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The Ubyssey Oct 24, 1969

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 'WHOM DOES THE UNIVERSITY SERVE?'
The neo-great
trek was
supposed to
improve the
universitys
public image.
But some
citizens
weren't
impressed.
For full
report
see page 3.
—dave enns photo
Under the covers
Page    6—German prof Maria Fursrenwald
takes a look at- the park board's
plans for University Beach
and finds some frightening things.
Page 24—Canadian University Press's Ron
Thompson on the movement to
crush studer.t radicals.
Page    8—Reporter Murray  Kennedy
examines course unions.
Page    9—Page Friday.
Page     5—Senate curriculum committee:
Belshaw, part 4.
Page   17—Anti-pollution group organizes at
UBC.
Page    2—Latest round in PSA's fight for
survival.
Judge chucks rap
OTTAWA (CUP)-A judge dismissed trafficking charges,
against a Carleton University student here Wednesday on the
grounds that he was trapped into the offence by an RCMP
officer who had become his "friend".
Gordon Shipley, 22, was charged with selling $30
worth of hashish to RCMP under cover agent Larry Lowes.
But Lowes testified he thought Shipley a naive person,
who respected him as a sort of 'big brother', and also said he
had borrowed 10 dollars from the student, refusing to return it
until Shipley got him some drugs.
Judge R. A. McAndrew dismissed the case, ruling that
"without (Lowe's) inducements the accused would not have
trafficked in drugs," and that the duty of an undercover agent
is not to manufacture crime.
The crown is considering an appeal.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LI, No. 13
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1969      °^^48      228-2305
Toronto, Carleton,
Dalhousie kill CUS
TORONTO (CUP)-The Canadian Union
of Students is dead.
Students at Ottawa's Carleton
University, voted Oct. 20 and 21 almost two
to one to keep their student association out
of CUS.
Thursday, students at the University of
Toronto voted to withdraw from the union
and students at Dalhousie University added
the coup de grace by voting "no" in their
CUS referendum.
Without Toronto's membership fees the
union, which has been losing members for
the past two years, can't possibly continue
financially.
With its membership cut to less than a
dozen institutions it wouldn't be much use
continuing anyway.
"The exact fate of the union will be
decided at a national council meeting next
Monday and Tuesday," said CUS president
Martin Loney Thursday night.
"I don't want to make any comments
until then about future plans," he said while
attending a CUS party generally billed as a
wake.
Financially the union may not even be
able to meet its present commitments. "If
those who are still members pay, and if
Toronto pays a portion covering the last two
months, we're okay: otherwise I don't
know," Loney said.
Carleton voted to withdraw last year by
a vote of 1,298 to 1,043 but a change to a
pro-CUS student council meant the campus
remained in until the annual congress this
summer. Final results Thursday at Carleton
were 1,656 to 881 for the 6,000 student
campus.
At Dalhousie, 237 spoiled their ballots
compared to 633 "no" and 411 "yes" votes.
Larry Katz, president of the Dalhousie
graduate student association, felt "the
defeat of CUS could set the cause of student
rights back five years."
The Toronto vote had a record campus
turnout of 38 per cent. Five thousand and
thirty-four students voted "no" and 2,222
voted "yes". Membership in the Ontario
Union of Students was also rejected as part
of the same referendum question.
Student president Gus Abols, who
campaigned against CUS, said he was very
satisfied with the results.
"This proves to me that the radicals are
no longer the representatives and the
students have rejected them," he said.
Loney disagreed that the meaning was
clear.
"It's unfortunate that campaigns haven't
been fought on issues but on stereotypes and
slogans—we were prepared to fight on CUS's
policies but that's not what happened." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 24,  1969
Poor being organized'
by unemployed council
By FRAN McGRATH
The poor of Vancouver are being organized, a
member of the Unemployed Citizens' Welfare
Improvement Council said Thursday.
"The UCWIC is organizing the poor so they get
to know their rights and so they get an awareness of
the reasons for their problems," said Jeff Marvin,
arts 7.
He said the group was started by people on
welfare. A campus group was   formed later by foui
or five students who got tired of student apathy and
went out to the welfare group.
"We didn't go to them because we had
something to give them but because they have
something they could teach us," said Marvin.
He said the group does not follow any set
ideology but will develop its own as they analyze
their situation.
"We will take in any ideas that will help us," he
said.
"We want to make the poor aware of class
differences and to get them in control of the
decision making processes that affect them. We also
want to develop an awareness among students that
they are no different from poor people. They do
not control the decisions which affect them either."
He said their first aim is to get the poor of
Vancouver fed.
"Many welfare people eat nothing but potatoes
for half of every month. There are 200,000 people
at the poverty line in the Lower Mainland," Marvin
said.
He said the group wants to take over the
complete food distribution process for Vancouver's
poor and set up a food commune.
They want to buy food from the small farmers
being pushed out of business by big farmers, process
it themselves and sell it at a low cost.
Marvin said this is not possible with the present
set-up of society.
He said an attempt at this kind of activity was
stopped recently when a man was prevented from
buying a truck load of produce in the Okanagan
because it is against marketing board regulations to
buy directly from the producer.
"Right now we want to get a meal in their
stomachs," Marvin said. "Poor people only think
about where their mext meal is coming from. They
can't think about organizing to better their situation
until this need is met."
He said to accomplish this immediate end the
group is organizing a food blitz. They will be
collecting food and money for food, and would like
to get a broad co-operation from other campus
organizations.
"We want other groups to sponsor this with us
regardless of ideology," Marvin said. 'This is
something everyone can relate to. It is in keeping
with the Liberal spirit of Christmas."
"We want to canvass two days on campus then
turn the campus out on the community. It is time
students got into the community and were of
service to people. We want to forge links between
the university and the community and think this is a
good way."
SFU administration gets injunction
against three striking PSA profs
By JIM DAVIES
Simon Fraser University
administration has obtained an
injunction against three striking
political science, sociology, and
anthropology department
professors.
The striking PSA faculty
members, John Leggett, Louis
Feldhammer and Sagir Ahmad,
received the injunction order at a
supreme court hearing Thursday.
Terrence Wolfe, counsellor for
the prosecution, produced a long
list of affidavits listing actions of
"coercion, trespass, and
intimidation."
"A supreme court injunction is
the last resort short of police
intervention to restore law and
order to the SFU campus," he
said.
When questioned by supreme
court justice E. E. Hinkson as to
what the act of trespass entailed,
Wolfe said, "It is just like the
truck    driver    who    with    an
overweight load trespasses on the
highway."
"If the injunction is not given,
the university will be helpless
against any organized minority
group," Wolfe said.
Counsel for the defense,
Richard Bird, questioned the
highly opinionated content pf the
evidence. He also objected to the
request for supreme court
action in a situation that the
university could handle.
"There has been no effort to
deal with the discipline within the
university itself," he said.
"The issuing of memos is about
all that has been done. The
university is quite capable of
dealing with sassy students.
"I contend that the university
can deal with this itself."
He said powers of the supreme
court are "like thunderbolts",
certainly unnecessary when the
university can excercise its own
powers of discipline.
Apparently the supreme court
justice did not agree, because he
allowed the injunction. The trial
and ensuing verdict will soon
become a reality.
"The prosecution is merely a
long list of isolated incidents with
many inaccuracies," Ahmad said.
"I believe our lawyer will be able
to dismiss the charges at the
trial."
"The evidence against us is
highly questionable," Leggett
said.
"I plan on being back at SFU
again next year as associate
professor in the PSA
department."
"We plan to win."
(Aft
Ity'flJaJ/
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Student accused of theft
WATERLOO    (CUP)-University    of    Waterloo
:|;      administration president Howard Petch has personally charged
a student with the theft and possession of a letter from his
files.
Petch accused Cyril Levitt, a member of Waterloo's
Radical Student Movement, of stealing a letter from Philip
Pocock, research director of the Senate Special Committee on
Science Policy, containing peripheral references to expected
increases in research funds because of American weapons
research. ■
Levitt read the letter to over 300 students September 25,
as they gathered to get answers and explanations from Petch
about the "Order on Campus" report of the Committee of     ■
Presidents of the Universities of Ontario.
American poet gives reading
American poet Miller Williams will read his work at 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday in Bu. 106.
Williams, editor of the New Orleans Review at Loyola
University where he teaches, has published poems in leading journals
throughout North America and has put out three books of his own
poetry.
He is an expert on Latin American literature and has received
numerous national awards for his own poetry.
Williams' reading is sponsored by the creative writing
department. Admission is free.
r
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Special Discount to Students and Faculty
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You'll find them in "BIRD CALLS"
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BUY YOUR COPY TODAY - only $1.00
UBC BOOKSTORE AND PUBLICATIONS OFFICE OR
THE THUNDERBIRD SHOP IN SUB.
"The Most Useful Book on Campus" Friday, October 24,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
'Education for whom/ anti-trek protesters ask
By ROBIN BURGESS
Organizers of Wednesday's reverse great trek planned
to bring the problems of the university to the people.
But they encountered some people they didn't plan
on-Indians, unemployed citizens and welfare recipients.
Holding high posters declaring "Education for
whom?" and "Unite for freedom from wage and welfare
slavery", supporters of a counter-rally jammed the
courthouse steps while others circulated among the crowd
distributing -coloured arm-bands and explaining the
significance of the slogans.
It was a trek week rally with a kick, but not quite the
kick the initial organizers had planned.
With an air of dutiful school spirit, about 120 souls
marched to the university gates to the beat of a bass drum
and off-key bugle and piled into buses for a lift to the
north end of Burrard Street bridge.
•r «s»   ff
The faithful few hiked the last hitch through town to
the courthouse under their signs reading "United but
crowded" or specifying their particular faculty, while
middle-aged housewives beamed and school children
laughed and pointed excitedly.
All it needed was a six-foot policeman standing on
the corner, smiling benevolently.
The sense of goodwill continued as Alderman Ed
Sweeney brought greetings to the students.
"I hope one of the objectives of the Trek will be to
explain the role of the university to the downtown and
business community," said deputy administration
president Bill Armstrong the next scheduled speaker.
Armstrong's and Social Credit MLA Evan Wolfe's
comments were booed and jeered by the
counter-demonstraters.
Following the presentation of the Great Treker award
Ui
—dick button photo
ENGINEERS AND FORESTERS careen around the stadium track as they battle it out in the annual chariot race. Gears
won the race easily by virtue of numerous oxen, but both teams were coated in mud, cow dung, eggs, sawdust and flour
before the race was over. Total receipts should put total near $2,000, as compared to $1,500 last year. Other festivities
included the charity football game, won 20-8 by the nurses over home ec, and the boat race, won by The Ubyssey team
who kept the trophy it's held for 50 years.
The great Sandpiper bomb
until last Monday that the contract had been finalized."
He explained they could not advertise on a large scale
basis until they definitely knew that the concert would be
held.
Finance committee member Stuart Bruce said the
booking was delayed until Monday because of incorrect
wording in the contract, which caused a delay in signing.
He said the finance committee had expected a big loss
from the concert.
"The committee approved the booking because we
were worried about the damage to the University's
reputation among booking agents," Bruce said.
"It is really ugly. Heads are going to roll," said trek
week committee member John Wells.
"The original intent of the evening was to make
money for charity and to cover losses on the Murray
Louis dancers".
(The Murray Louis dancers lost $1,800 in a
performance at UBC Wednesday.)
"However, now the special events people stand to
lose $5,000," he said.
By JOHN ANDERSEN
and GINNY GALT
Student apathy and an incredible series of
buck-passing have produced the biggest bomb this side of
Amchitka.
The Alma Mater Society has decided that admission
to the Sandpipers concert tonight will be reduced to one
dollar from the original ticket prices of $3.00, $3.50 and
$4.00.
When the decision was made Thursday afternoon,
only 100 of the 2,000 seats for the concert had been sold.
The concert was booked at a cost of $3,780 by the
AMS special events committee by request of the trek
week committee and was intended to be the highlight of
trek week.
Special events public relations officer David Lui told
The Ubyssey: "Most kids on the committee are very
competent but we've been forced into a situation which
has caused unfortunate things to happen."
"We found out that the Sandpipers do not draw on
this campus."
Special events chairman Basil Hobbs said, "We first
heard about the concert on Sept. 29 which left us three
and a half weeks at most to publicize it.
"However, we did not hear from finance committee
No arts senator?
Nominations closed Thursday tor all senate
constituency elections except arts.
The deadline for arts nominations has been extended
until noon today because no one had been nominated.
Former arts president Stan Persky, arts 7, and Nick
Collins, arts 7, are competing for the grad studies post.
Dennis Tokarek, law 1, and Bob Jacobs, commerce 3,
are running for the commerce-law position.
The science seat is being contested by Drina Allen,
science 3, and Bruce Wood, science 3.
Eric Wood, eng. 4, won the applied science seat by
acclamation.
The elections will be held on Wednesday-.
(Total budget of the special events committee is
$4,100.)
When it became apparent Thursday afternoon that
the concert would be a disaster, organizers decided to give
free admission.
They hoped the free concert would attract people to
the special events scheduled dance on the same evening.
However, AMS treasurer Chuck Campbell, when
contacted in Montana, strongly opposed the idea.
At present there is no telling who will eventually be
blamed for the fiasco.
The Sandpipers will give two shows, one at 8 p.m. in
SUB ballroom. Tickets are on sale today.
People who have already bought tickets can get
refunds in the AMS office.
A dance scheduled for the same time in SUB cafeteria
will cost $ 1.50. The High Flying Bird, The New Breed and
the Sweet Rolle will play until 2 a.m.
"It's the student council's fault as much as anyone
else's for approving the whole thing in the first place,"
said AMS ombudsman Sean McHugh.
to supreme court justice Nathan Nemetz, AMS president
Fraser Hodge admonished the counter-demonstrators for
attempting "to shove their ideology down people's
throats." He then conceded the sound system to them.
"Now we've heard from those the university
benefits," said arts undergrad president Dick Betts. "Let's
hear from those it screws."
NARP spokesman Henry Jacks, criticized the AMS
for presenting an award to Nemetz.
"That justice is the one that sent a lot of our people
to jail," said the Indian student.
"It makes me angry when people talk about the way
we're disrupting a rally here. They're disrupting our way
oflife."
"We don't want to integrate," he told the crowd,
"This is a sick society."
Meanwhile, Scott Lawrence of the IWW was
explaining the significance of his sign "Education for
whom" to by-standers.
"Education is not for the masses, only the wealthy,
white elite," said Lawrence. "We're here to point out the
real issues rather than the phoney one presented by the
AMS."
Jack Baily, speaking for the UCWIC deplored the lack
of concern for welfare recipients in Vancouver..
"The Unitarians raised three-and-one-half million
dollars for milk for children overseas," he said. "We've got
welfare children in Vancouver that need milk too."
"Don't tell me about the United Appeal," said Baily.
He pointed out that the Catholic Church, one of the
wealthiest churches, is an agency of the Appeal.
Steve Waters from the American Deserters
Committee, told the crowd about the different hassles
facing draft-dodgers in Vancouver.
"I'd like to go to school but I can't get in, I haven't
got the money and I can't get a good job here," said
Waters.
"We're being busted by the Man. We need lawyers but
we can't get any."
Power for the sound system was cut off for minutes
during both Baily and Waters speeches.
Organizers of the counter-rally blamed "a
misunderstanding" for the power failures rather than
direct sabotage.
A successful rally? Overwhelmingly so, said the
counter-rally supporters happily.
AMS trek week sponsors weren't quite so
enthusiastic.
"I only wish the counter-trek people had approached
us three months ago and we would have included them in
the program,"said trek week chairman John McGowan.
—dave enns photo
CITIZEN joins student at courthouse. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  October 24,  1969
THE1I8YSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
OCTOBER 24, 1969
One year older
Happy Birthday, UBC.
Today this university celebrates the anniversary of
its coming of age in contemporary terms, its ascension
into the ranks of the Real Universities.
One year ago today a motley crew of some 2,000
assorted radicals, dissidents and fun-seekers followed a
pig into the Faculty Club and embarked on one of the
most enjoyable—if confused—parties in the history of
this campus.
That action arose out of frustration. It was an
ill-planned, blind and indefinite event that released a lot
of steam and had its good effects and its bad effects.
Now, here we are one year later. The campus looks
pretty well the same. The same people are here, give or
take a few. Classes go on. People drink coffee, hustle
chicks, write mid-terms.
We now have 12, rather than four, student
senators. We still have no students on the board of
governors, most powerful decision-making body on
campus.
We now have a fully functioning student union
building, albeit with a ~few screwed-up facilities. We also
have 21,000, rather than 18,000 students.
