.
SPORTS
Editor: Ed Clark
Football Birds
gobble up Owls
in final game
By ED CLARK
Ubyssey Sports Editor
Frank Gnup finally got his offence untracked Saturday.
And his UBC Thunderbirds flew to victory in their final
game of the season.
UBC, known for its defensive stalwarts, put on a strong
offensive display and plucked the Owls from Oregon Technical Institute 18-6 before a meagre _450 fans at Varsity
Stadium.
The offense, which moved like a pregnant turtle all
season, scored its most points in one game with three unconverted touchdowns.
The victory gave UBC a 2-5-2 won-lost-tied record.
• • •
But while the offense was rolling over the Owls, the
pugnastic defensive crew was pounding the Oregon squad
into submission.
The defense set up the first touchdown when Joe Christopher pounced on a fumble by Oregon quarterback Bob
McNeeley on the Owls first play from scrimmage from their
own 18.
Dick Gibbons scored the touchdown eight plays later-
with 7:14 reading on the clock.
UBC struck again in the second quarter with Ron Kin-
cade scoring from seven yards, a play which was earlier set
up with a 27-yard pass from Gibbons to Chip Barrett.
Oregon penetrated deep into UBC territory on three
separate occasions during the game, twice in the first half,
but the tough defense didn't open the door.
• • •
UBC made a goal line stand late in the first half when
Oregon had two cracks at the line but on third down play
Owls fumbled and UBC's Morris Hayden recovered.
Later in the game, Glen Brandt intercepted an Oregon
pass on UBC's five and three minutes later 'Birds Chip
Barrett hauled in a McNeeley pass intended for end Ben
Olson on the UBC 14.
Gibbons combined with end Lance Fletcher for a 50-
yard pass-and-run play in the fourth quarter to finish the
Birds scoring for this season.
Oregon came back a minute later, with McNeeley passing ©0-yards to Olson, who got behind UBC's Jim Oldham.
-—     UBC's offence piled up a total 389-yards for 21 first-
i downs, 220-yards along the ground. "~
• • •
Oregon had 169 total offence, 74 rushing for only nine
first downs.
IThe Owls tried to retaliate against the rugged UBC
defense and were awarded 105-yards in seven penalties (the
majority for roughing).
It was the last game as a Thunderbird for end Ian
Donald, centre John Reykdal, tackles George Turpin and
Bill McLachlan and guard Kevin Murphy.
They went out winners.
opportunities /or
m
M '    * • ■■'-'''■-,
Slit pHrll HJ31G]?1C&I1
Pan American, a member of the Standard Oil Company (Indiana)
organiaztion, has several challenging career openings in the
Canadian Division Office in Calgary and in field operations
throughout Alberta. Graduating, Post-Graduate and Undergraduate Engineers are invited to:
INTERVIEWS NOVEMBER 22 and 23, 1965
Interviews for summer employment will also be conducted.
We are a rapidly growing major oil company in Alberta, offering
attractive salaries and benefits in addition to opportunity for
rapid advancement.
Appointments for interviews are being made at the Student
Placement Office. Company and Job information booklets are
available there.
PAN AMERICAN PETROLEUM CORPORATION Page 14
THE     U* B Y S S E Y
Tuesday, November 16, lv65
What do you want in a
company after graduation?
Graduates who've been out a few years say the important things to look
for in choosing a job are good training, an unrestricted chance to grow
in a solid, recognized company, income, early responsibility and a
stimulating environment where intelligence and enthusiasm are recognized. The points are not always in that order, but these are the main
ones. What, then, can Procter & Gamble offer you?
"I       An outstanding record of individualized, on-the-job training.
2.
3.
Responsibilities and promotion based on a man's ability —
not seniority.
A growth company which controls 30% - 65% of all the major
product markets in which it competes; at least one of our
brands is in 95% of all Canadian households.
A       Among other benefits, highly competitive salaries and profit
sharing.
Obviously, you need to know facts before making an excellent choice
of your career. We'd like to tell you more about us. Descriptive brochures
are availabe at your Placement Office and company representatives will
visit for interviews on:
Monday, November 29th
Tuesday, November 30th
Wednesday. December 1st
for positions in
ADVERTISING, BUVTNG, FINANCE, SALES MANAGEMENT and
"RANSPORTATION
PROCTER & GAMBLE
Hockey Birds
win seventh
UBC's  Varsity  field  hockey  team  Saturday won  its
seventh straight game in 'A' League play.
