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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 20, 1979

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Array Dep't head threatens prof
By TOM HAWTHORN
English department head Robert Jordan has threatened to
ask for an associate professor's resignation if he is involved
with an attempt to find Canadian applicants to fill a senior
Shakespearean post for which there are currently only
American candidates. 	
Ronald Hatch, who has led a
departmental protest against the
imminent hiring of a non-Canadian
professor, said Monday Jordan had
mistakenly thought Hatch and a
professor at Carleton University
had joined in soliciting applicants
for the position and were starting
an "underground recruitment program."
Hatch was told by Jordan that if
this was the case, Hatch should
resign and conduct his "personal
crusade as a private citizen."
"Jordan said I was conducting a
personal crusade and forgetting I
was a professional," Hatch said.
Hatch added that he had acted
professionally by writing to
members of the appointments and
executive committees. He said he
did not ask Carleton English professor Robin .Mathews to find
Canadian applicants and was not
involved in Mathews' action.
Jordan denied Monday that he
recommended that Hatch resign.
He also refused to speak to The
Ubyssey about the departmental
dispute because it is "too embarrassing to our reputation and to individual reputations."
"I can't account to my colleagues
any story in the student press. We
don't really conduct our business in
the newspaper," he said.
Mathews,_ a noted Canadian poet
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. \$Xf. No. 52     VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1979
228-2301
PUNK CONCERT POSTER . . . they couldn't stop rock'n'roll but . . .
Godiva could get raw deal
By PETER MENYASZ
Lady Godiva will not ride this year if the women's
committee of the law students' association is successful in its campaign against her.
A court injunction could prevent the engineering
undergraduate society from holding the perennial
event in which a naked woman is paraded around the
campus on a horse, said LSA member Arlene Francis.
"Nothing smartens people up faster than facing a
criminal charge," she said Monday.
Francis said she has been investigating various legal
means that could quash the event.
The university administration is firmly against
continuation of the Lady Godiva tradition, but can do
little to stop it, Eric Vogt, vice-president of faculty and
student affairs said Monday.
"The administration has been completely unequivocal that the ride was a tremendous mistake and
insulting to women," he said.
"But the Lady Godiva ride is a civil matter, and one
doesn't use academic principles for civil matters."
He said it would be helpful if students took some
part in stopping the ride.
The Alma Mater Society feels that it can do little to
prevent the engineers from carrying out their plans,
said AMS president Valgeet Johl.
"They (the EUS) don't really care what comes down
as the AMS position," she said Monday.
"There should be some concern from the administration. If anybody's going to restrict the actions
of the students, it's the administration."
Johl added that the most serious action the AMS
could take would be the disenfranchisement of the
EUS, but even this would probably not help.
"They'll have their money, they'll still be on the
campus, and they'll still do what they want to do.
"The engineers don't give a shit about anyone but
themselves, and that's hard to deal with."
See page 3: GODIVA
and Carleton professor, said Monday he has asked a senior professor
at the University of Toronto to apply for the position.
Mathews has been active in promoting Canadian nationalist interests in the past.
Meanwhile, Mathews has also
asked federal manpower and immigration minister Bud Cullen to
recommend a course of action.
In a Dec. 31 letter to Cullen,
Mathew says university departments often advertise for positions,
but do not search thoroughly for
Canadians.
"Professor Hatch is correct, toor.
in his suggestion that UBC can wait
a year if necessary to find a Canadian. The institution won't crumble
to the ground if they don't have a
Shakespearean immediately," he
says in the letter.
Mathews said Monday the situation at UBC was "intolerable" and
called on administration president
Doug Kenny and the senate to end
the dispute.
"As the pressure has grown in
Canadian universities to hire Canadians, the myth to hire someone
with a reputation has also grown.
How do you expect to get interna-
See page 2: HATCH
Cops cancel
punk party
RCMP pressure on the student
administrative commission has put
an end to plans to hold a punk rock
concert this weekend at UBC.
The Alma Mater Society cancelled the concert because of fears
by the local police over the policing
and security of the concert, AMS
general manager Bern Grady said
Monday.
But concert organizers had
planned to hire 20 security people
from the engineering undergraduate society at a cost of
$200.
Concert organizer Mike Bocking
labelled the RCMP action "a
blatant example of police intervention in legitimate student
affairs.
"As far as I know, this approach
is similar to practices in the Soviet
Union, where the police monitor
cultural events," said Bocking,
editor of The Ubyssey, which was
sponsoring the event.
He said Monday the RCMP
blackmailed SAC into accepting
RCMP recommendations by using
their power as advisors to the
Liquor Administration Board. The
RCMP can recommend refusal to
renew the AMS liquor license for
the Pit which comes under review at
the end of March, said Bocking.
"The RCMP's action is only the
latest in a series of heavy-handed
police action on this campus during
the last couple of years."
In Nov. 1976, the Pit was closed
for three weeks, after the RCMP
threatened to review the Pit's
licence following an increase in
campus vandalism.
Grady said the RCMP told SAC
they were concerned about the
policing of the concert because of
the violent reputation of punk rock
concerts.
But John Owen, manager of the
company Productions West, which
handles D.O.A., Pointed Sticks
and the Dishrags said Monday the
RCMP concern was "ridiculous."
The concert was limited to UBC
students and because they have not
been violent at any other UBC
concerts, Owen said he saw no
reason why the police should be
concerned about student violence at
a punk concert.
"I don't understand what the
problem could possibly be at UBC.
I didn't know students at UBC were
so violent."
He   said   D.O.A.,   who   were
scheduled  to   play   at  the   UBC
concert were performing at other
universities all across Canada and
See page 3: CONCERT
BoG grants cash
but helps few
By MARTINA FREITAG
In a plan to improve university
accessibility, UBC's board of
governors decided early this month
to make an additional $250,000
available in university bursary
funds.
"The proposal is intended to
provide more money for the
neediest students," student awards
director Byron Hender said
Monday.
The motion gives an extra
$50,000 a year to aid low-income
students. It originates from a series
of student-aid recommendations
made at a December meeting of the
B.C. Universities Council.
Student board representative
Bruce Armstrong said Monday the
motion is a definite step in the right
direction, but added he hoped it
only marked a beginning in
combatting the problem.
"I wouldn't look a gift horse in
the mouth, but I feel it's not really
enough." He said the motion
would aid perhaps 50 more students
annually.
Almost one-third of UBC
students receive tinancial aid from
university and government funds,
according   to   Hender.   He   cited
$3,500 as the minimum required for
an eight-month university stint
away from home.
Hender said the average award
runs about $1,800, although up to
$3,500 may be awarded.
The board did not discuss what
constituted a low-income student or
how the plan was to be implemented, Armstrong said.
The university offers nonrepayable grants of up to $1,700
annually through the B.C. provincial grant program. The Canada
Student Loan Plan provides up to
$1,800 a year in repayable loans.
The new motion frees $450,000
annually for student aid at the
university level.