We tore dowrt some of the shacks on West Mall and
built some new shacks to replace them. Temporary, we
understand.
The SDU is gone. We now have the Campus Left
Action Movement. Something of an improvement, we
suppose.
The old radicals are gone. We now have new
radicals. Ken Hare is gone. We now have Wally Gage.
John Buchanan is gone. We have Allan McGavin. (He's
chancellor, you remember.)
Last year the AMS was radical and did nothing.
This year the AMS is conservative and does nothing..
Last year The Ubyssey got the dirty end of the
monetary stick and went from three issues a week to
two issues a week. This year it threatens to go down to
one issue a week.
Last year Simon Fraser University was engulfed in
turmoil. This year Simon Fraser University is engulfed
in turmoil.
Things are changing. Things are changing like
Heraclitus' river. (You can never put your foot in the
same river twice, because the water is always moving.)
But it takes decades for the ordinary river to
radically change its course.
Things move faster if something forceful and
directed happens to the river.
The UBC river continues to float scum.
Hey, who wants to storm the administration
building?
Editor: Michael Finlay
News Paul Knox
City Nate Smith
Photo Bruce Stout
Wire         Irene Wasilewski
Sports Jim Maddin
Associate Peter Ladner
Senior John Twigg
Ass't News Maurice Bridge
Managing Bruce Curtis
Page Friday  .Fred Cawsey
Norbert.Ruebsaat
"The week of the ungreat untreck
has come untracked," cried Irving
Fetish (Irving, like Jim Davies, never
does anything but make inane
comments that can be put in the
masthead.)
John Andersen and Ginny Gait sang
a duet of Guantanamera while old
stand-by Brian McWatters stood by.
Murray Kennedy became a political
hack, Robin Burgess* became a
liberated woman and Fran McGrath
became ill.
Jacques Khoury. the Lebanese
leprechau'n (how's that for
international flavor?) hid in the waste
basket when Dave Keillor turned into a
frisbee and flew upon Leslie Plommer.
(Hey Martha, what the hell is he
talking about?" "I don't know Harvey,
but don't ask him, he sounds
dangerous.")
Urve Torva, Jennifer Jordan and
Leslie Minot engaged in the number
one office pastime, looking on with
shock and disbelief.
Sincerest and humblest apologies to
Sandy Kass, Robert Bennett, Sandy
Duke, Christine Krawczyk, Don
Lanthier and Elaine Tarzwell, who
labored long and hard, only to have the
fruits of their labor squelched by the
demon of the news desk. (Hey Martha,
Knox is a f ru i t -squelcher.)
Congratulations to Nick Orchard, who
finally made it into print.
Dave Enns, Dirk Visser, George Mah
and David Bowerman overexposed
themselves in the darkroom while
Tony Gallagher, Scott McCloy and
Dick Button consoled Maddin on his
failure to make the teacup team.
<Uy**>*y
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Reply anyone?
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It occurs to me, after repeated
exposure to them, that the
vocabulary and complaints of
protesters are extremely limited:
administrations are
"bureaucracies"; AMS reps are all
"bureaucrats and politicos"; the
Canadian and American
governments are all "oppressive
imperialists". These words are
supposed to be derogatory. They
are used to arouse contempt or
concern. They are only
words—less effective than the four
letter words that are used to
shock the "scrubbed face good
student".
The protestor choses his
words well —and hits
phychological nerves that have
reflex responses. Starving women
and children, the oppressed poor,
Negro, native Indian-few of us
are any of these. Guilt feelings are
instantly evoked, and suddenly
everyone in a position of
authority is responsible for all the
ilk of the world.
More specifically, the
Unemployed Citizens' Welfare
Improvement Council says, "poor
people need money, food, clothes,
recreational facilities, and proper
medical care, none of which we
are getting today. In all of these
fields, the university could move
to overcome and solve these
problems." Yeah? OK-the
university has just moved to help
overcome these problems. Now
then, all you poor people line up
at the registrar's office for your
money. Any amount you want.
Sure, the students can afford it;
the taxpayers have been "sucked
come on you Canadian Indians,
I'll grant you have many
legitimate complaints and have
suffered from an ill-informed
Ottawa Indian Affairs Branch. But
have you really got enough
prepared, and not just
educationally prepared, native
people to staff and maintain a
Department of Indian Studies? It
is unfortunate but an honest
answer would be negative. If you
bring in capable native people
from across Canada then you'll
deny other NARP agents the
opportunity to realistically
demand the same program in
other universities.
You say "... the lies of the
invaders of this land (everyone's
forefathers but yours) are
perpetrated in the educational
system today." You hope to
rectify that by exposing the "true
history of Canadian Society."
What is this true history". A
history of Canada's society from
the Indians' point of view? Will
history taught by a justly
resentful minority group have less
bias in it than that of our
"invaders". If you're Honest
Injun, your answer will be no.
So you want to make it
compulsory. You should know
better than that. In this present
day, administrative oppression is
not appreciated. Who will enforce
your demand? That bureaucratic
oppressive administration that
students bitch about? You'd ask
them to force students to do what
they don't want to do? You'd ask
Administration to become more
oppressive? Somehow we have
come full circle.
L. AVERY
nursing 4
up  to"; the  businessmen  don't   HqT POrnO
mind—they were "programmed
into the economy" and feel the
university is the place to dissovle
oppression of Poor People.
Hungry? No coat? The Home Ec
girls spend their entire day
cooking and sewing. They haven't
had time to attend classes mind
you, so don't criticize the lack of
seasoning or the unfinished seams.
Pardon. Please limit your "Oh
shits" to a respectable number.
Yessir, the university's the place
with the answer for all oppressed
people.
Now I'll really do it. I'll repress
any guilt I should have for not
being born an oppressed minority
member and take on the National
Alliance  for Red Poewer. Now
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Re top of page one Tuesday.
Poor taste. Is nothing sacred?
In this modern world privacy is
precious and peace in privacy is
even more important. What next?
A five page pictorial with
foldouts? We applaud the
gentleman and his mistress for
their courage and abhor the
underground reporter for his
mischievous and callous bad taste,
obviously bred by jealousy. If this
picture was not meant in jest then
something is sorely lacking in the
morals of the campus newspaper.
D. PARKINSON
B. WILLIS
physics 4
Money game
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I would like to make some
comments on a question raised in
last Tuesday's Ubyssey editorial.
The question was whether
students attend university "to be
programmed into the economy"
or whether they are here "to be
educated, to learn". Contrary to
what was stated in the editorial, I
believe that both statements
ultimately lead to the same
objective—applying what we have
learned to working in society. In
other words, the benefit of
learning is not realized unless we
apply the learning; no society
could exist if everyone sat around
philosophizing all day.
Whether learning is done under
our economic system or some
other one, whether it is done in a
scientific field or in the arts does
not matter; the point is that all
learning is just a means to an end.
The end being the application of
that learning to the doing of
productive work under that
economic system.
FRANK BAUMANN
eng 3
War is recognized as a great
economy-booster. People
"educated" at universities make
the best implements of war and
death. University grads are taught
that death means, in some
circumstances, money. Get the
idea?-Ed.
We care
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I would like to know who the
hell cares about tea pots or em
rulers? Sure, they're funny when
you think about it, but who
cares?
I always thought editorials
were supposed to stimulate a
person's imagination ... or
something. Well, I have yet to be
stimulated.
What's going to happen when
you run out of the little things?
Or is that all you ever think
about? Seriously, I'm beginning to
wonder.
GAIL COHEN
ed.I
Apparently, you have only
read one paper this year and took
two weeks to read it.—Ed. Friday, October 24,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
Currriculum committees
Students role only minor
By PETER LADNER
Fourth of a series
During last year's teach-in,
someone in Malcolm McGregor's
classical studies class asked THE
Canadian expert on ancient
Greece what he thought about
students sitting on curriculum
committees.
Rocking back on his cane and
slicking a bush of wise grey hair
off his forehead, the great master
bellowed in his gravel voice: "We
have NO students on the
curriculum committee in the
classics department because we
have no curriculum committee.
"But I am seriously considering
setting up a curriculum
committee, just so I can say there
are no students on it."
FOURTH CHAPTER
This disdain of student
participation seems to be the
thickly veiled sentiment behind
the fourth chapter of the senate's
long-range objectives committee
report.
The chapter is called "What
should be included in the
curriculum?"
The philosophical answers they
give to this question are: service
to students, service to the
community, relevance, flexibility,
intellectual growth, and specialist
competence.
The report doesn't entirely
ignore student participation. But
almost.
"Student demand should not
be ignored, nor should its
importance be unduly
exaggerated," the report cautions.
When it comes to specific
recommendations, the report
wants students to be consulted
and advised,, but not anything
else.
For advising students, the
report urges profs to get together
with the counselling service so
academic advisors have some clue
about career possibilities related
to  different academic programs.-
STUDENT PARTICIPATION
The committee's feelings on
student participation in their own
academic affairs leak out in the
following section: "Individuals'
ideas and plans for curriculum
changes are rightly subjected to
the collective judgments of
departments, faculties, and the
senate since it is the students'
academic careers which are being
affected, and for these the
institution, not the individual
faculty member, must be
responsible finally."
What about the student
themselves?
The most the report will say is
"that faculties should come to
grips with the question of student
membership on curriculum
committees."
So let's look at a field where
students have been very interested
and involved — evaluating courses
and profs.
GATHER STUDENT VIEWS
The report is willing to have
profs stoop over and gather up
student views, but that's all.
Specifically, their
recommendation here is for
consulting students "by means of
a : professionally-designed
questionnaires" to be
administered and looked over by
deans when they decide
promotions, pay and tenure.
Not one word is wasted on
anti-calendars, which combine
student consultation with
professionally-designed
questionnaires in fact as well as in
rhetoric.
The report also wants
compulsory teacher-training for
all up-and-coming profs.
COMPULSORY TUTORIALS
Then to make sure students
will be up to the improved level of
their profs, the report
recommends at least some
tutorials in the last two years of
any program; compulsory
provisions for improving every
student's writing and rhetoric and
some first-year introduction in all
disciplines being studied.
That last bit is part of a whole
flock of recommendations to
balance growing specialization
with more general courses.
The committee members figure
"in most departments, especially
those which are strongly
professionally oriented, it is the
general education which has been
sacrificed."
So they call for:
• better information on
interdepartmental programs in the
university calendar,
• a study of general education
possibilities, possibly
co-ordinating them with a
university-wide program of
general courses for any level.
ORGANIZATION LACK
They also want to move some
classes into residences "as soon as
possible" to see if life in
residences can be integrated into
academic life.
Who asked us?
By LESLIE PLOMMER
The 1970 budget drawn up by Alma Mater Society
treasurer Chuck Campbell allocates $3,650 worth of funds to
the B.C. Union of Students.
This means an AMS fee levy of 20 cents per student and
falls under the budget category of non-discretionary grants.
According to the AMS constitution, a non-discretionary
grant cannot be made without a majority vote by an AMS
general meeting or referendum.
The question at this time is not whether it will be useful
to belong to BCUS.
What should be asked is when the students were given
the chance to authorize the expenditure of these funds.
Can anyone remember such a vote being taken last year?
We can't.
The most interesting proposals
in the chapter are seven
suggestions for overcoming the
present lack of any
centrally-organized programs in
general education.
For example, they thought of
sentencing students to an extra
year of studies, to be devoted to
general education courses.
Or else an Arts I-type general
program could fill the first two
years of everyone's term here,
with an extra year for all, but one
less year of professional courses.
Or how about reducing the
number of courses required per
year from five to four, of which
one should be in general
education?
CONSTRUCTED COURSES
Some anarchist on the
committee even wanted "a
completely unstructured sequence
of courses to be taken by any
student who wishes,... to result
in a diploma, as distinct from a
regular degree which allow its
holder to proceed to graduate or
professional education."
Once again in this chapter, this
time in the strongest terms in the
report, the committee spells out
the powerlessness of senate.
Here is how the report says it:
"The ultimate sanction of
change in a university is the
money necessary to pay for it. It
is unanswerable. Yet at present,
this sanction is exercised
illogically.
"The senate is academically
responsible for curriculum
changes, the board of governors
for the finances necessary to
effect them. The link between the
two is provided by the
administrative hierarchy of
department heads, deans, deputy
presidents, and the president, who
take the effective financial
decisions under the board's
authority.
"The senate, in most cases,
must assess new curriculum
proposals in complete ignorance
of their absolute cost, of their
costs compared to those of other
proposals, and of their costs
compared to their academic
value."
So the report recommends the
senate get into considering
budgets and costs of curriculum
changes.
With this thinking behind it,
the report heads into its big
chapter on academic
reorganization including full
estimates of how much the
different proposals will cost. More
on that next issue.
**'   •     »    -*!!■     ■!   ■     ■     *f
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Simplicity $300
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REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
Granville at Pender Since 1904 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  October 24,  1969
The
By MARIA FURSTENWALD
Dr. Furstenwald is an assistant professor of
German at UBC and a member of Public Concerns,
a group formed to save University Beach.
She has organized two beach cleanups and has
been a strong 'save-the-beacher' since the road was
first announced by the park board.
The first battle against construction of a Beach Road
was won.
But preparations for further battles must be
made-because construction of the road is under way
again.
Perhaps you recall pictures of students and citizens
forming a human chain Feb. 17 in front of bulldozers
working on the north end of University Beach. They were
successful in postponing construction of a road around
Point Grey by the Vancouver park board.
The debate over the the development of University
and Wreck Beaches has been going on for some eight
months, and its clarity seems to be diminishing as the
debate goes on because we depend on the
pronouncements of the park board.
Ten days after the first outcry about the things
happening to this beach, Stuart Lefeaux, superintendent
of the park board and UBC senator, wrote in the UBC
Reports of Feb. 27, 1969:
"The suggestion that a seawall promenade be
substituted for a roadway is not practicable as we are
endeavoring to build a large marina at the end of the
roadway that must be served by a roadway."
On October 7, in an interview with The Ubyssey,
Lefeaux stated:
"The whole concept of a road being constructed in
that area has been the result of emotional, distorted
reporting." But in his latest statement, in The Ubyssey of
Oct. 17, Lefeaux says:
"There is no change in the plans for the Point Grey
foreshore. The city is now seeking funds from the
provincial government to start construction."
On campus there is confusion and and anxiety about
the future of University Beach, and students frequently
ask what they can do to save it.
—gordie tong photo
60,000 CUBIC FEET OF JUNK FILL spills on to
University Beach at starting point of park board's
proposed Beach Road. The board is presently petitioning
the provincial government for funds to extend the road
around Point Grey, thus making Vancouver's last virgin
beach accessible by car.
This article will try to inform the campus, especially
the newcomers to UBC, about the beach controversy. I
shall, as best I can, present the facts and document the
events in an undistorted manner.
However, I cannot claim to be unemotional about
University Beach. My involvement, which started with
bitter tears at the sight of the beginning destruction,
turned to anger and then to determination to stop the
road.
PARK BOARD'S PLAN
Although the park board and UBC have been
concerned about the erosion of the sand cliffs surrounding
the campus for decades, the government in Victoria failed
to advance any money to bring it under control. A good
deal has been done to channel surface runoff and to
control seepage, but nothing to combat marine erosion.
Beach
An extensive report on marine and land erosion of
Marine Drive foreshore was made in 1962 by Swan
Wooster Engineering Co. Ltd. at the cost of $18,000,
which was borne by the provincial government, the park
board and the federal department of public works.
Another report by the same firm was prepared in
December, 1967 and paid for with a donation of about
$10,000 from the P. A. Woodward foundation. This
report is concerned exclusively with long-range
development of Vancouver's last natural foreshore,
University Beach. It was approved in principle by the
Vancouver park board under the chairmanship of George
Puil in December, 1967 (the month of its completion).
The development was to proceed in the following
manner:
PHASE I
Stage 1 —Two-lane highway on
University Beach $ 500,000
Stage 2-Access road on Wreck Beach 1,200,000
Stage 3-Rowing Lagoon    265,000
Total $1,965,000
PHASE II
Stage 1 -Marina Breakwater and
Channel Dredging   $1,620,000
Stage 2-Construction of Marina* 1,415,000
Total $3,035,000
Project Total $5,000,000
*If the project is completed soon, federal aid for this
portion could be acquired.
The two-lane highway, 50 feet wide with 24 feet for
driving lanes, is to be built on top of an approximately
250-foot wide berm. The 50-foot to 150-foot wide span
between the road and the cliffs would eventually be
covered with fill and used for parking. (Note this is a
250-foot wide dike, not a walkway.) See below.
