UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 6, 2014

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126354.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126354.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126354-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126354-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126354-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126354-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126354-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126354-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126354-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126354.ris

Full Text

Array  // Page 2
WHAT'S ON i    THIS WEEK, MAY
THURSDAY   06
ENVIRONMENTAL
SCIENCE CAREER FAIR
5 P.M. @ EARTH SCIENCES BDLG
Get career advice from people who
got jobs after university. Guests
includetheAMECandCPAWS.
$5 non-members, free for members
FRIDAY ' 07
FIJI ISLANDER
10 P.M. @ #4-2880 WESBROOK MALL
Want to go to a frat party? This
party, hosted by Phi Gamma Delta, boasts impressive decorations
and a 50:50 male-female ratio.
Dress code is anything tropical.
At least go for the decorations.
Tickets at www.goodnights.me/
fijiislander
$15
SATURDAY ' 08
OUTDOOR AVENTURE
AND TRAVEL SHOW
7:30 P.M. @ 999 CANADA PLACE
Head downtown to the Vancouver
Convention Centre East
for over 250 booths featuring
camping gear, outdoor clothing,
free travel-photog seminars and
overall Pacific Northwest sporty
stuff. Tickets $10-15
ON
THE
COVER
Carter's arms are stained. Let'shope the professor doesn't notice
during his midterm tomorrow. Banner photo by Will McDonald. Main
image by Mackenzie Walker.
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
<*-
^|THE UBYSSEY
MARCH.6,2014 | VOLUMEXCV| ISSUEXLV
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
coordinating@ubyssey.cs
Managing Editor, Print
Ming Wong
orinteditor@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Web
CJ Pentland
webeditor@ubyssey.es
News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Veronika Bondarenko
vbondarenko@ubyssey.es
Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
eulture@ubyssey.es
Senior Culture Writer
Aurora Tejeida
atejeida@ubyssey.es
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heatherington@ubyssey.es
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
features@ubyssey.es
Video Producer
Lu Zhang
video@ubyssey.es
Copy Editor
Matt Meuse
eopy@ubyssey.es
Photo Editor
Carter Brundage
ehotos@ubyssey.es
Illustrator
Indiana Joel
joel@ubyssey.es
Webmaster
Tony Li
webmaster@ubyssey.es
Distribution Coordinator
Lily Cai
cai@ubyssey.es
STAFF
Catherine Guan, NickAdams
Kanta Dihal, Marlee Laval,
Angela Tien, Carly Sotas, Alex
Meisner, Luella Sun, Jenny
Tang.AdrienneHembree^
Mehryar Maalem, Jack Hauen
Kosta Prodanovic, Olivia Law,
JethroAu, Bailey Ramsay,
Jenica Montgomery.Austen
Erhardt, Alice Fleerackers
Nikos Wright, Milica Palinic
Jovana Vranic, Mackenzie
Walker, Kaveh Sarhangpour
Steven Richards, Gabriel
Germaix
BUSINESS
Business
Manager
Fernie Pereira
fpereira@
jbyssey.ca
604.822.668l
Ad Sales
MarkSha
advertising®
jbyssey.ca
604.822.1654
Ad Sales
Tiffany Tsao
webadvertisinc
@ubyssey.ca ~
604.822.1658
Accounts
Graham
McDonald
accounts®
jbyssey.ca
Editorial Office:
3UB24
SO 4.822.2301
Business Office:
3UB23
Student Union Buildinc
6138 SUB Boulevard ~
Vancouver. BCV6T1Z1
Web: ubyssey.ca
Twitter: ©ubyssey
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official studentnews-
aaper of the University of Rrmsh Cn-
umbia. Itispublished
andThursdaybyTheUbyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and all students are encouragec
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written bythe
Jbyssey staff. They are the expressec
opinion ofthe staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs anc
artwork contained herein cannot be re-
aroduced with out the expressed, written permission ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society.
_etters to the editor must be under
300 words. Please include your phone
number, student number and signature (not for publication) as well as
your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are dropped off at the editorial office ofThe Ubyssey; otherwise
verification will be done by phone.
The Ubyssey reserves the right to
editzubmi:: ir length and clar-
ty. All letters must be received by 12
noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point
will be published in the following issue unless there is an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display orclassified advertising that if the
Jbyssey Publications Society fails to
aublish an advertisement or if an er-
'or in the ad occurs the liability ofthe
JPS will not be greater than the price
aaid for the ad. The UPS sfial not be
•esponsible for sight charges or ty-
aographical errors that do not lessen the value or the impact of the ad.
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
Bill Wong's shop, Modernize Tailors, has been clothing Vancvouerites for more than 100
PHOTO ALVINTIANJTHE UBYSSEY
years.
Bill Wong is tailor-made
for Vancouver
Jack Hauen
StaffWriter
Bill Wong, former UBC engineer
and owner of Vancouver's longest-standing tailor shop, Modernize Tailors, is 92 years old and
shows no signs of slowing down.
His shop is a "living museum",
according to the man himself,
and is deeply entrenched in B.C.
history. Wong's father started
the business in 1913, making the
Chinatown shop itself just over
the century mark in age. The
only one left in the area, the shop
is a survivor of two world wars,
and still thriving today.
"We started in 1913. We were
in the same building for 50 years,
then we had to move across the
street for 45 years, and now
we're back because my brother
bought the building," said Wong,
gesturing to the old address out
the front window.
Like the now-famous shop, the
owner is a full-blooded Vancou-
verite, born and raised. "When I
was 14 years old, I went to Tech
[Vancouver Technical Secondary] because I loved working
with my hands. I got top marks
in the shop courses — woodwork,
metalwork."
Once he had completed his
four-year degree at Tech, it
was time for UBC. The timing
couldn't have been better for
Wong, who began his university
career in 1941, just after the Pearl
Harbour attacks. Since the army
needed able-bodied young men,
attending school was one way to
avoid the horrors of war.
"If you're not attending
university, they'd draft you. And
as soon as you graduate, they'd
catch you. By the time I had
graduated, the war was over.
It seems to me that my life was
really controlled by the economic
and political situation at that
time."
UBC was different in the early
'40s. "The first thing you did was
attend COTC [Canadian Officer
Training Corps]. Everything was
programmed to [go toward] the
war effort."
That included varsity athletics. "During the duration [of my
degree] there was no football,
no hockey, nothing. Instead of
sports, you'd have six hours of
military training per week."
Despite the hardships the war
created in Vancouver, Wong and
his family found a way to thrive.
Because the army was so desperate for supplies, able-bodied
students had no trouble finding a
sea of work in factories or on the
shipyards. And since the school
dress code in the '40s included
dress pants, young men with
money burning a hole in their
old, tattered pockets went to the
best place to get a shiny new pair
of slacks: Modernize Tailors.
"My father's business was expanding, and we had ten tailors
working on coats, which requires
skill. But pants don't take as
much skill, so my brother Jack
and I looked after them. I didn't
need any part-time work, I was
running my own tailor shop!"
Once his father decided to
hang up his scissors, Wong was
able to take over with relative
ease. Though he had graduated
with an engineering degree, he
felt he was "a lot more useful"
doing tailoring, as most ofthe
factories that had been supplying
the army were shutting down.
Now that he's in his 90s, it
seems Wong hasn't thought all
that much about retirement himself. When asked about the prospect of closing up shop, he looked
at the orders yet to be returned
to the customers. "Well, I'm too
busy right now," he said.
All in all, Wong is happy.
"I like fashion because you're
dealing with lifestyle, and it's
changing all the time — you
always have to be on your toes.
That's why I like tailoring. I'm
well-fitted to what I do." 31
Design,
layout,
PusheentheCat
email editor
MingWong
printed itor@
ubyssey.ca
Volunteer for The Ubyssey
What are you interested in?
Lights,
camera,
selfies
email editor
Carter Brundage
photo@ubyssey.ca
Governance,
Toope,
current events
email editors
WillMcDonaldanc
Sarah Bigam
news@ubyssey.ca
Arts,
entertainment,
sophistry
Qj
Varsity sports,
athletic reviews,
milkshakes
email editor
Natalie Scadder
sports ©ubyssey.ca
Investigative pieces
longform journalism
pizza
email editor
Arno Rosenfeld
features©
ubyssey.ca
;S // News
FROSH CHANTS »
)RS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
The new counsellor will do some of their work with the Sexual Assault Support Centre.
=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
UBC hires counsellor after frosh chants
Veronika Bondarenko
Senior News Writer
In response to the Sauder rape
cheer and a series of sexual assaults
on campus last term, UBC has
hired a new full-time counsellor.
Jennifer Hollinshead, who has a
master's in counselling psychology
and over 14 years of experience
working with depression, anxiety
and post-traumatic stress disorder, was selected for the position
by a panel of representatives that
included members of UBC Counselling Services and the Sexual Assault Support Centre. She will start
at her new position on March 17.
"I think that this will really be
an important role," said Cheryl
Washburn, director of UBC Counselling. "It provides an additional
level of expertise and capacity to
focus on sexual assault both in
terms of response to an individual
student, but also in terms of ensuring that we have a very strong and
coordinated response more broadly
across campus."
