UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 10, 1964

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126369.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126369.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126369-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126369-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126369-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126369-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126369-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126369-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126369-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126369.ris

Full Text

Array That's a lot
of prof
THS UBYSSEY
To take
off
VOL. XLVII, No. 23
VANCOUVER,  B.C., TUESDAY,  NOVEMBER  10,   1964
CA 4-3916
rf^x^
-don hume photos
PROFS SWEAT IT OFF
WORKING OFF academic fat, UBC professors run, tumble
and otherwise belabor soft muscles. Eight profs turned up
Monday for the first of the weekly keep-fit sessions in
Education Gym. Program is sponsored by the Faculty
Association and the Physical Education Department.
Sale of annuals
to be boycotted
Young Democrats protest
scabs'; editor resigns Medicare
By PAUL TERRY /,                        ,
A  New   Democratic   Party   member   of  UBC's   Totem WOn t   UPSCT
Annual  staff resigned  Monday   as   the   Young   Democrats
launched a campaign to boycott Totem sales. I         i           '
Marcia Quail, Totem's layout GfOCl OfS
Emergency
system
clarified
The confused emergency aid
situation on campus has already begun to be clarified,
director of University Health
Services Dr. A. M. Johnson
said Monday.
"Steps have been taken to
make students more aware of
what to do in case of an emergency," Dr. Johnson said.
He was replying to a survey
reported in Friday's Ubyssey
showing the difficulties students face trying to get emergency medical aid.
"We are posting notices in
every telephone booth on campus with the correct numbers
to phone in case of trouble,"
Dr. Johnson said.
The numbers on the notice
are:
• Fire Department and Inhal
ator:  local  222  or  CA  4-
4567;
• Police: CA 4-1911;
• UBC   Health   Service   (Wes
brook hospital): local 333
or CA 4-5650; and
• Ambulance: 879-4511.
Neither of the hospital numbers is listed in the Vancouver telephone directory or Bird
Calls, the student telephone
directory, the survey showed.
Dr. Johnson emphasized the
human element in handling of
accidents.
< "The one, danger is human
error," he stated. "Most people
give confusing information and
help is slower in coming because of this misinformation."
"You are as well protected
here on campus as you are
anywhere in Vancouver/' Dr.
Johnson emphasized.
"Simply by telephoning
local 333 before five o'clock
and CA 4-5650 after five, help
is available in minutes.
"The cost of supplying UBC
with an ambulance would run
to about $40,000," he said.
"This would make the cost of
one call about $10,000, basing
the statistic on last year's accident rate.
"The present system is adequate considering the cost of
any improvement, and with the
posters being put up no more
confusion should result," he
said.
editor, resigned as the Young
Democrats—formerly the NDP
Youth—began protesting the
awarding of Totem's contract
to Mitchell Press, Ltd.
The Young Democrats claim
AMS treasurer Kyle Mitchell
and the AMS have betrayed
the trade union movement and
UBC students by giving the
contract to a shop which has
been involved in a labor dispute for more than two years.
Announcement of the campaign to discourage Totem
sales came Monday from
Young Democrat's public relations officer John Dilday.
Totem editor Scott Mclntyre
said the campaign will make
no difference to where the annual is printed.
"Totem will be printed by
Mitchell no matter what action
is taken by the young NDP,"
he said.
Earle Kinney, president of
Local 441 of the Lithographers
and Photo-engravers International Union, said Mitchell
Press is a scab shop. (This
means a shop manned by strikebreakers.)
"I think that it is poor policy
to have the annual printed in
a non-union shop," Kinney said.
"In fact I would rather see
the annual printed in the U.S.
rather than in a scab shop in
Canada," he said.
Robert   Geis,   general   manager   of   printing   at   Mitchell
Press, said his open shop was
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE:    TOTEM
Exploding ether
smashes med lab
Exploding ether caused an
estimated $1,200 damage to
a UBC medical laboratory
Friday night.
The ether was stored in a
refrigerator in Room 202 of
Medical Block A, a fire department spokesman said.
The alarm was turned in
about 10 p.m. by a nearby
resident.
The explosion blew the
doors off the refrigerator
and the resulting fire damaged the lab's floor and
wooden cabinets, the spokesman said.
He said the fire was quickly contained with dry chemical extinguishers.
Cause of the explosion is
not known.
DEAN McCREARY
. . . expects Medicare
Medicare wouldn't upset the B.C. medical profession, UBC's Dean of
Medicine said Sunday.
Dr. J. F. McCreary
said the medical profession expects medicare
and no plan will be introduced without its active participation.
McCreary was speaking to a conference of 40
pre-med students and
doctors at International
House Sunday. The annual conference on medical careers was organized by the pre-med society.
The conference discussed medical ethics, professional opportunities in
the future and the course
likely to be followed in
i n t r o during socialized
medicine in B.C.
The consensus was that
future medical practice
will evolve around the so-
called group practice, a
small number of general
practitioners working together in a clinic.
Dean McCreary said
UBC's new health sciences
centre will increase the
present class of 68 doctors and dentists to 108
in 1969. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 10, 1964
'Ensign will die
Webster carves
up whole world
Sharp-tongued radio commentator Jack Webster returned
to UBC campus Monday and left verbal daggers in everything from education to Remembrance Day.
"I am negative about things
because there is little to be
postitive about," he told a
crowd in Education 100.
And on the subject of the
flag debate:
"The old ensign will die out
with the old legionnaires who
are parading it on Wednesday."
Webster went on to attack
a myriad of other issues, all
grouped loosely under his subject of the Education of the
God-damned Student.
Last month in a panel dis-
Seminar for
sharp types
If you like seminars and can
communicate ideas then the
Canadian Union of Students
National Seminar is for you.
The seminar will be held in
Calgary next August with the
theme Democracy and the University Community.
Chairman of the local CUS
committee Gordon Gaibraith
said: "We are looking for
people with genuine interest
in the topic and the ability to
communicate ideas and concepts."
Applications must be in by
4 p.m. Thursday.
cussion he exploded the Myth
of the Poor Student.
On open line radio shows he
said: "They are horrible. I
take part in them for only one
reason — money.