The proposed marina is to accommodate 2,000 or
more pleasure boats opposite the rowing course a 5,000
seat grandstand is envisaged. For both sites parking lots
for thousands of cars, dry storage sheds,"gasoline stations,
etc. would have to be provided.
SUM TOTAL: every inch of Vancouver's last natural
beach would be buried.
The park board, without money in its coffers but
anxious to start the ambitious project, hoped to press the
provincial government for money, which in turn would
have brought about the financial commitment of the
federal government, by going ahead with the road using
free excavation fill.
This dumping was begun in February of this year and
about 200 yards of the beach were buried under a heap of
rubble and mud but since then some 60,000 cu. ft. were
washed away, polluting the adjacent area. However, UBC
students and concerned citizens enraged at this dumping,
set up picket-lines Feb. 17, and caused truck drivers and
bulldozer operators to stop their work. Andy Livingstone,
the board's chairman, later promised to halt the dumping
until a new decision was made.
PUBLIC PROTESTS PLANS
In February, public reaction manifested itself in
shock about the dumping of the fill and the
condemnation has been growing ever since. UBC students,
led by Niels von Meyenfeld and Fred Boehm, protested
vigorously. Let me mention some aspects of the public
outcry against the road.
• Feb. 17. Meeting with Lefeaux and Puil at SUB.
About 200 angry students come at short notice.
• Feb. 18. Picket lines by students, faculty members
and citizens on the fill site. The park board suspends the
dumping of fill.
• Petition (of Feb. 20) asking the board for
immediate halt to dumping of excavation fill and the
adoption of "such plans as will improve access and
prevent erosion with the minimum sacrifice of the natural
amenities and the minimum 'development' ". Over 2,000
signatures sent to the board.
♦April 1. Crowded and angry public meeting (at
Bayview School) with four park board commissioners
organized by the Citizens Council on Civic Development
and attended by about 400 people, mostly non-students.
(A film by Jack Bryan illustrating the erosion problem
and showing the beauty of the beach was shown at this
meeting. The film is available through Public Concern, the
civic group formed to save the beach.)
Twelve briefs, two newsletters and two beach
cleanups were results of the beach issue. The briefs were
written by UBC students, Canadian artists, architects,
citizens concerned with the issue and professional
engineers proposing alternatives.
But a workable alternative to the park board's road
has been proposed, by Dr. Ian Bain, UBC geological
engineer and a member of Public Concerns.
BAIN'S COUNTER-PROPOSAL
The sand cliffs can be protected where necessary
without building a road, and at a small fraction of the
estimated expenditure, while all the attractive aspects of
the present natural beach are preserved if the proposal of
the UBC engineer is followed.
His brief on immediate protective works was
sumbitted April 28 and presented to the commissioners at
a meeting of the Vancouver park board. It proposed a
rubble mound sea wall 3 to 5 feet high costing an
estimated $16,500 with many technical advantages over
the sand-gravel berm dykes proposed by the Board.
The park board subsequently submitted this brief to
Swan Wooster for review. The review amounted to
defence of the $420,000 proposed roadway berm or
'sand-gravel blanket'. A counter-brief by Dr. Bain dated
Aug. 11 was not heard, but was received. It dealt with the
Swan Wooster review in a factual manner, presenting a
slightly modified rubble mound seawall proposal.
Other new information resulted in an additional
proposal for alternative methods of protecting the sand
cliffs by raising the sand beach profile. This would keep
the high water line well away from the base of the cliffs,
allowing the sand slopes to come to rest and vegetation to
take root and control erosing from minor causes such as
rain.
The most immediately applicable method of raising
the beach profile would be to remove the rocky point
Road
west of the worst slide area and place a long permeable
rock groin east of the same area in two stages. This would
cause a sand drift to form in the quieter water thus
produced opposite the Fort Camp cliffs, which would
keep winter storm waves at a safe distance.
The other alternative, which can be used at the same
time, is to relay by means of a rented sand pump and
pipeline) the sand from the annual federal dredging of the
Fraser River North Arm Channel to Point Grey where
littoral currents will spread it along the upper beaches
toward University Beach and Spanish Banks.
This coarser sand will form a steeper beach slope
capable of keeping high water storm waves away from the
foot of the cliff as before explained.
Both schemes will involve lower costs than even the
rubble mound seawall, and when combined with
rearrangement of existing beach boulder pavements, will
not be detrimental to the existing attractice beaches
washed by the waves. In any case, we do not have to
spend iarge sums of money and ruin the beach to prevent
the erosion of the cliffs.
'THIS ROAD IS NOT A PATH'
It is most regrettable that the park board, one of the
most respected public bodies in Vancouver, fell so pitifully
short of its excellent reputation in dealing with University
Beach.
Secrecy, in-camera decisions, contradictions,
inconsistencies, evasive and misleading answers to the
public, partisan attitude to civic groups-all this indicates
our elected representatives are not doing their job very
well.
In the past seven mondths the board has turned a
deaf ear to the wishes of a large segment of the public
Despite sustained efforts to achieve a discussion between
the seven, commissioners and the public, the board insisted
it would not discuss the issue further until it received
$420,000 from the provincial government.
But it is obvious that not money, but good will and
respect for public opinion are needed to reappraise an
unpopular plan for indeed only to listen to briefs by
serious citizens. (The board refused five consecutive times
to hear briefs by members of Public Concerns, all of
whom were UBC professors.)
In-camera sessions do not increase our confidence in
the good faith of park commissioners. Such meetings seem Friday, October 24,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
a very questionable procedure by a public body discussing,
not personal matters, but the expenditure ofthe taxpayers'
money.
Under the impact of the students' demonstration and
public protest the board disguised the original plan by
making a slight and temporary alteration in it. In a letter
of March 21, 1969 to Premier Bennett and members ofhis
cabinet, it was stated that the board was "most anxious"
that Stage I Phase I of the Swan Wooster Report be
undertaken. The letter reveals the board's policy ontfie
Beach Road:
It is NOW the board's opinion that the roadway
should be left out of the project FOR THE
PRESENT and the sand and gravel blanket for
erosion control be installed ONLY AT THIS
TIME    with    a    narrow    service    road    or
promenade   for   fire   protection  and public
safety. The cost of Stage I of Phase I of the
project   is   estimated   at   $420,000.   It   is
respectfully   requested   that   the   provincial
government    provide   the   Vancouver   Park
Board    with    $420,000   for   THE   FIRST
STAGE       in       the       LONG       RANGE
DEVELOPMENT   PLAN   for  Marine   Drive
Foreshore Park as it is most urgent that the
dangerous   erosion   of   Provincial   Land   be
checked and approximately two miles of new
beach be made available to the public.
The capitals are ours, but the words are theirs.
The "new" plan amounts to the finding of a
euphemism. The road is no longer a road, but a "blanket
for erosion protection." Some "blanket," designed to cure
an ailment by killing the patient! The sum of $420,000
was arrived at by a simple subtraction of $80,000,
estimated for the black top, from $500,000 estimated for
the road (Swan Wooster 1967, Section 8).
Only 10 days after the dispatch of this important
letter, Livingstone and commissioners Joseph Malkin,
Sandy Robertson and George Wainborh appeared at a
public meeting in Bayview School. The panel opposing the
project consisted of Drs. R. E. Kucera, V. S. Pendakur,
Robin Harger and Andrew Gruft and Sun columnist Bob
Hunter.
Instead of facts and an honest explanation of the
Board's intentions we heard idyllic stories about a planned
"walkway" and the excuse of building the road as a
service access for safety vehicles. We also heard promises
that there would be no road and' that the board would
keep its finger on the public pulse. As neither the
panelists, nor the public knew the contents of the letter to
Premier Bennett quoted above (exposed here for the first
time), the uneyen and confusing statements gave rise to
the well-founded suspicions that the commissioners are
hiding something.
The following months were punctuated with most
contradictory remarks, statements to the press and replies
to letters by Lefeaux and some commissioners.
More evidence is at hand about the park board's
inconstancy. To its request of March 21, 1969 for
provincial money were attached copies of letters
endorsing the project from Dr. Gordon Shrum, chancellor,
of Simon Fraser University, from A. Kelly, president of
the University Endowment Lands Ratepayers, and a letter
Spectre
on behalf of the UBC board of governors and the Point
Grey Citizens Committee.
In the park board's letter there is no mention of the
public outcry—which may be forgiven. What cannot be
forgiven is the board's failure to attach a copy of a letter
from the North-west Point Grey Homeowners (of Feb.
20) which supports the students' protest and which urges
the board to "realize the priceless recreational value of a
natural beach in a metropolitan area."
Shouldn't the park board be a responsible
representative of the public at large rather than an agent
of just one interest group?
GIRD YOUR LOINS
What can we do to stop the road?
Further appeals to ,the park board are probably
useless. However, we have not yet tried a direct appeal to
Premier Bennett and to the UBC administration.
A new petition sponsored by the AMS and the Public
Concerns, asking for the preservation of University Beach
and for immediate erosion protection measures is being
circulated and copies will be sent to both authorities. We
shall try to persuade the Premier to listen to a legitimate
and strong wish of UBC students and citizens of
Vancouver.
—bob brown photo
UBC STUDENT GAZES AT SITE OF BEACH ROAD even as the sea erodes the sand he is standing on. The proposed
road would surround Point Grey with a 250-foot-wide cordon of fill if plans of the Vancouver park board are realized.
We should also appeal to the UBC administration to
acknowledge that this foreshore is a unique asset to UBC.
A grant towards immediate and genuine erosion measures
would indicate the university's desire to protect UBC
buildings and land. It would also show the university is
interested in keeping this foreshore as a research ground
of many projects and as an oasis of peace in a highly
stressed academic community of almost 30,000 people.
In this battle for the beach, we must realize a
fundamental truth: conservation is politics.
Conservation is politics because it requires the
allocation of land, air and water resources between
competing interest groups—and someone must make a
decision.
Shall the beach remain a wilderness park or become
an  access  road  to  a  marina?  Whatever the decision,
inevitably a politician will make it.
Thus we must become involved in the political
process and use every tool at our disposal to influence the
decision—be it through letters, petitions, public hearings
or court action.
Students now at UBC, may be the very last ones
called upon to decide the future of University Beach. The
fight is not against somebody or something, but for the
preservation of an irreplaceable shore. Another site for the
marina will be found sooner or later—another virgin beach
in Vancouver can never be found—they are all gone.
And let us not be afraid of being "emotional". We
have neither five million dollars to spend or legal
authority. But we have something which can be neither
legislated nor bought: enthusiasm and dedication to a very
good cause.
.. __-■ _ «."*~a*s
••^""•S-^^^CX*^
x;**-****" -*- -       <.« -. —
*iiV.«irJ«.
—gordie tong photo
"I MUST GO DOWN to the sea again, the lonely sea and the sky . . ."where students can recharge their batteries after
exams and such similar horrors.
or how to save that sand Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 24,  1969
Students seek academic reform
by formation of course unions
By MURRAY KENNEDY
Ubyssey Academic Reporter
Course unions are supposed to
be the only effective organizations
for change available to students.
However, most students know
little or nothing about them.
The idea of course unions arose
last year during the teach-in that
followed the faculty club
invasion. Course unions were to
be a step towards academic
reform of the university.
By organizing at the classroom
level, students felt they had an
effective vehicle for student
participation in departmental
affairs.
The unions last year failed to
gain a strong foothold at UBC
primarily because of lack of
follow-through on the part of the
students. Reaction against any
form of change was the order of
the day. Therefore the idea of
student participation in academic
matters received very little active
support.
Democracy
This year, course unions have
been cited as the most effective
means available to democratize
the university. The violent
reaction to change is no longer
quite as prevalent so the climate is
right for the development of the
unions.
Dick Betts, arts undergraduate
society president, has some
definite ideas as to what the
course unions are and what they
should be doing.
"Course unions, are a unique
student way of organizing," he
said. "They are unique in that
students are not coerced into
viewing the problems from the
administration's standpoint."
Betts said other organizations
into which students may be
invited, such as the senate, are
meaningless. Students just become
frustrated in attempting to change
the institution or else their
opinions are altered, he
maintained.
Betts continued that the real
problem is not the university but
society in general. He said
students must become social
critics through course critiques
rather than mere course critics.
"Student organizing should
gear itself to fight the sordid
society that tends to perpetuate
the elitist structure of the
university," he said.
PSA example
Betts said the problems of the
political science, sociology and
anthropology department at
Simon Fraser University are an
excellent example of what can
happen if student organizing does
democratize part of the
university.
"They will be suppressed
because the interests of students
do not coincide with those of the
corporate elite sector of society
that runs the university," he said.
"Therefore students must not
only press for a democratized
university, but for a
democtratized society as well."
"For what good is a progressive
structure, or a democratic
university, in a sutltifeid society?"
So far this year, only the
anthropology-sociology union has
done any definite organizing.
Last year, the anthrosoc union
gained student representation on
virtually all departmental
committees. Efforts are being
continued to present constructive
student views on the committees
again this year.
Anthrosoc union chairman
Brian Brown said he would like to
see the union work toward
creating a better awareness among
students of the need for social
change.
"But this may not be the
primary goal of the union at the
present moment," he said. "If"
students wish to direct their
efforts toward more immediate
problems, such as departmental
affairs, it is entirely up to them to
decide."
The anthrosoc union is
presently involved in the setting
up of workshops for all students,
Brown said. The initial workshops
will be devoted to deciding what
the goals of the union will be.
"There is a newsletter which
we are printing, which will keep
students informed of our
activities, and we hope it will
encourage people to get involved
as well," he said.
As for other departments,
nothing positive has been done,
Betts said. There is a little activity
in the English department, but
nothing yet has come of it.
In order for course unions to
attain any degree of academic
reform, or social change, or
whatever its goal must be, they
must represent the opinions of the
students. Therefore, it must be
the students themselves who do
the organizing.
There must, however, be an
incentive for organization. This
incentive is not directly obvious
to the vast majority of UBC
students at the present time.
The problems of overcrowded
classes and limited enrollment do
not inspire students into many
noble actions.
The failure of the university to
serve the community should be
the rallying point of the course
unions, Betts said.
But the initiative must be
taken by students. Reform
through course unions can only be
attained if individual students do
the organizing.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
NON-FICTION PAPERBACKS
Specializing in Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393 W. I Oth Ave. 224-4144
FLOOR SHOW
Tryouts
SUB 125 (F)
12:30 - 2:00
Oct. 23, 24, 27, 28, 29,30
Singing,  Dancing,
Skits, Musicians.
MARDI GRAS
DELICIOUS CHINESE FOOD
SERVED 11 A.M. - 1:30 P.M.
AUDITORIUM SNACK BAR
Combo Plate with Chinese Tea - 85c
CHOW MEIN, FRIED RICE, CHOP SUEY,
SWEET & SOUR PORK, etc
Eat In or Take Out
9lXife of
2Wtoture
Young men attending the Canadian Services Colleges and Canadian universities
under the tri-service Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP) train for challenging and
rewarding careers as officers in the Canadian
Armed Forces. High school graduates of
.Senior Matriculation or Junior Matriculation standing qualify for entrance on a
competitive basis. These young men are
selected and will advance on one basis
alone — on their merit.
For information regarding
tuition, board, lodging, uniforms, books, instruments, medical
and dental care,
and salary, consult
the Canadian
Forces Recruiting
Centre in your
area, or write to
the Canadian
Armed Forces Recruiting Centre,
547 Seymour St.,.
Vancouver, B.C.       666-3136
U
SUB FILMS PRESENTS:
BYE BYE
BRAVERMAN
Starring ALAN KING
SUB THEATRE, 75c
Tonight - 7:00 and 9:30 p.m.
Saturday - 8 p.m. - Sunday - 7 p.m.
it Frisbee Consciousness
3S
Page Friday again does its whatever this
week... on these grey, end-of-October-days,
where nothing, or at least very little of cultural
relevance seems to be happening. Or being made to
happen. Little things, Little Things. Very.
We suppose-here as we wait for
earth-shattering, colorful cultural revolutions
(after all, what other kind is there, can there
possibly be)-we suppose that everyone is
diligently in the library, studying, doing it to their
minds at their desk. Persuing their faith:
Furthermore-you 're   probably   wondering
why we haven't followed the illustrious, awsomely
important and publically meaningful example of
that sage downtown paper "The Vancouver
Province," and exposed-front page-the evils and
socially-destructible (I told you so Johnny) results
of that disreputable drug-taking habit. "Good Boy
Dies Of LSD. "Like... is it all really happening?
Well, we're guessing its "What the people
want and like that."