UBC President Stephen Toope,
VP Students Louise Cowin and
Sauder School of Business Dean
Robert Helsley first presented the
position at a Sept. 18 press conference. The Commerce Undergraduate Society agreed to make
a $50,000 contribution to the
development of this position. But
while Helsley expressed his commitment to provide an additional
$200,000, Sauder students voted
down this proposal.
UBC has since agreed to provide
the additional funding necessary
to maintain this role. According to
UBC spokesperson Randy Schmidt,
the annual budget for the new role
is $100,000, which includes both
salary and benefits.
"The Commerce Undergraduate
Society has committed $50,000
toward the first year ofthe position
and the university will fund the
remainder ofthe first year," said
Schmidt. "The university will
establish a funding strategy going
forward and is committed to the
continuation of this important new
role."
The position, which Schmidt
said is permanent, is based out
of UBC Counselling services.
Washburn said the new counsellor's duties involve reaching out to
students who have been impacted
by sexual assault and educating the
wider UBC community.
Hollinshead will be working
alongside groups such as SASC,
Campus Security and the RCMP
victim to develop a coordinated
campus response to sexual assault
services, according to Schmidt.
Anisa Mottahed, manager of
SASC, said the new position will
help ensure that all survivors
of sexual assault have access to
the assistance, counselling and
resources they need.
"The plan is for us and that
particular individual to work as
collaboratively as possible and
to really ensure that outreach
is happening effectively, so that
students aren't falling through
the cracks," said Mottahed.
Mottahed said the new role
comes at a much-needed time for
the UBC community.
"[It's] really important to have
someone who is solely dedicated to working with survivors of
sexual assault," said Mottahed.
"We haven't had anything like
that before on campus, so it is
a really timely and appropriate
response." XI
NEWS BRIEFS
Sony plans horror movie based
on UBC student's death
The mysterious death of a UBC
student who disappeared in Los Angeles last winter may soon be made
into a horror movie.
Sony Pictures purchased the story
rights for The Bringing, a horror spec
script written by brothers Brandon
and Phillip Murphy, their agent Rich
Cook confirmed. The movie is based
on the death of Elisa Lam, a UBC student who was found dead in a water
tank on the roof ofthe Cecil Hotel in
Los Angeles. A coroner determined
that her death was accidental and
due in part to her bipolar disorder.
The film follows the story of a man
investigating Lam's death. Tolmach
Productions will produce the film with
Daniela Cretu from First Born films,
who developed the script.
Lam, 21, went missing in Los
Angeles in February 2013. While she
had taken summer courses, Lam was
not enrolled at UBC at the time.
UBC grad develops world's
thinnest condom
UBC engineering graduate Victor
Chan now holds the Guinness world
record for creating the world's thinnest latex condom.
The Aoni condom is only 0.036
millimetres thick. Chan said Health
Canada has approved the product,
which is currently only available
in Asia. Chan is now working on
other projects including a vibrating
condom and a "silver nano particles-coated sanitizing condom." xi
TECHNOLOGY»
Forestry acquires
high-tech woodcutting robot
Paul Jon
Contributor
UBC is now home to one ofthe most
advanced wood-cutting robots in
the world.
Called the Hundegger RO-
BOT-Drive, the machine was
purchased by the Centre for Advanced Wood Processing (CAWP),
part of UBC's Faculty of Forestry.
The centre hopes this new piece
of technology will help position
B.C. as a world leader in advanced
wood construction.
The Hundegger features a robotic
arm capable of six axes of motion
using a variety of tools from precision drills to buzzsaws. It is entirely
computer-operated and described as
one ofthe most sophisticated heavy
timber processing machines in the
world, and the first of its kind in
North America.
Wood has become increasingly
common in the construction of
non-residential buildings, including
UBC's Earth Sciences Building, the
largest panelized wood building
in North America. This is partially
due to the environmental sustainability of wood and the provincial
government's 2009 Wood First Act,
dictating that all future provincially
funded buildings must use wood as
the primary building material — an
initiative approximately 80 municipal governments have also followed.
The centre hopes its new technol-
The Hundegger joins timber panels for the
ogy will help B.C.'s advanced wood
construction industry compete in
a business currently dominated
by Europeans.
"In Canada, we are playing a
catchup game in the world of wood
construction," said Iain Macdonald,
managing director of CAWP.
"We really believe it's about
sustainability," said Macdonald. "It's
the only renewable construction
material."
The Hundegger's primary
function is the joining of engineered
timber for large wooden structures.
With the emergence of various new
wood building materials, the focus
has fallen on the joining of these
materials in order to create durable
structures capable of withstanding
fires, earthquakes, moisture and
other hazards.
"You can build these big
cross-laminated timber panels, but
if you don't join them together ef-
=HOTO STEVEN RICHARDS3THE UBYSSEY
construction of wooden buildings.
fectively, the system is going to fail,"
said Macdonald.
Macdonald emphasized that the
department's intention is not to
manufacture commercial products using the Hundegger, as this
could take business away from
the industry. "We don't want to
compete with industry," he said.
"We're here as a resource for the
industry."
Exceptions could be made for
charitable projects with minimal
funding such as current construction efforts for a Ronald McDonald
House where other companies
would perform the service at
a loss.
The Hundegger ROBOT-Drive
cost $640,000 and was paid for
through contributions from the
German manufacturer, the Canada
Foundation for Innovation and
a private donor who wishes to
remain anonymous. 31
ACTIVISM »
UBC prof hopes
to address
generation
squeeze
=HOTO COURTESY PAUL KERSHAW
UBC professor Paul Kershaw presents on
his campaign.
Anna Hablak
Contributor
A UBC professor has started a
project to address what he sees as
a lack of government support for
Canadians under the age of 45.
Paul Kershaw, a professor
at UBC's School of Population
and Public Health, founded the
Generation Squeeze campaign.
According to Kershaw, compared
to a generation ago, young people
are being squeezed by lower
incomes, higher costs of living,
less income and a deteriorating
environment. Kershaw said despite this rise in costs, there have
been no policies implemented by
either the provincial or federal
governments to help account for
this drastic increase.
"[Government] expenditure on
younger people is out of balance,"
said Kershaw.
Kershaw said his research has
found that seniors were economically fragile in the 1970s,
with 30 per cent of seniors living
below the poverty line, and
today, due to groups such as the
Canadian Association of Retired
Persons that figure is down to
five per cent. Kershaw thinks
that if young people can organize, they will be able to successfully lobby to government for
funding reforms.
"I, very purposefully, am
talking about Canadians under
45, full stop. One ofthe keys to
change is that we build our club.
We need large numbers, and the
data are showing ... the change
in housing cost, the change is
tuition is a similar experience
for those under 45 generally,"
said Kershaw.
Emphasizing that young
people generally have poor
electoral turnouts, even after
multiple mass movements to try
and spur young people to vote,
Kershaw wants to curtail this
problem by focusing outside of
former politics. Instead, he wants
to garner political traction by
locating close-race ridings in
provincial and federal races, and
informing all election candidates
ofthe numerous Generation
Squeeze members in that riding.
"We do think in the medium
term, that we can truly make
Canada more affordable for more
generations," said Kershaw.
Although, his research spans
over a decade, Kershaw launched
the Generation Squeeze website
in February 2013, with an ally
drive scheduled for late fall 2014.
The movement has attracted
funding from sources including,
the Vancouver Foundation and
YMCA along with some private
philanthropists. Kershaw plans
to build the organization at UBC
before branching out to more
campuses. XI 4    |    NEWS    |   THURSDAY, MARCH 6,2014
CHEATING »
UBC punished 37 students for cheating last year, but many cases of academic misconduct are handled at the faculty or department level.
=ILE PHOTO CHELSEASILVA3THE UBYSSEY
Academic integrity: how UBC stacks up
UBC punished 37 students for cheating last year; SFU punished 436
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
Compared to other universities
across Canada, the proportion of
students disciplined for academic
misconduct at UBC is quite small,
a CBC survey has found.
For the past 13 years, the number of UBC Vancouver students
punished by the president's
advisory committee for plagiarism, impersonation and cheating on exams and assignments
has hovered around 50. Last
year, this number was 37, which
is just 0.07514 per cent ofthe
student body.
According to the CBC survey,
this is one ofthe lowest rates of
discipline in the country. The
study, which looked at the 2011-
2012 school year, found Carleton
University to have the highest
rate, with 607 cases — 3.12 per
cent of their student body.
"Across the country, institutions are not very good at
reporting their academic integrity
because unfortunately they see
it as, if we produce our academic
integrity data then that's going
to result in a media story, that's
going to reflect poorly on our institution, and it's going to inhibit
our ability to recruit students
and we're going to be labeled as
a school of cheaters," said Ryan
Flannagan, director of student
affairs at Carleton.
"Quite frankly I think that
[means] you're doing a disservice
to the post-secondary education
system because we as a country
and as a province are served
very well by making sure that
we produce people that earn
their degrees in an honest way. If
we're producing a whole bunch
of engineers and scientists and
etc. and they're not actually doing
the work to earn their degree and
they go out and start building
bridges, that is not a very good
thing."