The B.C. universities board also
recommended supplementary
tuition and book grants for dependent students, and a move
towards waiving some of the
required student contribution to
educational costs.
Another proposal would include
part-time and graduate students in
the provincial aid plan.
The additional grant money is the
first recommendation to be acted
on at UBC, but more are likely to
surface when next month's board
meeting tackles tuition fees. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 20, 1979
Hatch pretest hit
From page 1
tionally reknowned Canadians if
you don't give them the opportunity?"
Mathews is in Vancouver to
speak today at noon in Buch. 203.
Hatch has sent a letter to all
English department members containing a form letter to the appointments committee which reads:
"Recognizing that at this time
there are many unemployed and
under    employed    Canadian
graduates of English literature in
Canada, and that our department
has no urgent need for a senior
Shakespearean, I recommend that
the appointments committee extend
its search for another year to see if
they can find a promising Canadian
candidate."
The executive committee agreed
Feb. 6 to support the appointments
committee's decision to bring four
American candidates to UBC, dep-
site Hatch's protest.
FREDERICK WOOD THEATRE
ALL'S WELL THAT
ENDS WELL
By William Shakespeare
MARCH 2-10
(Previews Feb. 28-March 1)
8:00 p.m.
(Thursday Matinee — March 8 at 12:30 p.m.)
Student Tickets: $2.50
Thursday Matinee: $2.00
BOX OFFICE * FREDERICK WOOD THEATRE *
Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
THEODORE ROSZAK
In a lecture/discussion on
PEOPLE/PLANET:
THE MISSING LINK
OF PERSONHOOD
Dr. Roszak is Professor of History and Chairman of General Studies at
California State University, Hayward. He is author of The Unfinished
Animal (Harper & Row, 1975) and most recently, Person/Planet: The
Creative Disintegration of the Industrial Society (Doubleday, 1978).
Thursday, Feb. 22, 8 p.m.
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Bldg., U.B.C.
$4; Students $3.
For further information
Phone 228-2181, local 261
Centre for Continuing Education
The University of British Columbia
U.B.C. OPEN
HOUSE '79
Needs YOU to
volunteer!
WE   NEED   PEOPLE  TO   LEAD   TOURS,   TO
ANSWER PHONES AND GENERALLY "HELP
OUT" ON
MARCH 2 and MARCH 3
from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
IT'S YOUR SHOW-
COME AND HELP OUT!
Phone 228-5415 or come up to Sub 238.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
6882481
TOUCH-DISCO
10   WEEKS    GROUP
LESSONS $35
Contact:
DANCE CITY
927 Granville St.,
Vancouver, B.C.
Phone: 685-4383
Classes start Feb. 26
NOTICE
Tuition Fee
Income Tax
Receipts
Available
FEB. 21, 1979
Dept. of Finance
General Service
Admin. Building
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
SNEEZY WATERS
HANK WILLIAMS
THE.STRiy riC NC.yCR GAVE
COMMODORE BALLROOM
670 Granville St.
MARCH 1 - 4     8:30pm
Ad»«nc« Tlck.ti $6.50   / At Th. Door 17.50
Tickets: Vancouver Ticket Centre, 683-3255
& all Eaton's Stores
»A MUST-SEE"    £?hW™Waitt!£
THINKING OF TEACHING?
The University of Victoria is again offering a Secondary
Internship Teacher Education Programme in 1979-80.
ELIGIBILITY: Candidates must have an acceptable undergraduate degree from a recognized University, have the
necessary subject preparation in two approved teaching areas
for secondary schools, be prepared to practise teach in Alberni,
Nanaimo, Courtenay or Campbell River School Districts and
show evidence of commitment and skill in working with young
people. Applications are encouraged from individuals with life
experience in addition to their formal education.
PROGRAMME: Academically admissible candidates will
be interviewed by University and participating School District
personnel in early May. Selected candidates will then attend a
week's orientation in their school district in mid May, attend
UVic for July and August course work, train in their school
district from September, 1979 to April, I980,andcompletetheir
academic work on UVic campus during May/June, 1980.
Successful interns are then recommended for a Teaching
Certificate.
FINANCIAL AID: Interns will be eligible for existing
student aid as administered by the University's Financial Aid
Office. School districts will provide a stipend to Interns during
their 8-month residency.
TO APPLY: Applications post-marked after midnight
MARCH .11, 1979, will not be accepted. For detailed information and application forms, phone 477-j69I I ext. 6636 or write
immediately to: The Co-ordinator, Secondary Internship Programme, Faculty of Education, University of Victoria, P.O. Box
1700, Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y2.
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Phone 228-0626
Open Mon-Sat 9:30-6:00 Tuesday, February 20, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag« 3
Students postpone ad campaign
By BOB BUCKINGHAM
B.C.'s three university student
councils have postponed plans for a
$4,500 province-wide campaign to
oppose cutbacks in education spending.
The plans involved placing
written advertisements in
newspapers across the province to
promote   support   in   the   fight
against cutbacks. The three student
representative council presidents of
UBC, UVic and Simon Fraser
University developed their anti-
cutback campaign plans at a
December meeting.
But recently, the Simon Fraser
Student Society has announced its
refusal to endorse the proposed
campaign.
SFSS president Jim Young said
Monday three main reasons made
him change his mind on the
campaign.
"Our cutbacks committee
believed it would have little or no
effect," he said. "There might be a
negative reaction to the campaign
with people saying if students can
afford an ad campaign they can
afford to pay tuition.
Young said SFSS has not ruled
—matt king photo
QUIET STILL LIFE, glassy eyes and glass bottles, is all that remains of the intense, action-filled intellectual
discussion that rocked the student union building last weekend. Fifty delegates from student newspapers as far
away as Manitoba argued, threw telephone books, came to cogent, well-thought out decisions and sampled some
of B.C.'s finest home-grown and home-brewed products before being flown out.
Feds increasing work funds
OTTAWA (CUP) — The federal
government has increased funding
for summer student work programs
by $18 million, but it's not enough
to eliminate another summer of
high unemployment, according to
the National Union of Students.
Employment minister Bud Cullen
announced last week that the
budget for this year's Canada
Summer Youth Employment Program will be $113.5 million, up
from last year's $94.8 million.
Cullen said the program will employ 64,000 people through direct
job creation and another 202,000 in
private sector jobs.
But the government is still not
doing enough to fight student unemployment in Canada, which was
17 per cent last year, NUS researcher  Morna  Ballantyne says.
Young Canada Works, the largest federal program, is expected to
provide 35,000 jobs with a $62
million budget. But Ballantyne said
last year YCW could fund only a
third of the 14,300 project applications with its $48.8 million budget.
To pay for all of the projects would
require $118 million tor YCW
alone, she said.
"Another problem with Young
Canada Works is it only provides
short-term jobs," Ballantyne said.
"When that is added to the
tightened unemployment insurance
regulations you are going to have
many students unable to qualify for
unemployment insurance when they
can't find work at the end of this
summer or at the beginning of next
summer."
Many other government job
creation programs, such as the
Youth Jobs Corps, suffer from the
same problem, she said.