A medley of littles this week: Roon reache.
for the skies and other amusement ofPf2wo; (SEE
INSIDE) on PfJRoy Cartlidge draws draws, and
how and with depth (Look At); OlgaRuskin looks
around her and still sees things (very) on pf's
mini-senter-spred-while Tim Wilson Finally comes
thru with his Vision of the campus, over on the
right of it. Vallerie is bak. On pf6ix, as is Dylan;
and QM on page pf7... well. A letter from Leo to
Alex as idea on Pfight.
Above you, moving down, you see the
compelling Bruce Dolson at work; and right here
you see seE sEE SEE ...
All conceived, compiled, edited and
produced by your ever-by-you-standing men
Friday Freddy Cawsey and Aloisius
Ruebsaaaaaaa. .. 3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
BUSY "B"
BOOKS
Used  University Texts
Bought and Sold
146 W.   HASTINGS
Opposite Woodwards
681-4931
Hallowe'en Jollies Open New Club
Heaven
Complete Auto
Service
To All Makes
• Electronic Tune-Up
• Brake Service
Disc and Standard
• Wheel Balancing
• Exhaust Repairs
•*%
10 YEARS IN THIS
LOCATION
UNIVERSITY  SHELL
SERVICE
Peter Lissack
4314 W  10th Are.
224-0828
By ROON
Hey Gang .. . yech ... start again ...
This is about a new place called Heaven ... and Hell.
Heaven and Hell is a new club, or bistro ifyou will, aimed at
UBC students who have nothing to do on weekends and are
dissatisfied with the lack of activities out on campus for them.
Heaven and Hell will occupy the same premises that the now
defunct La Place occupied. In fact, owner Pat O'Donohue says his,
new operation, at 3730 West Tenth (Tenth and Alma) is aimed
directly at UBC students.
The club has a seating capacity for 200 and a large dance
floor. It will be open to anyone over 18 who wants to dance and
groove to the music of Vancouver's top rock groups. Thursday
through Sunday will be this format and Wednesday nights will be
folk night for folk enthusiasts.
Opening night is Friday Oct. 31. That's Hallowe'en Martha.
Right.
O'Donohue wants to start things off right so he has
announced there will be a Masquerade Ball opening night with
free pizzas for all who come in costume. Tomorrow's Eyes, one
of Vancouver's most popular groups, just back from a tour in the
east, will be there for the first three nights starting with the
Masquerade Ball.
The Ball sounds like it could be quite a gas. In fact the club
itself promises to be a fun spot to spend a minute or two in.
The dance floor will be right in front of the bandstand with
the tables around periphery (that's the outer edge kiddies).
The decor etc. will be strictly in the Heaven or Hell motif.
Pitchforks on the walls and red lights countered by heavenly
things.
Admission will be $2 per head or $3.50 a couple regular
nights and $ 1 per head on folk nights. Musicians with instruments
get in free on folk night of course and all and sundry are invited
to come and do their thing right there on the stage.
A restaurant within the club will serve pizzas, sandwiches
coffee and pop at reasonable prices.
Reasonable prices means cheap according to O'Donohue.
"We want to provide a place where people can go without getting
killed on the prices," he says.
He says the doors will open at 7:30 with music starting at 9.
This is so y'all can come and fill yer guts before you get too
excited about the music and such.
"It's mainly for the kids in the dorms," says O'Donohue.
"Right now they don't have anything to do at night. They study
all day and when they want to go out at night there isn't always
something going on out on campus for them."
Grandmother's is going to do the exclusive booking for the
club so you know the bands are going to be boss, groovy, etc.
O'Donohue also wants to use UBC students as staff. So any
of you who want part-time jobs phone 224-1415 all day Monday
for appointments. Come to think of it, the opening night
festivities are going to be packed so you can phone the same
number any night next week and reserve a place. Dig the place.
It's for you.. Besides it's a good place to get away from the
hobgoblins. And if you don't like Heaven, you can go to Hell.
and Hell
Tomorrow's Eyes will open club
pi 2 WO I
^=
Some years ago, six hundred Moslems
gathered together in Bangkok and set off on a
four month pilgrimage that was to take them
to Mecca, the birthplace of Mohammed.
For such a long and arduous journey, one would
have expected them to travel light—but no,
included in their provisions were thirty-four hundred
cases of Coca-Cola—well over a bottle a day per pilgrim.
Understandably, the pilgrims did need readily available refreshment, but this story indicates a strong preference for Coca-Cola.
It is not known if Mecca was able to provide thirty-four hundred
cases of Coke to make things go better on the way back!
Both Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trade marks which identify only the product of Coca-Cola Ltd.
Authorized bottler of Coca-Cola under contract with Coca-Cola Ltd.
WOMETCO (B.C.) LIMITED
1818 CORNWALL, VANCOUVER
A Repeat of Last Year's Sell-out
^
STUDENT NIGHT
with the
PLAYHOUSE
THEATRE  COMPANY
}
$12 season ticket includes six plays, in the Q.E. Playhouse,
free coffee and wide-open discussion with the director,
designer, members of the cast and YOU!
Oct. 28-THE ROYAL HUNT OF THE SUN
Canadian premiere by
Peter Shaffer
Nov.  11-THE SHOW OFF
by George Kelly
Dec. 9- COLOURS IN THE DARK
by James Reaney
Jan.  20-EVENTS WHILE GUARDING THE BOFORS GUN
by John McGrath
Feb. 24-THE SLEEPING BAG
by Arthur Murphy
Mar.   17—TANGO by Slawomir Mrozek
For Application Forms Call Mike Lewis, Playhouse Rep. at
U.B.C. 922-8916 or write 2005 Inglewood, West. Van.
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 24, 1969 Vis® t®<smvsB@a&i&
pE Sbree
©our Ht&> pcxr w€£i^$ <k*0tr
ISiue Wi€KTH^ar<mfc«.eNtGNM(V3 etc-
VARSITY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE
JACK REID - JIM SMITH
£ssoj
A Complete Automotive Service
Government Certified Mechanics
33 Years at This Location
10th AVE. AT BLANCA - 224-7424
On Stage in Person . . .
GORDON LIGHTFOOT
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
OCTOBER 29th & 31st, 8:30 P.M.
Tickets at Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton or from
Their Branch Office—Thunderbird Shop—U.B.C.
| $3.50 - $4.50 - $5.50 - DONT WAIT!!
1
FLOOR SHOW
Tryouts
SUB 125 (F)
12:30 - 2:00
Oct. 23,24,27,28,29,30
Singing, Dancing,
Skits, Musicians.
MARDI GRAS
Friday, October 24, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY HUNGRY?
International House Specialties—
Monday — West Indian Food
Wednesday — Curry
Friday — Chinese Lunch
11:30 - 2:00  p.m. — For a change, give us a try
DUTHIE BOOKS
UNIVERSITY BRANCH
4560 W. 10th Ave. - 224-7012
OTHER STORES
919 ROBSON 684-4496
PAPERBACK CELLAR 861-8713
670 SEYMOUR 685-3627
1032 W. HASTINGS 688-7434
YWCA of Canada
571 Jarvis St.
Toronto 285, Out.
September 22, 1969
TO: 1970 (WOMEN) Graduates of UBC
FROM: YWCA of CANADA
• It is not too soon to be exploring job possibilities
far mid 1970.
• On November 3rd and 4th, Miss Laura Van Every,
Director of Personnel, YWCA of Canada, will
be on campus interviewing for 1970 job openings
in YWCAs and YMCA-YWCAs across Canada.
Contact University Placement Office for appointment. 25 to 30 "new" staff placed each year in
positions calling for specialization in PHYSICAL
EDUCATION and RECREATION, SOCIAL
WORK, and ADULT EDUCATION.
• If you are interested in work where you will be
involved with people of varying backgrounds
make your appointment for interview . . . NOW.
(§) Westinghouse
WILL BE ON CAMPUS
NOVEMBER 4# 5 & 6,1969
to interview
1970 ENGINEERING GRADUATES
ELECTRICAL - MECHANICAL
A well-defined training program is offered to prepare
candidates for positions of responsibility in:
DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING
MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
FACTORY ENGINEERING
SERVICE ENGINEERING
FIELD INSTALLATION
TECHNICAL MARKETING AND SALES
These positions will afford opportunity for career development to graduates with potential.
Professional salary scale and increases based on performance as well as excellent employee fringe benfit plans.
Contact the Placement Office for detailed information,
brochures and interview appointment.
Much More Art
Olga Ruskin, in h
way, (and we hen
looks at two recei
tions  on   the  Vc
Scene.
An artist's work gives a picture of the
artist himself. The impression of Jack
Shadbolt that I received after looking at
ninety of his works at the Vancouver Art
Gallery is that here is a painter who is
sensitive to his environment and who
responds to it—at times even with a sense
of humour.
Our artistic environment has changed
since 1939 and Shadbolt's works dating
from this period, reflect this. However, I
also received the impression that here is a
painter who knows what he is doing, no
matter what style or medium he uses.
And he has used a variety of materials in
his day: watercolours, oils, then oil on
lucite, acrylic on paper, enamel on
masonite, ink and casein and pop art
materials.
Born in England, Shadbolt has called
B.C. his home for 57 of his 60 years.
However, he has travelled to the Continent
so that while he has been influenced by
B.C.'s physical environment,, he has also
painted the Italian and Greek scene, of
which "Medieval City" is perhaps the best
known.
But the Vancouver scene figures
prominently in his early representational
watercolours of the West End and Granville
Street. The huge, vivid mural that
confronts one' upon entry into the
Gallery-called "Biomorphic World", and
never shown before—also shows the
influence of local environment.
"Winter Poppies" I thought was one of
the most delightful of his water and ink
works, and, no wonder, it belongs to his
wife, Doris. "White Field" with its bright
orange and white oils is a particularly
attractive work of the early sixties.
Shadbolt's sense of humour comes out
in the titles of his pop or junkyard
sculpture, which he himself owns.
"Ecclesiastical Conclave" is a series of
empty  oil   tubes  which when mounted,
exactly
Islam)'1
and cans
studio. P
from the
look at
Shadbolt
Some
audio-'-is
There is
loop, sh
projectic
not exhi
there, t
screen,
added n
going to
either w
As it
are then
the man
concerns
this an e
world.
Artsy Craftsy
A supermarket air pervaded the BC Arts
and Crafts Fair held October 16, 17, 18.
Part of this was due to the fact that this
affair was held in a former, large North
Shore supermarket, and somehow or other,
the atmosphere remained though the
groceries had disappeared.
As anyone knows who goes through the
weekly, boring ritual of food shopping,
you can find everything from caviar to
cheeszies in these massive food armories.
And the same could be said for this year's
Arts and Crafts Fair which offered a
mixed-up, conglomeration of arts and
crafts, ranging from the good to the bad to
the indifferent.
The purpose of the Fair, according to
the co-ordinator, R. D. Handel, is "to
create an attractive outlet for professional
and semi-professional artists and craftsmen
to display and sell their works and to
enable the North Vancouver Kiwanis Club
to   further   its   work   in   Senior  Citizen
Housing and many other of its projects." first pri
I would say that the second part of this glass bl<
purpose was accomplished, because at least Rose
on Friday night the place was packed like a weavinj
department store at Christmas, this despite attracti
the dollar fifty admission. win   ai
Yet the Fair has a ways to go before it Kakinu
can truly be called "an attractive outlet" Irving
comparable to the Art Gallery Gift Shop some g<
which,   though   smaller,   doesn't   charge Duri
admission but has an excellent assortment canoe
of BC Arts and Crafts that aren't junk. artifact
I   would   also   say   that   the   current sorts, '
"Discover Scandinavia" exhibit at The Bay beach t
outclasses this Fair as a showing of native In a
arts and crafts. a need
However, I suppose the Fair reflects the this in
wide range of taste in the public, and the more \
wide range of talent found in people who having
paint, sculpt, pot, weave, make batik, and Why
leather goods. Jarvis,
There was some colorful weaving and Fair?
batik displayed and which attracted a lot Mor
of attention, but not quite as much as the the Ar
group making leather sandals. not  hi
Hardly anyone, unfortunately, stopped caviar,
to look at Garry Zeweniuk's striking hard Not
edge paintings, which though they won should
There is an Idea floating around. There is an idea floating
around that there should be a Contemporary Arts Festival. There
is an Idea floating around.
Even if we, for the time, steer around the basic question ...
there are still problems involved ...
What is a "Contemporary Arts Festival": By definition a
celebration, a ceremony, a procession of events—something
happening somewhere. People doing things, creating, for reasons
other than mere expediency or necessity. Stimulation; Expansion;
Expression; Fun. A festival is created. (It is contemporary
because it happens now.)
How is it made to happen: The Contemporary Arts Festival
is made to happen by people who want to, who Do. To an extent,
its more formal events (if desired) must be planned. Activities
must be coordinated (what is to happen when where) and funds
must be budgeted. Basically though, anything (by anyone) can be
put on if it turns them on. And at any time.
IP
X
e
X
K
0
But    who    organizes   t
Contemporary Arts Festival (
week around the end of
representatives from varioi
themselves with media express
Arts Dept. This may change.
So: So in the past, events
usually presented by (put=on) t
"artists" working in them. The
festival has been the "Arts" a
now if, these two are enough
celebration.
QjUrwfe 6H
'GOOA*
Who are "Artists";
The Contemporary Arts
to happen: Energy is forming,
Festival will again be reaching i
But it may start very soon. Par.
We will see you again.
There is an Idea floating ;
p£ 4our
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 24,  1969 P*C***^*l«.-**^**K^?*K.-*^*«*.*-^*K****^'X^>X.*^X^^X^'>
it own sweet
\fittl love her)
t demonstra-
ncouver  Art
iflect the title. "Still Life (My
a collection of various bottles
vhich Shadbolt would have in his
ces of painted driftwood hanging
■eiling in a mobile fashion offer a
another less known aspect of
work.
publicity   has   preceded    the
il.aspeects of this retrospective.
ipposed to be a continuous film
ring the artist at work, and the
of 320 colored slides of works
ted. However, the Sunday I was
audio-visuals, except for one
re  not  in  use, and therefore
ling but irritation. If a show is
ve audio-visual aids, they should
; or be removed from the scene.
s, Shadbolt's paintings en masse
ves such a vivid commentary on
id his work that as far as I'm
nothing else is needed to make
llent exhibition of one painter's
An Irish ancestored dog
Art. Not by Shadbolt,
but nevertheless nice.
We like it.
veren't the crowd pleasers that
a; or sandal making were,
aumann displaying pottery,
a second prize, had some very
ts and pieces. Though he didn't
irizes, I still liked Thomas
pottery the best, though Tarn
Charles Partington also had
ots.
e Fair, Indians were carving a
also making other Indian
.'tai etchings, jewelry of all
printing, cello-finishing and
■ould also be seen and bought,
e fair of this sort, and there is
e stimulus of an event such as
immunity, I would like to see
ional painters exhibiting and
rorks for sale.
Shadbolt,   Smith,   Binning,
r at the BC Arts and Crafts
>le came to the Fair than to
;ry on Friday night, so why
are  art gallery  stuff,  more
aermarket?
sacred   these  days. Painters
: into the marketplace.
In the past years the
structured in terms of a
ary) was organized by
artments— who concern
d specifically by the Fine
3en structured around, and
us different media and the
mmon denominator of the
ntemporary". We wonder
y the thing into a public
is nevertheless beginning
zing, communicating. The
climax early in February.
Soft, round the magical
-ALOYS RUEBSAAT  $
The weaving, leaving, time
Friday, October 24,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
pf 5«ve Wear
TUXEDO RENTALS
10% UBC Discount
JIM   ABERNETHY,   MANAGER
2046 W. 41st 263-3610|
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY  GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W.   10th at Arbutps
Half-Assed
Hair
By VALERIE HENNELL
Getting tired of waiting for Hair to slip
through the censor's fine-toothed comb? Fret no
loriger. Mussoc's little dab will do you, and then
sonie.
Whereupon you are cordially invited to
attend the Half-Assed Follies, a spirited two-hour
comedy revue, the first of its kind to be
presented for public consumption on our
campus; compliments of the Musical Theatre
Society.
Every year Mussoc contributes to campus
culture by presenting a Broadway Musical, such
as Can-Can, How To Succees in Business Without
Really Trying, and Half A Sixpence. Their annual
production, Hello Dolly, happens in February.
Meanwhile, Mussoc is going inventive and next
week presents Half-Assed Follies, a compilation
of tidbits from more controversial Broadway
shows.