Last year, Simon Fraser University punished 436 students for
various academic offences.
However, when looking at the
severity ofthe punishments, UBC's
and SFU's numbers are more on par.
In the 2012-2013 year, for example,
UBC students were given grades of
zero in 28 courses, while students
at SFU were given failing grades for
academic misconduct in 11 courses.
There's also more discipline happening at UBC than is immediately
obvious. Minor cases are handled at
the department or faculty level and
only the most serious are seen by the
president's advisory committee. All
cases are filed with the committee
to be destroyed upon the student's
graduation, but only those cases
decided by the president's advisory
committee are reported publicly.
Chuck Slonecker, chair ofthe
committee, said about 30 cases
have been decided at the faculty or
department level so far this year.
Slonecker said the average number
of students disciplined annually at
UBC is 100, with about 40 determined at a lower level.
Still, 100 people is quite a small
proportion ofthe study body.
Slonecker said he thinks the only
reason for the small number is that
UBC students are better educated
on academic integrity than students
at other universities.
"The very first lecture in every
course deals with academic integrity ... and they're also usually
informed about the level of penalties
that can be incurred," said Slonecker. "I think that UBC is in front of
it more than behind it. I think they
encourage people to be honest."
He said he does not think that
UBC is failingto catch students
for plagiarizing papers or cheating
on exams.
"Most ofthe examinations that
I see in the health sciences in large
rooms and stuff like that, there's
four or five proctors walking around
watching people and doing things, I
think it's very difficult to [cheat]."
Other universities have an
academic misconduct policy that
is more centralized either in the
discipline or reporting process.
Tim Rahilly, associate
vice-president students at SFU,
said about five years ago SFU
standardized the procedures for
dealing with academic misconduct and centralized reporting
of it. Since then, the recorded
number of students disciplined
has increased drastically, from 119
people in 2007 to 498 in the 2011-
2012 school year.
"It wasn't that we weren't
following up on these issues
previously.... I think a lot of faculty
members at SFU were handling,
giving feedback, and maybe imposing their own consequences at
the course level but not reporting
up," said Rahilly. "And so one of
our concerns was that there was
maybe an inconsistency across
departments in terms of penalties,
and that's also another reason that
we wanted to centralize."
At Carleton, all cases of misconduct must be reported to the faculty dean and go through the same
central process. This policy was
put in place in 2007. "We wanted
to put in place a regime that was
more equitable to the students ...
that really gave the university a
sense that people were being dealt
with in a fair and consistent way,"
said Flannagan.
Slonecker acknowledged that
settling disputes individually at
the faculty level could mean there
are inconsistencies in the penalties
applied, but UBC won't be moving
towards a centralized policy any
time soon.
"I don't think that's really
necessary. I think the faculty and
staff and profs really have been
through this enough that they
[can] deal with the student," he
said. "Most students are traumatized a lot by having to come
before the president's committee.
"I think [the policy] is fair." XI
CHEATING ACROSS THE NATION
2011-2012
Lowest rate
Highest rate
Highest number of cases
2012-2013
University of Alberta
(0.04%)
Carleton University
(3.12%)
University of Toronto
(1,200 cases)
UBC
19
Cases of...
Plagiarism
SFU
247
16
Cheating on exams/
assignments
158
2
Impersonation (UBC)
Fraud/misrepresentation (SFU)
31
37
Incident reports
436
PUNISHMENT BREAKDOWN
UBC
■ 0 in a course: 21 cases
■ Suspension: 20
■ Letter of reprimand: 8
■ 0 on an exam or assignment: 3
*specificallyfailing because of academic
misconduct
UBC does hand out warnings and other
forms of punishment but they a re done at
the faculty or department level.
SFU
■ warnings: 61cases
■ penalty less than F for work: 56
■ failing grade forwork: 297
■ grade less harsh than FD*: 16
■ FD forthe course: 11
• redo/do supplementary work: 15
■ formal reprimand: 20
■ suspensions: 5 // Sports + Rec
SPORTS JOURNALISM »
EDITOR  NATALIE SCADDEN
The Olympics of sports writing
Ubyssey alum Bruce Arthur on his experience in Sochi
Bruce Arthur
Guest Contributor
The first time you cover the Olympics, it feels like someone dropped
you in the ocean and told you to
swim for it, have a great time, good
luck. There's just so much. Every
Olympics feels this way, as it turns
out, no matter how many you've
done. There is always so much.
Someone told me early in my
career that the Olympics are also the
Olympics of sports writing, and it's
true. Sochi was my fourth Games;
Beijing was the first. My job in Sochi
was simple: cover Canada, but not
just Canada. The Olympics is the
one time you really get to cover the
world, and when I go I want to cover
the whole of it; the sports, the politics, the experience, everything.
So you work. In Sochi I worked
about 16 hours a day, if I had to
guess; that's about average. I was so
tired. We were all so tired. By the
end, journalists are a hobo tribe. The
Olympics are a barrel of exhaustion
for the soul.
But it's worth it. On one Wednesday in Sochi I got up at 6:15 on
three hours' sleep, was on a bus
to the mountains by 7:30, covered
slopestyle for seven hours, wrote
it, ate a meal cobbled together out
of apples and water and a cake-like
yellowish thing with raisins in it,
covered the half-pipe where Shaun
White lost, ran out ofthe mixed
zone and under the bleachers as
White's last run ended to get a
Canadian cross-country coach on
the phone after he'd given a ski to a
Russian competitor, scrambled back,
slipping on the snow, covered the
half-pipe until White finally spoke
around midnight, wrote one ofthe
columns on the bus ride back down
the mountain, wrote the other one
in the Main Press Centre (MPC),
missed the 3 a.m. bus, had a beer
with a colleague in the media bar,
caught the 4 a.m. bus, decided to
have two more beers with the same
colleague in the media village bar
because at the Olympics you start to
get punchy after a while, and went
to bed 24 hours after I started.
Great day.
And then there was another.
And another. Every Olympics is a
tidal wave of sensory information,
of challenges, a lifetime. You need
to figure out the bus schedule, the
competition schedule, the venue
locations, the places to eat (I carry
chocolate bars in my bag, because
they're like food steroids), the places
to nap (I napped on my keyboard
during a mixed doubles match at
Wimbledon in 2012 while waiting
for a later match) and some local
customs. English is the lingua franca ofthe world, but learning some
words of Russian helped — "hello,"
"thank you," "Russia and Canada
are friends." Talking to volunteers
taught me so much about Russia.
You always try to talk to people, because when you're covering everything, anything can come in handy.
You have to figure out your
hotel. My Sochi hotel wasn't a huge
problem — I lost hot water for 24
hours — but I'd talked to so many
people with issues early on that I
could write a hotel problems column
on day two, as the jet lag subsided.
Everything canbe material.
And once you have those fundamentals down, you try to choose the
right story, and then the right story
again, and again, and again. And you
will be wrong, often. When Denny
Morrison won his unexpected silver
medal in men's long-track speed
skating after teammate Gilmore
Junio stepped aside, I sprinted most
ofthe kilometre from the MPC to
the speed skating, and I stood in
the mixed zone wheezing, sweat
running down my back. Then I
chased down Junio's brother and
sister at Canada House. They said
they cheered for Denny like he
was family.
Sometimes you will stumble on
stories. In Sochi I walked into a
press conference for the Dufour-La-
pointe family the day after two of
the sisters won medals and felt my
eyes well up as their parents poured
out their love and pride and regrets.
It was beautiful. There's a lot of
crying at the Olympics.
And that's why the Olympics are
the best, too. It's the widest possible
canvas, the richest possible material,
and it matters so much to so many
people. People might cry because
they win or because they lose or
because their child just competed
on the world's biggest stage. But it
matters, so much. You might even
cry. It's OK. Because the more you
experience the Olympics, the more
you work and grind and care, the
better you swim in the ocean, and
the more it feels like home. XI
Bruce Arthur is a sports columnist
for the National Post, and was very
proud to be The Ubyssey's sports
editor (1997-98) and coordinating
editor (1998-99), back when the
world was young.
=HOTOCOURTESYOF BRUCE ARTHUR
The author with a well-deserved beer at the end of the Games.
BASEBALL»
UBC baseball throws change-up in future plans
C J Pentland
Managing Editor, Web
Put bluntly, it's a pretty exciting
time for baseball at UBC. Having
freshly secured varsity status for the
time being, the Thunderbirds have
visions of a new stadium, training
facility and university league on the
horizon, but that doesn't mean the
present lacks excitement of its own.
Coming off of two years in which
they compiled a strong regular
season record before falling in
the NAIA West playoffs, leaving
them short ofthe NAIA World
Series, UBC returns the majority of
their pitching staff and top hitters
to round out a balanced roster.
They've shown that balance over
their first 11 games, going 7-4 with
their latest win coming against
Lewis-Clark State, the NAIA's No.
2-rankedteam.
