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UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Summer Ubyssey Jul 5, 1990

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Array SUTVUVIER,
THEUBYSSEY
We're back
& we're bovine
See page 3
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, July 5,1990
Vol 9, No 1
r
Committee
creates
controvery
by Rebecca Bishop
Council has stuck to tradition:
the Renovations Committee's recommendations have again created
controversy within the AMS.
In February of this year, council decided to re-allocate the Dress
for Less space to service organizations. The renovations committee
was set up to deal with the plans
for the space and to decide who
would get the new offices in the
SUB concourse.
On June 20 council members
ofthe Global Development Center
accused two members ofthe Renovations Committee of bias because
the GDC did not receive space.
The four other organizations
which applied for and received
space are the Ombuds Office,
Speakeasy, the Disabled Student
Association, and the Student
Environment Center.
The GDC made a presentation which criticized the renovations committee's procedures
which gave all groups only five
minutes to present their cases.
The GDC claimed that they
were not given adequate time to
give their presentation and were
cut off, while the Renovations
Committee stated that the GDC
were given five minutes because
they constituted one group even
though they are an umbrella
group representing several clubs
and student organizations.
Hai V. Le, speaking for the
GDC, alleged that both Johanna
Wickie and Roma Gopaul-Singh
were biased and had decided who
would receive space before the
Renovations Committee even met.
" (I) felt that we were under
attack from the beginning of the
meeting," said one member ofthe
GDC who spoke in council.
In their own defence, Wickie
and Gopaul-Singh also alleged
that director of administration
John Lipscomb was biased because he is a member ofthe GDC.
He was the only member of the
Renovation Committee to vote
against the four office plan which
did not allow for space for the
GDC.
When asked how he responded to the allegations of being
biased because he is a member of
the GDC as well as being on the
Renovations Committee,
Lipscomb said "I do not think that
conflict of interest applies within
an organization. It would apply if
there was a competing, external
organization involved, or if there
was some personal pay back to
myself. And in this case there is
none."
In a report to student council,
Gopaul-Singh said "my reason for
not putting the GDC in that space
is that they have only been in existence for two months now and I
would like to see something from
them before they receive this
prime space. As a service organization they receive an office and
this, in itself, is a privilege."
Because of the nature of the
accusations, Gopaul-Singh offered
to resign as chair of the Renovations Committee, but she decided
to stay after AMS president Kurt
Preinsperg had council vote to
express their confidence in her as
chair.
Council voted last night to
send the four office plan to Campus Planning, which must approve of all renovations and building on campus.
"If we approve the five office
plan in Council, it will then go to
Campus Planning and we will
decide who will get the space from
there," said Gopaul-Singh yesterday.
Ashnola Pow-wow participant.
A similar event is scheduled in Mission July 13-15.
DAVID LOH PHOTO
Sex, drugs, and broken bones
by Martin Chester
Are prescription drugs too
expensive for your tight student
budget? Does your health plan
cover hospital visits? The AMS
students' council is investigating
ways to provide UBC students
with a comprehensive health
plan.
"Health wise, students aren't
being taken care of," said Johanna
Wickie, AMS vice president.
Wickie will present a proposal for
a comprehensive health plan from
the Canadian Federation of Students and The Mutual Life of Canada company to council on July 18.
If council accepts this proposal, a referendum will be called
for early fall. UBC students will
decide not only if they want to pay
an additional $33 for this plan, but
also if they want the plan extended
to cover accidental death or dismemberment and eye care.
Students could join a family
plan for dependents or they could
opt out ofthe plan all together, as
long as they provide "proof that
they are participating in a plan
with equivalent coverage," she
said.
The plan being proposed is
similar to ones now available at
ten universities across the country, including the University of
Victoria. It includes an 80% cost
coverage on prescription drugs for
twelve months, access to semi-private hospital rooms at no added
expense, and limited vision care,
all in addition to provincial health
care programs.
Instead of having to pay cash
for each visit to the doctor, students would just show a membership card similar to the provincial
government's "CareCard". Prescription purchases would require
the user to pay 20% ofthe cost.
This system, a "pay-direct
system", costs far more than a
reimbursement system, but it involves far less paperwork. A reimbursement system can be "an
administrative nightmare,"
Wickie said.
And students find it easier to
scrape up 20% of the money for a
prescription than to scrape up all
of the money and get reimbursed
later.
"Everybody has $4," she said.
"Not everybody has $20."
The plan would cover 80% of
the cost of oral contraceptives.
Women who usually buy oral contraceptives would save enough
money in just a few months that
the plan would pay for itself, she
said.
But she did not yet know if the
plan would provide same sex
spousal benefits. Classifieds 228-3977
RATES: AMS Card Holden - 3 linen, $3.00, additional Une* 60 cents,
commercial -3 lines, $5.00, additional line* 75 centt. (10% Discount on
25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4.-00
p.m,. two days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van^ B.C. V6T
2A7, 228-3977.