Concert dead before arrival
From page 1
added   he   is   mystified   by   the
problem at UBC.
"It's a shame it could be cancelled because of such a flimsy
reason." Owen added there is
nothing violent in D.O.A.'s stage
show that would incite audiences to
violence.
AMS president Valgeet Johl said
Monday she is disturbed by the
RCMP's interference in the concert.
"I can understand that there may
be some adverse reaction to a punk
concert but I didn't think the intervention was necessary."
Johl said The Ubyssey had taken
all the necessary security
precautions and those measures had
been approved.
"It's also disturbing to find that
they (the RCMP) have so much
:ontrol on what goes on in this
campus."
She said the punk concert would
basically have been no different
from any other social event at
UBC.
"I think jt (RCMP involvement)
is just going a little too far now."
Bocking said the RCMP is
determining what cultural and
entertainment events students can
attend at UBC. He said he saw no
reason why they should be concerned and that the RCMP has no
authority to pressure the AMS
because the liquor license has
already been approved.
"Sergeant Hutchinson has
seriously damaged relations between the local RCMP and the
students on this campus. His
continued   heavy-handed   actions
threaten to put the local RCMP
into disrepute," said Bocking.
University detachment RCMP
sergeant Al Hutchinson said
Monday he did not wish to comment on the RCMP recommendations or his "private" discussions
with Grady.
"I don't feel there's anything to
discuss," he said.
"It's getting to the point where
you can't hold an event more
radical than a knitting bee," said
Bocking. He added that The
Ubyssey "expected little more than
to break even" on the concert.
"The event was intended to introduce a musical and cultural form
which has never appeared before at
UBC," Bocking said. "We undertook the event because we were
approached by students who
wanted to see it happen."
out a campaign but believes it
should be held in conjunction with
other action.
He said he subscribed to the B.C.
Federation of Students' campaign
which calls for on-campus
educational work and building
alliances with community organizations and labor.
British Columbia is lagging
behind the rest of the country in on-
campus work because it does not
have a strong provincial
organization, said Young.
"We won't have one until UBC
and UVic join the BCSF."
The SFSS could be justified in its
stand on the campaign, said Kate
Andrew, Alma Mater Society external affairs officer.
"The SFSS has some valid
concerns about doing an ad
campaign by itself. But the message
has to get through to the public
quickly," she said Monday.
"The campaign is to tell the
public that if they care about the
quality of education to do something about it."
But Andrew said she does not
believe that the campaign will
diffuse energy from any plans to
build a more comprehensive action
to fight the cutbacks.
"Under better conditions the
tactic should be part of a comprehensive campaign but lacking that
we need something immediately."
Andrew said she was not sure if
the AMS would go ahead without
the support of the SFSS.
"The campaign is in the hands of
Paul Sandhu and he will have to
decide if it will reach enough people
without their support. He should be
reporting to the student representative assembly which will make the
final decision."
Tuition fee fight
feeble at UBC
By PETER MENYASZ
Tuition fee increases at UBC are
a certainty without widespread
student opposition, according to
Alma Mater Society external affairs
officer Kate Andrew.
If last Wednesday's meeting to
establish strategies for the fight
against tuition increases is any
indication, student apathy is still
alive and well at UBC.
Only five students appeared at
the meeting.
"I was hoping more people
would show up, so we could see
how much support we're going to
get. If this is all there is. . .," said
Andrew.
Despite the poor turnout, the five
people at the meeting agreed on
most of the issues discussed. One
major problem is that students
don't know the major issues involved with the increases, said
Andrew.
"Once people start knowing the
facts, they'll be able to do
something."
Lack of knowledge could be one
factor influencing the poor turnout
for the meeting, said one of the
concerned students, Mark Dedin-
sky.
"I talked to about five people
and they didn't know about the
meeting. I told them if they didn't
attend the meeting, they wouldn't
be able to bitch about tuition increases, they said they didn't care,"
he said Wednesday.
Education minister Pat McGeer
is the key to stopping tuition increases, said Andrew.
"McGeer is in a weak position. If
he doesn't come through, he can be
defeated (in the next provincial
election)."
But McGeer cannot be influenced
unless students show their support
for the anti-increase movement,
added Andrew.
"No one's going to do too much
against McGeer unless they know
that the students are behind them."
Education senator Frank Lee
said he did not know if students in
the education faculty would
support the battle against fee increases.
"Those education students are
like a bunch of lemmings going
over the cliff," said NDP club
president Bruce Ralston. "Don't
they know what they're facing
when they leave here?"
Lee questioned the lack of involvement of student representative
assembly members in the campaign.
"How   come   we   haven't   got
anyone from SRA involved? If you
can't get them involved, you won't
be able to get anyone involved."
But Ralston said he thought SRA
members were just as unconcerned
about tuition increases as any other
students.
"People in SRA are no different
from anyone else. They have no
greater commitment than anyone
else."
The group of five decided to
launch a campaign in the campus
residences on the Feb. 23 weekend,
distributing buttons, talking to
people, and getting their names and
whether or not they want to work
on an anti-increase campaign.
Other plans include work during
UBC's Open House.
"If we go ahead and do it, we do
it big," said Andrew.
'Godiva ride
support a
little short'
From page 1
EUS president Brian Short said
Monday that the issue is being
blown out of proportion "as
usual."
He said it was unlikely that
enough pressure could be brought
to bear to prevent the ride and
wished the ride's opponents "good
luck."
"It's too bad people can't accept
it as the fun tradition that it's
meant as," said Short.
Women students' office director
Lorette Woolsey said Monday that
originally the ride might not have
been offensive, but people's consciousness is now higher.
"Only a few years ago it was also
a tradition to lynch Negroes (in the
U.S.A.).
"We can't stop the nuts that
write sexist stuff in washrooms, but
we can slip large publicly-funded
groups that represent the
university."
The LSA women's committee has
taken the first step toward getting
the injunction by passing a motion
approving the establishment of a
legal fund at a meeting Monday.
"We wish we didn't have to raise
a fund, but as long as people keep
doing irresponsible things, it has to
be done," said Francis. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 20, 1979
Dangerous music
Perhaps we should have booked
Nelson Eddy.
The RCMP's decision to pull the plug
on The Ubyssey's punk concert before
the first pogo was hopped is only the
latest example of the force's heavy-
handed and autocratic behavior both on
and off this campus. The reasons the
RCMP used in pressuring the AMS into
cancelling the concert appear to have
more to do with censorship than preserving the peace.
The concert would have been
restricted to UBC students and their
guests, just as the Pit, the Lethe and all
other socials at UBC are restricted.
There would have been far more security at this concert than is provided at
other socials at UBC. There would have
been a limit on the amount of alcohol
consumed — a security provision that is
not provided for at the Pit or the Lethe.
But, because of the nature of the
entertainment, the show could not go
on.
The RCMP felt that because
something  might happen the concert
should be cancelled. This is exactly the
type of preventative law enforcement
techniques that have been brought to
light in recent years by the McDonald
and Keable commissions.