"I am no longer the only
loudmouth in western Canada
but I am the only one who
could pass a sanity test."
Webster spoke of the quality of newspapers in Vancouver and said the Vancouver
Times, which he writes for, is
only a speculative proposition
like a mining stock.
"I contribute one trashy column to the Times because I
want to be in on the ground
floor if it ever goes anywhere," he said.
Webster said Canada has become too enamoured with the
spread of education at the university level.
"We need more technical
schools and we must guide
students in high schools into
the  proper  channels."
"It is obvious that too many
students come here to fail or
for social reasons. There must
be some kind of selection before the university level," he
said.
He admitted that university
students of today are a little
brighter than their  parents.
"You are still a cross section of the community and as
such I don't hold much hope
for you,"  he said.
WALTER KOERNER
.. . honored
Prof, Board
member get
doctorates
A UBC faculty member and
a member of the Board of Governors will receive honorary
degrees  this month.
Walter C. Koerner, a member of the UBC Board of Governors, will receive an honorary doctorate from the University of Victoria on Nov. 14.
Professor Roy Daniells, head
of the UBC English department, will receive an honorary
degree from the University of
Toronto on Nov. 27 at the fall
congregation.
Professor Daniells received
another honorary degree last
May when he gave the congregation address at Queen's University in Kingston.
Paper says residences
director prejudiced
By RICHARD BLAIR
A charge of racial prejudice
has been hurled at Victoria
College's director of student
residences by that university's
student newspaper, the Martlet.
The charge was levelled in
last Thursday's edition of the
Martlet, after the newspaper
investigated an incident which
occurred three weeks ago in
one of Victoria's residences.
A female resident returned
to her residence accompanied
by two East Indian men after
an off-campus private party.
After the two men left, the
director of residences, Mrs.
Lola Mora, is accused of questioning the girl about her parent's approval of "a colored
date".
There were no witnesses to
the incident, as the two women
were alone in the lobby of the
residence at the time.
TOTEM
(Continued from page 1)
pleased to have the Totem account.
Geis added the wages between his shop and a union
shop are comparable.
"I cannot understand why a
provincially supported university would consider having its
year book printed outside of
the province let alone the
country," Geis said.
(Last year the Totem was
printed in Kansas City.)
Mclntyre said Mitchell Press
was awarded the contract because they submitted the lowest bid and offered the highest
comparable quality.
"And I am not worried about
the resignation of Miss Quail
because there is a profusion of
applicants for the vacant job,"
he said.
The best-tasting filter cigarette
SPECIAL EVENTS
presents
MEREDITH
DAVIES
Conducting
THE NEW REVITALIZED
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY
This Thursday Noon
AUDITORIUM — 25 cents
•        •       •
COMING SOON — Reserve Your Tickets NOW
'Montoya
*i>*tb.
b»btH
Aeeritf
"•v«d»
AUDITORIUM, 8:30 P.M., TUESDAY, NOV. 17
Tickets: 75c - $1.25 for Students; $1.25 - $2.00 for Adults
Available  at AMS Office  and Vancouver  Ticket  Center
• • •
India's Finest Musician
RAVI SHANKER
Sitarist and
Composer
direct from
San Francisco
where his two
performances are
already sold out
AUDITORIUM — NOVEMBER 28th — 8:30 pjn.
Tickets    -    -    -    -    Students 50c    -    -    -    Adults $2.00
AMS Office and Vancouver Ticket Center Tuesday, November 10, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Stevenson and Whitelaw cross finish line
Engineer babies
fastest on campus
Engineers are. the fastest,
campus.
EUS president Steve White-
law and vice president Art
Stevenson emerged victorious
against the Frosh at the baby
buggy - pushing - pablum - eating contest held Friday noon.
The event was sponsored by
the Frosh Council who provided the pablum.
The  race  took  the Agricul-
if not the biggest, babies  on
Ceremonies
held in Gym
UBC will hold it's traditional
Remembrance Day ceremonies
Wednesday in the foyer of the
War Memorial Gym.
The service, which begins at
10:45 a.m., will be conducted
by Rev. George Turpin, padre
for the University Naval Training Division.
Professor emeritus Hunter
Finlay will give the address at
the ceremonies.
Reading from the scriptures
will be Dr. Lynn Gunn, president of the 196th Western
University Battalion Association.
Ten UBC organizations will
place wreaths at the foot of
the memorial plaque in the
gymnasium foyer.
ture, Arts, Engineering and
Frosh contestants around an
oval portion of the main mall.
One contestant sat in the
buggy while his partner pushed.
At the half-way mark the
seated contestant was fed a
coffee cup full of rancid pablum by his partner. They then
switched places and struggled
to the finish line.
Aggies had a cement-encrusted wheelbarrow.
They succumbed in the first
heat to the Engineers in their
requisitioned shopping cart.
Frosh defeated a buggy-less
Arts team—Artsmen had to
borrow the EUS cart.
But they couldn't overcome
the Redshirts in the final.
NEW YORK
FORMAL  WEAR
TUXEDO'S
TAILS
WHITE DINNER
JACKETS
SPECIAL RATES
FOR STUDENTS
4397 W.   10th Ave.
24 Hr. Service       CA 4-0034
Western Canada's Largest
FORMAL WEAR RENTALS
Taxodaa Whit* ft Mme Coata
Fun DraM Shkta ft Accessories
Morning Cool* Mm tlaxers
Diracton' Coots Solos ft Rontohj
OVER 2,000 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE FROM
E. A.  LEE   Formal Wear Rentals
623 HOWE (Downstairs) MU 3-2457
2*01 Granville (at 10th)      4683 Kingsway <«by.)
 ,RE 3-6727 (by Sears) HE 1-1160
Egg-throwing incident
Complaints trivial
complains Hayes
By LORRAINE SHORE
Ubyssey Ass't City Editor
Complaints of a student facing student court prosecution
are trivial, said discipline committee chairman Dick Hayes
Friday.
The student, Donald H. MacKay, 3197 Point Grey Road,
has been charged with conduct
unbecoming a student following the Screech Day egg-throwing incident.