In those four losses, UBC was
outscored by a total of just six runs,
with three losses coming by a single
run. While that number could
suggest that the 'Birds aren't able to
close out tight contests, head coach
Terry McKaig believes otherwise,
especially since his team has three
wins in games decided by fewer
than two runs.
"I think we are quite balanced,"
said McKaig. "We aren't a heavy
offensive team that's going to put up
10 runs per game, so I have a feeling
we're going to play a lot of close
games this year. But we seem fit to
handle that with our pitching and
defence."
The stats back up McKaig's claim
of tough pitching and defence. In
seven games, the T-Birds have given
up three or fewer runs, and they've
given up more than six once. In their
past four games, they've give up just
four runs.
Leading the way on the mound is
Connor Lillis-White, who's thrown
11.2 innings without giving up a run,
allowing just 11 hits and striking out
15 in the process. Rounding out the
trio of aces is Sean Callegari, the
lefty back for his senior year after
PHOTO APJUN HAIR3THE UBYSSEY
UBC's Jeremy Newton was recently named NAIA West pitcher of the week.
posting a 2.56 ERA in 59.2 innings
pitched last season, and Jeremy
Newton, who threw seven shutout
innings against Lewis-Clark State
last weekend.
In the bullpen, Bryan Pawlina anchors a strong relief corps. Pawlina,
who went 9-1 last year with a 2.47
ERA as a rookie and was named
NAIA West pitcher ofthe year, already has one save on the year, while
Alex Webb has recorded a pair.
Pawlina was also named to the
All-NAIA West Team as a relief
pitcher last season, and was joined
by Callegari, shortstop Tyson
Popoff, second baseman Andrew
Firth and outfielder Jerod Bartnik,
all of whom are returning save
Firth. Popoff recorded one ofthe
most impressive seasons in T-Bird
history last year, postingthe highest
single-season batting average with
a .401 mark that went along with a
.533 slugging percentage. His .975
fielding percentage also saw him
named a Gold Glove winner.
Popoff will again hit near the top
ofthe order alongwith Bartnik, who
has his team's only two homers so
far this year. Infielder Kevin Biro
has got out to a hot start with a .381
average out ofthe cleanup spot,
while Tyler Enns is hitting at a .429
clip with a .529 on-base percentage.
Offensive production as a whole has
been coming from throughout the
entire order, with seven regulars
hitting over .300.
McKaig doesn't expect his team
to put up gaudy offensive numbers, largely due to the new metal
bats and the cold weather, and has
come to accept it as part ofthe new
college game.
"We've been playing a lot of small
ball," he said. "You have to be able to
hit and run and be able to bunt and
move guys around and then hope
you get the big base hits, because
you're not going to hit three home
runs anymore like you used to. It's
just a different brand of offence."
The T-Birds have made the NAIA
World Series just once in their team
history, as untimely slumps have
had a habit of finding them in the
NAIA West tournament where the
spots for nationals are decided. The
conference knows that UBC has balanced pitching, hitting and defence
in the regular season — now they
need to show it in the playoffs when
it really matters. XI
The full version of this article can be
read online at ubyssey.ca/sports.
Repairs done right. Fast. Simple.
With express check-in, online status updates and a first
class service centre, the choice couldn't be simpler.
Simply
COMPUTING   • •^
Premium
Service Provider
Macs, iPads, iPods • Repairs, Upgrades, Data Recovery
1690 West Broadway, Vancouver • 604.714.1450 • simply.ca
20% off labour for UBC Students
Simply bring in this coupon and a valid
student ID to receive the discount. Ill
COUP
Terms and Conditions: Offer expires March 31, 2014. Minimum 0.5hr charge.
Discount applies to labour only, not including parts. T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
KATRINA
DAVIS
LIAM
MURPHY-BURKE
KRISTA
WHITTAKER
MARLEE
MARACLE
/      r&
YOU LIKE SPORTS? US TOO. FOLLOW US ON TWITTER
@UBYSSEYSPORTS
SamuiNori
with Kim Duk Soo
CHAN SHUN CONCERT HALL, CHAN CENTRE
Tickets $36 - $72
$10 Student Rush
Tickets available!
chancentre.com/students
SAT MAR 15 201478pm
CHAN CENTRE CONNECTS
FREE EVENTS AT UBC CELEBRATING KOREAN CULTURE
Presented in association with the Chan Centre presentation of SamuiNori with Kim Duk Soo
Fri Mar 7 3:30-4:30pm    Korean Traditional Music in Film
A talk by Dr. Hee-sun Kim in partnership with the UBC School of Music
and the Centre for Korean Research. Royal Bank Cinema, Chan Centre.
Fri Mar 7  5:00-7:00pm   King and the Clown (2005) Film Screening
South Korea's 2006 Academy Award submission, this historical drama portrays
a Joseon dynasty king and a court clown. Royal Bank Cinema, Chan Centre.
Fri Mar 14 1:30-2:30pm   Korean Drumming Demonstration and Beginners' Workshop
With members of SamuiNori. Telus Studio Theatre, Chan Centre.
chancentre.com II Culture
RHYS EDWARDS
The
fighting
woman
How Doris Gregory
tackled gender
segregation — and the
Nazis — with hard work
and a sense of humour
In the fall of 1944,
there were so many
casualties. The troops
would come over, you
would see a fellow, have
a few dates with him,
and then he'd be gone.
Bailey Ramsay
StaffWriter
PHOTO COURTESY DORIS GREGORY
After her time at UBC, Gregory joined the Canadian Army Women
Corps in the fight against the Third Reich.
At the age of 92, Doris Gregory has just finished writing the manuscript of her life.
.    During her studies at UBC in the 1940s, she
was a catalyst for a feminist movement against gendered
classroom segregation. She worked as an associate editor
for The Ubyssey and dropped out of school to join the
Canadian Women's Army Core towards the end of World
War II.
"This had been percolating in my mind for many years,"
said Gregory, concerning her motivation to finally write
and publish her story. "At first I was just going to write
for my friends and family. Then, I discovered that so few
people had known that we Canadian Army Corps girls had
ever existed."
Gregory was eager to join the staff of The Ubyssey at the
age of 18 when she had the idea of journalism as a career.
She started out as a reporter and, through her hard work,
she soon became an associate editor with fellow editor
Pierre Burton.
"There were very few options for women in those days.
You could be a nurse, do office work, or maybe be a teacher
— and I didn't want to do any of those things. I wanted to
be a journalist and always wanted to write. The only way
to be a journalist in those days was to get on the staff at The
Ubyssey because there was no journalist program."
Looking forward to studying English at UBC, Gregory
was extremely disappointed when she became aware that
classes were unfairly segregated. She used the power of
the press to spur a feminist movement that was heard all
over UBC, and eventually reached campuses all across
Canada. "I wasn't exactly rebelling against the whole
thing, I was rebelling against one specific thing that happened."
Junior professors, assistant professors and lecturers —
all of who were mostly female — taught all the women's
English classes. Meanwhile, senior professors only taught
the men's classes. Not only were the classes segregated and
teaching quality unfairly divided, the senior professors of
the English department also created exams and denied
junior professors access to the exam material.
In the face of a course conflict, 10 female students had
the option to either miss two out of their three lectures
a week or take a men's class. Two professors who were
teaching in the fall term allowed the girls to participate in
their men's class. But in the spring term, professor Freddy
Wood refused the women permission to study in his class.
"One of those girls complained to me in my capacity as a
reporter for The Ubyssey."
Gregory, along with the 10 girls who were denied permission to participate in the men's class, recruited an addi-
I never
thought math
was a very
sexy subject —
except maybe
for the bell
curve.
=HOTO COURTESY DORISGREGORY
tional 10 women to their group. Despite being instructed
against it, the 20 women crashed the men's lecture.
After Wood walked in and began lecturing, he noticed
the 21 women sitting at the back ofthe classroom. Stopping
mid-sentence in his lecture, Wood said, "I am not accustomed to lecturing to young women in this class. Would all
ofthe women kindly vacate the room at once."
After writing her article about the incident, Gregory
was horrified to read the last sentence of what had been
published by her editor in the paper: "Unless something is
done to appease these enraged young women, Mr. Wood
may not find it safe to cross the campus without a body
guard."
Burton encouraged Gregory to return to Wood and
gather a response statement regarding his reaction to the
article. Laughing, Gregory said, "I had the paper and pen
in my hand — I was a scared kid, you know!".
After ushering her into his office, he explained to her
how he believed "there [were] very good reasons for having segregated classes in English." When she inquired as
to what those reasons were, Wood said "there are certain
things in English literature which cannot be discussed in
mixed classes."
"Very shortly after of course, Canadian University Press
had picked up the story and some reference to it appeared
in campuses all across the country," Gregory said. "I didn't
accomplish anything, except that those 10 girls did get
their lecture slot.
"I later found out that the same deplorable situation
existed in the mathematics department. I wonder what
Dean Gage and his professors' excuse was because I never
thought math was a very sexy subject — except maybe for
the bell curve."