The RCMP felt leftists may be planning illegal activities. So for years they illegally opened their mail.
They felt something might happen if
the FLQ and the Black Panthers got
together. So they burned down the
building where they were going to meet.
Perhaps we should be grateful they
did not torch the student union building.
Nor is this the first time the RCMP
made excessive use of their authority on
campus. In 1976 they prevailed upon the
AMS to close the Pit for three weeks
because of the amount of vandalism on
campus. Bars in downtown Vancouver
where people are killed are never closed
for anywhere near that length of time. In
recent years the RCMP have also raided
a UBC residence without a search warrant.
Anyway you can be damned sure
we'll never book the Musical Ride.
Letters
Gays hit homophobic Christian
We take the strongest exception
to one of the letters which was
printed in the Feb. 13 issue of The
Ubyssey. The letter denounced the
Page Friday issue on sexuality and
specifically, presented an illogical
refutation of Julie Wheelwright's
article titled Homosexuality.
Mr. Slade and his co-authors
base their objections to homosexual
acts on the fact that Christianity
has, in the past, condemned such
acts. In recent years, however,
many Christian organizations have
adopted the view that same-sex love
— emotional as well as physical —
is not, per se, contrary to the
teachings of the Bible.
This change in attitude has
evolved partly as a response to the
discovery that, through its many
translations, certain passages of the
Bible have come to be interpreted
very differently than originally
intended.
This is especially true of the
passages which are employed today
to prove that the Bible is anti-
homosexual. Additional and more
detailed information on this topic
may be found in The Church and
the Homosexual by John J. McNeill.
The letter mentions homosexuality in conjunction with
adultery, promiscuity and unreasonable anger. Where and what
are the connections? There are, of
course, none. Such juxtapositions
serve only to confuse attempts to
separate the facts of homosexuality
from the myths.
The discourse on marriage
perpetrates myths concerning not
only homosexuality but also those
relating to the concept of all
sexuality. The letter defines
"marriage" as ". . .a complete
personal, sexual and loving
union. . ."
Aside from the fact that many
might, rightly, wish to adopt a
different definition of the term, the
authors seem to be ignorant of the
fact that many same-sex couples
live in just such a "marriage."
Although such bonding does not
receive legitimation by the state,
many homosexual and heterosexual
couples realize that it is the commitment to a relationship, rather
than a legal document, which gives
it its validity.
People of all sexual persuasions
will take exception to the attempt
by the authors of the letter to define
a "sexual union as leading (not
necessarily but probably) to a
family "
With such a limiting definition,
non-coital acts such as fellatio,
cunnilingus and anal intercourse or
any sexual activity involving
contraception would not be
classified as a "sexual union" since
none of them neither necessarily
nor probably leads to conception.
While procreation is one function
of sexual expression, sexual contact
is now viewed in a wider context as
the means of expressing and
fulfilling certain fundamental
psychological and physiological
needs. Mr. Slade and his co-authors
are perilously close to advocating
the Christian view of sex in the Victorian era: i.e., that sex is for procreation only, that sex in the
missionary position is the only
position acceptable, and that sexual
intercourse more than 12 times per
year  is   both   immoral   and   unhealthy.
We do not accept the premise
that gays should abstain from the
expression of the sexuality that is an
integral part of our being. Would
the authors write: "Heterosexual
inclination aside from the practice
is not sin but rather a burden, heavy
but not unnatural, which can be
borne in the same way in which
others have carried the burden of
celibacy?" We think not. To advocate such action for gays is irrational.
In conclusion, we would like to
mention that studies have repeatedly shown that human
sexuality cannot be categorized as
simply a black and white, 100 per
cent homosexual vs. 100 per cent
heterosexual, dichotomy. On the
contrary, it is a broad expanse of
grey much of which remains uncharted.
Gary Maier
pharmaceutical sciences
Society for Political Action
for Gay People
Return collective cubicles
THE UBYSSEY
FEBRUARY 20, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
Good golly Miss Molly, but you should have seen the pile of cuppies jammed into that half-
demolished hotel room. It had been a hard day's night and even Bill Tieleman and Mike Bocking had
shaken off their February stupor to stomp. "I've just seen a face," Peter Menyasz shouted in Matt
King's ear. "No, that was Geof Wheelwright and his new hair-cut." "Never in my life," came the sudden scream of the manager, scaring Ross Burnett and Kevin Finnegan off the balcony. Their cries of
help were drowned out by the manager's ravings. "Revolution! They wouldn't allow this back in the
USSR." Another shout came from the balcony, where Alayne McGregor was teetering. "You're goinc,
to lose that girt," Doug Smith observed. "She's a woman," cried Martina Freitag, hitting him neatly
with a Francis. "If 1 fell . . ." said Heather Conn, but couldn't complete the thought. The crowd surged back, pouring through the door into the hallway where Bob Buckingham lay comatose, flying. "You
can't always get what you want," shrugged Verne McDonald. "Fuck you," said Tom Hawthorn.
*■ ■   ■ ■    ■    ■    ■ ■   i. ■ ■     -   ^      i.i    ■  ■ U    '
We are writing in regard to the
obvious communist plot to destroy
the social behavioral patterns of the
Canadian student. This, of course,
is in reference to the construction of
the hideous apparatus of separatism in Sedgewick library.
These grotesque cubicles were
obviously erected without the
consensus of the majority of the
students who utilize Sedgewick as -a
study area. The cubicles hinder
group study, which is by far the
most popular mode of studying
employed by serious students.
The weak opposing argument,
that for those who prefer group
study there are the group booths on
the main foyer, is absolute rubbish.
There are so few of these 'group
booths' on the extremely noisy
main floor, that even if a person
makes the effort of arriving early
enough to secure one, it is nearly
impossible to study as a group with
the constant clatter of the passing
students and vending machine
junkies.
Although we realize that the
minority who prefer the individual
cubicles have their rights, in a
democratic society such as exists at
this university, the majority rules.
Perhaps the areas for individual
study needed to be increased, but
renovating the entire library in such
a manner was thoughtless and
ignorant.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity, legality, grammar or taste.
In conclusion we feel that the
majority of the cubicles in the
Sedgewick undergraduate library
should be removed. From the
general feeling running throughout
the library, we would suggest that
the authorities involved have the
cubicles removed before some of
the more aggressive members of the
student body employ their own
renovation methods.
Sedgewick undergraduate society
r
Chuck blabs
Well, well, well, it's so refreshing to see Ian Greenwood,
chairman of the board of governors appealing "to all students to
use their good sense when it comes
to assessing the duties and responsibilities of the board of
governors". I would like to request that chairman Greenwood
clean up his own house before so
eloquently criticizing students on
breaches of confidentiality.
I noticed that in the same issue
as chairman Greenwood criticizes
my actions there appears a front
page story regarding the
possibility of having a research
park located on campus. Well,
isn't that strange. Just a few
months ago all members of the
board were told "that the success
of the negotiations would require
complete confidentiality until they
had been completed."