The Thunderbirds strengthened hold on first place in A
Division with a 2-0 shutout
over second-place Pitt Meadows. Goaltender Brian Rattray now has an impressive
record of five shutouts in
seven games.
Playing on a pitch of soggy
long grass which considerably
slowed down play, the two
teams fought to a deadlock at
halftime.
• •      •
All this season the  'Birds
have been a second half scoring team, and they held true
to form on Saturday with
goals by Paul Macmillen and
Diederick Wolsak late in the
game.
The 'Birds are now using a
new player positioning system
devised by coach Eric Broom.
• *     •
The    new   system,    which
seems to be working with
some success, is designed to
provide more . scoring punch,
coupled with mass defence.
While the 'Birds were
strengthening their hold on
the first division, the Braves
were taking over top spot in
the third division by whipping
the previous incumbents,
Jokers B, 4-0.
&ANADA
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HEAD FLOCKMASTER Frank
Gnup emits Gnuppian boiler during heat of Saturday's clash between Birds
and Oregon. But minutes
later Coach Gnup was more
complacent as final game
of season ended.
Top spot
clinched
by UBC
Thunderbirds clinched first
place in their section of first
division rugby with a 16-3 win
over the North Shore All-
Blacks at Kinsmen Stadium
Saturday.
The UBC pack, ably led by
Chas Pentland, outfought
their heavier opponents in the
loose play and Brook Campbell dominated the lineoutg
to give the back a constant
supply of the ball.
Dean McKinnon scored in
the corner in the early minutes and Bill Black completed
a powerful thrust by Dave
Murphy to make the score 6-0.
The All-Bladks showed
signs of wear in the second
half as the 'Birds dominated
the game, and only mistakes
in timing prevented the 'Birds
from turning the game into
a rout.
Dean McKinnon and Bill
Black each added another try,
both of which McKinnon converted to complete the scoring.
The 'Birds played well
against worthy opposition, but
their timing left much to be
desired in view of Saturday's
unofficial playoff at Brockton
Point against Kats, the leaders of the other section.
UBC Braves encountered a
roadblock to their hopes of
maintaining 1st division
status by losing to Blue
Bombers 6-3 Saturday at
Wolfson.
Totems continued their bid
for the second division championship as they walked over
Blue Bombers  16-3. Tuesday, November 16, 1965
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
—norm
NEW DANCE, the "Stomp" was demonstra ted   during   Saturday   nighfs
hockey game at Winter Sports Centre between Thunderbirds and Lumber Kings
managed to out-stomp Birds 7-4.
»»##*'
betts  photo
exhibition
Kings
POLICY  PROBLEM
Will progress win at UBC?
By ROBERT BANNO
There were those who opposed the new Canadian flag,
the women's vote and income-
tax.
And there were those who
scoffed at the Wright brothers, Socrates and The Iron
Horse.
But the sands of time have
shown that man marches in-
exoribly forward. The forces
of reaction are defeated. And
progress ultimately wins out.
This is why, according to
B.C. Lions' end Jim Carphin,
Law II, UBC will soon have
an active athletic scholarship
program.
'It's inevitable. Public opinion both in the city and on
campus is in favor," he said.
ILLUSIONS
Carphin said that the evils
sometimes associated with
athletic scholarships are either
illusory or easily avoidable.
The oft-mentioned argument of the deterioration of
academic standards, for one,
is invalid, according to Carphin.
"Some of the best athletic
schools in the U.S. have higher academic standards than
UBC," he said.
This statement is borne out
by recent academic ratings of
U.S. colleges.
CORRUPTION
They show the Big Ten,
traditionally the most powerful athletic conference in the
country, starting to eclipse the
intellectually prestigious Ivy
League in academic standards.
And they show U. of California, Joe Kapp's alma mater to
be highly regarded academically.
Undaunted, the cynics will
say that scholarships will lead
to corruption in recruiting,
that "over-emphasis" will lead
to game-fixing.
This, says Carphin, is utter
hogwash.
On corruption in recruiting:
"I hardly expect what happened in the early 50's in a
few U.S. schools will occur at
UBC. Can you picture Robert
Osborne chasing after a high
school athletic, offering him
a  Cadillac and  a  retirement
pension for his father?"