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after 7 pm
50-RENTALS
RENT TOP QUALITY
Camping Gear, Mountain Bikes, Tents,
Kayaks (doubles and singles), etc. Lowest
rates in town. Reserve equipment.
228-3515
Located in Dispensary
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM.
70-SERVICES
LOOSE WEIGHT NOW
Safe, quick, easy
Call Marcel or Joan 263-4370
75-WANTED
SPERM DONOR VOLUNTEER
required non-smoker, health, physique important dependability a top priority,
please call 325-0920
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
word processing/typing. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson, 228*8346.
TYPING / WORD PROCESSING.
Resumes, student papers, laser printer. Call
Debbie, eves 266-8716, days 682-2366
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES
Papers, thesis, resumes,
call Dianne at 270-3389
TYPING - EDITING • PROOFING, 24
hour service, Tapes-cassettes transcribed
Located beside campus 224-2310
TYPING QUICK. Right by UBC.
All kinds, editing, $1.50 pg. dspc.
call Rob at 228-8989 anytime
QUALITY WORD PROCESSING laser
printers, student rates. Phone Agnes 734-
3928 or Lynda 736-5010.
BIND YOUR THESIS
Library quality hard cover books
$15 plus gold stamping,
anything in soft covers $1.99 + up
CaU 683-2463 today
WORD-PROCESSING
2.50/page 224-5242 Computersmitha
3726 W. Broadway (at Alma St.)
Between
Deadline for submissions: fbr
Thursday's paper is Monday at
&30PM, LATE SUBMISSIONS
WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
THURSDAY, JULY 5
UBC School of Muse
Music for Summer Evenings
Concert  Series,  featuring an
Evening of Chamber Music
8:00 pm Recital Hall • Music
Building - UBC contact 228-3113
TUESDAY- JULY 10
UBC School of Music
Music for Summer Evenings
Concert Series, featuring James
Alexander, piano
8:00 pm Recital Hall - Music
Building - UBC contact 228-
3113
THURSDAY, JULY 12
UBC School of Music
Music for Summer Evenings
Concert Series, featuring an
Evening of Chamber Music by
the Festival Players of Canada
8;00 pm Kecital Hall - Music
Building - UBC contact 228-
3113
IHOT
■flashes
ANTIDISCRIMINATION
MEETING
Monday July 19th
General Meeting,
5:00 pm SUB rm 260
contact 228-6101
AMS
Nomination forms now available
for two (2)
STUDENT AT LARGE
POSITIONS
on the
AMS Budget Committee
in Room SUB 238.
Due on Friday, July 13th at 4:00 pm.
Apologies to those who handed in applications
previously. Please resubmit
rPHOTOCOPYINGi
SERVICES
SELF-SERVES ... 5C and 1 Oc
available early morning to latenight
FULL COUNTER SERVICE
Monday - Thursday ....8:30 am - 7:00 pm
Friday 8:30 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday 12 noon - 4:00 pm
LOWER LEVEL
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
Ph: 228-4388 Fax 228-6093
The vilest raq
west cf the
Atlantic..."
,     The Ubtsset
SUMMER SCENE
Volume 19, No. 1     July 5 -12,1990
Hello and welcome to Summer Session '90
SliUfirnOr SOSSJOn The Summer Session Association is the student organization of Summer Session; if you
A _>-_*-sNs^'i-it'^N.--. have any Problems, concerns or suggestions, please drop by our office - SUB 210. We
ASSOCIQTIOn     are there Monday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Phone 228-3980.
UBC SUMMER BLOOD DONOR CLINIC
Help support the annual UBC Summer Blood Donor
Clinic by Providing a pint of blood to help save
lives. Clinic will be held July 5 & 6, Scarfe Bldg., 11
a.m. - 4 p.m.
SUMMER SOUNDS
Free, noon-hour concerts. Bring your lunch and a
friend. At SUB Plaza.
Thursday. July 5
Friday. July 6
Monday. July 9
Monday, July 9
Tuesday. July 10
Wednesday. July 11
Gary Keenan Jazz Quartet
Basin Street Jazz Band
TBA
"Phoenix Jazzers"
TBA
Penguin String Quartet
MUSIC FOR SUMMERS EVENING
Free. Music Building Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday. July 5
Thursday. July 12
Tuesday. July 10
String Quartet Chamber
Music, featuring Schubert's
"Trout"
The Festival Players
of Canada play music of
Mozart, Martinu, Crusell
and Dahl.
Piano recital featuring
James Alexander,
(Germany), performing
music of Scarlatti, Brahms,
Hindemith and Scriabln.
SUMMER SCREEN
All films are FREE to everyonel 7:30 p.m.
Coming soon to Woodward IRC Lecture Hall #2
Thursday. July 5:
LETHAL WEAPON II - the action-filled sequal to
1988's major summer hit features Danny Glover
and Mel Gibson battling the evil forces of drug
lords and murderers in this thrill-a-minute action
movie. (RESTRICTED)
Friday. July 6:
THE ABYSS features Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth
Mastrantonio In this exciting venture into the
depths of the ocean in search of an incapacitated
nuclear submarine. This Film won Oscars for Its
amazing special effects and photography.