In response to being asked why she dropped out of university to join the Canadian Women's Army Corps, Gregory responded with a joke. "The campus was rapidly being
depleted of interesting young men," she said, laughing. "I
didn't put that in my book, but people may read between
the lines."
Gregory considered herself fortunate to be assigned
to serve overseas, and was stationed in London from late
December of 1942 until D-Day, June 6,1944. The remainder of her time in Europe was spent in Farmborough, until
September of 1945.
"I don't think I ever said I was being really truly patriotic—I don't think I was."
Sharing a small bedroom with her mother at 19 years
old, Gregory was unhappy at home and sought some space
of her own. "The army presented a really neat way of getting out of the whole thing because it was the thing to do,
and it wouldn't offend my family.
"I wanted to travel and it satisfied my thirst for adventure. The other thing was that, being such an awkward,
fish- out- of-water kind of character, I had never really felt a
sense of belonging. I thought, 'In the army, I will be wearing the same uniform; I will be involved in the same routine as everybody and have the same adventures. Maybe
this will give me truly a sense of belonging.' This was an
underlying feeling I had, but of course [what] I told people
was that I wanted the adventure and the excitement."
Gregory says the story of the Canadian Women's Army
Corps needs to be told. "I mean, maybe what we did wasn't
terrifically significant, but it freed up guys to fight and that
was the idea," she said.
In London, Gregory was assigned to file stacks of cards
upon a seven-digit regiment number. "Everything I did
would now be done by a computer. It was the most soul-destroying job that I ever had.
"In the fall of 1944, there were so many casualties. The
troops would come over, you would see a fellow, have a few
dates with him, and then he'd be gone. You'd know that
it was not just the fact you didn't get the chance to really
know anyone, but also the significance of what that meant.
The casualties were really mounting, and 18- and 19-year-
olds were being sent from Canada with very little training
to be thrown into battle. That is when the war really came
home to me, not from the air raids."
Being present for various air raids and other dangerous
situations along the way, Gregory admits she didn't feel
scared. "I really can't account for it. It was really more of a
matter that those things were happening, it was a matter
of discourse, and there was nothing you could really do
about it. You just move on."
During her time in Europe, Gregory made many friends
and explored much of England on bicycle. The detailed
accounts of such adventures are written in depth in her
upcoming autobiography, How I Won the War for the Allies:
One Sassy Canadian Soldier's Story.
"1 wasn't anxious to get back [home after the war]," she
said. "After D-Day, I was already mourning the loss of my
army identity. This is who I was: I was always fashionably
dressed, I never had to worry about what to put on, everything was taken care of, and I didn't need to worry about
finding a place to rent. It was a very comfortable feeling
and a wonderful camaraderie."
Being pressed for further details on her return trip to
Canada, Gregory simply teased: "In the ending — wait, no.
I am not going to tell you the ending."
True to Gregory's cheekiness, it appears as though the
only way to get the full story is to read the book, tl
How I Won the War for the Allies: One Sassy Canadian
Soldier's Story will be published for June 6,2014 — the 70th
anniversary of D-Day.
=HOTO MACKENZIE WALKERJTHE UBYSSEY 8    I    CULTURE    I    THURSDAY, MARCH 6,2014
LIFESTYLE »
Queering the Kitchen
Monthly Women and Queer
night at AMS Bike Kitchen
breaks down gender barriers
Aurora Tejeida
Senior Culture Writer
Chelsea Enslow is one of only two
female mechanics currently working at UBC's Bike Kitchen. Besides
helping people fix their bikes, En-
slow also helps run workshops like
"Women and Queer Night," which
happens the first Wednesday of
every month.
"The purpose of Women and
Queer Night is to both introduce
people to the bike shop and to provide a safe space for someone who
might not feel comfortable working
in a regular bike shop environment," Enslow said.
People come and go during the
workshop, which runs from 6 to 9
p.m. But most ofthe attendees stay
to chat about bikes; there's also
music and free pizza.
According to organizers, last
month about 12 people came
through at one given time. During
the last installment on a cold
February night, there were about
eight people in the Bike Kitchen at
the SUB, a large underground area
covered in bikes and tools.
Enslow is a former UBC student
who used to be a board member at
the Bike Co-op. Now, she works as
a mechanic two days a week. She
explained that Women and Queer
Night had been around since before
she became involved with the Coop, but it continues to exist for the
same reasons it was created.
"Any trade-type place is geared
towards men and we're trying to
change that and have it be an open
space for women and queer people,"
said Enslow.
April Stainsby has been involved
with the Co-op forthe last three
years and is the current coordinator of the event, but this is just her
second month in the role.
"[The Bike Kitchen] always
seems to be male dominated," said
Stainsby. "Some people have told
me that they appreciate this event
because they feel uncomfortable
or intimidated in the shop during
regular hours."
The numbers speak for themselves. At the moment Enslow is
one of two female mechanics working at the Bike Kitchen out of a total
of six, the other four are men.
"Women come in during regular
shop hours, but I find that when
somebody has come in for Women
and Queer Night it's more likely
they'll stop by at another time to
work on their bike," added Enslow.
"It's like they come and they see
that girls work here and girls hang
out here, and that it's a friendly
space."
But sometimes it feels like
Women and Queer Night is mostly
geared towards women, queer
or not.
Chris Lee is a PhD student in
3TEPHANIEXUJTHE UBYSSEY
Chelsea Enslow helps run the monthly workshop, which provides a welcoming environment to cyclists who might otherwise feel intimidated by the Bike Kitchen.
the Department of Botany. He
chose this night to come to the Bike
Kitchen because he feels more comfortable, even though he's usually
the only man in sight.
"The people here in general are
very nice, it's just nicer tonight
because sometimes some ofthe
members are very macho about
things and there's no need for that,"
said Lee.
He's been coming to the event
for the last two months, but he's
usually the only guy. Sometimes
this makes him feel like he's
invading a women-only space. "I
would've thought that more gay
guys would be into cycling, but
maybe not," he said, laughing.
Lee still enjoys coming to this
event, and thinks there should be
more like it.
"When the Bike Kitchen started
doing this I thought it was wonderful," Lee said. "I see a lot more
involvement with a more diverse
group of people, and with other
groups that would be fantastic. I
just think other groups aren't as
sensitive as the Bike Kitchen has
been."
But organizers stressed that the
point of events like this one isn't
to create an even bigger divide between genders and orientations.
"The point of Women and Queer
Night is not to encourage women to
come to this night instead of other
shop times, it's to get women in the
space in general. If they're scared
to come during regular hours, it's to
show them that the bike shop is not
a scary place to be," said Enslow.
It's also meant to be an opportunity to learn about bike mechanics — something workers, volunteers and coordinators are happy
to teach.
Katie Miles doesn't know much
about bikes. She's a first-year Arts
student whose brakes gave out
the day before Women and Queer
Night.
"This night was perfect, because
I've come here in other nights and
there's always all these burly men,
and I try to ask for help but I felt
intimidated and I felt silly. I felt like
this was perfect and everyone is so
nice and I don't feel dumb at all,"
said Miles.
Miles changed her tires, fixed
her brakes and oiled her chain — all
things she had never done before.
"I think it's valuable for anybody
to come in. Maybe I'll even think
about volunteering, I need to learn
much more," said Miles, 'ffl
ART»
Elephants take the SUB by storm
=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGEJTHE UBYSSEY
Christina Toms'video installation features
relaxing footage of our everyone's favourite
pachyderms.
Kaidie Williams
Contributor
Christina Toms invites audiences
to acknowledge the elephant in the
room — literally.
Toms, a candidate for an MFA
in film production and creative
writing at UBC, discovered that
art isn't merely whatever has the
most monetary value, but rather
what Mother Nature preserves.
Her exhibit, "The Elephant in the
Room," will be on display in the
SUB art gallery until March 7,
2014.
After pursing her Bachelor's
degree, Christina Toms embarked
on a journey through the jungles of Africa and, together with
non-profit organization Save the
Elephants (STE), recognized that
the existence ofthe forest elephant
was an art form in virtue of its
endangered status. The elephants
in the room, although once largely
ignored, are now the centre of
attention for Toms — and soon, she
hopes, the world.
Gallery-goers are taken to
another continent as they enter
the exhibit. Upon entrance, the
sounds of flowing water, animal
calls and other forces of nature create a calm and peaceful
atmosphere. The white walls of
the SUB enhance this serenity by
evoking a solemn mood. The walls
are covered in long, green vines
to create a jungle ambiance for
viewers as they walk through the
gallery; plants on the floor embody
the foliage which springs from the
ground in the habitats of elephants
and other animals alike.
The size ofthe gallery makes it
impossible to miss the eponymous
elephants. Footage of elephants is
projected on all four walls, emphasizing that the elephants should be
noticed and valued. Every screen
tells their stories, through the
movements of their trunks and
the ways in which they socialize.
Toms allows audiences to view the
elephants in their natural habitat
and observe their everyday lives.
The exhibit is further equipped
with two beanbags for audiences
to sit, relax and enjoy the wonders
ofthe elephants in the room in a
state of comfort.