But lo and behold in big fine
print one of chairman Greenwood's own staff comes out and
lets the entire world in on the
research park proposal. (Psst
Chuck, you were supposed to be
hush hush on this one.) But do
you think that chairman Greenwood will write an irate letter to
iThe Ubyssey complaining about
board • confidentiality now? Do
you think that president Kenny
will initiate backroom manoeuvring to get Chuck kicked out of
board meetings? Do you think J.
V. Clyne will erupt with anger and
give the old thumbs down to
Chuck?
It seems to me chairman
Greenwood, that the board is
applying a double standard when
it comes to board confidentiality.
Students are harassed and roasted
every time confidential board
information finds itself in the
public view. I have yet to see that
same kind of treatment being
applied to other members of the
board.
Perhaps vice-president Connaghan should be equally treated —
punished and used as an example
for board members. After all,
chairman Greenwood, if you can
do it to students you should be
able to muster up enough strength
to do it to one of your own.
Paul Sandhu
P.S. Last time I heard negotiations were going well for this proposal. What's going to happen
now? This could be a great loss
for the university and the people
of this province. j Tuesday, February 20, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Davis replies
The "open letter" from Craig
Brooks addressed to me in
the Ubyssey reads like he has
a closed mind on the subject of
UBC's 1979-80 housing budget.
Unfortunately there are several
errors in his letter which I feel
should be corrected if students are
going to get a proper understanding
of the issues currently being discussed about student housing.
First of all, there's nothing confidential about the housing budget
— all students have access to its
details simply by asking their
representative to the budget committee meetings. Fred Puetz is the
representative from Gage.
The joint residences committee
has been in session every Monday
and Wednesday night since the
beginning of January. In December
and late November, exam pressure
does not allow for budget committee meetings to take place.
Some other errors which must be
corrected are briefly:
• The figures I supplied at the
Gage meeting relative to cost increases totalled $127,600, not
$112,797, representing a fee hike of
approximately eight to 10 per cent.
• Gage students pay only 36
per cent of the asset replacement
fund, not 60 per cent.
• Interest on the asset replacement fund is not $25,000 but approximately   $10,000-$14,000,
Playing this week—8:30 p.m.:
Tuesday
JAM NIGHT with DON OGILVIE
Wednesday
ALL THAT JASS BAND
Thursday
DAVE ROBERTS JAZZBAND
Friday and Saturday
UPTOWN LOWDOWN
Members $3.00-Guests $4.00
NO NEW MEMBERSHIPS
TUES/WED/THURS — FREE for Members
LIVE—NEW ORLEANS JAZZ
36 E. Broadway — 873-4131
_   YEARLY MEMBERSHIPS — S3.00   __
Camp Fircom . .
IS LOOKING FOR
SUMMER STAFF
This year's staff will include:
— a Cook and Assistant
— a qualified Nurse
— craft specialist
— two waterfront specialists
— and people with one or more
of the following skills:
— swimming qualifications and
skills
— boating qualifications and
skills
— outjripping and camping
skills
— recreation and games skills
— nature awareness skills
Persons hired for summer staff
will be on-site from June 15 to
August 24, with one day off per
week. Room and board is provided, as well as an honourarium
ranging from $900 to $1300.
For application forms, write
First United Church
320 East Hastings Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
V6A 1P4
or call 681-8365
depending on the return on investment by the finance department.
• My view is that the "quality
demand" would not be substantially affected by the anticipated cuts.
• The budget is presented to the
board of governors meeting in
March and must be submitted by
February 16 — not in January. It
will be given thorough examination
before we submit it.
• My attendance at the meeting
was fully explained to the Gage
committee in advance. I volunteered to return the following week.
I want to assure students that
their opinions which are expressed
to me in the general residence
meetings, and through the Gage
survey which they participated in,
will be fully taken into consideration by the budget committee
before decisions are made.
We  value  observations  anyone
may bring to these meetings if they
can make a contribution to the consideration of service cuts versus fee
hikes and the housing budget itself.
Michael Davis
director of student housing
and conferences
PUBLIC
228-61 21
FRI. & SAT.
7:30 p.m. - 9:45   p.m,
SUNDAY
1:00 — 3:00 p.m.
STUDENTS
& CHILDREN    .75
ADULTS. $1  25
THUNDERBIRD
WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
&m$    THE
^ poppy Shop!
JUR CONCEPT — LOW PRICES*
UP TO 50% OFF
LADIES FASHIONS       ,,
Samples and size range also.  ~-"'1
ONE SEASON AHEAD OF LEADING
RETAIL AND DEPARTMENT STORES
So, buy wholesale and save
your hard earned money!
4394 W. 10th (at Trimble)!
224-4341
PRESCRIPTION
OPTICALI
Great moments in college life.
On May 3, Graham Watt lit up
a Colts. Paused. Reflected. Then
paused again. And reflected again.
Then paused. Then reflected. Paused
once more and looked on the marks
listing and found his name there
with a big "passed" beside it.
Colts. A great break.
Enjoy them anytime. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 20, 1979
'Tween classes
Subfilms is pleased to present:
TODAY
UBC HUMANITIES ASSOCIATION
Dr.  A.  Pacheco speaks on Metaphysics and
Poetry: A. Machado, an Agnostic in Search of
Faith, noon, Buchanan 2238.
HILLEL HOUSE
Fallafel lunch and Israel film, noon, Hillel House.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB OF UBC
Regular meeting, noon, SUB 205.
WEDNESDAY
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
Anti-tuition increase strategy meeting,  noon,
SUB 260.
GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Erich Vogt speaks on The Science Council of
B.C.  - What Is It?, noon. Graduate Student
Centre upper lounge.
THURSDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Disco dance lesson,  12:46 p.m.,  SUB  party
room.
HUNGER PROJECT
Meeting of Hunger Project in Canada, noon,
MacMillan building room 256.
UBC OPEN HOUSE 79
Last general meeting before Open House '79,
noon, SUB 206.
AWARDS OFFICE
Awards office representative will be available to
discuss financial aid, noon, SUB  Speakeasy.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Film, noon, IRC 1.
POTTERY CLUB
General meeting, 1:30 p.m., SUB 251.
UBC NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
UBC LIBERTARIAN SOCIETY
General meeting and discussion on pollution,
noon, SUB 224.
CCF
Regent College week on Bible and Literature,
noon. Regent College.
SATURDAY
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Disco party, 7:30 p.m., SUB party room.
228-3697
Thur., Sun. 7:00
Fri., Sat.
7:00 Er 9:30
E1977 20th Century-Fox
Please bring AMS card
$1.00
Hot flashes
Youth leaders
needed
Dating services aren't the only
ones looking for young, free and
approachable people.
Canada World Youth is seeking
group leaders aged 17 to 20 for its
cross-cultural exchange program to
coordinate the education, support
and supervision of Canadian participants.
Applications forms are available
at the SUB Speakeasy office or at
2524 Cypress St. For more information, call 732-5113.
V.N. conference
If you think the Canadian
economy is crumbling, then have
we got the conference for you.