(MATURE)
Saturday. July 7:
RAIN MAN features an Oscar Winning performance
by Dustin Hoffman in this touching story of the
re-unltlng of brothers. Many critics feel that Tom
Cruise presents the finest performance of his
career in this film. (MATURE)
Monday. July 9:
DRIVING MISS DAISY Is the beautifully - filmed
version of the Pultitzer Prize - winning play. The film
won 1989 Oscars for *Best Film" and "Best Actress"
for Jessica Tandy's superbly-acted performance.
(GENERAL)
Tuesday, July 10:
LICENSE TO KILL is the latest In the Cubby Broccoli -
produced series of James Bond films. This one
features Timothy Dalton on a mission of revenge in
the Florida Keys. (14 YRS. - LIMITED)
Wednesday. July 11:
HONEY, I SHRUNK THE KIDS was the major surprise
hit of 19891 Join the 4 Szalinski kids as they are
reduced to being 1 /4" tall and try to stay alive in
their backyard. This Disney film features some
spectacular special effects. (GENERAL)
2/THE UBYSSEY
July 5,1990 '■M'VjMflgggp«WWjgggjgfl^'"'""«iimiiii tfgii---inigiuyw jgmigg^ypii^giiiH^iiiiiv m
'Thank you kindly, k.d.lang, for sticking up for our rights."
UBC handles discrimination
by Rebecca Bishop
One good thing that has come
out ofthe scandal about the Engineering Undergrad Society's
nEUSlettre was the creation ofthe
position of anti-discrimination
coordinator.
The purpose ofthe position is
to study discrimination on campus, and to find ways of dealing
with it.
Carol Hui, an active participant in the Hate Hurts campaign,
was appointed to the position by
the students' council.
She said that UBC is not the
only university having to cope
with discrimination.
"THE UBC Engineers are not
the only ones with this problem.
The University of Alberta recently
had a problem with their engineers about discrimination. They
have been asking UBC what we
have been doing about it.
"Since other universities are
turning to UBC for advice, it
seems that UBC is leading the way
in handling discrimination."
Hui is presently dealing with
a dilemma regarding the fine of
$15,000 levied against the EUS by
student court. The fine is supposed
to cover the cost ofthe potlatch and
the conference the EUS promised
to organize.
President Strangway decided
that the administration will not
collect the EUS's fees for the 1990/
91 academic year, preventing the
society from paying the fine.
"We cannot hold the potlatch
or the conference until Strangway
reverses his decision," she said.
One other issue Hui has dealt
with is adding a section in the
AMS Code and Bylaws dealing
with multiculturalism, human
rights, and harassment.
"The AMS has previously
been handling cases under the
section in the bylaws which gives
the AMS authority to deal with
students' for any behaviour
deemed unbecoming to a member
ofthe society,™ she said.
Student Court has seen a
large increase in the number of
cases brought forward. Hui's intention is to change the code so
that it is more specific. Changes to
the code can be made by AMS
council, but bylaws must be
passed in a referendum or at an
annual general meeting.
Hui is also putting together a
pamphlet to be written by minority groups.
"Two organizations I have
contacted are the Sikh Student
Association and Dykes Unlimited.
It is a pamphlet that gives minor
ity groups the opportunity to
speak up and relate their experiences. It gives them a chance to
dispel myths about their groups."
"Its going to be distributed at
Brock, Speakeasy, and the Registrar's Office. It is too late this year,
but hopefully next year it can be
distributed in the registration
packages telling new students
that discrimination will not be
tolerated on campus."
Hui's term ends September
eighth, and one of her concerns has
been to seek funding to make the
position a permanent one.
"You cannot tackle discrimination in sixteen weeks," she said.
"We are hoping to extend the position so we can continue working."
Hui has been looking for support from the administration and
has noted that the AMS is not the
only group looking into discrimination on campus.
"In speaking with the multicultural-cultural liasons office it
seems that president Strangway
has been planning a task force on
race relations," Hui explained. "It
would be a great step to counter
discrimination and an appropriate response to dealing with the
EUS newsletter - if this task force
gets underway as soon as possible."
Valley seeks university site
by Mark Nielsen
The Fraser Valley could become the home of a fourth university in B.C. by 1995.
The university should be
large enough for 4,000 full-time
students and should be located in
Abbotsford, Langley or Surrey "to
provide optimum commuter access," according to a report released June 4 by Bruce Strachan,
Minister of Advanced Education,
Training and Technology.
The report was written by the
Fraser Valley Access Committee,
which was made up of the presidents of Simon Fraser University,
Douglas College, Kwantlen College and Fraser Valley College.
Strachan also announced that
a consultation group will be
launched to gather public opinion
on the subject.