Toms' work shows that art is
beyond painting, ornament and
sculpture. Mother Nature presents
the world with the purest form
of art: nature itself, pure and untouched. 'tJ
Study in curopa 3uxiff8
1 course, 3 credits 3 weeks for $2100
2 courses, 6 credits 6 weeks for $4100
3 courses, 9 credits 9 weeks for $5900
* 12 courses to choose from
Your home base: Unna, Germany
Accommodation, breakfasts and cultural activities included
Thompson Rivers
University
KAMLOOPS, BC • CANADA
i
University
of Applied
Management
(UNNA, GERMANY)
Hurry — for details and to apply to go  tru.ca/studygermany THURSDAY, MARCH 6,2014    |    CULTURE    |    9
MUSIC »
CiTR unites local talent for fundraiser
Jenica Montgomery
StaffWriter
After nine days of non-stop fund-
raising, campus radio station CiTR
promises a wild ride at their annual
Fundrive Finale show this Friday —
and a warm hug along with it.
Until March 7, CiTR is conducting their annual fundraiser to
help raise money to support CiTR's
operating costs and, particularly,
this November's move to the New
SUB. The finale show will consist of
six bands, which have been formed
randomly for one night only, as
well as a silent auction including
items donated by Fluevog Shoes,
the Vancouver Folk Music Festival,
Sled Island, NXNE, Mint Records
and more.
Sarah Cordingley, music department manager at CiTR, approached
around 150 local bands before
solidifying musicians from over 15
different Vancouver-based bands to
participate in the Fundrive Finale
show, aptly themed as a "Rock and
Roll Lottery."
"They're a pretty wild range of
people, from folk singer-songwriters
to goth rock bands, and pop bands,
punks bands, and sort of everything
in between," Cordingley said. "They
were all shuffled together to make
who knows what. We won't find out
until Friday."
Twenty-four musicians have
been randomly placed in bands and
have had this past week to prepare
a set to play at Friday's show. The
amalgamation of musicians includes
talent from H00VES, E.S.L, WAR
BABY, the Ballantynes and more.
"It's just important to support the
people who have been so awesome
to us, really," said Kirby Fisher,
drummer for WAR BABY. "CiTR
has just been so rad to us, to WAR
BABY. It's kind of like, anything to
help them, because they've helped
us so much and been so supportive
to us."
CiTR's efforts to promote and
support local bands have not gone
unnoticed. Their hard work has created a solid community of listeners,
alumni and artists who are willing
to contribute back to the station.
"I think CiTR is really rad for
promoting local music and keeping
the community alive," said Joy Mullen — also known as Joy on Drums,
drummer from E.S.L. "Props to
them for doing such a good job all
the time, keeping the local music
scene alive."
=HOTO STEVEN RICHARDSJTHE UBYSSEY
CiTR's Sarah Cordingley approached 150
bands for the musical smorgasbord.
While the silent auction and one-
night-only bands will reel audiences
in, it's the community that makes
them stay.
"I think that our Fundrive Finale
shows have always been really
warm and welcoming and had a
more of a community vibe than
most rock shows you might go to. So
it's a really diverse bunch of people,"
Cordingley said. "It's a once-in-a-
lifetime thing." XI
The show takes place at 8 p.m on Friday, March 7, at theBiltmore Cabaret.
Tickets can be bought in advance
from Red Cat Records, Zulu Records,
at citr.ca and at the door.
DANCE»
Traditional performance comes alive at MOA
PHOTO KOSTAPRODNANOVICJTHE UBYSSEY
Aurora Tejeida
Senior Culture Writer
"This song is about the Vancouver fire of 1886," said Cease Wyss,
after singing her first song during
a pre-festival performance at the
Museum of Anthropology.
This was the same song three
Squamish women were learning
on the night ofthe fire. According
to Wyss, they went back and forth
across the Georgia Strait until the
sun came up, trying to save as many
lives as possible.
It doesn't matter that the song
was a Catholic hymn, the result
of European contact and subsequent evangelism. The song is in
Squamish, a language that still lives,
and the night was important enough
to be remembered. This living memory, in part, is what the Coastal First
Nations Dance Festival is about.
The festival is described as a
celebration of stories, songs and
dance, but it is also a colourful and
powerful experience that brings
together cultural traditions from up
and down the American coast: the
Yukon, Alaska and, for the first time
this year, Ecuador and Peru.
"I think dancing is an integral
part of culture," said Nigel Grenier, a
third-year UBC student and a member ofthe Dancers of Damelahamid,
the dance troupe that organizes the
event. "Part of it is that it's a form
of self-expression, but in addition
to that, it's something that brings
people together, as families and as
communities. And in terms ofthe
dance festival, it's an opportunity
for cultural sharing."
The festival has been happening
for seven years now, and Grenier has
participated every year.
"For me, growing up with it has
been really good to have a foundation in my culture," he said. "I really
enjoy being part of that community."
Grenier performs traditional
Gitxsan dance. For most ofthe
dances, he wears traditional button
blankets and carved masks, as well
as other regalia. Like fellow dancers,
he has been training since he was
very young.
"Most people start dancing
before they can even walk," he said.
"Parents will carry them around,
so from a very young age you're
involved with dancing."
This is also the case with Giselle
Vargas, one ofthe two South American dancers joining the festival this
year. She started dancing when she
was five, and has continued for 15
years. Originally from Ecuador, Vargas is excited about the festival and
being in Canada for the first time.
"Even though our cultures are
so different, there are so many
similarities," she said. "Dancing is
a sincere and pure way of showing
your feelings towards things that
matter. What moves you to dance is
the force that comes from the earth
and those things you can't buy."
Like Vargas, Grenier believes
dancing is a spiritual experience, for
both the dancer and the audience.
"It gives other people a chance to
have a connection with something
deeper, something more profound,"
he said.
It is also an opportunity to
experience culture like never before
at the world-renowned Museum
of Anthrop ology.
"I think a lot of people in Canada
don't know much about the diversity
of culture in B.C. and other places
in the world, and it's an opportunity
for them to get a glimpse of that
richness," said Grenier. "Hopefully
it'll open a few eyes." XI
The Coastal First Nations Dance
Festival runs from March 4 to 9. Performances are free with admission,
which is free to UBC students.
Show your school spirit and you could win a new camera!
Hey UBC! The Artona Group wants you to win a Nikon camera!
'Like' our Facebook page (facebook.com/ubyssey) in orderto I
Snap a picture on campus that shows your school spirit
"'--'-        "- - '-'-jn on campus during the cont""' ' """'""
men ie la oui iuui opirit, so bring out your blue anu yum.
Send your photo to webeditor@ubyssey.ca with "Artona Photo
Contest" in the subject line.
The photos will be put in an album on our Facebook page. The top
ten photos with the most likes will go to the judges.
The sooner you enter your photo, the sooner it will be upon our
Facebook page, meaning more time for it to get likes.'
Photo submission deadline is Friday, March 8. The winner will I
announced on Sunday, March 9.
..cSBY
FOOD»
Student Cooking: Three
pancake recipes for a hot plate
JESSICA
CHRISTIN-
HAMETNER
Food
Every so often, I like to make
crepes. They are a classic bite
to eat and one of life's sweetest
pleasures.
For students, cooking needs to
be efficient, fast and affordable.
Fortunately, pancakes happen to
fulfil all of these criteria. While
many undergraduates have a
fully equipped kitchen and oven,
there are some of us who are less
fortunate, finding ourselves with
merely a hotplate. At first, this
may seem tragic; after all, how
could one possibly sustain themselves without an oven? This last
year, however, I have embraced
my one-plated companion, and
discovered dishes that made the
leap from "bland and boring" to
"appetizing and tasty."
Pancake day was on March 4,
so I've compiled three recipes
that will whisk you off around the
world and satisfy even the pickiest
of students.
Buckwheat pancakes
These super nutritious pancakes
by Honestly Healthy are ideal
for those on dairy- or gluten-free
diets. Buckwheat is not a cereal
grain, as it is often believed to be,
but a fruit seed. As suggested by
the George Mateljan Foundation,
buckwheat is good to start your
day with, because it benefits your
cardiovascular system, regulates
blood sugar and protects the heart.
Ingredients (serves six)
70 g buckwheat flour
70 g rice flour
1 tsp baking powder
Vi tsp Himalayan pink salt
300 ml brown rice milk
1 tbsp lemon juice
1 tbsp sunflower oil, plus extra
for greasing
1 tbsp rice syrup
For the compote:
200 g blackberries, rinsed
and drained
2 tsp water
1 tbsp honey
Instructions
1. Place the buckwheat flour, rice
flour, baking powder and salt in a
large bowl and mix well.
2. Place the milk, lemon juice,
sunflower oil and rice syrup in another bowl and mix well, then stir
into the dry ingredients and mix
gently until just combined, being
careful not to over-mix.
3. Wipe a frying pan lightly with
oil and heat over a medium heat.
4. Place a pastry ring in the pan
and ladle in one tablespoon ofthe
pancake mixture. Cook until air
bubbles start to appear on the surface ofthe pancake. Do not turn
until this point.