MacKay accused Hayes of
inexcusable performance in
conduct of his office as Discipline Committee chairman in a
letter published in Friday's
Ubyssey.
Hayes said he would answer
only three points in MacKay's
letter.
"The letter is too trivial for
me to comment on the rest,"
he  said.
MacKay, in his letter, said
that the complaint had been
laid against him by AMS.
Hayes said the complaint
was laid by an individual student, as entitled by the AMS
by-laws.
MacKay also said the motion to commit him to trial
was on the floor before the
arrival of the discipline committee's  one  witness.
Hayes said AMS first vice-
president Bob Cruise's complaint, not the evidence, was
being considered at the discipline committee hearing.
"The evidence will be introduced into court," Hayes said.
"The job of the discipline
committee is only to decide
whether or not there is sufficient cause to charge the
student."
MacKay said there was no
court clerk present at the hearing, but Hayes said there is no
requirement for a clerk to be
present at the committee hearing.
"He is clerk of the court
only and has nothing to do
with the discipline committee,"
Hayes  said.
Hayes said student court
will meet at noon Thursday to
hear the charge against MacKay.
If the student is found guilty
the faculty council is notified
and is requested to treat the
student court fine as any outstanding university fine —
meaning that final exam marks
could be withheld.
Hayes said a letter asking
for confirmation of administra-
tion backing of the student
court's position was sent to
President John Macdonald.
"This matter is too serious to
go without a policy statement
from the administration,"
Hayes said.
The letter referred to the
egg-throwing incident, but did
not mention MacKay by name.
Roaf too busy
for dull meetings
Architect's President John
Roaf says he doesn't go to
student council meetings because he doesn't have the
time, and there is nothing
in it for architects anyway.
Roaf has not attended a
single meeting this term, although he attended several
before the term started.
Truant undergrad society
representatives come under
weekly fire from AMS president Roger McAfee. "It's
part of their job to come,"
McAfee said Monday.
Roaf said he should attend
- the meetings, but little is
discussed pertaining to the
architects.
Other faculty representatives often absent are Medicine and Social Work.
Guitar Specials
1 only 12 String Guitar $79.99
Spanish Guitars $11.99-$14.99
and up
Classic Guitars,    reg. $39.95
only $20.95
Lousy Ukelele's  at $3.29
ARNOLDS
PAWN SHOP
»M Granville MU S-7S17
ANNOUNCEMENT
ENGLISH 200 NOTES
ARE NOW ALSO ON SALE AT THE COLLEGE
SHOP — BROCK EXTENSION. AS USUAL,
THEY MAY ALSO BE PURCHASED BY TELEPHONING RE 8-6375 or RE 3-3614.
Walkin Publishers
Have you considered
the opportunities of a career
with The Mutual Life?
A copy of the Company's informative booklet
"Career Opportunities" is available at your
Placement Office.
Our representative will be present on
TUESDAY, Nov. 17th
and would be pleased to discuss with you the
many rewarding opportunities with The Mutual
Life. To arrange an interview please contact
your Student Placement Officer.
The Mutual Life
ASSURANCE COMPANY OF CANADA
HEAD OFFICE: WATERLOO. ONTARIO/ESTABLISHED 1869
m THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B. C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those ot the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press, Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1964
A dead day
Few university students will be remembering Remembrance Day.
To most it will be a meaningless break before Christmas exams—a holiday.
To thousands of school children who know nothing
about the day, it will be just another day off.
To the youth of this generation, Remembrance of
the Armistice means little.
It means little because they had little or nothing to
do with the events which students now read about in
cold, dispassionate terms.
But this doesn't mean there shouldn't be a Remembrance Day.
Those who lost sons, husbands and comrades try to
remember why they were lost.
Everyone should remember that those men died
for an ideal — however misguided it may have been,
however few of them really understood what they were
fighting for.
They were fighting for something called democracy,
although few of them really knew what democracy
meant.
Fewer still could forsee that the hot war would
freeze into a cold war which is still unnerving the world
they were fighting to keep safe.
And probably none of them imagined we'd commemorate their fight and their deaths by letting kids
out of school, giving petty clerks a holiday and allowing fuzzy cheeked university students a day off.
Surely Remembrance could be observed more
fittingly.
It would be more dramatic if the Remembrance
period were confined to two minutes in the middle of
an ordinary business day.
A little more meaningful to the school child if the
teacher could explain — on the spot — why the two
minutes were being observed in silence.
A little more productive if the day were a day for
the dead and not just a dead holiday.
Socredonomics?
The Mind Boggles.
The B.C. Social Credit League wants B.C. secondary
schools to teach economics.
Socreds?
ECONOMICS?
Party members of a government that has every man,
woman and child in this province in hock for almost
$1,000 worth of contingent liability are suggesting we
teach ECONOMICS in B.C. schools? '
They can't mean Keynesian economics.
They must mean Bennetian economics.
That's the kind where addition means multiplication,
subtraction isn't recognized, and both sets of books are
paved every year.
Oh really? dept.
A News bulletin on UBC Radio the day after the U.S.
presidential election:
"UBC Radio made itself a force in news broadcasting
last night (Nov. 3) by scooping all other news media in
declaring president Johnson .elected at 7:15 p.m., fifteen
minutes prior to any other source.
"A team of skilled reporters and analysts worked for
over five hours amid reams of paper and noise to bring
complete and instantaneous reports and summaries on the
night's important events.
"UBC Radio's feat in first declaring officially a Johnson victory gives it the lead in British Columbia news
broadcasting."
iMWldBr
That? Oh, the student union building — named after a student president.
Seems the old boy was quite a railroader.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Goddam Engineers
Editor,  The   Ubyssey:
Thursday I had a luncheon
engagement with Miss Kim
Campbell, the President of
the Freshman Class, an engagement which Miss Campbell was unfortunately unable to attend because the
E n g i neering Undergraduate
Society had kidnapped her.
May I say that on general
principle I strongly disapprove of having my luncheon
guests kidnapped, particularly
when they are young and attractive. I trust this will not
happen again.
JOHN   N.   NORRIS
Professor of  History
Sf.    Sf.    .J.
Fort food figures
Editor,  The  Ubyssey:
Anyone wishing to find out
what is good or bad about
Fort Camp food should first
take a look at the figures of
Fort Camp kitchen helpers.
