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The Ubyssey Mar 5, 2012

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| Ashley Whillans J^ | News»
Editors: Kalyeena Makortoff & Micki Cowan
03.05.2012 | 3
LABOUR»
Security employee launches discrimination complaint against AMS
Andrew Bates
Senior Web Writer
An AMS Security member has
lodged a labour complaint against
the AMS, citing unfair discipline
and discrimination.
AMS Security supervisor Irfan
Reayat has filed a complaint with
the Labour Relations Board (LRB)
saying he has been unfairly targeted
bythe AMS after helping unionize
the security employees last fall.
Dave McPherson, senior organizer for COPE 378, said the AMS
tried to intimidate Reayat by issuing
three letters of reprimand and attempting to eliminate his supervisor
position.
Reayat was rebuked for refusing
to accept a verbal warning about
using a laptop at work, missing a
rescheduled work shift, and alleging
that the AMS was discriminating
against Reayat through the first two
reprimands.
COPE 378 has raised issue with
Reayat's use of a laptop, as the
AMS allows student employees to
use computers on shift. Reayat is
currently a law student at UBC.
Reayat's missed shift was rescheduled after he had already committed to work for UBC Security
that day. McPherson said employees
are allowed to have additional jobs
and that Reayat gave adequate notice that he couldn't cover the AMS
shift. Reayat was subsequently suspended by the AMS for five days.
The AMS declined comment on
the suspension. "Before the Labour
Relations Board actually makes a
ruling on the matter, we currently at
this point don't feel it's appropriate
to make a comment on the specific
case," said AMS President Matt
Parson.
"Itwas really a discipline, in our
view, in order to intimidate," said
McPherson.
The AMS has also hired a nonunion assistant manager, and accordingto COPE 378, "it's being
done to be punitive. That's our allegation, and we intend to prove it."
Accordingto McPherson, the incident has damaged the relationship
with the AMS. "It puts it in very
serious jeopardy," he said. "It makes
us believe that this is an employer
that wants to destroy the union and
the bargaining unit."
This is the second labour relations complaint from COPE 378. The
union first filed for mediation after
bargaining stalled in early February.
The union is now planning further action, and COPE 378 will be
meeting at 6:30pm on Monday to
discuss a potential strike vote. "I've
negotiated 170 or 180 contracts, and
I've only had 8 strikes," McPherson
said. "[But] to be honest, my opinion
is this looks like one." 13
ANIMAL RE SEARCH »
Four UBC research monkeys killed
Andrew Bates
Senior Web Writer
Four research monkeys have died in
a Parkinson's disease research experiment at UBC, and an animal activist group is questioning whether
the deaths were accidental.
The four macaques were euthanized after complications in
the experiment which induced
Parkinson's symptoms by injecting a chemical called MPTP. The
study was intended to analyze how
the brain is affected as the disease
progresses and help develop treatments. The experiment involved 18
macaques in total.
The complications were described
by UBC neurology professor Doris
Doudet as an "unexpected adverse
event" in the November issue ofthe
Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and
Metabolism. But STOP UBC Animal
Research (STOP) activists claim the
deaths were planned all along.
"It wasn't an unforeseen adverse
reaction," said STOP spokesperson
Anne Birthistle.
"They put...a very potent neurotoxin into the monkey's brain to
damage the monkey's brain. It was
intended all along to disable them
severely."
"This work was done with an approved protocol...over several years
slowly collecting data towards this
study," said Helen Burt, UBC associate vice-president research.
"What normally happens is they
start with a very small dose and it
takes numerous doses over a long
period of time for the animals to
start showing the mild symptoms of
Parkinson's disease."
In the case ofthe four macaques,
they deteriorated so quickly that
they needed to be euthanized immediately after scanning. Burt
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DAVID ELOP^HE UBYSSEY
A fence that leads to the Animal Care facility at the university
compared the "idiosyncratic reaction" in the monkeys to allergic or
unforeseen reactions in humans.
"It's not always known why some
people have an adverse reaction to a
particular drug," she said.
"These kind of things happen in
humans, and this is exactly what
happened in these animals."
But STOP said a 2010 progress
report on Doudet's study indicated
four monkeys were to be "sacrificed
to neuropathology"—two at the
six-month mark after showing mild
symptoms of Parkinson's, and the
final two after twelve months.