Highlights are smatterings of Hair and
You're a Good Man Charlie Brown, plus morsels
from Pyjama Game, Sweet Charity, Carousel, and
many more. Tom Lehrer's "Vatican Rag,"
"Pollution," and "Smut" find their way into the
script, and Laugh-In of course cannot be ignored.
Follies is entirely student directed, acted and
scored; uniting under the talents and wit of
David Lui, Ed Astley, Bruce Kellet, Ruth Nichol,
and Lorraine King (choreography). Cast and
production crew exceeds fifty, and Folk-Soc
contributes twenty minutes to the two-hour
spectacular.
Thwart the censor! Catch the Half-Assed
Follies in the Old Auditorium next week. Shows
go at 12:30 and 8:00 p.m. Wednesday and 8:00
p.m. Thursday. Tickets are 50c at the door.
Dylan
Underground
ternroimd  the    mi
vour now bin ii wasn I know
Huh Dylan's now
n .iuHinct tor o\
(Bevvaie
ie allium nsel
: \ plana! ion
FX lecords
ic recorded
venlv heiweei
oil lerence net Wi
t)\it and Liroim
liv lumscll In lan comes in close, so close thai
\ on have ihe leeling thai you're seeing sides ol
him lhai have never come out before. When the
(apes were made he was obviously deep into the
Southern racial situation, lhc songs are coming
from the honest Dvlan rather than Ovlan the
mystery man.
The two sides featuring the Band include
several songs latei released in the Big Pink album
which despite the rather primitive recording
technique, come through vividly. Really strong
eneigy vibes. 'Wheels on Five" was good on
"Music from Big Pink'" On this record it's
fantastic. When Dylan and the band sing 'I shall
be Released' they're not trying to please an
audience or a studio engineer, they're just doing
it because thev really waul to.
ie even netting inside him
Madam I'd like to give you your money
but the Campusbank architect made a
slight error in wicket design.
True Chequing Accounts.
True Savings Accounts. Complete banking
services for students and faculty.
Visit your Campusbank
ta
Bank of Montreal
Canada's First Bank
Administration Building Branch: G. F. PEIRSON, Manager
Student Union Building Branch: J. M. S. POULIOT, Manager
ip£ 6ixi
FLOOR SHOW
Tryouts
SUB 125 (F)
12:30 - 2:00
Oct. 23, 24, 27, 28, 29,30
Singing,  Dancing,
Skits, Musicians.
MARDI GRAS
°U> AUDITOR
FEATURING...
- SATIRE
- SKITS
- FOLK  SINGING
- DANCING EXTRAVAGANZA
- SUSPECT HUMOUROUS
SKETCHES
Musical Production
Numbers from:
"HAIR"  -  "PAJAMA   GAME"
"YOU'RE   A  GOOD   MAN
CHARLIE BROWN"
"CARROUSEL" and  many  others
An Original
Review - 50c
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30
One night only! The fabulous Romero family (The Royal
Family of Spanish Guitar) will perform the Rodrigo
Concierto Aranjuez, th* Vivaldi Concerto in B Minor
for 4 guitars and orchestra with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. Don't miss this thrilling concert!
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
Tickets NOW at tha Vancouver Ticket Centre, Townhouse Electronics in Kerrisdale or charge at any Eaton's
store.   $2.50,  $3.50,   $4.50.  Reservations:   683-3255.
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 24, 196? By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
When I heard of the entertainment which Special Events was
bringing to campus this week, I was slightly alarmed. The Murray
Louis Dance Company sounded all right from their advance
notices, but The Sandpipers?
It sounded like a mushy cultural liberalism was spreading
over the campus, compatible with the useless demonstrations
organized by the AMS this year. (Operation Border-Close and the
assorted Trek Week idiocy)
It seems, however, that Special Events has its own particular
problems which determines the kind of events coming to campus.
Special Events is a committee under the mighty arm of the
AMS which is given a limited ($4100) budget to bring artists,
entertainers, and other such people of note to campus. Current
negotiations are being made with Leonard Cohen and the Smothers
Brothers.
Naturally, all the people they want aren't available cheaply.
The AMS is willing to put up a fair amount of financial backing for
any artist, but then the situation of getting money back is
frustrated by UBC architecture.
The SUBallroom holds about 1,200 people, while the War
Memorial Gym holds nearly 4,000. The trouble with the latter is
that the acoustics are slightly worse than desirable, as Buffy St.
Marie fans might remember from a concert here a few years ago.
Therefore, it's difficult to put the performers somewhere
where they'll be heard without having extraordinarily high
admission prices. Special Events wants, in fact, to offer "the best
possible entertainment" at the lowest prices."
This means that very low prices must be offered when
negotiating with certain artists. And when that's combined with
the fact of availability, you have the present situation whereby the
entertainment is of a very dubious nature.
(Joni Mitchell refused to come because (like we all read in
Wassermann's column last Saturday): "Vancouver is a hick town.
In fact the only town I will play in Canada in Saskatoon because
my parents live there." That's a nice folksingy feeling, Joni. Real
nice.)
There -are some solutions to the problem. The AMS could
hire someone to co-ordinate the activities, like Simon Fraser has
done with Nini Baird, who acts as public relations spokesman for
the SFU Communications Centre. One of the complaints voiced by
Special Events people was that they are students, and therefore
are unable to put in as much time'as they should.
The AMS could also stop interfering with Special Events. A
spokesman said AMS Co-ordinator of Activities Dave Grahame had
refused to let the committee book the SUBallroom several weeks in
advance, a move vitally necessary when negotiating with artists to
appear within a limited space of time.
Aside from that, the situation seems a bit grim. Perhaps some
of the AMS bureaucrats could get off their collective asses and
think about the UBC "cultural" situation. For example, why not
put on a bit of pressure to get a new auditorium built (there's one
in the plans somewhere), one where both performers could and
audience feel comfortable.
After all, any student council which puts safe machines in
the washrooms can't be completely unconcerned with students'
welfare ...: :
JffWiGrrrHMXf
In spite of any. rumours you may have heard, the Donovan
concert on November 1 isn't sold out. Famous Artists' spokesman
Hugh Pickett commented that the Coliseum was about half sold
out last Monday.
* * *
Following hot on the heels of one guitarist (Julian Bream),
the Vancouver Symphony is presenting yet four more, all at one
concert. The artists in question are The Romeros, a father-and-sons
team who appeared last year in concert with the VSO to provide
some fairly stirring music.
This year, they're appearing again with the VSO on October
30 at the QueeniE. Meredith Davies conducts them and the
orchestra in Vivaldi's Concerto for Four Guitars and Morton
Gould's Concerto for Four Guitars. Also included is Rodrigo's
popular Concierto de Aranjuez featuring Angel Romero. Also on
the program are Ravel's Pavane for a Dead Princess, de Falla's
Ritual Fire Dance from El Amor Brujo, and Chabrier's Espana
Rhapsody.
With a bit of luck, the Romeros may do a few selection on
their own like they did last year, pleasing all the Jose Greco fans
and Spanish expatriates in the house.
Tickets are available cheaply (buck at the last minute trip) or
expensively ($2.50, $3.50, and $4.50) from the Vancouver Ticket
Centre.
SUB FILMS PRESENTS:
pf 7even
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Saturday - 8 p.m. - Sunday - 7 p.m.
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— Theatre Excitement -
THE CRUCIBLE
by Arthur Miller
(Gripping Drama of Salem Witchcraft Trials)
NOVEMBER 7-15
DIRECTED BY STANLEY WEESE
STUDENT TICKETS - $1.00 (available for all performances)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES
Monday, Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 13, 12:30 p.m. Matinee
Tickets:     The Frederic Wood Theatre     Rbom 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
OFF CAMPUS NITE SPOT FOR U.B.C.
OPENS SOON
See Classified Section For Employment
Friday, October 24,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY Hot (poop
The latest work of hot
young American sculptor
Dewain Valentine will be the
subject of an exhibition
opening Oct. in the UBC Fine
Arts Gallery.
The show, in co-operation
with Douglas Gallery in
Vancouver and ACE in Los
Angeles, will include 10 new
pieces in cast polyester resin.
There will be a reception
at 7:30 Oct. 28 to officially
open the exhibit.
Valentine, who lives and
worked in L.A. started his
interest in transparency in
high school with polished
rocks, lacquer finishes on
Kustom Kars and funky
polyester jewelry.
He is concerned with the
interior as well as the exterior
of his sculptor, so he uses
translucent resins in clear,
subtle colors which create
interior illumination enabling
the viewers to see into and
through his pieces.
Valentine has exhibited in
many major museums and
galleries in the U.S. He is
currently in Europe but there
is a possibility he will be back
for the opening of the show
which continues through
Nov. 15.
THE BEARD by Michael
McClure will be revived and
restaged by the Gallimaufry
Theatre Co. at Ronnie's
Riverqueen, 1043 Davie from
Oct. 27 through Nov. 8 (no
Sunday performance), curtain
9 p.m. Admission is $2.50
with special student rates of
$1.50 on Monday, Tuesday
and Wednesday nights only.
For reservations call
688-2636. If you dig dirty
words, etc. dig the beard.
^F.C.
FORUM
This space is for comm en t\
and discussion for
PF's readers.
Open Letter to Alex Kosygin
Dear Mr. Kosygin,
You probable don't know me—I'm just a student in British
Columbia, but I thought I'd write you anyway to tell you about a
beautiful opportunity for world peace and an end to the arms
race that you are passing up.
I guess your best chance to make your move would have
been during your recent visit to Canada, when you could have
talked to Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau directly, but it will
probably just take a letter to him and Dick Nixon to get this
whole thing fixed up.
First off, you'll have to agree with me that the bad vibes
between Asia and North America are one of the biggest threats to
world peace right now. Right? OK. Now we all know that Mr.
Trudeau has said time and again that he will do all he can for
peace. And the same goes for Dick Nixon, who's also very
concerned about defence, judging from the amounts his country
spends on their defence department each year.
Now, with all this in mind, we turn to the North America
Radar Air Defence System (NORAD).
As you and I know, Canada and the U.S. spend many
millions on this intricate radar systen, but for some reason they're
not making it as defensive as possible.
What's this you ask? Well, we all know that the U.S. is just as
likely to send off the first bomb Asia-wards as you or Mao are to
send one off our way. So to make NORAD truly defensive, you
just have to write PET and RMN and ask them to let the Russians
join NORAD.
They could put the NORAD radar screens on swivels so they
could be used to warn you guys of an attack from the U.S. as well
as vice versa. You could kill two bombs with one screen, as it
were. If Canada is really neutral and peace-loving, and the U.S. is
really sincerely peace-loving and defensively inclined, it's a cinch
the North American leaders will jump on your suggestion with
enthusiasm.
They could object to the problem of costs. But here you
just have to point out the opportunities for international
brotherhood if Russian men were to join "Canadians and
Americans in the northern radar stations. And since you wouldn't
have to use your own northern defense setup, you could abandon
it and use some of its operating money to keep NORAD going.
There are other financial advantages to my proposal.
You could also stop making fancier bombs, and concentrate
on making fancier defence systems.
(It'll be a while before military types will let you give up war
games altogether.)
Then no matter what the other side comes up with, you'll be
warned in time and you'll have some tricky bit of equipment to
bring it down. If I can throw in a personal request here, please try
and make it go back to where it came from, to deter them from
sending it up in the first place, and to prevent everything from
landing on Canada.
Make sure you send over some of your defence experts with
the radar operators so they can share secrets with the Yankees
and cut costs on all this spying nonsense that you're all wasting so
much tax money on.
I don't know why someone hasn't thought of this sooner,
especially Mr. Trudeau. He must realize that Canada stands to
lose just as much if the war starts with a bomb from you guys or
from the Yankees.
Anyway, if you'd just write him a letter, (address: Parliament
Buildings, Ottawa, Ont.-no postage necessary) I'm sure we'll
have this whole thing under way in time for some Russians to
come over here while the weather's still warm in the summer.
Drop in and see me if you're ever in Canada again. I can
always fix you up with a place to stay in Vancouver.
Sincerely,
c&0 JoAawurfU
pS Sight I
QUEST OF INNER SPACE
THURSDAY, OCT. 30
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 24, 1969 Friday, October 24,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  17
Pollution problem information
must reach secondary students
By LESLEY MINOT
The Society for Pollution and
Environmental Control, is
organizing a volunteer group at
UBC.
"The ulitmate purpose of this
group will be to send volunteers
to high schools and inform the
students of pollution problems,"
said Anne St-Onge, organizer* 0f
the group.
"We must get to high school
kids who'll be going into industry.
Unlike adults, they are not yet
committed."
"We will make sure that all
volunteers are well acquainted
with all the problems of pollution
by having specialists speak to
them on pollution and by showing
them the available films on the
subject."
UBC ecologist Robin Harger
will address a SPEC meeting at
noon Tuesday in SUB 125.
"Membership in the Vancouver
branch of SPEC is slightly in
excess of 1,500," said branch
vice-president Derrick Mallard.
Mallard also commented on the
film "Spirit '76", which depicted
the tragedy of the oil-drenched
beaches of Santa Barbara, Calif.
He said Vancouver could
become another Santa Barbara if
Gulf Oil goes ahead with its plans
to drill for oil in Georgia Strait.
"In Santa Barbara a certain
area of beach was affected,"
Mallard said. "In Vancouver the
numerous beaches of the Gulf
Islands, in total a much greater
area, would be ruined if oil
leakage occurred."
"Spirit    '76"     eloquently
Small turnout for
arts AMS hopefuls
A grand total of 12 persons turned-out for the arts undergrad
society's all-candidates meeting Thursday.
There were six candidates for positions on the Alma Mater
Society Council who presented their platforms. They were Daryl
Keeling, Denis Newman, George Gibault, Fred Irvine, John Davies and
Pat Friesen.
The platforms were hardly stirring.
Candidates realized the farce involved in trying to inspire the
meagre audience assembled before them to vote over any crucial
issues.
The theme that seemed to run through most of the'
presentations was that the AMS is a non-representative body and a
candidate could not promise to have much affect on the
firmly-entrenched power structure.
AUS president Dick Betts, who organized the all-candidates
meeting, informed the assembly that arts will now have five
representatives and will be the most powerful faculty in the AMS.
Faculty and students
to strike at Loyola
MONTREAL (CUP)-The postponed three-day strike at Loyola
College has been set for Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday (October
27-29).
The strike is to support demands for binding arbitration in the
case of physics professor S. A. Santhanum, fired earlier this year by
the   administration   after   confusion   in   deliberations   about   his
contractual status.
• A faculty petition for strike support had gained over thirty
signatures by Wednesday. Supporting faculty will cancel classes during
the strike.
Students originally supported calling the strike in a referendum
Oct. 14 that had an 83 per cent turnout.
1,775 voted for the action and 1,762 against.
Student president Marcel Nouvet postponed the action however
in order to give the administration time to come to an agreement.
The board of trustees agreed to give Santhanum half salary for a
year's sabbatical on a terminal contract and excellent references to
other institutions. The administration president seemed to agree and
so did the Canadian Association of University Teachers, called in to
help mediate.
Other administration officials pressured against the deal
however, particularly the academic vice-president, and it was finally
withdrawn.
The faculty association is now expected to unequivocally
demand binding arbitration by the CAUT for Santhanum and the
formation of a committee to study the entire administration set-up on
the campus. The student strike will support the same demands.
THIS SATURDAY AT THE
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
LIVE PIANO MU
MUSIC AND BAR - 9-12 P.M. - 25c
NEXT SATURDAY NIGHT - NOV. 1
HALLOWEEN    MIXER
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Bar Service — Music 8:30-12:30 — $1.00 For Men
depicted the horror of Santa
Barbara—the crude oil sludge
covering the beaches, the
numerous birds killed by the
disaster and the demonstrations
that came too late.
"SPEC has written to the
provincial and federal
governments requesting that
public hearings take place before
any drillings are allowed," Mallard
said. "At these hearings, citizens'
committees can be heard by the
government and Gulf Oil."
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and will conduct
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Post Graduates — Graduates
Undergraduates
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Geological Engineering
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Physics and Geology
Mathematics and Physics
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Arrangements for Personal Interviews
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UNIVERSITY'S PLACEMENT OFFICE
ALL CANDIDATES
MEETING
FOR
-SENATE ELECTION-
12:30   Monday - October 27
S.U.B. Auditorium Page  18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 24, 1969
—dick button photo
NURSES'   SPLIT  END  shows style  as  she  hurls herself into
oncoming homewreckers.