They are all fat. This could
mean that the food is not at
all bad or they are at>out the
only people who enjoy the
food—and for a good reason
—it is free to them.
Second, one should observe
the way these helpers cast
their glances. They all cast a
hungry look (not a smile) and
appear as if they want to eat
everybody up.
Third, one should note the
number of napkin and sugar
dispensers on the tables.
There are not enough of them
—and they are taken away
even before one is through
eating.
Finally, one should try the
meals there for two weeks.
By then the monotony will
be felt.
JOHN  TELLER
Fort Camp
eft      eft      rfi
We're a leftist rag
Editor, The Ubyssey:
While one realizes that The
Ubyssey sympathizes with the
political left wing, that is no
reason why its staff members
should waylay unsuspecting
readers to Wesbrook 100 to
supposedly hear Dr. Holsti
speak on the "Radical Right".
The event was, in fact, held
on the extreme other side of
the campus at International
House.
Come, come, we must not
stoop to such low tactics or
blatantly neglect to check the
accuracy of such pertinent
information.
ELAYNE van SNELLENBERG
Arts IV
•ji      sji      eft
Totem trumpeters
Editor, The Ubyssey:
May I clear up a few inaccuracies made Friday by
reporter Staples, understandably confused by the fast-
moving events surrounding
the Totem  Park gate?
First, the gate mysteriously
appeared on the Acadia Camp
water tower the previous Friday, not Sunday, night.
Second Acadia was not "ordered by Housing to return
the gate." On Wednesday evening a group of public-spirited Acadians, wearying of
the unsightly object, voted to
restore it to the waiting arms
of Totem Park. This mission
was duly completed.
Finally, far from "beating
a hasty retreat", the Acadians
then withdrew in good order,
singing lustily and playing a
tuneful trumpet.
ROBIN S. TAYLOR
Acadia Camp
T*     T*     V
Pearson's image
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We feel that the Pearson
image is slipping. Our once
proud Canadian hero, the or-
EDITOR:  Mike  Horsey
News   Tim Padmore
Managing   Janet Matheson
City _  Tom Wayman
Art  Don Hume
Sports     George Reamsbottom
Asst.  Managing    Norm  Betts
Asst. City      Lorraine Shore
Asst. News  Carole Munroe
Associate  Mike Hunter
Associate     Ron Riter
Magazine   Dave Ablett
Working, working, working, sweating: Art Casperson, Mona Helcer-
manas, Carol-Anne Baker, Don Hull,
Linda Morrison, Eton Little, Doug
Halverson, Harold McAllister, Art
Neuman, Lynn Curtis, Steve Brown
Messimmo Verdicchio, Paul Terry,
Jack McQuarrie, Big Ed Clarke,
Robbi West, Mike Sunfink Vaux,
Bob Weiser, Rick Blair. Punchy
close lacking from swinging masthead due to hour lateness even.
iginator of the UN Peace
Keeping Force in Suez; the
peace-keeper in the Near
East; winner of the Nobel
Prize for Peace in 1956, has
become a weak old maid.
Gone is the dynamic figure of the General Assembly,
to be replaced by a babbling,
disorganized incoherent
whose only success in the
lengthy flag debate has been
to lower the prestige of Canadians   at   home  and  abroad.
PLEASE ! ! Let the flag issue come to a final vote in
Parliament. Put an end to
cheap politicking on the part
of the Liberal Party.
Two disillusioned Liberals,
KAREN PURDY
Arts III
B. D. STEWART
Arts IV
What UBC tests?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Many students enrolled for
the first time at UBC received a rather disturbing letter from the registrar recently.
You see, a number of us
did not receive (with our eligibility forms earlier this
year) the command to present
ourselves for the University
Test  Battery.
We did not write them—
and most of those with whom
I have discussed the matter
had no idea that these tests
were mandatory, some even
professing no knowledge of
their existence.
Yet according to the letter,
our failure to take these
"well-advertised" tests was a
"willful act" on our part, and
"unless satisfactory arrangements have been made before
the opening of the Second
Term, these students (are to)
be excluded from further attendance at the university."
A letter of such threatening
and presumptuous tone seems
to me to create needless student-administration antagonism.
DAVID FOGGIN
Science I Tuesday, November 10, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
Says exchange scholar
Tree education
costly in Russia'
Russian free education is  a myth,  UBC's first Russian
exchange student said Monday;	
Brent   Barr,   a   World   Uni-
DR.    WILLIAM   HOAR    has
been named head of the
department of Zoology at
UBC. He succeeds Dr. Ian
McTaggart - Cowan who is
now dean of Graduate
studies.
Graeme gets
lunch across
the waters
AMS co-ordinator of activities Graeme Vance has foiled
university food services again.
Vance, who lives in Fort
Camp, said he usually takes
one of the bag lunches which
must be ordered a day before
they are eaten so they can be
made up overnight.
Vance went to Victoria last
Wednesday to help present the
Student Means Survey brief
to the  provincial government.
So Tuesday afternoon he
asked for a lunch for Thursday.
"I was told it was not food
service policy to take orders
for lunches in the afternoon,"
said Vance.
So he phoned food services
head Ruth Blair from Victoria
Wednesday morning to order
a lunch.
The call cost him 75 cents
but he got his lunch.
versity exchange scholar, told
a Brock Hall audience the
Russian government gives $25
a month to each student.
"This does not even cover
food costs," said Barr.
Students must have an auxiliary source of income, usually parents, he said.
• •    •
Barr, who studied in Russia
during the past year, said the
system of free accommodation
has three or four students in
a room comparable in size to
a single room in one of UBC's
old residences.
"There are only two official
restaurants to serve a campus
of 17,000 students at Moscow
University," he said.
Academic freedom is unknown.
"There is no political discussion or conflict in Russia," said
Barr, a geography student.
"Students are brainwashed."
"Many non-political courses
contain up to 40 per cent Marxist and Leninist philosophy.
Twenty per cent of the material on University entrance examinations consists of political
questions,"   he said.