5. Remove the mould, turn the
pancake and cook for about one
minute on the other side, until set.
6. Serve in a stack, layered with
the compote, a sprinkling of
blueberries and soya yogurt, or
with fresh fruit and agave syrup
to accompany.
7. To make the compote, place
the ingredients in a pan over a
low heat. Simmer for 10 minutes,
stirring occasionally until the
berries are soft. Blend the compote
PHOTO VANESSAMINKE-MARTIN3THE UBYSSEY
until smooth and drizzle over your
pancakes.
Hungarian palacsinta cake
1 recall a balmy summer's afternoon
when a dear friend of mine surprised me with this delightful take
on the classic pancake: a towering
wedged pancake cake. The Hungarian palacsinta torta is a traditional
dessert that simply stacks one pancake on top ofthe other, commonly
filled with sugar, jam or fruit. It is
fluffy, light and a wonderful alternative to crepes.
Ingredients (serves five to eight)
4 eggs
50 g caster sugar
50 g butter
350 ml milk
120 g flour
Cooking oil
Sugar and vanilla sugar to sprinkle.
Instructions
1. Mix egg yolks with butter and
sugar, add flour and milk for a pancake mixture.
2. Whisk up the egg white until
stiff.
3. Fold the whipped up egg white
gently into the pancake mixture,
being careful not to over blend it.
4. Heat a little oil in a frying pan,
add a ladle of mixture and fry it
only one side. When it's golden
underneath, slide it onto a plate
(with the egg white uncooked top
side) and sprinkle with sugar and
vanilla mixture.
5. Repeat process until the pancakes
stack up as a cake. The very last
pancake should be served with the
cooked side up.
6. Sprinkle with sugar mixture and
slice it like a cake.
Potato pancakes
These are not everyone's conventional idea of what a pancake
should be, but these "kartoffel-
puffer" are rather common in my
native southern Germany and I
continue to devour them as much
today as I did back when I was a
child. This is my grandma's authentic recipe.
Ingredients (serves four)
6 russet potatoes
2 eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon salt
Vegetable oil for frying
Apple sauce to serve
Instructions
1. Finely grate potatoes into
a large bowl. Drain off any
excess liquid.
2. Mix in eggs and salt.
3. Heat oil in pan over medium
high heat.
4. Drop two or three 1/4-cup
mounds ofthe potato mixture into
hot oil, and flatten to make 1/2-
inch thick pancakes.
5. Fry, turning once, until
golden brown.
6. Plate and serve with apple
sauce. XI II Opinions
Fair Elections Act would
suppress student vote
=ILE PHOTO HORIAANDREIVARLAN/FLICKR
Student's sufferage could sufffer under the Conservative government's new elections act.
UBC's new robotic wood processor could come in useful for more than just making 2x4s.
-LUSTRATION JETHROAU3THE UBYSSEY
LAST WORDS//
IS THIS THE END FOR
HUMANS AT UBC? JUST
ASKING
Under the ersatz auspices of "developing innovative construction
techniques," the UBC Faculty of
Forestry has recently acquired a
death machine.
Don't let their gentle words,
bewhiskered visages and warm,
unpretentious clothing fool you;
with the procurement of the
Hundegger, Forestry students are
ushering in a new dawn of sentient
robotic massacre.
The Hundegger (it even sounds
like it's designed to reap death) has
a multifunctional arm which can
hold a variety of tools, including
"gigantic buzz saws," to quickly
cut massive stockpiles of wood.
Undoubtedly, these functions
could be quickly adapted (indeed,
if they already aren't) to the efficient evisceration of undesirables.
And that's just the start. The
whole thing is operated by a computer — who's to say that an enterprising individual, perhaps from
the computer science department
or the engineering faculty, couldn't
program the Hundegger to hold
something better suited to long-
range warfare? (As if plus-sized
industrial lumbering tools aren't
terrifying already). Not to mention
that the Forestry faculty themselves could very easily develop
advanced laser weaponry under
the pretense that such a device, a
la Goldfinger, has superior cutting
capacity — perfect for excoriating
the bark ofthe great Western Red
Cedar and British intelligence
operatives variously. And who
knows what the Hundegger will
be capable of once it achieves sentience, as it undoubtedly will.
Perhaps most injurious is that
the entire purchase has been
partly funded by an "anonymous donor." Who is this donor?
Why should they wish to remain
anonymous, for funding something so purportedly innocuous
as a lumber cutting tool? The
answer, of course, is obvious: he,
she, or indeed it, is the agent of a
nefarious organization dedicated
to the equanimous destruction of
humanity via the most horrific
means possible.
We at The Ubyssey virulently
condemn this purchase, if only for
our love of peace, kindness and the
common good.
Maybe we're just better than
everyone else
UBC has far fewer reported
cheating cases than other Canadian universities. In fact, the
37 reported cases are well below
Carleton, which leads the list at
607, and even SFU, which had 436,
according to a recent CBC survey.
This probably means UBC is
missing some cheaters, but there's
also the possibility we're just morally superior to the rest of Canada.
Then again, there is the question
of whether cheating is really such a
bad thing to do, but we digress.
An interesting aspect that may
reflect UBC's publicly reported
numbers is that administrators
said the system at our university is less centralized when it
comes to reporting and dealing
with cheaters. To the extent this
allows a more flexible, case-by-
case discipline system in cases
of academic misconduct, it is
undoubtedly positive.
We should be careful to ensure,
however, that the lack of a truly
centralized system does not unfairly impact certain students who
get stuck with more strict teaching
assistants or professors.
Also, with Forestry having a
new robot capable of cutting off
arms, cheaters should make sure
UBC President Stephen Toope's
replacement — who will be announced this spring — isn't a fan of
creative punishments.
PLEASE SIR, CAN YOU
SPARE A DIME FOR CITR?
Look at the things you spend a
couple bucks each month on. Your
cable bill. Netflix. A coffee and
muffin. Perhaps an album or movie. If you can afford those facets
of your life, surely you can afford
to support CiTR, UBC's famous
radio station run by campus and
community volunteers.
The whole "university is a time
to explore" line is said quite often,
but CiTR offers an experience that
can't be fulfilled at many other
places. You can run your own
live show, have access to a record
collection bigger than you've probably ever seen, or find your band
put on the road to success. And it's
not just music on the airwaves, but
news and sports, too (and Nard-
wuar).
Few others have done more for
the Vancouver music scene than
CiTR over the past 75 years, so
even if it's just a loonie you find
under a couch cushion, throw it
their way to ensure a smooth transition into the New SUB.
UBC'S SCRAMBLED
PR EFFORT FINALLY
IMPLEMENTED
Remember the whole media shit
show at the beginning ofthe year
after The Ubyssey broke the story
about the Sauder rape cheer?
Well, in their quest to get the
monkey of shame off their back,
UBC announced a bunch of weird
measures to respond. One of
them was hiring a sexual assault
counsellor to work at (or for?)
Sauder to improve the climate.
What that actually meant was
never very clear. Nor was the
need. Because some Commerce
students are insensitive about
rape, we are going to hire a counsellor for students?
Things got even more confusing after Commerce Undergraduate Society students voted
against allocating money to pay
for the position. That was an
OK decision, because UBC and
Sauder were basically coercing
students into paying for something they didn't understand
the need for. Following that
vote, UBC stepped in to pay for
the counsellor themselves, and
after a six-month hiring process, they've finally found an
eligible candidate.
Despite its inauspicious
origins, you can never have too
many sexual assault counsellors
at a major university, and the
fact the position has finally been
filled means they have a chance
to do some great work. XI
VARSITY NEWSPAPER
Editorial
TORONTO (NUW) - The federal
Conservative government recently
announced the Fair Elections
Act, a controversial proposal to
amend the Canada Elections Act.
Unfortunately, the act takes steps
to suppress voter turnout by implementing new rules for verifying
who is an eligible voter at the polls.
This new piece of legislation poses
significant issues for minority voters, low-income families and, unfortunately, students. At present,
eligible voters can vouch for
another person's eligibility, such
as a roommate or neighbour, at
polling stations, allowing them to
vote. The Conservatives's proposal
places unnecessarily stringent
limits on reasonable and useful
forms of identification, which will
inevitably prevent young people
from voting.
One form of identification
targeted for elimination is vouching. While the act will leave 39
identification options, these are
often onerous or impossible for
students or marginalized voters.
Other identification options —
including providing phone bills,
bank statements or ID — work for
voters who have a well-established
life in the riding. Students, who
who often live in a given riding
for only one federal election, and
marginalized citizens, who might
not have a mailing address or ID,
rely on vouching to facilitate their
democratic right.
While it has been presented
as a measure to crack down on
voter fraud in Canada, the Fair
Elections Act really represents a
direct attempt on the part ofthe
federal Conservatives to suppress
voter turnout among groups that
habitually oppose them. By ending
the practice of voter vouching, the
government risks effectively disenfranchising entire demographics, from new citizens to students.
Another troubling detail is the
lack of any convincing evidence
that individual voter fraud is a major problem in Canada — one that
calls for a legislative solution. The
Conservatives have cited Elections
Canada research, saying that it
shows vouching is problematic.