PSA gets support
in New Brunswick
FREDERICTON (CUP)-The
student council at St. Thomas
University has voted unanimous
support for strike action of
students and faculty in the
department of political science,
sociology and anthropology at
Simon Fraser University, and
condemnation of the SFU
administration.
U.B.C.
Home Service
Larry Brownlee,  Prop.
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When I see
a client coming
I don't have to
cross the sheet
"When I graduated in 1967," says
Paul Shaw, a B. Comm. graduate in business
administration from the University of
British Columbia, "I wasn't sure what I
wanted to do.  I knew if I took a sales job,
the product would have to give me both
confidence and pride. I didn't want to be
ashamed of meeting my clients on the street."
London Life provided Paul with the product,
the training and the confidence he needed.
"Because it's a product you can't see
or touch," he says, "there aren't many
young men around who can talk
rationally about it with other young
businessmen. With the training I've had,
you get the feeling you can't fail."
Paul was recently appointed sales training
assistant at London Life's head office.
There's a challenge waiting for you, too,
at London Life.
For further information consult your
placement officer, or write to the
Personnel Dept., Station 160A,
LONDON LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
London, Ontario Friday, October 24,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
—david bower-man photo
"MITHTER TONY to yog, thithter," says Tony Hodge, as he
inspects the,wares displayed by Treasure Van. The yearly sale,
sponsored by the World University Service of Canada, sells unique
items collected from the four corners of the earth, with funds
going to various worthy causes. The Van will set up shop in the
SUB party room next week.
Chinese food
served in SUB
Chinese food prepared by a
genuine Chinese cook from Hong
Kong is being featured in the
cafeteria under the auditorium.
Paul Wong, has been coming in
every day for the last week to
prepare the food on the special
Chinese waks (charcoal stoves)
that have been installed.
Mary Ip, supervisor of the
operation, said: "About 100
dinners are served every day as
well as many individual dishes."
The dinners cost 85 cents each
and include a main dish, chow
mein, fried rice, and Chinese tea.
The menu is changed each week.
Miss Ruth Blair, UBC food
services supervisor, said: "There
was a chance to rent the
equipment and we thought the
students would like a change. So
far the service has met costs."
"It's better than International
House (which is also starting a
Chinese food service) because you
have a choice of buying the large
meal of individual dishes at a
different price range," said Jim
McFeely arts 4.
"The chow mein is a bit like
spaghetti but otherwise it's good,"
said Jan Garnet, arts 4.
A spokesman for IH said it is
possible that if competition gets
to be too much that they might
change to another kind of food.
Cheap food
More cheap food is available on
campus.
Due to the popularity of its 85
cent foreign lunches, International
House is starting a dinner service.
West Indian meals are being
sold for a dollar every Thursday
night.
The Argyle Shop
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Lawyers
demand
parity
Student parity is being
demanded by the Law Students
Association.
A motion calling for immediate
student voting parity on the law
school curriculum committee, the
law school examination
committee and at full faculty
meetings '-was passed at the LSA
general meeting, Thursday.
Bruce Preston, chairman of the
LSA academic committee, called
for a straw vote on this point.
"The faculty should not be
making decisions for students in
curriculum comittee matters,"
he said.
An amendment presented by
LSA president Carey Linde,
proposing that the LSA president
can be any law student, not just a
member of the grad class, was also
approved.
Also passed was an amendment
which will make way for
executive elections in November
or December.
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Advertisement
THE      UBYSSEY
Advertisement
Friday, October 24, 1969
COUNCIL APPROVES BUDGET, BUT NOT GIBSON
Preliminary approval was
given at Monday night's
meeting of Student Council to
the 1969-70 AMS budget.
Treasurer Chuck Campbell
submitted the seven-page
document, emphasizing that it
was the biggest budget ever,
anticipated revenue to be
$459,315.00.
Campbell drew the
attention of Council to certain
points in the budget, among
them:
* now undergrad society fee
levies, permitted by
constitutional amendment
last spring;
* termination of the World
University Service
scholarship program;
* doubling of funds for the
campus-wide Intramural
program;
* $1,500 set aside for
assistance to undergrad
societies in publishing
anti-calendars
The budget committee will
hold hearings next Thursday
on applications for changes in
the budget, and will report any
new recommendations to
Student Council on Monday,
Nov. 3.
Extra copies of the budget
are available from the
Treasurer's office for interested
parties.
Following considerable
debate, councillors also
approved by a vote of 12-3,
with 8 abstensions, a motion
introduced by Law rep Dell
Valair and Grad rep Art
Smolensky expressing a loss of
confidence in Internal Affairs
Officer Dave Gibson.
Reasons cited included
Gibson's alleged neglect of
duties during Valair's campaign
against Education Minister Don
Brothers in Rossland-Trail and
during the Blaine
demonstration Oct. 1.
Gibson is reported to be in
retreat at an isolatedredoubt
east of Horsefly, headquarters
of the Chilcotin Liberation
Front.
Other Council business
included:
* approval in principle for
the establishment of a
social service centre on
campus;
* plans to publish a joint
Administration-AMS
booklet combining Tuum
Est, the Sports
Handbook, and
registration   information;
* request to the Speakers
Committee    to    arrange
more public discussion on
the hopelessly confused
strike situation at Simon
Fraser University;
* granting of a further $300
to Cool Aid, as provided
in the 1969-70 budget;
* Special grant of $2500 for
the Community
Information program;
* Further action on the
Save the Beach campaign
(see Tony Hodge)
Abesenteeism was held in
check, but still managed to
carry off Misses McEwan and
Baker, and Messrs. MacSween,
Ellison, and Hodgins, with Mr.
Doyle away on a speaking tour.
ii b c
Student
BoVERNMENT
€
NEWS
PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICE OF THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY
A weekly official summary of Alma Mater
Society activities, i n -
eluding notes on Student Council meetings,
official notices, elections, undergrad
societies, student committees, etc.
EDITOR: Dave Gibson,
SUB 252, Phone 228-3969
TONY CALLS
New Pit Promotion
FOR BODIES
Tony Hodge, AMS
Vice-President, is looking for
two students for newly-created
positions.
Both are for the Education
Commission, a new AMS
department first proposed
during the Zirnhelt regime to
promote academic reforms.
"Now that we have the
structure and duties of the
group clearly defined and
approved by Council, we need
the personnel to staff it.
We need people who are
willing to devote a fair amount
of time and thought to
academic reform at UBC, and
preferably  people   with some
experience in the field, either
here or elsewhere," said Hodge.
Call him at 228-3973.
Chuck Campbell is looking
for a pair of Assistant
Treasurers for various duties,
both day-to-day and long-term.
Phone 228-3975.
Mike Doyle, External
Affairs Officer, needs research
assistants to work on housing
and residence financing,
scholarship and loan projects,
and assorted other things. Mike
is currently out of town with
the Community Visitation
program, but will be in
Monday at 228-3968.
The Pit Management
Committee has announced
plans for a campus-wide
membership campaign to
promote the popular afternoon
beer-garden in SUB.
Committee chairman Lome
Stewart, commenting on slow
renewal of last year's 1000-plus
memberships, laid much of the
blame on poor publicity.
"Membership sales have
been at about half last year's
rate," said Stewart.
"This is partly due to
insufficient advertising by us.
Also, the increase in the
membership fee from $1 to
$2.50 is a factor.
"Unfortunately, this higher
fee is required under the
present Liquor Act, something
we were not aware of last
year."
The new drive includes the
presentation of live
entertainment weekly in the
Pit, and a travelling unit to
make memberhsips easier to
obtain.
The travelling unit will visit
all residences next week during
the dinner hour, starting with
theological colleges next
Monday evening.
TREKKING EVENTS
«
Q
Trek Week Committee and Special
Events are co-operating to sponsor a
dance and concert Friday night in SUB.
Appearing will be The Sandpipers, in
twa performances at 8 and 10 p.m. A
charily dance, featuring several bands,
will run from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. in SUB
Cafeteria.
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS
DANCE
-TONIGHT-
—    •  HIGH FLYING BIRD
3   BANDS   #  SWEET ROLLE
    •  NEW BREED
8 P.M. - 2 A.M.
SUB CAFETERIA
$1.50
******^-^>*-^«^^-^>^^<^>^^^>^.^^
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
External Affairs
Students (especially from lower years) are invited to work
on research projects on:
(a) Student residences and housing in B.C.
(b) Scholarships, bursaries, and student loans in B.C.
(c) Liaison  between  universities,   colleges,  and  other
educational institutions in B.C.
Contact  Mike  Doyle,  External Affairs   Office,   SUB   250,
phone 228-3968.
Assistant Treasurers
Any student interested in applying for position as
Assistant Treasurer should apply in writing or in person
to Chuck Campbell by Friday, Oct. 24.
Two positions are available:
1. a special assistant to work on some areas of
benefit to all students, requiring much research
and day-to-day work. The first such project
is reduced admissions to theatres, concerts, and
movies.
2. requires some knowledge of campus activities
and the planning and arrangements necessary
for dances, concerts, etc., and will involve working with organizers from clubs, undergrad
societies, etc.
Both are rewarding positions, in terms of practical experience gained, and provide an opportunity to contribute significantly to campus life. Further information
from Chuck at 228-3975. Friday, October 24,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 21
Firing of Prof halted
LOS ANGELES (CUPI)-The
dismissal of Angela Davis, a
Communist party member, by the
Regents of the University of
California was ruled
unconstitutional Monday
Judge Jerry Pacht forbade the
regents from spending any more
tax revenues to oust Angela Davis,
assistant philosophy professor at
the University of California at Los
Angeles, saying "mere
membership" in the Communist
party was not a ground for barring
a person from public
employment. . . and such a move
would be "unlawful and
dangerous."
University general counsel
Thomas Cunningham said the
regents will appeal the decision,
and sources in the U.S. expect the
appeal will be carried to the U.S.
supreme court.
FRIDAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
United Nations Celebration, 7 p.m. to
midnite. Soul food dinner and dance
to Felix Assoon Band.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Special hot lunches, Friday—Chinese,
Monday—West Indian, 85 cents. 11:30
to 2:00. Come early, limited supply.
CUSO
Free   film   on   CUSO   volunteer   in
Africa, noon,  SUB 125.
VARSITY  CHRISTIAN   FELLOWSHIP
Hodge Podge, noon, SUB 207-209.
B'NAI   B'RITH   HILLEL   FOUNDATION
Science and Creation talk noon  can-
ceUed.   Talk   for   Tuesday  also  cancelled.
ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
Meeting noon, International House.
SRL, A Free Religious Fellowship
Weekend conference, the ultimate education,  Vancouver  Unitarian  Church,
49th  and   Oak.   Bring  sleeping  bags,
music, love, peace.
AIESEC
Organizational  meeting,  noon,  Angus
415.
CLAM
Discussion on Quebec,  8 p.m.,  Clubs
Lounge.
SSFKBA
Guest  speaker  Ronald  Rollins noon',
old auditorium.
COMM. U.S.
Seminar   committee   meeting,   noon,
Ang. 406.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General   meeting,   noon,   SUB   111. ,
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP SOCIETY
Talk on school and children's libraries
by Miss E. Goff, noon, Bu. 225.
CROSSROADS   AFRICA
Recruitment talk,  noon,  Bu.  102.
SUB FILMS
Bye, Bye Braverman, today 7:00, 9:30;
Saturday   8:00;    Monday    7:00,    SUB
theatre.
MARDI CRAS
Floor show tryouts,  Oct.  24,   27,  28
29, 30.  SUB ■ 125.
'tween
classes
SUNDAY
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Gymkhana, 9 a.m., $3.00. SFU campus
Lot B.
CHINESE  VARSITY  CLUB
Car rally followed by party, 1:00 to
4:30 p.m., Oakridge Parking Lot.
UNION COL. RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION
Film: A look at a family in trouble
seen from the inside. Union Col. Reception Room.
MONDAY
PROGRESSIVE  CONSERVATIVES
Executive meeting,  noon, SUB 211.
TUESDAY
DEPT.  HISPANIC AND  ITALIAN
STUDIES
Prof. Guido Almansi. U. of Kent, lectures on: Eros in the modern novel,
noon, Bu. 202.
URBAN  LAND ECONOMICS CLUB
Mr. Grant Kilo, director 108 mile recreational   ranch   project,   8:00  p.m.,
SUB 211.
SPEC
Meeting, noon, SUB 125.
THUNDERBIRD  SKI  TEAM
Ski films, Tuesday and Thursday, old
auditorium.  Outer Limit included.
WEDNESDAY
HISTORY DEPT.
Talk: South African History — Approaches and Interpretations, noon,
Bu. 100.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Discussion of education for the future,
noon, SUB 125.
JAPANESE  SUMMER   EXCHANGE
Meeting, noon, Bu. 106.
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK
Max   Bick   from   inner   city   project
speaks, noon, SUB 119.
THURSDAY
WORLD UNIVERSITY  SERVICE
Public lecture: Cyril Belshaw and
Raymond Firth, "Social Context of
Development", noon to 2:30, Bu. 106.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Great Pumpkin Rallyette, noon, Traffic circle,  SUB.
CLASSIFIED
Rate:s Students. Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 75<t 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25-tj
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. ot B.C.,
  Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
UNITED NATIONS CELEBRATION
. . . Fri., Oct. 24, at International
House. "Soul Food" Dinner at 7
p.m., $1.00. Dance to Felix Assoon
Band, 75c, 9 to midnight. Dinner
tickets in advance at I.H.
Greetings
12
Wanted Information
13
Lost & Found
14
LOST—Basement   Washroom,   main
library, dark briefcase with books.
Busted  without   same,   must  drop
out.   Barry   Brown,   588-3825.
LOST:      MAN'S     SEIKO
watch.   Call   Andy,   224
ward.
WRIST -
-0589.   Re-
Rides & Car Pools
15
MOBILITY — FREEDOM. $18.00
per month inc. insurance. See the
volume dealer in "Two-Wheel
Freedom" for details. Hi-Performance Honda 3712 W. 10th at Alma.
Phone 228-9077.	
NEED A RIDE FROM 5338 CY-
press St. to UBC for the rest of
the year. Jean Wright. I am a
blind student in 3 year arts. Ph.
266-9023
RICHMOND CARPOOL! VICINITY
Blundell and Garden City. Especially drivers. Phone Ralph, 273-
3289; Chris 277-5585	
RIDERS FOR BRIGHOUSE CAR
pool.   Phone   Bob,   277-1715
Special Notices
16
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rate if you are 20 years or
over and have good driving record you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott,   299-9422.	
SKIING IS THE SUBJECT AT
The Flicks, Tues. and Thurs. next
week. 12:30 in the Old Auditorium
50c. ,
SUBFILMS PRESENTS "BYE BYE
Braverman", Oct. 24, 25, 26; Fri.
7:00, 9:30; Sat. 8:00; Sun. 7:00.
Stars Alan King of Warrendale
fame.   SUB Aud.   75c.	
WANTED TO BUY ... A NUM-
ber of second-hand copies of the
text Inside Today's Home by
Faulkner.   Phone   985-7363.	
UNION COLLEGE, OCTOBER 26,
7:00 p.m. Film: A Look at a Family  in  Trouble.   Coffee  following.
SCUBA CLASSES
(N.A.U.I. Certification)
Starting now, all equipment supplied; limited enrollment, professional instruction, one evening a
week for 6 weeks. Transportation
from Campus arranged on request.
GRAY AQUATICS
For information & registration
685-6017  (24 hrs.)
IPHEC PARTY, OCT. 24, 8:30 P.M.
Med. Lounge, VvG.H. FREE ad-
mission. Beer sold.	
WANTED—2 TICKETS FOR DON-
ovan. Phone Shane at 224-9054
and  leave  phone  number.	
"LOOK PROFESSORS"
SAVE TIME . . . will mark students assignments for professor's
at home on weekly basis. Vic.
P.N.E. Phone 255-8853, ask for
Rosie.
Travel Opportunities 17
KHATMANDU OVERLAND FROM
London, Depart Vancouver May
'70, return August. 12 seats only
for mixed group of under 25's.
Letters only to Ed Wilks, 45,
2560.    Whiteley Crt.  N. Van.
C.N. TICKET VANCOUVER TO
MONTREAL, half price. Phone
after 6  p.m.,  266-0617.	
WORKFLIGHT 1970: (1) MONT-
real-Frankfurt and return $150.00;
(2) 4-day trip to Berlin, free; (3)
work for 8 weeks; (4) 3-4 weeks
free for individual travel. Eligible:
all students who have taken at
least one German course by April
1970. Application forms in the
German Dept. office, Bu. 2270.
Students will be selected on the
basis of academic standing and
recommendation.  Deadline: Nov. 3.