• •    •
Students' free time is taken
up with compulsory military
drill once a week for male
students, and nursing training for females. Komsomol
(Communist Youth League) activities such as obligatory parades and demonstrations consume another 10 to.25 per cent
of   the   students'   time,
said.
Barr
(thud io fail
Saiukdouj. TliahiA?
The Thunderbird Curling Club has been organized to
promote curling as a social activity within the University
Community.
The Club will curl Saturday nights at the U.B.C. Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre from 7:00 to midnight.
Memberships are invited at $10.00 for the academic
year, and a temporary game charge of $.50 per game.
All applicants must be 21 years of age or over.
If you are interested, please mail all applications or
inquiries to:
Membership Committee,
Thunderbird Curling Club,
c/o U.B.C. Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre,
University of British Clumbia,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
I wish to become a member of the Thunderbird
Curling Club:
Name .' ,	
Address  u „...,	
Home Telephone No .,..+...
Faculty       Grad. Student	
Student       Staff	
I bereby certify I am 21 years of age or over.'
Signature
20 speeders
get caught
Speeders beware! The radar traps are back.
University KCMP told The
Ubyssey Monday a radar
trap set last Friday caught
about 20 people.
Police refused comment
on activities of the R squad,
a group of students dedicated to foiling the radar traps.
The R squad, inactive
since last year, swung into
action Friday posting warning signs around campus
and flashing lights at cars
approaching the traps.
Homecoming
big success
Homecoming committee executive was overjoyed with the
Homecoming Festival this
year.
"It was a real success," said
committee chairman Rick McGraw. "Not one event was a
failure."
Committee treasurer Robin
Lecky said last year's home-
cpming had ended up with a
debt of $2,400.
This led to a new approach
to financing this year, Lecky
said, and a deficit of $200.
NOTICE
Take notice that the student court will hear charges
of a breach of By-law 11,
©(b) 1(c) of AMS Constitution, to wit:
That alleged behavior at
the Sorority Bids Day in
the Auditorium Cafeteria
was behavior deemed unbecoming to a student of the
University;
Preferred against Donald
H. MacKay in the TV Room,
Brock Hall at 12:30 p.m.
Thursday, the 12th day of
November, 1964.
DON
CRA WF0RD
NOV. 5 - 14
at the
BUNKHOUSE
Coffee House
612 Davie
Reserve now — 683-9790
.... and remember
Jazz Every Sunday .
Afternoon 2-5 p.m.
CAREER OPPORTUNITY
INTERVIEWS
FOR   GRADUATES
in
Civil,   Electrical
and  Mechanical   Engineering
November 23 to 27
with
Federal Government Department's
For Details Contact Your
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE
SHELL
CANADA   LIMITED
Will Be On Campus
to Interview Students
For Regular and Summer Employment
For
EXPLORATION
PRODUCTION (Oilfield Engineering)
GAS
MANUFACTURING
ACCOUNTING and FINANCE
Dates: November 16th-19th 1964
For specific details please check our posters
and also with your Placement Officer Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 10, 1964
Break-in
probe left
to patrol
Investigation of the theft of
40 Math 120 examination
papers will be left in the hands
of Sir Ouvry Roberts' security
patrol.
' 'The theft has not been reported to RCMP because the
exams have no monetary
value," Sir Ouvry said.
"Because of this, it would be
difficult to lay a charge," he
said.
The exams were taken last
Monday from the office of
Professor James Whittaker.
The door to the office had
been   forced  open.
The Patrol is also taking up
arms against the current wave
of campus coat and book thefts.
Sir Ouvry has asked that
students report thefts to the
patrol at once.
"The more reports we get
the more easily we can get results," he said.
Value of stolen property had
climbed to almost $1,000,
AMS first vice-president Byron
Hender  told  The  Ubyssey.
CAPTAIN WILLIAMS
. . came back
Grad returns
to army post
A UBC graduate just returned from a two year military
teaching assignment in Ghana
is the new Canadian army
resident  officer  on  campus.
Captain Douglas Williams
commanded a Ghanian recruit
training in Kumasi.
Student hot air
on TV next week
By JOHN DILDAY
Close to 40 UBC students
will be on television next
week.
The students were interviewed by CBC television
Thursday on topics ranging
from contemporary Canadian
Society to the price of books
at the Bookstore.
Interviewing took place in
front of the library.
CBC producer Ain Soodar
said the students will be shown
on a program called Let's Go
next week.
Students were asked: "Do
you care about French-Canada;
"What do you think is wrong
with contemporary Canadian
society;
"Who is the greatest and
most important individual to
you?"
The filming took place immediately following a student
demonstration at the book store
so Soodar added a question
about the book store.
A CBC cameraman said most
students found the questions
too broad to answer in the
short time available.
"Except the question about
the most important individual,"
he said.
Mbst students immediately
replied "me!"
Strapped female
startles smokers
BERKELEY, Calif. (UNS)
—Men's Smoker, Absolutely
No Dames, the signs read.
But an enterprising reporter
from the University of California Campus paper spent
two hours watching hare
male derrieres and listening
to dirty jokes at the smoker.
The reporter passed two
chest checkers and then revealed all the secrets of the
smoker in a front-page story
in the paper.
OK   BRAKES
1st Ave. & Main St. Phone: 879-3014
* For all popular makes:—
Broke Shoes (4 wheels) $16.50
Wheel Kits (4 wheels) $10.00
Both Shoes and ——
Wheel Kits $25.00
* Special 5% Discount Before Xmas, for UBC Students
Classical Guitar
Tuition  to Advanced Level
Segovia Technique
W.  Parker 682-1096
University Students
Earn Extra Money
Representing the
HARVARD CLASSICS
Top Remuneration
Car Necessary
For Appt. Phone 435-9348
peter
elbling
plus
|ana
bergh
3607 West Broadway
Reservations: RE 6-6011
Chemcell (1963) Limited with annual
sales of over 90 million dollars, ranks
as one of Canada's major producers of
chemicals, synthetic fibres and fabrics.
The head office is located in Montreal
and the two operating divisions, Canadian Chemical Company and Canadian Celanese Company, together employ over 6,000 personnel in plants,
laboratories and offices across Canada.