A number of high-level United
Nations and U.S. government
representatives will be on hand at
workshops Feb. 23 to 25 at the B.C.
Conference on the Emerging International Economic Order to inform
Science Speaker of the week
Dr. DENNIS CHITTY, of the Zoology Dept.
speaks on
"William Harvey and the New Philosophy of
the 17th Century"
(William Harvey discovered the meaning of the Human
Circulatory System)
TUES., FEB. 20 - Biol 2000 - 12:30
Public Administration
A one year policy oriented Master of Public
Administration program. Preparation for city,
regional, provincial and federal public service.
Queen's University
Entrance with Honours B.A. or equivalent, all
fields of study. Enrolment limited to 30. Write:
School of Public Administration, Queen's
University, Kingston, Ontario.
IS PROUD TO PRESENT
WEDNESDAY,
28th FEBRUARY
TWO OF VANCOUVER'S TOP
DISCO DJ's
LARRY BAUDER
AL MOSTER
The
MID-WEEK
MIX
Finally, the DJ's give you their music
and exciting mixes.
BRING YOUR WHISTLE
CONTACT A BODY
364 WATER STREET,
IGASTOWN-681-5724
participants about the crucial issues
of the current economic and social
situation.
There's a $15 registration fee for
delegates. Please make cheques
payable to IDERA and mail to EIEO
Conference, 2524 Cypress St. For
more information, call 732-1496.
K0RRES
** MOVING AND T
HI TRANSFER LTD. h
"STORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th
Vancouver
732-9898
ALSO GARAGES,
BASEMENTS & YARDS
5 — Coining Events
Commedia deirArte anyone?
Vancouver Ultle Theatre Association
presents the comedy
A COMPANY OF WAYWARD SAINTS
By George Hermen
Feb. 7-24. Wad.-Sat., 8:30
METRO THEATRE. 1370 S.W. Marina Drive
Students «.60. Info: 266-7191. 731-1616
SUBFILMS PRESENTS
Jl3i>
STARTS THURSDAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Wed.,   Feb.   21-8   p.m. —Folk   evening   with
Chilean folk group. Refreshments, Bagies and
Coffee. Everyone welcome.
Every Monday, 7 p.m. at the 'Coffeepiace'.
SPANISH LANGUAGE, Evening songs, music,
food,   Spanish  coffee   -   and  listen/talk  to
native speakers — Sing and Dance.
More Info 228-6021.
IN PERSON!!
The ECKANKAR
("Co-worker with God")
spiritual movement, which teaches
that man has access to special life-
sustaining forces, is bringing Sri
DARWIN GROSS, the Living ECK
Master, to the Holiday Inn Vancouver—City Centre on* Feb. 24-25,
to speak to the public on this ancient
Way of Life. Call ECKANKAR for
more information. 732-5514.
PRE MED Society presents Conference
*79. This year's topic is Biomedical
Engineering. Saturday, February 24.
in IRC 4, 1:00-4 30 Admission is
free. Everyone welcome. Refreshments.
DON'T MISS the Pre-Med Car Rally,
Saturday, March 10. $2.00 per car.
Meet in "B" lot across from Thunderbird Winter Sports. 4:00 p.m.
Prizes!!  Party  ait  finish.
11 — For Sale — Private
COMMUNITY SPORTS — Excellent
prices far ice skates, hockey, soccer,
logging and racquet apart* eqaip-
m«nt 733-1612. 3015 Wot Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C. 	
15 — Found
THREE Portable Calculators have been
found after Economics classes in
Buchanan. Two during Term I and
one in Terra 2. Positive identification sequired. See K. G. Barker,
Buto 997.
20 — Housing
STUDENT Housing Office Vacancies.
There are single rooms available
for women in Gage, Place Vanier and
Totem Park residences. Also available for men: Double rooms in Place
Vanier and Totem Park. Please enquire at the Housing Office, Ponderosa Building. Office Hours: 8:30-
4:30, Monday through Friday. Phone:
228-2811.
30 — Jobs
INTERESTED in earning an extra income in your leisure time? A
business of your own at home?
Maybe $150,, $500., even $1,000 a
month? For interview, phone 530-
7867. No obligation. No information
over the telephone. Let's have coffee and talk.
SUMMER JOBS in B.C. — Clerical,
Labour, Skilled, Unskilled, Northern
and Local. Apply now! Send $3.00
for Summer Employment Guide.
LMES-UB, Box 7810 (Sta. A) Edmonton, Alta. T5J 3G6.
35 - Lost
LOST. Gold Chain with Chinese character at the end. Contact Melanie
Hall.    Telephone:   224-9015.
LOST White Camvas Bag with Olympus
Cameras. Call Vickie Jensen, 733-
8800. Thanks.
40 — Messages
CONGRATULATIONS   to a   fine   UBC
squad    in    ther    51-14 victory    over
Cap.   College   in   the Krst   Annual
Scum   Bowl.
70 — Services
WEDDING Photography Specialist.
Complete professional coverage at
very reasonable rates. Call for consultation ait your convenience.
732-9651  eves.
70 - Sorvicos (Continued)
80 — Tutoring
85 —Typing
TYPIST. Reports, essays, term papers,
etc. Also transcribes standard cassette tapes. Reasonable. June
682-1870  after 6:00 p.m.
TYPINO — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist Gordon,
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, etc. Fast and accurate aer-
viae. Bilingual, demy 324-9414.
YEAR-ROUND expert essay and thesis
typing from legible work. Phone 738-
6829, from 10:00 a.m.-9 p.n».
TYPING—Fast and accurate. IBM Selectric. Please call Susan after 6:00 p.m.
736-1544.
•AST     efficient
rates.  266-5053.
typing.     Reasonable
90 — Wanted
TO BUY: Used Psych 300 texts. 2nd
edition Abnormal Psychology and
Contemporary Readings in Psycho-
pathology. Contact Kathy McCrum,
UBC   Bookstore,   228-4/741.
99 — Miscellaneous
WANTED
to interview
STEPPARENTS
Your experience may help others
Phone Reg Dumont at 681-2690
or leave messages at 228-2255
SKI  WHISTLER
Rent   cabin   day/week   732-0174  eves.
=Jp=ir="="=ir=Jr=ir=ir=ir=ir=r!
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
at=ar=ap=Jr=iir=Err==ir==ir=ir=it=ir= Tuesday, February 20, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Student senators challenge voting rights
A motion to allow student representatives on the law faculty council
to vote on all matters except those
concerning marks and student
awards passed easily at the Feb. 14
senate meeting.
But despite the motion's success,
student senators challenged the
exclusion of full voting rights for
student representatives in the
faculty of law.
Student senator Arnold Hedstrom said that since students were
ultimately involved in questions of
marks and awards at the senate
level, there is no reason to exclude
them from deliberations at the
faculty level.
He also questioned the legality of
the exclusions, citing a clause in the
provincial Universities Act which
requires student representation in
the "meetings and proceedings of
the faculty."