AN AIESEC TRAINEESHIP IS A
work-travel experience you will
never forget! Come to Angus 415
today noon and find out!
Travel Opps.—Cont'd
17
STUDENTS INTERESTED IN
filling out a charter to Europe
leaving approximately Jan. 1,
1970, returning approximately
May 1. One-way or return. Contact, Raven Committee, School
of Architecture,  U.B.C.
Wanred-Miscellaneous 18
WANTED:— Camp Trails "Medium
Cruiser", aluminum backpack and
bag.     Phone   Ian,   261-2503.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'65 HONDA CAR, low mileage,
excellent condition, pirelli tires.
Call   Peter,   733-9293   after   6   p.m.
'58 VOLKSWAGEN with rebuilt
engine, excellent mechanical condition. Call 228-3432, 9 a.m. to
5' p.m.	
1968 MGB-GT, 22,000 ml. excellent
condition, snow tires, ski pack,
etc., mineral blue, asking $2,400.
Phone   736-9509.
1963 MORRIS, 1100, FT. WHEEL
drive, new disc, brakes. Good
cond.   throughout,   261-7713	
1961 PUGEOT 403. Clean, 30 mi./
gal, $325, or best offer. Phone
Bruce,   327-3126	
1964 PONTIAC PARISIENE WAG-
gon, 327 cu. in.; one owner, all
power equipt.; new tires, brakes,
Phone   325-4341.   $4300.	
'61 CARAVELLE CONVERTIBLE
hard-top/soft-top. City tested.
Best offer over $350. Phone Diane
731-7429	
'55 CHEV. 2 DR. SDN., 410 H.P.,
327 cu. in Contact Vic at 874-0117
after 6.  Mail 5760,  Toronto Rd.
1962 VW DELUXE MODIFIED
1200 engine, guages, wide tires,
etc. Excellent condition. Phone
733-5017	
1959 STUDEBAKER LARK VI . . .
brand new clutch. Good condition.
$200. Phone Andy at 922-9806
after 6 p.m.	
1967 FIAT 850 FASTBACK. GOOD
condition, $950, or offers. Room
109  Chem.   building   or   738-1384
1966 COMET CALIENTE, 2 DR.
H.T., 289 Automatic, new tires.
Excellent condition. Call Rudy,
434-1976	
1960 VOLVO 544, GOOD CONDI-
tion, $600. Phone 738-6784. Back
of  2315   W.   8th.	
1964 VOLV0122S. PERFECT CON-
dition.  Offers.   325-9075   after  5:30.
LADY OWNED '69 MGB WITH
specially imported hard-top from
Britain; Mich. ZX radials, overdrive, driving lamps, luggage rack
and other extras. Open to offers.
Phone 224-3132.	
CITROEN  DS   19,   '62.  VERY GOOD
condition.   Ask   for   Remi,   879-6561
(work)  or 263-333-1	
'67 EPIC DELUXE, ONE OWNER,
24,000 miles, $950, or offers. Call
224-6186   after   5.	
'68 BEETLE 1600 cc's, DUAL
carbs, headers, chrome Posche
wheels, stereo tape and many
other extras. Excel, cond. Phone
224-7670	
1967 ROVER TC 2000 EQUIPPED
with extras, $2900, firm. Pte.
536-9753	
MERCEDES DIESEL 1960. EXCEL-
lent mech. cond. Needs some body
work. Runs cheap. AM-FM-SW
Radio, $525, or best offer. Phone
228-8022  —  224-4589	
1951 HILLMAN. GOOD TRANSPOR-
tation, $100. Firm.  435-4349.	
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
TWO 600x13 SNOW TIRES ON
rims for Fiat 850. Ph. Paul Friday
261-2796
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
1968   HONDA   SS125;   4100   mi.   Excellent  cond.   Helmets  and  accessories,   only   $300.   Phone   922-0398.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
DIRT     CHEAP     ROCK     BAND —
Rock   Band   Dirt   Cheap   —   Band
Cheap    Dirt    Rock   —   Any   way
you   want   it.    985-5727,   Dave.
Duplicating 8c Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
Photography
34
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscellaneous 36
Scandals 37
DIRT CHEAP ROCK BAND —
Rock Band Dirt Cheap — Band
Cheap Dirt Rock — Any way you
want   it.     985-5727,   Dave	
HOW MANY ROOMS ON CAMPUS
have study lamps, shoe cupboards,
mirrors, towel racks, w/w Carpets, and waste baskets? Shocking isn't it! Sigma Chi House,
5725 Agronomy Rd.; 224-5530 even-
ings.	
SCUBA CLASSES — N.A.U.I. CER-
tification. Starting now, all equipment supplied.   685-6017 (24 hr.).
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs 39
Typing 40
TYPING DONE — 3589 WEST 19th
Ave.   Reasonable  rates.   733-5922.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist. Experienced essay and thesis
typist. Reasonable rates. TR 4-
9253.	
TYPING ON ELECTRIC TYPE-
writer. 30c. per sheet. Close to
university.   Tel.    224-4261.	
EXPERT TYPING — THESIS, 35c
page. Essays 30c page, 5c per
copy. Fast efficient service. Ph.
325-0545	
TYPING — Phone 731-7511 — 9:00-
5:00  —  266-6662 after  6:00.	
ESSAY AND THESIS TYPIST.
(Campbell form and style). Ph.
RE  1-3700
EXPERIENCED AND RELIABLE
typist available for home typing.
Please phone  277-5640	
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Phone    321-2102	
TYPING OF ESSAYS. ETC., DONE
neatly, efficiently and quickly at
reasonable rates. 'Phone 224-0385
after 5 p.m.	
HOME TYPING. ELECTRIC, EX-
perienced.   Reas.   rates.      738-7881
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
INTERESTED IN SELLING
Then why not be an advertising
salesman for The Ubyssey? This is
an excellent opportunity to gain experience and to earn worthwhile
commissions for part-time work.
Reliable 2nd and 3rd year business-
minded student who will work hard
for 10 or 12 hours weekly is needed. If interested apply to the Publications Office, Rm. 241, SUB,
(afternoons).
Male or Female
53
EARN EXTRA MONEY QUICKLY,
easily. Will not conflict with
studies. Larry after 6:00 p.m. Ph.
224-7352
WANTED: EMPLOYEES FOR NEW
Club opening Oct. 31. Interviews
on Monday, Oct. 27. Please phone
for appointments. Club near Alma,
224-1415. Wanted: waitresses, bar-
man,   cashier.   3730 West  10th.
OPERATE YOUR OWN " ON
campus" stationery - office supplies business. Special programs
add to your  inventive sales skills.
Phone  879-0465	
CUSTOMERS WANTED
No   experience   required.   Apply  He
& She Clothing, 2140 Western Parkway,   Univ.   Sg.    224-0915
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction Wanted
81
Language Instruction
61A
QUALITY  LANGUAGE  TUTORING
and
CERTIFIED   TRANSLATIONS
CONVERSA-SCHOOL    OF
LANGUAGES
1603  W.   4th   at  Fir  — 736-5401
Chargex Cards Accepted
Music
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
FRENCH TUTOR FOR STUDENTS
with  high  school  or first  year  of
French,    $2.00   hour.    Phone   Mar
Mayet,   224-9073   after   6   p.m.
FLAMENCO*    GUITAR     TUITION.
Michael   Kocial,   tel.   224-7762.
FRENCH LESSONS — PARISIAN
teacher—20 yrs. of experience. Mr.
Alain Neumand (1102) 4665 W.
10th Ave. Call 224-4434 after 4
p.m.  or  weekend.
Tutoring—Cont'd
64
TUTORING IN MATH-PHYS. FOR
undergrad by instructor. (Ph.D.)
$5.00 hr.  Ph.  733-6037 eve.	
EXP. TUTOR FOR STUDENTS IN
math & chemistry by graduate.
738-5603.  	
LOST? CALL 327-0678 FOR Expert tutoring in Math, Physics or
Engineering by  Grad  students.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your Student  Telephone
Directory
NOW AVAILABLE — $1.00
al the Bookstore,
AMS Publication!  Offic*
and Thunderbird Shop
GIBSON THIN HOLLOW - BODY
electric guitar, 15 yrs. old, beautiful mellow sound $150.00 cash.
736-7574.	
B R A U N HOBBY AUTOMATIC
professional flashgun. 8 West 19th
Ave.   874-3268.	
JUST ARRIVED! BEAUTIFULLY
embroidered Afghan coats. Sheepskin linings. Reasonably priced.
LeatherboX, 2645 West 4th, The
Mews,   3257   West   Broadway.
PANASONIC MONO TAPE RE-
corder; two years old. Top condition. Only $50, with extras. Phone
922-0398.	
9-PIECE WALNUT DINING SUITE,
dinette suite, drapes and curtains,
2 chests drawers, matching wooi
grey rugs, 9x12, 9x15; cotton shag
9x12;   blue   nylon   9x12.     263-4127
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
SINGLE ROOM — OR ROOM AND
breakfast, men only, Dunbar area,
priv.  entrance.  Ph. 224-3389.
JUST OFF CAMPUS. LARGE
pleasant room for one male student. Private bathroom and en-
trance.   224-6757.	
SINGLE ROOM WITH PRIVATE
bath.  Male student.  738-6680	
EXCELLENT FURNISHED Accommodation; quiet; private entr.;
single and double occupancy
rooms;   near  UBC.    228-8040	
NEAR CAMPUS, $60 mo. Men only,
priv.  entrance,  bath.   Ph.   224-4243
ROOM FOR MALE STUDENT
units area. Call 733-9762 after 5
p.m.	
LIVE CHEAPLY ON CAMPUS.
Rooms for male students at $50
mo. with kitchen privileges! Large
study room and lounge. Board
available for $45. Weekly linen.
Come to 5760 Toronto Road or
phone   Ron   at   224-0327
Room & Board
82
LIVE ON CAMPUS, PHI KAPPA
Sigma. Color T.V., sauna. 5785
Agronomy   Road.   224-9684.	
ROOM AND BOARD, ALSO SUITE
for two girls to share. 1998 Cedar
Cresc,   20th,   Maple.	
ROOM AND BOARD, DELTA
Kappa    Epsilon,     5765    Agronomy
Road.   224-9691	
SIGMA CHI HOUSE—LARGEST
rooms on Campus, two lounges
and dining hall. Free room cleaning service, laundry, color TV.
Come out and see us, 5725 Agron-
omy  Rd.,   224-5530.   evenings.
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
now for female student. Free ride
for   8:30   lectures.    224-7361	
FOUR-ROOM FURNISHED BASE-
ment suite, 3417 W. 3rd (Waterloo). Available Nov. 1st. Phone
733-3095   after   5:30.
ROOMS FOR THREE GUYS. ALL
furnishings and facilities, 3rd and
Burrard. Not a co-op.   Ph. 738-0784
Furn. Houses tc Apts.
83
Unfurn. Houses 8e Apts.       84
WANTED TO RENT: WORKING
couple desire 1 or 2 bedroom house
to $135 funr. or unfurn. Kits,
Jericho  or UBC area.  Phone  224-
3839  after  5:30.	
ROOM - MATE    WANTED,    MALE
furnished one-bedroom apartment,
No. 104, 2335 West 3rd, $65.00.
Rick,   731-5403	
BASEMENT SUITE, OWN ENTCE.
Kitchen, bedroom, living room and
bathroom. Telephone, cablevision.
Use of washer and dryer. All this
for $60.00 and occasional help in
looking after 4 school-age children. One child welcome. Phone
after   8:00  p.m.    929-1771	
KITS — TWO BEDROOM HOUSE
with basement in-law suite. Immediate possess. Ph. 224-0446 aft.
4  p.m.   	
COUPLE WANT SUITE, KITS, OR
West Point Grey, less than $95.
Phone   733-4469   after   6.
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED SECTION Page  22
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 24, 1969
if*?"*-*.**'      ■' """.""■■.■'  ■*■■-*■.■■'■*. '■'■'■ ■•*••■' --**j|
.■■lV.
-v? ^
""X
^Hrr** ,.
—richard still ivan photo
UBC SCRUM half Mike Hutchinson passing the ball out from the scrum in a match played earlier this
season. He will be playing against his former teammates, the University of Victoria Vikings in this years
Homecoming game, Saturday, 2:30 p.m., at Thunderbird Stadium.
Field hockey teams play home matches
The UBC field hockey team plays Pitt Meadows
'A' at the New Spencer fields behind the Winter
Sports Centre Saturday at 3 p.m.
Coach Paul McMillen expects good play from
top goal scorer Antonie Schouten to help the Birds
out oftheir fourth place spot.
NOW YOU SEE IT !
. NOW YOU DON'T!
And that's just about how long it takes us to take out the motor of a
Volkswagen. You see, we've done it so often — it's easy (especially
since we have all the proper equipment). Our volume of work lets us
repair your car cheaper than anyone"— Shouldn't we be doing your
repair work?
AUTO-HENNEKEN
8914 OAK STREET (at Marine)
Phone 263-8121
"QUALITY   WORKMANSHIP   GUARANTEED"
Rugby Chaps
play big game
By SCOTT McCLOY
Two fine college rugby teams, the UBC Thunderbirds and the
University of Victoria Vikings, clash this Saturday 2:30 p.m. in the
grudge match of the year at UBC.
UVic beat the Birds last year 17-3 and the Birds are out for
blood. It was their first loss to the Vikings in six previous meetings.
The Birds are currently riding on the momentum of last
weekends 21-18 win over Rowing Club.
The young squad finally jelled and proved they should be a
contender for first place this season.
In last Saturday's match UBC beat Rowing Club by an
unconverted try scored with three minutes remaining in the type of
fast, wide-open game the UBC team is designed for.
"This season personnel lack not the talent, but the experience,"
said coach Donn Spence.
Several of the team have been nominated to the BC Reps team.
Gary Rowles and Dave Austin have already played for BC while backs
Doug Shick and Gordie MacKenzie have been invited to tryouts.
The one with biggest grudge of all will be scrum half, Mike
Hutchinson who transferred from UVic to UBC two years ago. He
missed last year's game, but he won't miss this one.
Said Coach Donn Spence, "The boys are riding high after last
weekend's game and they're ready for this one. It should be the same
fast wide-open game as last week's."
"UVic has suffered the same problem that we have in that many
of their seniors have graduated as well."
If the Birds win, and they should, it would be a fitting end to
Trek Week, but more significantly, it will make a fine start for the
first Homecoming rugby game since 1945.
Weekend Bird to watch
The homecoming games this
year features rugby with the UBC
Thunderbirds taking on the
University of Victoria Vikings.
One of the leading 'Birds is wing
forward, Bob Jackson.
Bob learned his rugby in
Vancouver at Prince of Wales
school and has since developed
into this province's best line-out
man.
For a big man (6' 4" and 205
lbs.) Bob is extremely fast which
makes him very effective in both
loose and tight scrums and in
open-field play.
At 22, he is now working on a
M.Eng. after completing his BASc.
in metallurgy last year.
Under his leadership the 'Birds
should do better r than their last
meeting with the Vikings which
ended in a 17-3, Victoria win. The
game is at Thunderbird stadium,
Saturday at 2:30 p.m.
HATE WAITING
AROUND IN A
BARBERSHOP?
Then . . .
Phone 224-6622
and make an
appointment
for Today
or Tomorrow
FINEST RAZOR CUTS
AND STYLES
We Love Long Hair
and Do Exactly
What YOU Want
UPPER TENTH
BARBER
4574 W. 10th Ave.
SANDPIPERS
TONIGHT - SUB BALLROOM
$1.00 - Tickets While They Last -$1.00
Available in Lobby of SUB Today - 12 Noon
Tickets and Admittance to AMS Cardholders Only
Refunds at Door to Those Who Previously Bought Tickets
Two Performances - 8 p.m. and 10 pm Friday, October 24, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 23
Football Birds go
so optimistically
By TONY GALLAGHER
The UBC football
Thunderbirds, still bubbling from
their 6-6 tie with the SFU
Clansmen, journey to Bellingham
this weekend to take on the
Western Washington Vikings.
The Birds will be employing
their punishing "I" formation
running attack to make full use of
their strong offensive line and
running backs Ron Fowler and
Dave Corcoran. Unfortunately
UBC will be going against a
defense with considerably more
size and speed than SFU.
The Vikings, led by linebackers
Jerry Kelly and Rocky Hughes,
stopped the tough Whitworth
College Pirates 28-21 last week to
advance their record to two wins
and one loss in the Evergreen
Conference.