The keynote of Chemcell is growth
and diversification. Started by a petrochemical operation launched in 1955,
Chemcell's history has been marked
by a continued expansion of capacity,
diversification into new products, and
a steady growth of markets and earnings.
CANADIAN CHEMICAL COMPANY
The main plant at Edmonton,
Alberta produces a wide range of
organic chemicals — solvents and
intermediates — which serve a host
of industrial uses such as the manufacture of paints and lacquers, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, plastics, ad-
hesives, herbicides, etc.
At Two Hills, Alberta, Western
Chemicals, a recently acquired subsidiary, produces inorganic chemicals
including chlorine, muriatic acid, caustic soda and calcium chloride.
Canadian Chemical has a modern
research centre at Edmonton. Sales
offices are located in Montreal, Toronto  and   Vancouver  and  extensive
export  sales  are  handled  by  agents
throughout the world.
CANADIAN CELANESE COMPANY
The Caradian Celanese division
manufactures a wide variety of synthetic textile products, including the
chemical intermediates which receive
further processing. The end products
include fibres in both staple and continuous filament form, cigarette filter
tow, woven and knitted fabrics and
tufted and woven carpets. Cellulose
acetate and polypropylene are the
principal fibres processed. The main
plant and research centre is located at
Drummondville, Quebec, with other
Quebec plants at Sorel, St. Jean and
Coaticook.
A plant'producing cellulose acetate
flake and fibre is located in Edmonton
in conjunction with the chemical operation of Canadian Chemical Company.
Sales offices are maintained in Mont-
real,Toronto,Winnipeg and Vancouver.
Types of Graduates Required:
The diversity and growth of Chemcell provides the opportunity to fully
utilize a broad range of skills at the
graduate and post-graduate levels. Requirements include chemistry; chemical, mechanical, electrical and textile
engineering; physics and engineering
physics. As a chemist or engineer, you
may work on research, product development,   process   engineering   design,
construction or production; or your
qualifications and interests may suggest a career in marketing or technical
service.
Requirements also occur in other
disciplines, notably commerce, mathematics and business administration and
graduates are utilized in such functions
as accounting, data processing, operations research, planning, marketing,
industrial relations, etc. Post-graduate
requirements occur most often in research.
Salaries and Employee Plans:
Our salaries and benefit plans are
designed to meet part of our overall
objective of attracting and retaining a
highly qualified work force.
Opportunities for Advancement
Chemcell is a growth Company and
personal professional growth can be
achieved through varied, interesting
and challenging experience in a fully
integrated and highly diversified operation.
Our representatives will be visiting
your campus and we cordially invite
you to make an appointment for an
interview through your placement
officer.
For further information, just write
to: Administrative Officer, Chemcell
(1963) Limited, 1155 Dorchester Blvd.
West, Montreal 2, Quebec.
Representatives of the Company will visit this Campus for interviews on November 26 and 27, 1964.
e.
'tometC (f963) jQjtOted
MONTREAL   .   TORONTO   •    WINNIPEG    •    VANCOUVER
OPERATING DIVISIONS: CANADIAN CHEMICAL COMPANY • CANADIAN CELANESE COMPANY
CHEMICALS • YARNS • FIBRES • FABRICS  • CARPETS •  PLASTICS Tuesday, November 10, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
8
ITS RATHER OBVIOUS what the above pic is all about but for the uninitiated—the feila
on top is attempting to pull the pyjamas off the fella on the bottom. But as the fella's
red face suggests he doesn't want any part of it—there's too many people looking on.
Sports roundup
Birds third in Judo tourney
UBC Thunderbird Judoists
showed well at the third annual UBC Open Judo Tournament held at the War Memorial Gym on Saturday.
Kayomi Mayeda proved to
be  the surprise  of the UBC
squad. Returning after a year
and a half layoff, he fought to
the quarter finals of the lightweight division before being
decisioned after two overtime periods.
In  the   heavyweights   Sam
Bird soccer chaps
get Royal slap
Plagued by such giant obstacles as broken shoe laces, the
UBC Thunderbirds lost a close, though uninspiring, 2-1
decision to the New Westminster Royals in PCL soccer
action Sunday at Callister Park.
The loss left the Birds still
in fifth place but dropped
them one point farther back
of the fourth place Canadians
who fought to a draw in their
match.
UBC's lone goal came from
Bob Johnstone who scored his
third of the year on a penalty
kick in the first half.
The Birds' inexperience
showed up in their lack of
scoring ability.
Not counting a goal an opposing player scored on his
own goalie the UBC club has
managed but five goals in
seven games with Johnstone
notching three of these.
BOB JOHNSTONE
. . . scores third
Hockey Braves bomb Army
to take over second place
UBC Braves moved into sole possession of second place
in the Pacific Coast Jr. Hockey League by bombing the
Army 9 to 5 Saturday in Chilliwack.
Ray Gould's pack of spirited hustlers fired three unanswered third period goals to gain the victory. The Braves'
record is now three wins and three losses.
Led by defenceman Len Bousquet's hat trick and a goal
by Wayne Desharnais the Braves held Chilliwack to a
4-4 first period score.
Fenton Doyle and Jim O'Dogherty gave UBC a 6-5 lead
after two periods.
Wayne Desharnais with his second goal, Gordon Schnepf,
down from the Birds, and Al Feyer scored in the third
period to clinch the win.
The Braves host first place New Westminster Saturday
at the Thunderbird Sports Centre.
Samyima of UBC was upset
in another close decision.
The grand champion of the
senior division was little
Frank Nakashima (145 lbs.)
of Vancouver Judo Club.
In the five man team competition, the Thunderbirds
were defeated in the semifinals by the Vancouver Judo
Club. The Steveston Judo
Team took top honors, defeating the second place Vancouver team 22-7 as UBC placed
third.
• •    •
A record entry of 80 cars
mudded through the UBC
Sports Car Club's annual Totem Rally Sunday.
The 10-hour, 250-mile tour
of Fraser Valley backroads
was won by Engineers Ted
Kierstead and Rick Cook in an
MGA with nine penalty
points.
Second was the Volvo of
John and Dave Grey, with 13
points, and Ron Thurston and
Tom Day were third in a Mini.