"Animals should be able to
recover from the Parkinsonism
that researchers inflict on them,"
Birthistle said.
"She's intending to kill them
all along, and then they're talking about it as being unforeseen
circumstances."
Accordingto the article, the surviving monkeys were able to care for
themselves after recovering from
the effects of MPTP.
Burt defended the experiment,
explaining that it passed the protocols set by the Canadian Council for
Animal Care (CCAC).
"There's a number of checks and
balances in the system," she said.
But STOP wants the study investigated after a veterinarian who reviewed the study for STOP called it
"unnecessary, cruel and shocking."
The group has called for a halt to the
study and its funding immediately.
"We're concerned about the cruelty inflicted on these animals on a
long-term basis," Birthistle said. "I
don't think Dr Doudet should have
any actual duties while there's a
shadow over her work."
Pascale Belleau, a CCAC communications coordinator, said there
hasn't been a formal investigation
request.
STOP has been campaigning
for more information on animal
research since summer 2010. UBC
released information on animal research numbers in November, and is
currently preparing to release more
information on animal research
after a Freedom of Information
request by STOP was approved in
February. tH
News briefs
UBC researchers develop new
technology to study malaria
A new technology being developed
by UBC researchers will help clarify
the causes of malaria. The researchers use a chip to measure the
deformability of infected red blood
cells, which experts say can help
determine the best treatment of the
disease.
The device will separate cells to be
later analyzed by the system.
"Our results show that it's possible
to precisely measure the stiffening
of red blood cells caused by the
parasite at various stages of infection." said Hongshen Ma. assistant
professor in the departments of mechanical engineering and urologic
sciences.
UBC students win University
mobile Challenge in Barcelona
Students Michael Moll. Jeff Blake
and Justin Locke won first prize at
the University Mobile Challenge on
March 1 in Barcelona for their paperless ticket application.
The mobile app is called "Good
Nights" and is available on iTunes. It
allows users to buy tickets on their
phones. After the purchase, a digita
copy of the ticket is stored, which
the user can then show to gain entry to the event.
Moll. Blake and Locke created
their company, called Good Nights
Entertainment, a few months ago.
UBC competed against 13 international teams from countries including India. France, the US and UK.
Gale Cup claimed by UBC Law
UBC students from the Faculty of
Law won the Gale Cup in Toronto
this past weekend.Top law schools
across Canada competed for the
Cup. focusing on criminal-constitutional law.
This year, the 60 competitors
were tasked with re-litigating the
real life case. R. v. Sinclair. The participants had to determine whether or
not manslaughter convict Terrence
Sinclair's rights were violated.
UBC's sguad were the winners,
while the University of Toronto
came second. Meanwhile, the teams
from the Universite du Quebec
a Montreal and the University of
Windsor were ranked third and
fourth respectively
Marine biologists question
shark finning laws worldwide
A recent paper by UBC marine biologists calls into guestion multiple
worldwide laws which regulate
shark finning.
Researchers Lea Biery and Daniel
Pauly determined that many laws
overestimate the percentage of a
shark's body mass that resides in
the fins.
This oversight ultimately allows
extra fins to be slipped into a catch
without proper oversight of the fate
ofthe shark.
"[The laws] provide an opportunity to harvest extra fins from more
sharks without retaining 100 per
cent of the corresponding shark
carcasses." said Biery. "(3
LAND USE »
Gage South layout
draws criticism at
open house
GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Kalyeena Makortoff
News Editor
The second round of consultations
are currently underway for Gage
South, but some resident and student groups are disappointed with
the university's proposal.
UBC Campus and Community
Planning (CCP) have presented one
option for the bus loop and surrounding area, based on feedback
from the first round of consultations
conducted in November 2011.
Students are concerned that
the layout has been specifically
designed to accommodate non-student housing. AMS President Matt
Parson said that if such housing
wasn't being prepared for, the footprints of Maclnnes Field and the
newly rebuilt Aquatic Centre would
be larger.
But CCP communications manager Kera McArthur said the area's
destiny is yet to be determined.
"Certainly we know that there's
been concern expressed about the
possibility of non-market rental
housing for faculty, staff and students in the [area, but] there was
never a layout that did propose
housing, or didn't propose housing."