The consultation group will
hold public meetings throughout
the summer and report back to the
Ministry in the fall.
But the report fails to address
the possibility of developing a
current college into a university,
according to Ed Lavalle, president
ofthe College-Institute Educators
Association of B.C.
He said that such a model,
which adds degree-granting
status to existing community colleges, is considered to be more
cost-effective and more community-responsive than the creation
of a new and separate university.
Within the next five years,
Okanagan College, Malaspina
College and Cariboo College will
become university-colleges.
Lavalle called FVC president
Peter Jones's treatment of university-colleges in the report as
"superficial and an injustice to the
potential of Fraser Valley College
to become a degree completion institution."
Lavalle also attacked the
process by which the report was
developed.
"The strong reaction that
Canadians have had to the Meech
Lake process indicates that there
is a healthy demand and respect
for the democratic principle of
participation by both those with
expertise and those who will be
affected by decisions that the government makes," he said.
"The C-IEA would have preferred the involvement of all constituencies in the college community and the public at large in
developing this study."
But Jones said that the university-college option has not been
discounted completely.
"The concerns I expressed
were made in the appendix ofthe
report and are not considered to be
part of the report's recommendations," he said.
Jones said that the recommendations were deliberately
made general to provide room for
public discussion at the upcoming
hearings.
Adlerian Psychology
Association of BC
M.A. DEGREE IN COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY
Degree is granted by the Alfred Adler Institute of Chicago.
Courses are taught in Vancouver on weekends and evenings by
Alfred Adler Institute approved instructors. Ideal for those in the
teaching, nursing, social work and counselling fields and other
helping professionals.
The program is founded on the theory of Individual Psychology originated by Alfred Adler with a focus on holism of
individuals, mutual respect, equality, encouragement, cooperation and goal oriented behavior.
POST GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN COUNSELLING
Provides specialized training in Adlerian techniques and is
designed for practicing professionals who already possess a
Masters or Doctoral degree in counselling or related fields.
For more information phone 874-4614 or write
#210 - 2525 Manitoba Street, Vancouver, BC V5N 3A7
CLOSEST BYCYCLE SHOP TO UBC
BICYCLE STORES
OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
12 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU
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We Also Have a Fully Stocked Service and Repair Department
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July 5,1990
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ANNIVERSARY
SUMMER CAMPUS TOURS
AND INFORMATION
Visit the Information Desk in the main concourse of the Student Union Building. An AMS information officer is available 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays
to answer your questions. Information is available on campus events, services
and facilities open to both students and the community.
Free walking tours of the campus are also available at the desk until Aug. 31.
Tours include gardens, museums, sports facilities and other UBC attractions.
Drop-in tours leave the desk weekdays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. You may also
book 3 p.m., weekend and special tours by calling ahead.
FOR INFORMATION ABOUT UBC,
OR TO BOOK A TOUR,
CALL 228-3777.
19 15-1990
m
ANNIVERSARY
Going through
What has happened sh
Court findings
accepted by council
Student court's findings regarding the Engineering Undergraduate Society's nEUSlettre,
which was accused of printing
racist, sexist, and homophobic
articles, were accepted by AMS
students'council on April 4. NEUSlettre editor Martin Sykes was
fined $10 while the EUS itself
stands to be fined $15,000. The
EUS fine, however, is dependent
upon Strangway reversing his
decision not to collect EUS fees.
Council also disassociated itself from AMS president Kurt
Preinsperg's comments to the
press questioning Student Court's
involvement and defending the
nEUSlettre's freedom of speech. A
press release was not issued how-
Council votes to
change election bylaws
The rules are changing. The
AMS students' council is hoping to
change the by-laws that govern
the society's elections.
All those planning to run for
AMS positions in the future will
have to have twenty nominator's
signatures, rather than the ten
previously required.
Candidates will also be able to
spend more on their election campaigns with the limit being raised
from $125 to $150. Reimbursement of this money by the AMS
will continue but will now be limited to those who run for executive
positions.
Other by-laws introduced and
accepted at council included a
conflict of interest guideline for
council members as directors of
the society, changes to the regulations governing service organizations to include a one year probationary period, and an undergraduate publications policy to
create a framework of responsibility for undergrad publications.
Global Development
Centre created as a
new service
organization
A new service organization
has entered the limelight at UBC.
At May's first student council
meeting the Global Development
Centre was created as a new service organization, to inform students about development issues.
The VSO conducted by Derrick Inouye
International Women's Volleyball comes .o I
Scott punches holes in the Japanese defens
Japanese national team edging Team Canad
V-Con 18, May 25-27 at UBC.
4/THE UBYSSEY
July 5,1990 i the motions
V
ce we last published
j
V
euro
IM
■i-
y^izuic
JBO on June 14. Here Canada's Diane
b in a tight match, but which sees the
3-4.
Aquatic Centre
management in
negotiation
Students may get the boot
from the Aquatic Centre management.