On over-emphasis: "Has it
hurt Michigan, or UCLA, or
Washington? Besides, it's difficult to draw the line between not enough emphasis
and too much. Most people believe UBC isn't emphasizing
athletics enough."
GAME-FIXING
On game-fixing: "The NCAA
has really tightened up. Offending schools are so heavily
punished that they're very
careful about it."
What about the financial
end?
Carphin claims the sacrifice
of going into the red for a few
years will be more than made
up later on.
"At most schools, the revenues from the major sports
support minor sports and inter-murals. At some schools,
money from athletics pays for
new academic buildings," he
said.
"And better teams will enable students to have a focal
point for building a feeling of
cohesion and spirit," he said.
UBC of course, with its inter-faculty rivalries has often
been criticiized for its lack of
unity and cohesion.
ATHLETIC BOND
Carphin said athletics
should also provide a bond between the community at large
and the university that is now
lacking.
"Good teams will enable the
general public to develop a
feeling of pride for the university. This is now almost
noon-existent," he said.
"As the situation is now, a
lot of people don't have anything to do with the university after they graduate. But
if we develop good football
and basketball teams, alumi
will continue to take an interest in their old school."
Watt's Jayvees
humble Saints
Norm Watt's basketball Jayvees scored their third
victory of the still young season rolling to a 69-40 victory
over CYO Saints in the Memorial Gym Saturday.
Once again, the UBC team
had trouble getting started
against weaker opponents
and were half way through
the second quarter before
they were able to permanently gain  the  lead.
By pressing most of the
way, Watt was able to keep
the tempo of the game at a
fast pace which favored his
Jayvees. A failure in this
tempo resulted in UBC's first
season loss against Victoria
last week.
Former Abbotsford track
and field star, Sam Vander-
muelen was the top UBC
scorer with 16 points. Brent
McLean, outstanding for the
losers, potted 12.
UBC (69) Langley 6. Kainer 7,
Blumenscheit 2, Carter 5, Molinski
8, Vandermuelen 16, Kein 7, Frice
6,   Churchland 6,   Quinn  6.
CYO (40) Howe
Collina 3, Kelsch 9.
4.
3,    McLean   12,
Wilson !), Kelly
Freshmen
top rowers
A surprisingly strong freshman performance highlighted
the UBC rowing crew's sweep
of the events in a meet with
Oregon State and Pacific
Lutheran University on American Lake near Tacoma Saturday.
Coach Waynne Pretty's
frosh, for whose experience
the race was primarily scheduled, stroked across the finish
line in 6:35.6, seven boat lengths ahead of Oregon State's
rooks.
All Thunderbird crews
showed the advantages of superior conditioning as theV
pulled ahead early and coasted to their victories.
The varsity finished in
6:31.4, 4V2 lengths ahead of
their own jayvees, who were
clocked in 6:49.7.
Both races were over 2,000
metres and calm water.
SIR    LAWRENCE    OLIVIER
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NOV. 18 & 19
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This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia. Page   16
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 16, 1965
'TWEEN CLASSES
Peanuts on the gospel
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
The Gospel According to
Peanuts by C. R. Pearson, Wednesday noon in Angus 110.
• •      •
ONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Secret Science with Capt.
O'Brien French, noon today in
Bu. 221.
COMMUNITY  AND
REGIONAL  PLANNING
Free film, New Face for
Britain. Wednesday noon, Las-
serre 102.
• •      •
SPECIAL EVENTS
Jean Marie Jamet and Christian Larde from Paris in a harp
and flute concert of classic and
contemporary words in Auditorium noon today. Admission
35 cents.
Jean-Pierre Ferland, French
Canadian chansonnier on national tour Wednesday noon in
Brock. Admission 25 cents.
• *      •
PRE-LAW SOCIETY
Organizational    meeting    in
Bu. 221 today at noon. All students interested in law are invited to attend.
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Dr. Jack Lewis speaks on
What Makes a Dentist, noon
today, Bu. 204.
NOON HOUR CONCERTS
Pianist Kathryn Bailey plays
works by Berg, Schoenberg
and Webern. Wednesday noon,
Bu. 106.
• •      •
PHYS SOC
Two free NASA color films:
Clouds of Venus and Four Days
of Gemini IV. Wednesday noon,
Hebb Theatre.