Law dean Ken Lysyk said the
exclusions continued the faculty's
longstanding policy and added that
some students are opposed to the
Jl"*!
presence of other students when
marks are discussed.
Faculty members criticized the
law faculty's new policy of boosting
student voting representation to 33-
1/3 per cent.
Although the number of students
at law faculty meetings will not
change because of a decrease in the
number of voting faculty members,
science professor Cy Finnegan said
the new percentage might violate
previous senate policies which limit
maximum representation to 25 per
cent.
Professor Charles Bourne said
the senate could still amend the
proposal. But despite the differences of opinion, the motion
passed with amendments.
In other business, student
senators said the admission
procedures for the proposed
masters of archival studies program
were too subjective.
"These should be across the
board criteria," said student
senator Dave Coulson and added
Bird Droppings
Seven members of the College
Bowl finalist Thunderbird football
team were chosen in the Canadian
Football League college draft last
week.
Defensive halfback and punter
Al Chorney was the second player
over-all to be selected. He and
second-round choice Bernie Crump
will attend Saskatchewan's training
camp, while Chris Davies went to
Edmonton, also in the second
round.
Doug Biggerstaff was Winnipeg's
third-round pick, while Brent
Racette, a fourth-round choice, will
try to make Toronto fans forget
Anthony Davis, Terry Metcalfe
and Leo Cahill.
John MacKay and Barry Muis,
fifth- and sixth-round choices
respectively, get to toil for the
toughest fans in the country, but at
least they'll be close to home.
•     *     *
The Thunderette ice hockey team
finished in seventh place in the
Lower Mainland Girls' Ice Hockey
League -after losing twice to
Killarney last weekend in a home
and away series. Saturday at
Killarney UBC lost 3:0 and Sunday
they dropped a 2-1 decision at
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
Anne Stevens had the lone UBC
goal.
*     *     *
The UBC ski team maintains a
slim over-all lead over University of
Puget Sound in Northwest
Collegiate Ski Conference standings following last weekend's
University of Washington meet at
Hyak mountain.
The conference, which encompasses UBC and five Washington universities, has held five meets
this season. The top three finishers
in each of the slalom, giant slalom
and cross-country events at each
meet score points for their team.
Entering the Northwest-Southwest championships at Mt. Hood
this weekend, the UBC women's
team is in first place while the men's
team trails UPS.
Last weekend UBC's Bruce Hil-
land took the ski-meister title for
over-all points with a first in the
slalom and giant slalom events.
Kathy O'Sullivan won the women's
ski-meister title with a second in the
slalom and a third in the giant
slalom. UBC's Mia Davis finished
third in the cross-country.
GRAD MEETING
For 4th Year Psychology Students
If you would like some kind of graduation function this
year (a dinner, party, dance, whatever) please come to
this meeting.
Friday, February 23rd
12:30, Henry Angus 214
MAKE YOUR GRAD
'79 MEMORABLE!
MON.-THURS. - FEB. 26-28
"I AM A DANCER"
v
With Rudolph Nureyev and Margo Fonteyn
7:30 p.m.
//
RED SHOES"
9:15 p.m.
Box office opens 7:00
16th & ARBUTUS, VANCOUVER
738-6311
that the proposed criteria would be
impossible to administer fairly.
History professor Jean Elder said
she disagreed.
"You may think that's immoral
and perhaps it is, but I repeat my
statement, the world operates on
patronage."
Senate later approved the Master
of Archival Studies program
despite the recommendation of the
senate curriculum committee to
reject the program as not being a
master's level program.
The approval comes after four
years of haggling between factions
of the faculty and the administration.
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
HOW'S YOUR
SHAPE
Find    out   at   the   J.M.
Buchanan Fitness Lab (UBC
Aquatic    Centre)    Physical
Fitness testing —
for students $15.00
others $20.00
Information: 228-4521
UBC
Graduation
Portraits
since 1969
Anuuirayli   ^Utuius ICtiX
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
Phone now for your Free sitting
DO YOU NEED A TUTOR?
A few hours with a tutor from the Speakeasy Tutorial Centre could
put you back on the right track.
Anyone who feels qualified in any subject may also register as a
tutor.
REGISTER NOW
SPEAKEASY IN SUB,
Any Time We're Open
COSTS YOU $1.00
HILLEL HOUSE
FALLAFEL LUNCH
AND
ISRAEL FILM
TUES., FEB. 20     12:30
HOLLYWOOD
3123 W. Broadway 73fr32
FEB. 19-24
Woody Allen and
Diane Keaton in
"ANNIE HALL"
9:35
Burt Lancaster, Susan Clarke
"MIDNIGHT MAN"
7:30
Adults & Students $2.00
A WESTERN M
PROFESSOR DAVID A. PEACH, MBA Program Chairman of the University of Western
Ontario, will be on campus to provide information about Western's MBA Program on:
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22nd
From 12:00 noon-4:30 p.m.
At PONDEROSA ANNEX F
Interested students may feel free to stop by at their
convenience.
—.The unique taste of Southern Comfort, enjoyed for over 125 years. POg« 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 20, 1979
UBC in second place
Coach i n second heaven
Coaches usually aren't all smiles after a
loss, but UBC swim coach Jack Kelso was
very pleased after the Canada West swimming championships this weekend at the new
Aquatic Centre, where the University of Alberta edged UBC 319-317.
"It all came together very nicely," said
Kelso after his swimmers turned in personal
best times in 31 of 36 races they entered to
come within a hairsbreadth of defeating the
powerhouse Alberta team.
The UBC women defeated the Edmonton
women 173-162, led by Wendy Hogg and
Janice Blocka with three first-place finishes
each and Chris Lovett-Doust with two.
The men's team made a surprisingly strong
showing, although the Alberta men out-
scored them 157-144. Paul Hughes had two
firsts and Fraser Atkinson one, while Bruce
Nicholson, whom Kelso termed a "sleeper,"
surprised everyone by defeating Hughes to
win the 100-metre backstroke.
UBC would have actually won the meet
under the old scoring system, but this year
diving points did not count toward the title.
UBC swept the diving competition, out-
scoring second-place Calgary 42-22.
The meet was the debut for the new
$40,000 Colorado timing system that was
installed last week. The system, which is pro
grammed for swimming, diving and pace-
clock operation, and which can be programmed for water polo, gave no problems
during the weekend.
"It's the first system I've ever seen go in
and work the first week," said Kelso, who
added it was much cheaper than other, more
popular systems. The building was designed
to allow easy installation of the system, and
the only problem arose when a workman fell
through a temporary ceiling.
The meet left UBC with a potential team
of 22 swimmers and divers for the Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Union championships in Montreal on March 2-4.
To enter, swimmers must meet a minimum
qualifying time and also rank among the top
100 competitors in a complicated decathlon
scoring system.
Although the final rankings will not be
available until later this week, it appears
UBC will have one of the largest teams at the
championships.