The UBC president's office
informed the AMS in late April
that it hopes to alter the Aquatic
Centre Management Committee.
The university's changes would
entail the president's office appointing the chair of the committee with the manager ofthe centre
also reporting to the office. The
existing committee structure is an
autonomous committee composed
of representatives from both the
AMS and the university.
The AMS is presently negotiating with the university.
Committee
applications lost
Applications for the student-
at-large positions on the AMS
budget committee, except for
those of Anna Brown and Carol
Tremblay, were lost. To date no
students-at-large have been appointed as council postponed the
appointment of students-at-large
to the committee until applications could be sought again.
Two council members, Alan
Price and Kelly Guggisberg, have
been appointed to sit on the committee along with the director of
finance John Lipscomb and vice-
president Johanna Wickie.
Goddess looking for
home
The Chinese Students' Association is looking for a location for
a six foot high "goddess of democracy" statue that it has received
funding for.
Merilomas praised,
not condemend
The AMS chose not to
condemn the Meralomas Rugby
Club for a sexist and racist incident in May. The incidents refer to
a movie which depicted a Chinese
peasant being hung and a parody
of the massacre at the Ecole
Polytechnique. Instead, council
sent a letter congratulating the
Meralomas Rugby Club on their
speed in dealing with the incident
and those responsible.
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July 5,1990
THE UBYSSEY/5 :■ _§MI';:""__ *■» J_L■':■      "■'; -**K'■;": '■'■ __
^C_T._____ ■>•__■ _____ mm tut _n__ ■
editorial
Hibernia held
hostage
Underneath the Atlantic, off the coast of
Newfoundland lies the Hibernia oil field.
Hibernia contains enough oil to free Atlantic
Canada from poverty, enough to make the
province of Newfoundland a relatively wealthy
province.
But now another body of water may block
access to economic prosperity—Meech Lake.
The urgency with which the federal government pursued the completion of a deal with
the provincial legislature has disappeared
along with their zeal to approve a $2.6 million
contribution to the oil project development.
Many Newfoundlanders wonder if it was
just a coincidence that the sudden halt in the
process came so soon after their premier's decision not to hold a vote to ratify the Meech
Lake Accord. Is this Ottawa's way of punishing
dissenting provinces?
The Quebec situation cannot be ignored,
yet the Meech Lake accord did not adequately
address the problems of other Canadians such
as the Native peoples and Newfoundlanders.
The federal government is blatantly retaliating against provinces who legally and justifiably opposed the accord.
The people of Newfoundland now must
bear the consequences of Mulroney's failure to
be a Canadian hero.
The tactic of passing the buck to scapegoat
provinces is dangerously divisive, promoting
more regional disunity instead of trying to consolidate confederation.
A time for healing indeed.
TBafeSSEY
July 5,1990
The Summer Ubyssey is published Wednesdays by the
Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The Summer Ubyssey is published with the
proud support of the Alumni Association. The editorial
office is Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building.
Editorial Department, phone 228-2301; advertising,
228-3977;   FAX# 228-6093
It was a blistering hot afternoon and the sprawling bodies on the
beach had just finished shovelling down lunch. There were lots of
lime popeicles and chopsticks. Greg Davis was stoned and reading
Kerouac. Mike Coury and his purple and orange Volkswagen van
just cruised up onto the boardwalk. "Hey, Steve Chan...like, what's
happening to the waves?" he squealed, but Steve was busy flipping
over the honey-brown bodies with a stainless steel spatula. Suddenly the beachballs stopped in mid-air; out of the blue, out of the
ocean came the goddess of Tan, beads of water glistening on her
freckled shoulders. A peroxide blonde in a crocheted string bikini,
she slinked toward Martin Chester. Mike Roman drooled. It was
Rebecca Bishop. Paul Dayson the hulking, rippling sex machine
joined her. "God, IVe got big muscles, and I can bench press your
house." John Gray scoffed, "I can kick that zinc shit and Vaumets off
your nose." Chester, joining in the beach body showdown, divined
venomously: "Shut up you fool. At one time, I could have consumed
you, part by part, and you would have melted in my mouth. Now, I'd
chew you up and spit you out." Laura J. May in red polka dot ankle
socks and nothing else, came screechingin on the back of David Loh's
peacock blue Harley Davison. "Wow all these Fabulous babes,"
moaned David the arrogant stud muffin. Meanwhile all the 98 pound
weaklings were still lusting after Rebecca the Temptress. "Ooh baby,
ooh baby. Won't you be my Annette Fettucini," crooned Don Mah.
Imprisoned within a 10 foot sand condominium was Yukie/Yuka-
Buk Kurahashi. "Help me, help" she squeaked. Ernie Stelzer roared
into the scene strapped to the hood of Effie Pow*s cherry red,
convertible Toyota Tercet, listening to New Kids on the Block. Upon
hearing the cries for help, Effie the auccubus gunned the engine and
plowed through the condo, creating a billowing tornado of sand,
blinding Lyanne Evans in the lifeguard tower. "Aahh, BE HEARD
NOT HERDED* capitalized Omar Diaz as he shaved Ted Awesome's
moustache. The truth always cornea out on the beach...Ted was Greg
Man's Twin brother. Mike Laanela was naturally putti ng highlights
into his welcome mat dreadlock stubs. "Oh you sexy brat" whimpered Hao Li. It was another day at the Ubyssey beach.