MATH CLUB
Student-faculty meeting. All
members  please   attend.   Wed
nesday 8 p.m., Buchanan Penthouse.
MARDI GRAS
Auditions for floor show. Females 11:30 to 2 p.m. today.
Males, Wednesday same time.
All in Brock TV room. Everyone welcome.
FENCING CLUB
Please return last term's
fencing equipment to Women's
Gym. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.
• •      •
CHORSOC
Meeting Wednesday   6   p.m.
in Bu.  104. Members see new
club room in Brock 360.
EUS
A speaker from Columbia
Cellulose will discuss employment opportunities. EUS office
today at noon.
• •      •'
EL CIRCULO
Spanish speaking day today
at IH from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Experts and coffee free.
CUSO
Film night tonight 8 p.m. at
IH.
• •      •
BRIDGE AND CHESS CLUB
Game sessions Wednesday
7:30 to II p.m. Brock TV room.
UBC CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General meeting Wednesday
noon in Bu. 214.
DEBATING UNION
Sex is For the Single Girl.
Wednesday noon, Bu. 217.
CVC
Presenting film, This is Hong
Kong, Wednesday noon, Bu.
104.
• •      •
SOCIALIST CLUB
Socialism   and   the   Federal
Election by Ruth Bullock Wednesday noon in Bu. 203.
PRE MED
Lecture by Dr. Copp on Physiology Wednesday noon Wes.
201.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days. $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock  Hall,   Ext.  26.   224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost k Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publication* office. Brock Hell. Local 24.
224-1241.
I'XJl'ND.  Sum of money on Oct. 5th.
l'hone Chris,  TR 6-5361.
l-'Ol'ND   ill   BU.   22:'.X,    Nov.    8,    1:30,
Aulos   recorder.   Owner   claim   in
Publications Office,  Adv.   Dept.
FOUND. Blue fountain pen, front of
Music. Wed., Nov. 9th, 8:30 a.m.
l'hone   KA  5-2474.
FOUND. Man's initialed ring, Angus
Bldg. Apply Ubssey Adv. Office,
Brock Hall.
LOST. Man's gold ring with Jade
stone in vicinity of Bio-Sciences
Bldg. Nov. !)th. Phone 683-8955. Reward.
JOIN
KITSILANO
CREDIT UNION
Low Cost Loans
to Members - Insured
Phone or Call:
2821 W. Bdwy.   RE 1-4531
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 West 10th
The Store with the
Technical Photo Knowledge
ft TRADES        * TERMS
ft RENTALS     ft REPAIRS
Try us for the best in
CUSTOM PHOTOFINISHING
Black and White and Color
We are always ready to help
with all your
Photographic Problems
DARKROOM SPECIALISTS
Your B.C. DLFORD stockist
224-5858   224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
FOUND. 7 inch ball point refil lin
Sedgewick. Call Irwin at 224-5598
af'.er 6 p.m.
FOI'ND in Angus 104, on Fri., Nov.
7th, text. Claim by identifying.
CA  4-9790, eves. 6-7, Harv.
DOST. Geography 101 Ttext •'Physical Geog." Strahler. Urgent. If
found please phone Marilyn, 736-
5241.
DOST. Calc. and Anal. Geom. Return
to Ubssey Adv. Office, Brock Hall.
Thank You.
HILLMAN hdtp., new clutch, rebuilt
trans., motor, body excellent shape.
Offers? Phone 224-1570.
Totem Park Resident's Association
presents
The Uniteteitii
in a concert of
Brahms, Mendelsohn, Tansman
Friday, November 19      -       8:00 p.m.
Main Lounge, Totem Park
EVERYONE WELCOME
1962 AUSTIN 850. Excellent condition, radio, new tires, $725. 736-
5375.
1960 NSU PRINZ. Good condition,
low mileage, new tires. 2200. Phone
325-5826.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriters k Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, 220
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
49
TYPING. All kinds. Mrs. Wood. 985-
5086.
THESES,     essays,     book     reviews,
notes. Phone 263-4530.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
•1
Special Notices
13
IF I SCRAPF.D your met. blue Monarch Fri. a.m. on Chancellor Blvd.
phone Dave, 731-2808 and we'll negotiate. 	
ARE YOU interested in travelling
or working abroad? Information
available at Canadian Union of
Students Office, B.E. 258, regarding work opportunities, travel,
aids, part-time study in Europe.