After the championships Kelso will face
the impossible task of replacing Hogg and
Hughes, both former national team members
who are in education five. Hogg spent the
weekend lapping competitors, and even now
her 100-metre backstroke time is only one
second off the world record.
SPORTS
'Horns hop
hoop here
By KEVIN FINNEGAN
UBC basketball teams won three
of four games in Canada West
action last weekend in War
Memorial Gym. The Thunderbirds
defeated the University of Lethbridge twice, 84-67 Friday and 90-
74 Saturday, while the Thunderettes finally won a league game, defeating the Pronghorns 64-62
Friday night in double overtime before losing their last game of the
,year 53-47 Saturday.
CANADA WEST
UNIVERSITY ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION
Men's Basketball Standings
GP   W   L
Pts.
Victoria Vikings 18    16     2
32
Alberta'Bears    18    12     6
24
Calgary D'saurs 18   10     6
24
UBC'Birds        18     8   10
16
Leth. P'horns    18     7    11
14
Sask. Huskies     18     1    17
2
Women's Basketball Standings
GP   W   L
Pts.
Calgary Dinnies 18    15     3
30
Victoria Vikettes 18    12     6
24
Alberta Pandas   18    11      7
22
Sask. Huskiettes 18     9     9
18
Leth. P'horns    20     8    12
16
UBCTh'ettes     20     1   19
2
—thomas chan photo
'BIRD IN FLIGHT is Kim Cassar-Tofreggiani, competing in Canada West championships in Aquatic Centre last
weekend. Along with Sue Goad, Don Lieberman and Alan Hay she led UBC to lopsided win. Team should make
strong showing at national finals in Montreal in two weeks.
It's try, try again for rugby 'Birds
The final score was 28-6 in favor
of UBC, but it was the final play
that really proved the superiority of
the Thunderbird rugby team in a
game Sunday against James Bay.
UBC dominated the entire game
against the top island side in a
match that was billed as the "unofficial club championship of
B.C.," and summed it up with an
amazing display of team work and
open field running to take the ball
80 metres for a try on the last play.
Eight Thunderbird players
touched the ball between the time
Preston Wiley recovered a
dangerous James Bay kick near the
UBC goal and the time Rob Greig
finally touched down in the island
team's end zone.
Standoff Gary Hirayama had an
excellent game, scoring one try and
setting up several others. He used
his quickness to establish an
overlap on the left wing and then
pitched out to John Olesen who
scored the first try seven minutes
into the game.
Greig scored the first of his two
tries two minutes later when Dave
Whyte recovered a James Bay
fumble at midfield and then fed
Greig. Whyte converted, and a late
penalty goal by the island team
made the half-time score 10-3.
UBC stepped up the pace early in
the second half with Ross Breen
scoring a try at the five-minute
mark. After James Bay countered
with another penalty goal,
Hirayama went to work again, first
setting up Whyte on a 60-metre run
up the left sideline for a try, and
then duplicating the feat with a try
himself. Greig's second try rounded
out the scoring.
UBC's next game is against Trojans Saturday at 2:30 p.m. on the
south campus field. The following
week, UBC will meet the Vancouver Island representative team,
the Crimson Tide, in the second
round of the McKechnie Cup.
Each rugby union in the province
fields a representative or all-star
team to play a round robin series,
with the winner gaining the McKechnie Cup. There are four unions
in B.C., including Vancouver,
Fraser Valley, Vancouver Island
and UBC. Although UBC competes
in the Vancouver union, for
historical reasons they are considered a union in themselves.
The Thunderbirds, who have
now won five games in a row, used
strong outside shooting and a full
court press to thrash the Pronghorns twice and move ahead of
them in league standings.
The 'Birds were again led by
rookie centre Bob Forsyth, who
scored 14 points Friday and 22
Saturday, as well as keeping Lethbridge's colorful 6'7" Ernie Hill in
check. Hill had several shots
blocked by the shorter Forsyth, and
his only contribution to the Prong-
horn cause was to be called for
goaltending twice on Friday night,
and to keep the crowd amused with
his defensive antics.
The Thunderbirds played well as
a team and they should be a strong
contender next year. Team captain
Frank Janowicz, who led the team
with 15 points Friday night, is the
only player to have used his five
years of eligibility.
Although UBC cannot make the
playoffs, it could improve its league
standing this weekend when it
meets last-place Saskatchewan here
in its last series of the season.
Games are Friday and Saturday at 8
p.m.
The Thunderettes, meanwhile,
staved off the possibility of a
winless season with their victory
Friday night. The game was tied SO-
SO after regulation time and 54-54
after the first overtime period, but
UBC managed to pull ahead to win
64-62. Denise Simard had 20 points
and Margot McCullough 17 for
UBC.
Saturday night the Thunderettes
stayed close until the final minutes
before losing 53-47. Jane Waddell
scored 12 points and McCullough
had 11.
The Thunderettes finished the
Canada West schedule with a 1-19
win-loss record. In the past three
years they have won six games in
league competition.
Gay Coburn, who has coached
UBC for the past two years, said
after Saturday's game that she
would not return next year. She
cited inconsistency as the biggest
problem this year, and pointed out
the Thunderettes had seven different high scorers over the course
of the season.
In addition, starting forward
Berni Yurkowski broke her wrist
half way through the season.
The Thunderettes have a young
team and will lose only team
captain McCullough through
eligibility. McCullough, who has
led the team through a trying three
years, finished the season as high
scorer with 234 points in 20 games.
Dinos spark JBirds to two losses
The Thunderbird ice hockey
team survived two losses and a fire
in a road trip to Calgary this
weekend.
The Thunderbirds were annihilated 11-4 Friday night by the
University of Calgary, and if that
wasn't enough to disrupt their
sweet dreams the hotel fire that
drove them from their rooms and
into a nearby shopping mall at 3:30
a.m. certainly was.
By Saturday evening the 'Birds
had recovered enough to play even
with the Dinosaurs for almost two
complete periods before succumbing 7-4.
On Friday UBC trailed 5-1 after
the first period and 6-3 after two
before Calgary went wild in the
third. Jim McLaughlin, Jay Rumley, Terry Shykora and Paul
Carson had the UBC goals.
Saturday the 'Birds got first-
period goals from Derek Williams
and Bill Trenaman to lead 2-1 at the
break. After two quick Calgary
goals early in the second period,
McLaughlin tied the score 3-3.
However, Calgary scored 11
seconds before the period ended to
take the lead for good. Shykora's
third-period goal was sandwiched
by Calgary scores to round out the
scoring.
The   Thunderbirds   have   four
games remaining, all at home. This
weekend they play University of
Saskatchewan Friday and Saturday
at 7:30 p.m. at the Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre. The
following weekend UBC hosts
University of Alberta, the top-
ranked collegiate team in the
country.
CANADA WEST
UNIVERSITY ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION
Men's Hockey Standings
GPW L Pts.
Alberta'Bears    20   19 1 38
Calgary D'saurs 22    13 9 26
UBC'Birds        20     5 15 10
Sask. Huskies     22     5 17 10

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