Rabocca Bishop
Editor*
Martin Chester • Paul Dayson
^^^
I am HAW T& EXIST AT THIS mm
HAPPY BECAUSE MEN ONE PUTS ONE'S
\\m, REASON AND Witt lb WKK
AT THB SKVIC£ OF lr\E PEOflE,
ONE T&& ™H HAPPINESS. OF 7HAT
WrtlCH flftlte TO BE FEEORN "
-victor 3fa
t.raphic   Thf Mum
Letters
Nidal needs
you!
Amnesty International
UBC would again like to
thank anyone who aided us
in the release of BASIL
LEGBA, who was our
adopted prisoner of conscience until his release in
August of'89.
We would now like to
announce the adoption of
Nidal Do (a 24 year old engineering student in Syria).
NIDAL is a prisoner of conscience who was arrested on
April 12, 1987, because of
his involvement in the forbidden Communist Party
Political Bureau (CPPB).
120 members of the CPPB
are presently being retained
without charge or trial.
To help NIDAL once
again obtain his freedom
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words In length. Content
which Is Judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually Incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but It is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with Identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.	
and see his rights restored,
Amnesty UBC is writing on
his behalf. We ask that
NIDAL be released immediately because he has not
advocated nor used violence, and because he is
being detained solely because of his political beliefs.
We also inform the authorities, when writing letters,
that NEDAL is being detained without being formally charged or tried
(which is unfortunately allowed under the Syrian
State of Emergency Law of
1962).
If anyone wishes to help
Amnesty UBC speak out
against the injustices that
NIDAL and many other
prisoners now face, writing
a letter could help a great
deal. Some addresses of
Syrian authorities will be
posted on the office  door
(SUB 241B) as well as the
number of someone to contact if you have any questions.
Let NIDAL experience
the effects of our voices.
Thank you for your help.
Trina Moulin
D of F speaks
The Global Development Centre has asked me,
as a member of the AMS
Renovations Committee, to
abstain on Committee motions concerning the GDC.
Further, they request that I
make this known to the student body via the Ubyssey
and to Student Council via
individual letter.
I will comply with their
request.
I hope that AMS Student Council will come up
with a solution that houses
all applying service organi- -
zations in the concourse because it is so important that
students find out about all
the valuable services available.
Re the term "conflict
of interest": I believe that .
this applies to organizations
external to the AMS, not to
internal organizations like
the GDC. For example, I
believe that the Prime Minister would not be in a conflict of interest if he supported Parks Canada while
at the same time voting for .
Parks Canada to oversee
part of the Carmanah Valley.
Webster's: "conflict of
interest": a conflict between
the obligation to the public
and the self-interest of a
public officeholder.
John Lipscomb
D. of Finance
Frustrations of a University Christian in the trenches   *
When I was younger,
and first took things seriously, I thought an evangelical was a sincere or active
Christian. In today's world
people usually think of an
evangelical as a right-wing
middle-class suburbanite
with a scheduled spirituality, a shallow personality,
having little interest in the
outside world, and possessing a blind intolerance of
anything different. I can see
now why my parents were a
little worried about me
when I came home from
camp one summer actually
wanting to go to Sunday
School.
Now that Fm in university, I struggle with the
doubts and uncertainties of
Christianity every day. The
doubts would be much easier to deal with if I didn't
have to deal with Christians. In theory Christians
should be more humble,
more unassuming, less
judgmental, and more concerned with the world
around them than the rest of
society. We should be because of some basic we are
said to hold like The Golden
Rule, Love Thy Neighbour,
and Comfort The Suffering.
Unfortunately we don't
seem to be living up to our
own standards. Many
Christians I
know are selfish, judgmental, materialistic, and driven by Western
Culture's need to "succeed".
Ironically, most Christians
seem to be not only just the
same as the rest of society,
but recent media attention
on "Christian Leaders" suggests they are worse than
those who don't claim absolute moral standards. Your
average middle-class mainstream Christian adult worries more about his or her
career and his or her mortgage payments than he or
she does about world hunger, human rights, or the environment. In short, the
Church has not gone into
the world, the world has
gone into the Church.
Perspective
Many times I have
looked at organized religion,
at its hypocrisy, factionalism, ethno-centricity, and
lack of vision, and have despaired. One does not necessarily find the warmth and
openness that
is called for in
the Church,
unless one
meets a congregation's cultural requirements first.