WHY PAY high auto insurance
rates? If you are over 20 and have
a good driving history you qualify
for our good driving rates. Phone
Ted   Elliott,   224-6707.
DANCE to The Rogues in the Lower
Mall Ballroom, Friday. Nov. 19,
9 p.m. - 1 a.m.
GREY CUP curling party. Sat., Nov.
27, 9-1. Tickets at $2.00 per couple
from   A.M.S.  or curling executive.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY from one 'dummy" to another.
Transportation
14
W. VAN. carpool needs 2 drivers.
Phone Judy, WA 2-8924 or Heather
WA 2-0256.
SAFE, exciting and exotic. \V. Van.
group needs one NEW driver with
guts. Call Sam,  922-7489.
AUTOMOTIVE   * MARINE
Automobiles For Sal*
21
1957 METEOR 2-door Hdtp. V-8,
new automatic, winterized, six
tires, radio, $600 or offer. YU 8-
7752.
FOR SALE or trade, 1956 TR 2,
wire wheels, 48,000 miles, radio,
recently overhauled engine. Phone
Ron, 224-9768, room 629, Salish
Totem Park.
1964 SUZUKI, only 3,600 miles. Must
sell, $100.00 or best offer. Phone
224-9820,   ask  for Colin   Fothergill.
'53   ZEPHYR   SIX   for   sal.   Rebuilt
clutch, trans., steering,  new tires.
Priced   low   for   quick   sale.   Doug
or   Al  at   261-3595 after six.
1959   M.G.A.   Exc.   cond.,   radio  and
heater.   Call   Ken.   228-3192.   $1,000.
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and  West Van.
PS:   New outlet  coming  close  to
U.B.C.
FRIENDLY home offered to female
student in return for baby sitting
and light duties.  261-6105.
INSTRUCTION
COMM.    252    tutor   wanted.    Please
phone  261-8340  in  the  evenings.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—THE MOST USE-
ful book on the campus. Student
telephone directory. Now available. Limited number. Buy Tour's
Today—Only 76c.	
"VOX AMPTLIFIERS, CLASSICAL
Guitars, Gretch & Guild & La-
bella Nylon Strings. Ward Music
Ltd. 412 West Hastings MU 2-
5288.
HIGH DENSITY desk lamps, $6.95
and $9.95. Drafting lamps, $14.95
(why pay more?); Calvert-Craft
Hardware & Gifts (Post Office).
Interesting selection. 3209 West
Broadway, 738-2311 (Opposite
Peter's Ice Cream and Super Valu).
PUREBRED   fluffy   white   Samoyed
pups.  CA 4-5905.	
FOR SALE. Snow tires, sixe 5.20x10,
10% wear. Phone Bill Roberts, 224-
9817 between 6 & 8 p.m.
Rooms
81
CLOSE TO GATES — SLEEPING
room for 2 male students. Pvt.
Ent., shower, phone, etc. Use of
rec. room. Available Nov. 14 CA
4-3648 after 6.
LARGE bed sitting room, private
entrance and bathroom, phone; in
quiet  home,   $45.00.  AM  6-8078.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD PRIVATE
Home. Excellent food quiet room
of your own 2735 West 14th. Phone
738-4552.   $80.    	
ROOM and board for male student.
CA 4-5905.
SKI TRAIN TO
SCHWEITZER
$21 RETURN
Leaving Vancouver Dec. 26
Arriving Sandpoint Dec. 27
(in morning)
accommodation easily arranged
along with special rates on meals
and lifts.
For reservation and information meet in Bu. 204 Wed.,
Nov. 17 at noon or phone CA 4-0604 (after 6:00 p.m.)
@ Westinghouse
WILL BE ON CAMPUS
November 22, 23 & 24
TO INTERVIEW
ENGINEERING and
SCIENCE GRADUATES
A well-defined training program is offered to prepare
candidates for position of responsibility in:
DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
FACTORY ENGINEERING
SERVICE ENGINEERING
FIELD INSTALLATION
QUALITY CONTROL AND TEST
TECHNICAL MARKETING AND SALES
These positions will afford opportunity for career development to graduates with potenial.
Professional salary scale and increases based on performance as well as excellent employee fringe benefit plans.
Contact the  Placement  Office for detailed   information,
brochures and interview appointment.

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