Team title went to the Engineers—Kierstead and Cook,
Moor and Tucker, and Leeson and Jones.
* •    •
In men's field hockey the
Varsity hopped over the
Grasshoppers 3-1; the Vancouver B's buzzed past the
Golds 2-1 and the Blues became bluer after a 2-2 tie
with the Hawks. ;
w  If rOUR P122A IS PtRftCT
PIZZARAMA
WE ARE NOW
Open for Lunch
with  a  special
LUNCHEON MENU
Low Prices - Quick Service
from 11:00 a.m.
2676 W. Bdwy. - RE 6-9019
With 5-4 record
SPORTS
EDITOR:
GEORGE   REAMSBOTTOM
Birds - Wolves
in season finals
By JACK McQUARRIE
The Modern American Dictionary defines wolves as being
"large wild carnivore of Europe, Asia, and North America,
destructive to sheep, cattle, etc."
It doesn't connect this capacity for destruction with
birds.
In light of the UBC Thunder-
birds' 48-14 demolition of the
Oregon College "Wolves" in
Varsity Stadium on Saturday
afternoon it is perhaps a forgivable oversight.
Vic Iwata who weighs 150
pounds, with the utmost of
concentration, and for this reason tfempts death every time he
steps on a football field, led
the Bird scoring with three
touchdowns.:
Other touchdowns were scored by Bob Paulley, Lloyd Davis,
Glen Brandt and Barry Callaghan. Ken Danchuk's four
converts and a safety touch
rounded out the T'Bird scoring.
THING  OF BEAUTY
Brandt's score was a thing
of beauty . . . and beast.
The play covered 87 yards
after Brandt's interception
with time out for blocks by
Roy Shatzko, Dick Stein and
Bill McLaughlin.
Stand-in QB Lloyd Davis,
who took over with the departure of Roger Hardy, again
did a great job of running and
passing while leading the offense to a big day.
In the fourth quarter the
Birds substituted freely, drawing upon their bench with an
eye, to next year.
PROSPECTS GOOD
The result was encouraging
with Halfback Eric Savics and
J. V. Quarterback Doug Stave-
ly looking good.
The win gave the T'Birds a
winning season by virtue of a
5-4 record with victories over
McMaster, Portland State, San
Francisco U, Oregon College
and Southern Oregon.
Birds march
The Thunderbirds maintained their high scoring
pace over the weekend
swamping Pocomo 40-5 in
exhibition rugger action.
Another exhibition contest
is scheduled for the Birds
Wednesday in Brockton Oval
at 2:00 p.m. against Georgians of the Mainland League.
CUBA!
THE STUDENT
COMMITTEE ON
CUBAN AFFAIRS
invites members and their
guests to meet the Cuban
Ambassador Dr. Americo
Cruz at the Graduate Student Center from 1:30 to
2:30, Thursday, Nov. 12,
following his meeting in
the Brock Hall.
FEDERAL   GOVERNMENT
INTERVIEWS
November 18 to 24
For Graduates and
Post Graduates in
Biology
Animal Science
Chemistry
Pharmacy
Plant Science
Microbiology
Wildlife
Zoology
Soil  Science
Careers
Bacteriologists
Chemists
Food and Drug
Officers
Fishery Biologists
Live Stock Officers
Plant Inspectors
Poultry Officers
Officer Trainees
Soil Surveyors
Wildlife Biologists
CONTACT YOUR PLACEMENT
OFFICER FOR DETAILS Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 10, 1964
'tween classes
Russia  eviction' probed
Dr. K. J. Holsti leads a discussion on Russia and United
Nations finances — pros and
cons on the expulsion of Russia from the UN. Today noon,
IH upper lounge.
• •    •
POETRY  SYMPOSIUM
Earle Birney, renowned poet
and editor of Prism, leads an
open discussion on new poetry
and what makes it acceptable.
IH 402, today noon.
' • • •
SPECIAL EVENTS
Vancouver Symphony, under
the direction of Meredith Davies. Thursday noon, Auditorium.
Last minute tickets for Desire Under the Elms, Jack Carter, and the Japan Symphony
Orchestra from Special Events
office.
• •    •
NDC
Dr. Saul Miller (faculty of
Medicine) speaks on the Genetic Effects of Nuclear and Allied Radiation. Noon today, Bu.
104.
Plans are under way to start
a Student Non-violent Co-ordinating Committee (SNCC) on
campus. Meeting, Bu. 102 at
noon.
• •    •
GERMAN  CLUB
Skating party today at 7:30
p.m. Meet in front of Thunderbird Arena.
• •    •
EL CIRCULO
Keep evening of Nov. 27
free for Fiesta.
Structure woes
founder founding
The founding conference
of the Union Generate des
Etudients de Quebec will be
held in February instead of
this month as originally
planned.
UBC Canadian Union of
Students committee chairman Gordon Gaibraith said:
"They are having trouble
establishing the structure of
the  organization."
rf«rV
IARL BIRNEY
. 'new' poetry
PSYCH  CLUB
A field trip to Oakalla,
Thursday at 7 p.m. Those interested please meet in the
Psych Huts lounge Tuesday
noon.
• *    •
PRE-LIB  SOC
Dr. Ronald Hagler speaks on
The Book Trade in Bu. 225,
noon today.
• •    •
NEUMAN CENTRE
Tuesday night lecture, Basic
Catholic Beliefs, by Father J.
S. Hanrahan, 7:30 in Seminar
room.
•    •    •
ONTOLOGICAL SOC
The Real Nature of Peace,
talk by Richard Thompson, today noon, Bu. 221. All welcome.
• •    •
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Essondale field trip, Thursday noon. Meet below Faculty
Club.
• •    •
LAST LECTURE SERIES
Dr. J. F. Hulcoop gives his
Last Lecture today noon in
Bu. 100.
• •    •
PRE-MED SOC
Field trip to Oakalla, next
Monday. All those signed up
meet in front of Wesbrook by
6:15 p.m.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
FOR GRADUATES IN COMMERCE, BUSINESS
AND GENERAL ARTS
"i "■
*" American Hospital Supply — a lead
ing  supplier to Canada's expanding
health and hospital market.