I stick around because
every once in a while I discover people older than
myself who have not met the
media's expectations. They
shake me up because I too
have begun to conform to
the world's mold, and that is
frightening. These men and
women are truly counter-
cultural—in the true sense
radical—and push against
Christian lethargy and
worldly selfishness. Certainly one can find amazing
people in the outside the
Christian Church, but those
who are in it seem to have a
firmer foundation, and a
focus for their activism.
These people are notable because of a "something" they have as Christians that the rest of the
world does not. It would be
impossible to try to describe
here what that is, as words
do not come close to encompassing it fully. Call it zeal,
piety, focus, purpose, un-
worldliness, holiness.
The Church should not
be a comfortable cloister for
people of like minds to hide
away in. It should be a
centre from which its members can affect the world
around them. Christianity
began as a counter-cultural
fringe group. In that time it
was the most effective. The
Church today has forgotten
its roots and the power it
possessed. Christians have
lost sight of one of their most
important missions: to
awaken mainstream culture to its corruptness, its
selfishness, and its materialism in short social action.
Spencer Capier
Arts 3
6/THE UBYSSEY
July 5,1990 llVIVy^,^pjila.  	
"i't'SS^jr,^
AMS attends national
student conference
By Martin Cheater
"Within the next 5 years, we
- will be a part of a national student
organization,"  said  AMS  vice
^president Johanna Wickie.
Wickie and AMS coordinator
of external affairs, Jason Brett,
attended the Canadian Federation of Students National Confer-
* ence as observers.
At this time UBC is not a
^member of CFS and Wickie still
has some reservations about joining.
Wickie questioned the financial situation of CFS.
There is the "potential for a
financial crisis in CFS," if they do
not sort out their funding priorities, Wickie said.
She also said she has some
concerns about the future of CFS
because ofthe reluctance of larger
universities such as UBC, York
University and the University of
Toronto to join. All three want to
see CFS change to a weighted
system of voting which allows the
larger universities more say than
smaller and more numerous colleges.
"We can't be isolated unto
ourselves," Wickie said indicating
that the AMS should be looking to
become a part of a national student voice. But she believes that
voice need not necessarily be the
CFS.
Coordinated efforts, such as
the lobbying done by the AMS and
the CFS last year for transit concessions, may not be possible in
the future if UBC does not join
some sort of student organization.
Reno comes to Canada
.:
f-
The 3rd Canadian Special
Olympic Summer Games will take
place in B.C. this year with more
than 750 mentally handicapped
athletes from across Canada com-
■ peting.
The Games take place nationally every 4 years, and will be held
July 11 to 15 in Vancouver and
Richmond, with most events at
UBC.
Opening ceremonies will
take place Wednesday, July 11 at
7:00pm at B.C. Place Stadium,
with local celebrities such as recording artist Mike Reno and former NHL player Dave "Tiger"
Williams lending support.
Reno will perform the Special
Olympic theme song, "Keep The
Fire", at the opening ceremonies.
Williams, who has been involved
with Special Olympics for over
sixteen years, will act as Honorary
Head Coach for the games.
"These programs provide
(people with) the chance to train
and practice in a variety of sports,
learn new skills, and have a great
time doing it," said Williams in a
prepared statement.
The Games feature aquatics,
soccer, track & field, powerlifting,
rhythmic gymnastics, and five and
ten pin bowling.
Gold medal winner in rhythmic gymnastics at the 1984 Olympics, Lori Fung will act as honorary coach in this discipline. Former Vancouver Whitecap Bob
Lenarduzzi will act as coach in the
soccer event.
We're back
& we need help
Come to The Ubyssey, SUB 241K
The UBC BOOKSTORE
setsSALE
from June 21st
until Aug 3rd.
Paperback and hardcover BOOKS
for all interests
new selection daily, rain or shine
$1.99 • $2.99. $3.99 • $4.99
Great deals!
We have more than just
books on sale	
selected Vancouver souvenirs
and gifts, art supplies and electronic
goods, sportswear and sunglasses.
Enter our Summer Spectacular draw
for our summer surprise.
June 21st-August 3rd
10:00 am-4:30 pm
i BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard-228-4741
SUMMER SIDEWALK
SALE
Open
7 Days
A Week
F8-6
Sat-Sun
11-6
DISCOVER THE
COMPETITION
!vl**=  low low prices
!=ri^  free services
;M^  laser printing
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE 2ND FLOOR 2174 W. PARKWAY, VANCOUVER, B.C. PHONE (604) 224-6225
ONLY 99*
Plus Deposit
RECEIVE A 6 PACK OF
COKE WHEN YOU
ORDER ANY PIZZA WITH
TWO OR MORE ITEMS.
(Also Valid with 2 for 1 orders)
No Coupon necessary. Just call and ask.
One 6 pack per order. Limited time only.
UBC
224-1030
5736 University Blvd.
®
July 5,1990
THE UBYSSEY/7 ARTS
Lux
bv Puul Dayson
VER wondered how you
might survive lost in the
woods overnight?