Quarterback   Glenn   Hadland
Intramural
Notices
FIELD HOCKEY—12:30—Oct. 24: En*
vs. Arts; Phi Gamma vs. Beta.
—Oct. 27: Eng vs. PE; Arte vs. Kappa
Sigma.
—Oct. 28: Phi Gamma vs. En*-*; Arts
vi. Beta.
—Oct. 29: Kappa Sigma vs. PE.
CURLING—5:00 p.m.—Oct. 27: Commerce vs. Totem; St. Marks vs. DU;
Psi U vs. Dekes; St. Harks OI va. Eng
IV; Eng XI vs. Eng V; Eng XII vs.
Eng VI.
FOOTBALL—12:30—Oct. 24: PE vs.
Eng; For vs. Ed; Aggies vs. Phi D;
Sigma Chi vs. Arts; SAM vs. Beta;
Kappa Sigma vs. Law.
—Oct. 27: For I vs. Dentistry; Ed vs.
Eng; Union vs. Dekes; Union vs. Law II;
Aggies H vs. ATO; Eng in vs. PE II;
For II vs. Kappa Sigma pledges; St.
Marks II vs. Union II
—Oct. 28: ZBT vs. Big IV; Eng IH
vs. Law II; PE n vs. Union; Eng n vs:
PE TH; Pharmacy vs. Phi Gamma; Eng
vm vs. Eng VI; For II vs. Carey Hail;
Kappa Sigma pledges vs. Beta pledges.
SWIMMING — 12:30: For vs. Union;
Beta vs. AD. Finals Oct. 20.
SOCCER—12-3-V-Oct. 27: Kappa Sigma II vs. Eng n. -
SOCCER—'Division I quarterfinal*
—Oct. 27—12:30:Eng I vs. Beta I
(Field 8); Phi Gamma vs. Commerce
(Field  9).
—Oct. 28—12:30: For vs. DU (Field 5).
—Oct. 30—12:30: Aggies vs. Union
(Field 1).
WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS
1) General meeting for all managers,
Tuesday.
2) Marathon walk entries due Oct.
31.
3) Volleyball and bowling entries due
Oct. 31.
will be at the helm of the offense
which has managed to engineer
victoies over Whitworth and
Centeral Washington College,
mainly on the running of backs
Rob Lonborg and Dan Dolfin.
The Birds will doubtlessly go
into the game optimistically as
their defense has improved,
particularly in the secondary, and
the offense last week came up
with an amazingly 276 yards in
total offense against SFU.
Coach Frank Gnup,
commenting on his game plan said
"We hope to throw the ball more
as our pass protection showed up
real well on the Simon Fraser
movies." About the Birds chances
of knocking off Western
Washington Gnup said, "We've had
only three days to prepare, but
were gonna give them a hell of a
game."
Game time is 8:00 p.m. in
Bellingham, Wash, and the Booster
club is sending busses, leaving at
6:30 p.m. from the north end of
SUB passenger loading zone.
Round trip tickets include
admission to the game, cost
$1.75, and are available in the
SUB foyer at noon today.
J'vee footballers
play last game
The jayvee football team plays
its last home game on the Whit
Mathews field in front of
Thunderbird Stadium, when they
take on the University of Puget
Sound jayvees, Saturday at noon.
Coach Nestor Korchinsky is
looking for a tough game, as Puget
Sound does have a football
scholarship program.
The Braves lost last week to
Monroe State Reformatory, the
team they beat at the beginning of
the season 40-12.
Korchinsky said he would dress
his full team of 30 players for the
12 noon game.
Slocks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Remodelled
I UNITED TAILOR5I
549 Granville St.
DEANS
RESTAURANTS
Full
Dining
Facilities
I   Take-Home
Service
PIZZAS - CHICKEN
HAMBURGERS
4544 W. 10th 224-1351
5688 Yew at 41st    266-7188
Hours: Weekdays 7 a-Jii. la 11 pjm.
Sundays  10  a.m.  to  11   p-a.
-dick button photo
UBC BRAVES center Rich Longpre watches his shot narrowly slide by the goal as numerous New
Westminster Royals helplessly look on. Longpre and crew battle the Richmond Hornets Friday night,
then open their league play Saturday at 8:00 p.m. at the Winter Sport Center.
Braves host to Selkirk Saints
in new intercollegiate league
By DICK BUTTON
B.C.'s newest hockey league, the Pacific
Intercollegiate League will open at UBC Saturday at
8:00 when the UBC Braves will battle the Selkirk
College Saints.
The league is made up of teams from SFU,
BCIT, Gonzaga Univeristy, Selkirk and UBC Braves.
At the present time it appears that the strong
teams in the league are UBC and Selkirk. Saturday's
game should give an indication of how the league is
likely to go later in the year.
Braves coach Don FidTer is confident that his
team is ready to start the season on a winning note,
feeling the team is playing much better than last
weekend when they tied New Westminster Royals
4^1.
Friday night the Braves try to get into the
winning mood when they play an exhibition game
against Richmond Hornets in the Winter Sports
Center at 8:00 p.m.
Meanwhile the Birds start on exhibition series
this weekend with 2 games against the Williams
Lake Stampeders in Williams Lake.
Birds coach Andy Bakogeorge has been juggling
players this week trying to put together a well
balanced team, but is still having difficulties on
defense. He expects to have everything ironed out ?..;
plenty of time for the league opening November 21.
Weekend Action Box
Oct. 24-lce Hockey (J.V.)
Hornets
UBC
Oct. 25-lce Hockey (J.V.)
Selkirk College Saints
Arena
Oct. 25-Rugby Birds
U. of Victoria
Stadium
Oct. 25-Rugby Braves
Meralomas
UBC
Oct. 25-Rugby Totems
Meralomas
UBC
Oct. 25-Field Hockey 'Birds
Meadows "A"
UBC
Oct. 26-Soccer J.V.'s
Norburn Eintracht
UBC
Oct. 25-Football J.V.'s
U.of Puget Sound
UBC
8:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
1:15p.m.
1:15 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
11:00 a.m.
12:00 noon
60 SOUTH
THUNDERBIRD SKI TEAM
presents
SKI FLICKS
including "OUTER LIMITS
TUES.,   OCT.   28
and
THURS., OCT. 30
al  NOON in the
OLD AUDITORIUM (N
of Math. Bldg.)
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
228-3197
PUBLIC SKATING
7:30 p.m. — 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 26 - Wednesday, Oct. 29 - Friday, Oct. 31
Group Skating Parties — Some Dates Still Available
CURLING
Casual Games may be arranged, also
some League openings.
HOCKEY
Game time: 8 p.m.
FRI., Oct. 24—U.B.C. BRAVES vs. RICHMOND HORNETS
SAT., Oct. 25—U.B.C. BRAVES vs. SELKIRK SAINTS
SAT., Nov. 1—U.B.C. THUNDERBIRDS vs. VANDERHOOF
SAT., Nov. 8—U.B.C. THUNDERBIRDS vs
WILLIAMS LAKE
NOTE: FREE ADMISSION to UBC STUDENTS to all
THUNDERBIRDS and BRAVES Home Games
MAKE MONEY
SAVE MONEY
at the
SKI  SWAP
Saturday, November 1st
P.N.E. - PURE FOOD BUILDING
To Sell
Bring used equipment (no clothing or unsafe equipment)
Friday, October 31 (noon - 11 p.m.) and Saturday,
November 1 (9-11 a.m.). Set your own price. The CASA
retains 10 per cent (club member) and 15 per cent (non-
club member).
To Buy
Come to the Pure Food Building, 1-11 p.m., Saturday,
November 1st. SALE IS ONE DAY ONLY.
To aid the CASA development program, the B.C. Lions are
offering pairs of football tickets (value $5 per pair) in
exchange for donations of acceptable used equipment.
To get your tickets . . . present equipment to CASA representatives . . .
Monday, October 27
RENFREW  COMMUNITY CENTRE
2929   East   22nd   Avenue
5-7 p.m.
Tuesday, October 28
WEST  VAN   COMMUNITY   CENTRE
22nd and Marine Orive, West Vancouver
5:30 - 7:30 p.m.
All Proceeds for Development of
Skiing in B.C. Page 24
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 24,  1969
PSA CRISIS:
PART OF A TREND
By RON THOMPSON
Canadian University Press
(CUP)-In October, 1968, Graham Spry, former
ambassador to Saskatchewan House in London and a
respected name in Canadian communications theory, was
granted an honorary doctorate by the fall convocation of
the University of Saskatchewan, Regina campus.
In his address to the convocees and audience, he
expressed his fears at the striking similarities he perceived
between modern North American student radicals and
Nazi youth of the thirties.
Minutes later, a student at that convocation refused
his degree, asking to speak in rebuttal to Spry's remarks.
The chancellor refused to allow it.
"Oh, my God," said a woman in the faculty wives'
section after the student had removed his robe and left, "I
was afraid he was going to set fire to his robes."
There were no such illusions among the
administrators on the stage.
Their only worry was that they would probably have
to call in the police to remove the student.
It was the beginning on an ideological debate that was
only slowly to become concretized.
Nine months later, in Saturday Night magazine,
George Woodcock, author of a number of books on
anarchism, authored an article which raised again many of
Spry's fears.
Documenting several examples of similar critiques by
many western leftists, Woodcock wrote, "In Canada we
are not far behind the rest of the world in a type of
activism which pretends to be libertarian but is in action
authoritarian and in prospect totalitarian.
"Like academic freedom, fair play is unrecognized by
authoritarian activists."
He defined fascism for the purposed ofhis argument.
"Fascism is not conservatism . .. nor is a police state
necessarily a fascist state . . .Fascism is in fact a radical
movement aimed at social transformation."
Two months later the debate continued in the letters
column of Saturday Night.
Woodcock says in a letter to the magazine, "I am not
implying anyone can at present be termed a fascist; I am
talking about tendencies and threats."
And perhaps there is enough hedging in the
remarks of men like Woodcock to satisfy their own
requirements about objectivity.
But in the meantime, the past year has seen an
extension of that debate from the arena of liberal dialogue
to the points of real confrontation on the campus. The
extension was gradual.
Virtually every article or program in the mass media
has raised the spectre of "extremism" in coverage of the
problem of 'student unrest.'
Since the fire in the sir George Williams computer,
even Newsweek has seen fit to consider "Canadian
students... among the most militant in the world," —
merely parenthetical comment in a report on student
unrest in the U.S.
But almost every university and college administrator
in the country is by now on record as 'in favor of change'
so long as it is achieved through 'the proper
channels'-that they like students to be 'concerned with
change, so long as they aren't extremists.'
In this context, all the terms are applicable anywhere,
because they remain undefined.
For instance, the chancellor of Carleton University,
Lester Pearson, talks of the need for change and the
dangers of extremism; although extremism is hardly
descriptive of the situation at Carleton.
At Carleton, 'radicalism' is at the stage of a student
attempt to get a petition to ask the senate to set up a
committee to look into overcrowding in the university.
Yet Pearson sees fit to warn against extremists, and
Davidson Dunton, the administration president, has
already been established as the sole person who can give
the directive to the police to come onto the campus.
Perhaps the function served has been to move
everyone's political definitions to the right. Where there
is no real confrontation taking place, it may have become
easier for people to define the students who were farthest
to the left as extremists.
At any rate, this past year has seen the creation of a
new label in student 'polities'—the moderates.
1968-69 also saw two incidents that were firsts for
Canadian campuses-at Simon Fraser University on the
west coast and the University of New Brunswick on the
east, the RCMP were called on campus to remove aand
arrest protesting students.
Perhaps that is the function of the 'liberal
philosopher' in this socjety-a symbiotic relationship that
allows him to retain a position on the fence, edging away
from taking a stance, while the society feeds off his
rhetoric to create a climate for repression.
The rhetoric of 'anti-democratic disruption' creeps
into the press statements of the 'liberal' administrator.
And when confrontation occurs, the issues are shoved
under the table.
When  a charge  of racism is  raised at Sir George
DRUNKS' SUSPENSION
Williams University, and over the year escalates to an^
occupation and a destroyed computer, the problem is seen
merely  as  one   of control.  A new discipline code is
introduced which outlaws all disent.
In Ontario, the presidents of the province's 14
universities caucus and come out with a working paper,
'Order on Campus', in a virtual vacuum of any kind of
confrontation. But then a spokesman for the group did
say the release of the paper had been 'premature.'
It somehow follows, in that kind of an atmosphere,
full of the rhetoric of disorder and anarchy, using a logic
which defines the strongest dissent around as dangerous
extremism, that Simon Fraser would work out the way it
has.
Administration president Kenneth Strand, for the
second time in a year, is able to set the stage for whatever
means necessary to break the dissenting group on his
campus without ever having to answer their charges or
speak to their demands.
This time it is the department of political science,
sociology and anthropology, trying to shuck off an
administrative trusteeship imposed over the summer
which resulted in the probation, demotion or firing of
eleven PSA faculty.
Students and faculty eventually voted to strike.
Faculty said they were on strike but that they would
teach a class if only one student wanted it held.
But the rhetoric in the air was against them. The
Canadian Association of University Teachers, the
university faculty lobby, was going to have no part of
such "emotion-laden atmosphere of confrontation and
strike."
Strand, right on cue, called the whole thing "threat"
and "coercion"-it was depriving students of their rights
(although nearly 700 PSA students had voted for the
strike)-and said the university could not operate under
such conditions.
A week later nine profs had been suspended pending
their dismissal. Now they fear only a court injunction to
keep them off campus.
Only eight months ago, such an injunction resulted in
a demonstration that ended in a police raid.
And, well, if the police are there, that just about
proves that the students really are, if not fascists, then
tending that way.
BY NICK ORCHARD
Commies supply beer?
The university prepares the student for society.
However, the high school doesn't prepare the student
for university.
You might have read, assuming university students
can read, about the suspension of Point Grey high school
rugby players for drinking beer after a game.
Drinking, according to a school official, could pose a
serious threat to athletics. Visions of drunken rugby orgies
come to my mind.
The English game might degenerate to the version
played in Pango-Pango, where the ball is replaced with a
beer bottle, the players replaced by drunks and other
assorted waterfowl, and a try is scored by running
backwards, indecently exposed and screaming obscenities.
I suspect some communist organization supplied the
team with beer.
The communists being short on funds this week, they
could only afford eleven beer for sixteen players.
"But one beer leads to another," said a member of
the school board. It's profound statements like that that
get them elected,
So next year most of those players will graduate and
become part of our great academic society. Most of them
will believe a boat race is something performed on the
water.
Who the hell is going to tell them that Uncle Ben isn't
someone who writes a diaper wetter's column in the
newspaper.
No wonder so many frosh feel disoriented on campus
and so many freshettes bend to the task of hunting down
horny UBC males.
The Vancouver school board can be credited with
keeping liquor, dope, sex, and academic interest out of
schools, and to this I raise my glass of milk.
FLOOR SHOW
Tryouts
SUB 125 (F)
12:30 - 2:00
Oct. 23, 24, 27, 28, 29,30
Singing, Dancing,
Skits, Musicians.
MARDI GRAS
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just   One   Block  from   Campus
In  The Village
(Next   to   U.B.C.   Barber   Shop)
WE   SERVE   GOOD  CHINESE  FOOD
AT    REASONABLE    PRICES
For   Take-Out   Service  Ph.  224-6121
OPEN   TUES. -  TO   -   SAT.
11:30 A.M. TO  10 P.M.
SUNDAY & MONDAY 5 TO 10 P.M.
^Jninhina of buulna a oDlamond,
-iLn think a/Mbf*
"Bridal Bouquet"
Creations
4) "Lady Tulip"
$137.50
5) "Lady Gardenia"
$200.00
6) "Lady Camelia"
$300.00
Matching Band $87.50
10% Down—
Balance Over 12 Months
Insured Free for One Year.
Special Courtesy Discount
20% to Students & Faculty
DOWNTOWN VANCuTVER
• 655 GRANVILLE ST.   683-6651
• 47 W. HASTINGS ST.   682-3801
IXIWNTdWN NKW HKSTMINSTEft
• 622 COLUMBIA ST.    526-3771
VANCOUVER STOKE OfES FRIDAYS UNTIL SINE. .NEW WKTM1*JB« STORE OPEN TMHS. t FRIDAYS IXTII. NKt
BOSTON
PIZZA & SPAGHETTI  HOUSE
21 VARIETIES OF PIZZA ... a kind for every taste
plus Spaghetti - Lasagna - Ravioli and Rigatoni
Chicken Cacciatore • Veal Scaloppini
FREE DELIVERY
4 p.m. - 4 a.m. — 7 Days a Week
4450 W. 10th Tel. 224-1720

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