However, many experts have convincingly argued that the Conservatives are distorting this research
for their political purposes. That
the Conservatives have chosen to
target vouching, without proving
that it is really a problem, speaks
volumes on their motives. These
are political, not public-spirited.
In addition to eliminating
vouching, the act includes new
limitations on the implementation
of online voting. Under the current
election laws, the testing and implementation of electronic voting
by Elections Canada, as well as
other forms of alternative voting,
is permitted, as long as it is approved by Canada's chief electoral
officer and a parliamentary oversight committee. Under the Conservatives' proposal, online voting
in any form would have to be
passed by the House of Commons
and the Senate. It's worth remembering that the latter body is itself
unelected and currently has an
iron-clad Conservative majority.
Many believe that implementing
online voting at a national level
would drastically improve voter
turnout by increasing ease and
accessibility. In particular, online
voting would almost certainly
increase youth voter turnout. With
the bill in place, the Conservative government would have to
approve any move to implement,
or even test, online voting. This
power is better left in the hands of
Elections Canada, an arms-length
and impartial organization.
Experts such as Jon Pammett,
a political science professor at
Carleton University, argue that the
chief electoral officer should decide when online voting should be
implemented, and that the senate
shouldn't have a say in the matter.
With the act, he argues, the decision would be rendered "more
difficult, if not impossible."
The measures proposed in this
act will make it more difficult
for demographics who generally
oppose the Conservatives — including students — to vote. Youth
voter turnout is already dropping.
Steps should be taken to encourage
student voters, not bar them from
the polls.
Any genuine attempt to ensure
fairness in this country's elections
is a step in the right direction,
but the act is not such an attempt.
By placing unnecessary barriers
between voters and the democratic process, the Conservative
government is making a calculated
move to frustrate a demographic
that has traditionally supported its
opponents. II Scene
CHART»
TERM ONE VS TERM TWO
SEPT OCT
NOV
(EVER! THING
IS AWE SOME)
2
<
10
D
X
THISYEARWILL
BETHEBEST
SCHOOLYEAR
EVER!
WINTER BREAK
WASMUCH TOO
SHORT
(PLEASE LIFE,
STOP)
JAN
DON'T KNOW
ANYONE IN CLASS?
WHATEVER
DEC
BLOCK PARTY!
SUMMER! LIFE
BEGINS AGAIN!
SO... CLOSE..
FEB
DARK. GLOOMY. EVERYTHING
DUE. EXAMS SOON.
MAR
APR
TIME
CATCULTY
MEDICINE
LLUSTRATION LUELLASUNJTHE UBYSSEY
C1| Meeting Times
^Lll    Come to our meetings to learn journalism and get involved
with UBC's student newspaper
NEWS
Mondays @ 2 p.m
SPORTS + REC
Mondays @ 1 p.m.
OPINIONS
CULTURE
Fridays @ 2:30 p.m.
FEATURES
Wednesdays @ 2
p.m.
GENERAL STAFF
Mondays @ 12:30 p.m.     Wednesdays @ 12 p.m.
Thursdays @ 1 p.m.
PRODUCTION
Wednesdays and Sundays
from 3 p.m. onward
Don't see anything you
like? Photo? Design?
Email coordinating®
ubyssey.ca for
more opportunities.
BCIT presents.
EARN A DIPLOMA IN ONE YEAR
If you have a university degree in any field, you may be able to earn a BCIT diploma
in one year. Check out our diploma and post-diploma business programs and fast-
track your career.
Finance, Accounting and Insurance
> Accounting
> Taxation
> Finance
> Financial Planning
> General Insurance
and Risk Management
Broadcast
> Broadcast Radio
> Broadcast and Online Journalism
Management
> International Business
Management
> Business Information
Technology Management
> Business Operations Management
> Business Management
> Business Administration,
Post-Diploma
> Human Resource Management,
Post-Diploma
Marketing Management
> Professional Real Estate
> Entrepreneurship
> Marketing Communications
> Professional Sales
> Tourism Management
For more information, please visit bcit.ca/business
-    SCHOOL OF
^   BUSINESS
Real Experience. Real Results. 12    I    GAMES    I    THURSDAY, MARCH 6,2014
CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1
2
3
4
1
5
G
7
•
1
'
10
11
12
13
14
"
"
17
,.
13
20
21
■
■
■
2'
■ 24
"
p
27
33
34
35
28
29
30
"
■
36
■ 37
3,
40
"
^_
-
■    II
45
•■
48|
43
50
51
■
i
53
58
53
54
SS
■
G3
G4
G5
57
■
GO
"
GG
67
GS
1
-
70
1
"
"
73
"
"
MUZZLE COURTESY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION.
9
5
2
4
8
3
5
4
9
5
1
3
4
1
9
8
7
1
4
4
3
8
2
8
6
7
5
4
=UZZLE COURTESY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION.
6%* BEER WITH A SMOOTH FINISH
, IT & BL PLATINUM PRESENT
SPRING SEMESTER
PARTIES:
FEB. 28™  BL PLATINUM DJ SERIES
FEATURING JOHNNY OMEGA
MAR. 7™ BL PLATINUM DJ SERIES
MAR. 17™ ST. PARTY'S DAY
MAR. 28™ BL PLATINUM DJ SERIES
APR. 4™ CORONA BEACH PARTY
BL PLATINUM $425*
Scan for your chance to
WIN1 AN IPAD& HOCKEY TICK
kkCDVi^,
H£..E
s
(pit pub
PL
"~
fj
'■
^"—	
R
l_   1
A
1
N
i
'' w
B
.
1- Raced
5-Wineglass part
9-French school
14-Timber wolf
Ike's ex
Watering hole
Drug-yielding plant
Person skilled in accounting
Dwarfed tree
Trauma ctrs.
23- Jekyll's alter ego
24-Workers' rights org.
26-Able was ...
28-Shipwrecked person
32-Shifty person
15-
16-
17-
18-
20
22-
36-Vitamin bottle abbr.
37-Artist's support
39-Stage play
40-Grad
42-Some locks
44- River which flows through Stratford in England
45- French composer Erik
47-Grassy plain
49-Zeta follower
50-Midday nap
52-Tiny ember
54-Tasks
56-Bridge
57-Son of Rebekah
60-Person, slangily
62-Slushy
66-Nonsense
69-Expose
70-Nonsense
71-Choir member
72- Inkspot
73-More devious
74-Chair
75-Meditator
DOWN
1-Thickslice
2- Game played on horseback
3-Black, to Blake
4-"That help"
5-Staircase
6- Involuntary muscular contraction
7-Suffix with exist
8-New Zealand native
9-Ages
10-Throne ofa bishop
11-Anthem opener
12- Swedish soprano Jenny
13-Ferrara family
19-Pre-owned
21-Winglike part
25-Kind of metabolism
27-Slender bar
28-Gross
29-Opponent of Ike
30-Pan-fry
31-Shouts
33- Chairman's hammer
34-Overact
35-Charged
38-Springs
41-Judge unjustly
43-Photograph
46-DDE's command
48-Like some history
51-E.g., e.g.
53- Like the knees ofa newborn
colt
55-Fountain treats
57-Subsides
58-Travel on water
59-Comrade in arms
61- Roy's "singin' pardner"
63- Alto
64- Type of rock, briefly
65-Abominable Snowman
67-Ballad ending
68- RR stop
MAR. 3 ANSWERS
A
R
E
S
JT
1
'3
T
0
A
A
M
"l
S
N
0
L
|
E
A
S
P
S
M
E
T
0
N
A
A
c
P
H
A
T
H
A
L
A
R
A
R
M
c
H
A
K H~C
A
T
T
L
E
H'a
R
A
B I'M
A
D
I
S
0
N
g
U
"\
T
A
K Hi'
A
K
E |
A
C
T
1 Hi TA
R
C
E
L
G
Ji
L
T
s
L
A
V
% HJs
A
L Hi
E
R
I
E
H
A
T
E
M
0
N
G
E 1 R H N
0
R
M
H'a
R
E
A He
A
T
N
A
P
A
X
'",
L
L
A
K Hi
A
R
L |
D
E
S
A
L
1   H'v
I
S
C
E
R
A
L
0
N
I
N
=a.
L
E
0
1
•A
M
A
N
A
p
I
N
E
0
C
R
E
•A
A
N
N
Y
T
A
C
S
N
E
A
R
A
N
T
E
S
Do you feel strongly
r games page?
m
Contact our managing editor, print with
complaints or suggestions
Ming Wong | printeditor@ubyssey.ca
BUILDING SCIENCE GRADUATE PROGRAM
INNOVATION + SUSTAINABILITY
The BCIT Building Science Graduate program offers a unique, interdisciplinary
approach that combines practical, rigorous coursework and independent research
in building science.
Engage in advanced research topics including:
> Building envelope > Whole building performance
> Energy performance > Building materials
Apply now.
bcit.ca/buildingscience
It's your career.
Get it right.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126354/manifest

Comment

Related Items