Curious George has the answer: Light your skateboard on
fire, and roast game on a stick
placed across the trucks.
MUSIC
Curious George
Lux Theatre
July 1st
Besides providing audience;
with pearls of survival knowledge, Curious George has to he
the best of the new punk rock
bands that have emerged on the
Vancouver music scene in the
last few years. They play fast,
hard-hitting music.
Mixing ideas with humour,
irreverence and a touch of
lunacy, Curious George creates
live shows of pure energy. Their
July 1st show was no exception.
For an all ages show it was
surprising how many people
showed up at one o'clock in the
morning. Surprising until one
saw the show. Curious George's
set was fast and furious. What
was really impressive about
these guys was the amount of
fun they seemed to be having.
And it was infectious. They
enjoyed their music but didn't
take the whole thing too seriously. They wanted a good time
and delivered it as well.
The energy uunng   v..ana-
dian National Front", the band's
attack on skinheads, or "Walk
with an Erection", a humourous
rewrite ofthe Bangles' "Walk
like an Egyptian", was truly
amazing.
These songs are destined to
be punk rock classics as is "Red
Shirt". It's a song about being a
security person wearing a red
uniform when Scotty beams you
down with the landing party,
knowing that you will be dead by
the first commercial. It is a song
for all of those who feel like
cannon fodder.
The two opening bands were
solid. The Afghan Whigs, a
Boise, Idaho band on Seattle's
Sub-Pop label, played a GO's
garage style of music with a 90's
flavour. The second band, Dirt,
played fast straight forward
music that was good but a little
uninspiring.
Curious George are now
touring California with Dirt for
three weeks. I recommend to
anyone who hasn't seen Curious
George to catch one of their
shows when they return. Why
delay the inevitable?
Oils ooze the
passion
b\ Martin Chester
W    LEVEN thousand people
______ packed themselves into
UBC's Thunderbird Stadium last
Tuesday night, more than the
UBC athletic department has
seen in the last decade.
But the crowd was not out
for a football game, nor a soccer
match, but for an outdoor concert
featuring Australia's Midnight
Oil.
MUSIC
Midnight Oil
UBC Thunderbird Stadium
June 26th
The Oils gave a slick performance. Lead singer Peter
Garrett held the audience
spellbound with his stage antics,
resembling a rather frantic
display of tai chi.
,        The band kept the audience
hopping throughout their show
with a wide range of songs from
the environmental Blue Sky
Mine album to The Power and
The Passion, the song which
brought the Oils their first North
American success, despite its
anti-American and anti-big
business theme.
Opening the show with a
solid, though uninspired half
hour set was Vancouver's punk
refugee Art Bergmann. "We're
the little guys tonight,"
Bergmann explained to the
crowd and his performance lived
up to his words.
Bergmann's music is better
suited to dingy clubs, but he and
his band are slowly breaking out
into the larger arena of popular
music, perhaps despite themselves. Bound For Vegas, his
newest single, has even had
MuchMusic airplay.
Hunters and Collectors followed Art Bergmann with an energetic display of melodic songs
which were somewhat lost on the
crowd, which can be attributed to
the band's lack of exposure on
North American radio. H & C
has been backing Midnight Oil
throughout a North American
tour, of which Vancouver was the
last stop, giving Hunters and
Collectors its first opportunity to
play before large audiences
outside of Australia.
Their music owes a lot to
American soul, but what sets H
& C apart from other bands is
their horn section which consists
of a trumpet, a trombone and a
french horn. The combination
makes for not only a distinctive,
muted sound, but one that seems
very well suited to pop music in
general.  It's a wonder the french
horn has not been used more in
The one element which tied
the three bands together on the
bill was politics. Bergmann is
well known for his anti-right
wing tirades, and H & C added
to the left wing content with
Inside a Fire Ball, a sympathetic
look at labour strife in Northern
Australia.
The Oils' message, presented
in clear terms not only in their
music, but by Peter Garrett in
between songs, was one of preserving the environment,
fighting for equality and respecting the culture ofthe indigenous
peoples of Australia and North
America. A message that should
not be lost on this campus.
"How are we going to make
this a better place," he asked, "if
we don't start using our heads
and our hearts?"
4
*
VOLUNTEERS REQUIRED
Genital Herpes treatment study. Volunteers
with recurrent genital herpes are required for
the testing of a potential new treatmentinot a cure).
The study involves admission to the hospital for
5-6 days for the intravenous infusion of this new
agent or a placebo containing no active ingredient.
Treatment must be initiated within 12 hours ofthe
appearance of a new lesion. Volunteers must be 18
years of age or older, not pregnant, and off all
antiviral preparations for 7 days prior to enrollment.
An honorarium will be provided to cover expenses.
If you are interested in finding out more about
participating in this study, please call for details
660-6704 before your next recurrence.
QUENCH
Large Selection
of Sodas & Juices
SUB LOWER CONCOURSE
Recycle this newspaper
8/THE UBYSSEY
July 5,1990

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