FOR GRADUATES IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
Canadian  Laboratory  Supplies
/CL — i ^S Limited — a leading supplier to indus-
i can lap i
>«- -*^ trial, governmental, educational  and
hospital laboratories.
The above firms, already foremost in fhei'r fields, offer interesting positions with
an excellent future. Both organizations are owned by American Hospital Supply
Corporation, Evanston, Illinois, the world's largest company serving the rapidly
growing health and science markets.
Interviews Today and Thursday
Contact the Placement Office for detailed information
and interview appointment.
YBAAA
Meeting noon today in Conference Room.
• •    •
LIBERALS
Ron Basford, MP for Vancouver Burrard speaks today
noon in Bu. 106.
• •    •
SUS
General meeting, Thursday
noon, Physics 200.    , w
• •    •
RAGC
Report of Academic Goals
Committee meets in Graduate
Student Centre, Thursday
noon.
BIRD CALLS
ERROR
Byron Henders' residence
telephone number under
Students' Council in the
Yellow Pages should be
738-3679,    not    738-2679.
PLEASE
CORRECT
YOUR DIRECTORY
ACCORDINGLY
MHCMOTION I
EYE GLASSES
AH DoctorVEyegiois Proscription!   '
-fitted. First, quality material* *tfd.
.Atj work p*rform«d  by qua£ftod
Optidam.
u,
GRANVILLE OPTICAL
MI Granville     Ml) 3-8921
pROGRf ss Brood
Clothes
Fine material and
painstaking craftsmanship combine
to give you a suit
of impeccable cut
and lasting quality.
Price? A pleasant
surprise!
Clinton's
MEN'S WEAR
742 Granville Street 4*1-5425
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS Inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall., Local 26,
224-3242. 	
LOST — Bookcase, zippered, dark
blue. Brock, girls' washroom. RE
3-7231.  Reward offered.
WILL PERSON finding woman's
turquoise raincoat in Bio Science
Bids, last Thursday please call CA
4-4480.
FOUND—Men's glasses. Black, gray
rims.  Publications office.
FOUND—Ladies' glasses, Riddington
ladies' washroom. Apply Publications A.M.S. office.
FOUND •— Ladies' brown leather
gloves at Ponderosa bus stop. Call
CY  9-4286.
FOUND — Man's umbrella .Slavonic
Circle Hut Fall Fair. Apply Brock
Extension 359. Slavonic Club Room.
Meetings
12
RACE MEET — The Royal Hong
Kong Rickshaw Racing Association will hold a race meet at Locarno   Sunday.
Special Notices
13
BIRD CALLS. Will those holding
pre sale tickets please apply for
their directory at the Publications
Office as soon as possible.
DIABETIC CLUB for young adults,
18 yrs. and over. Those interested
phone Dorothy Baylis, AM 6-9358
or Jim Harrison, AM 6-4375.
HEAR   the   young   lovers   in   action.
731-9108.
LOST—Brown wallet Monday morning.  Reward.  B.  Martin,  224-9062.
Transportation
14
TWO RIDES wanted from 1700 block
W. 37th Ave. to arrive U.B.C. for
8:30 lectures Mon. to Sat. Phone
Bill,  AM  1-4031:
AUTOMOTIVE   &   MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1956 FORD, 4 door Sedan, radio, $300.
John,   228-8141.
Autos for Sale, Confd.
21
FOR SALE—A black 1964 TR-4, new
generator thrown in. Only rallyed
a little—see Hunter in the ex-editors' lunchroom, North Brock Basement.
FOR SALE — '60 Sunbeam Rapier
convert. Must sell, best offer takes.
Like  new  condition.  434-9093.
-55 VAUXHALL Velox, green, 6 cyl.,
one owner, good condition. FA
1-2486.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Typing
42
EFFICIENT typing service, reasonable rates. Mrs. Fitzpatrick, 272-
4747. Will pick up & deliver.
INSTRUCTION
SCHOOLS
Music
63
JOYCE MAGUIRE, G.R.S.M. (England), L.R.A.M., A.R.C.M,., Piano,
Theory,   Accompaniment.   733-4584.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
FOR SALE—Frig, in good running
condition, $45; and a mangle iron,
$25.  Phone RE 8-1363.
TOTEM   PRE   SALES   now   at   th*
AMS office.
RENTALS   &   REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
Room  & Board
82
A VACANCY exists in the PSI Upsilon Fraternity House, 2260 Wesbrook, for some lucky guy—call
CA 4-9052 for details. 	
EXCELLENT room & board on
Campus. Kappa Sigma Fraternity
House. Phone after 5:30. Ask for
Derek.   CA 4-9986.
SHARING ROOM for male student.
$75 mo. all found. Phone Mrs. A.
Worner,  CA 8-8380.
Chadsmk. (kiwiiioA
There's a dubious pink tinge to AAC Activities this
week.
Tom Berger, unashamed leftist, will be subverting
Brock Friday, Nov. 13. His suspicious topic: Labour Legislation and Human Rights. Even more ominous is the
visit of Dr. Americo Cruz, Cuban Ambassador to Canada.
He is being brought by the subversive U.N Club to speak
on "Cuban Relations with Canada and Latin America,"
Thursday noon in Brock.
To further confirm our suspicions, "Russia and U.N.
Finance" is the topic of a talk by foreign-sounding K. J.
Holsti today in the International House Lounge.
Also scheduled is the last lecture of Dr. Hulcoop of
the Dept. of English, put on by A.U.S. today noon in Bu.
100. This one seems OK, but we're still investigating
it.
Careers in the Sciences
Opportunities For Graduates
and Post Graduates
with the Federal Government
• Physics
• Maths and
Physics
• Engineering
Physics
• Physical
Chemistry
• Chemical
Engineering
• Metallurgical
Engineering
• Geology
• Astronomy
• Meteorological
Service
• Trade and
Commerce
• Inspection
Services-DND
p Patents-Secretary
of State
> Mines Branch
i Dominion
Observatories
> Marine Services
Branch
i Geological
Survey
INTERVIEWS NOV. 23 TO 27
For Details Contact University Placement Office

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126369/manifest

Comment

Related Items