Student advocates have said Gage
South should be zoned "academic,"
which would restrict the university
from developing any non-student
housing in the heart of campus.
In addition, an advocacy group
called Friends of the Aquatic Centre
wants the existing Aquatic Centre
renovated and expanded instead of
replaced, saying it will both save the
university money and save components like high diving boards.
But John Metras, UBC's managing director of infrastructure
development, said that renovating
and expanding the Aquatic Centre
would cost approximately $2.5 million more than building anew.
Metras added that UBC Athletics
decided a dive tower was unnecessary. One-metre and three-metre
springboards will be built instead.
Consultations continue until
March 7. 13 4 I NeWS   03.05.2012
Hello and goodbye
We ask the outgoing AMS president to reflect back, and the incoming to look forward
Jeremy McElroy
As the 102nd AMS president, the bearded
Jeremy McElroy said he thinks things went
pretty well.
when asked to reflect on his year in the
role, McElroy said most of his time was
spent restructuring the AMS's finances and
continuing work on the new SUB. But he
hopes to be remembered for different reasons as well.
"If I could be known as the president
with the facial hair, then I will die a happy
man," he said.
Professionally, McElroy said he worked
with AMS councillors and executives on the
new SUB project to make sure they went
"as big as they could." He counts receiving
a LEED sustainability certification as well
as the inclusion of childcare facilities and
a student-run brewery as victories, with
the brewery being an initiative in which he
played an especially big part.
"Everyone thought in the [SUB] project,
this [was] as good as it's goingto get—and
then we said, 'No, it's goingto get bigger,'"
said McElroy.
Financially, McElroy was relieved that
the referendum to raise AMS fees passed.
He feels it allowed him to accomplish much
of what he had set out to do. "Over the
course ofthe year we adopted a new [AMS
staff] structure, [including] two new senior
management positions and [we] are almost
done hiring both of them, and then adopted
a strategic plan that will help us through
the next few years moving into the new
SUB," he said.
"If the fee referendum hadn't passed, it
would have been a very different year...We
would have had to make cuts right, left and
centre, so I think I was really privileged."
McElroy reflected that his biggest disappointment was when the substantive bylaw
change referendum didn't meet quorum.
"The bylaw package failing in March of last
year," which would have changed when
the AMS executive turnover occurs, "was
pretty disappointing," he said. "I would
have liked to have been able to work in that
model."
Going into the next year, McElroy hopes
the AMS will be able to move away from
being "introspective" and reach out more to
students.
"I think Matt's ambitious project to meet
new students every week is a great step in
that direction. We need to make sure it's
not just Matt, but that the AMS itself starts
to really turn their focus around."
But while McElroy and his moustache
will still be on campus next year as he finishes his political science degree, he's glad
it's now time to let others make the decisions for the AMS.
"I'll be on campus and involved in some
other things; getting back to the more traditional community service that I used to do.
"I made my commitment, and you kind of
need to know when to bow out," he said. "I
think I've reached that point." 13
—Micki Cowan
GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Jeremy McElroy pictured left, Matt Parson pictured right
GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Matt Parson
Matt Parson is not new to AMS politics, but
taking office as the 103rd president ofthe AMS
will take some getting used to.
"It still feels really strange," he said. "I
imagine that with time, I'll slowly become accustomed...but it's still kind of a strange title
to have."
After pulling off an unexpected win in
last year's VP Academic race, Parson is stepping into the presidency with a year of AMS
experience.
One of his campaign promises was to gather
input about the AMS from regular students
every day, in what he termed his "1000 ambassadors" project. He offered to forgo one third
of his pay for every week he fails to meet his
objective.
He's setting a goal of 20 students per week,
and he has already started.
Aboard the bus to campus on his first day
in office, Parson spoke with a varsity football
player. When asked what the AMS could be do-
ingbetter, "The student really didn't have much
to say, it was, 'Um, I'm not sure.' I guess that in
itself speaks to something that the AMS might
be able to better do, which is communicate what
we're doing."
But the AMS has priorities. Issues surrounding UBC's lack of governance and the
fate of Gage South are expected to come to a
head this year, and Parson sees his experience
in university relations as an asset.
"I strongly believe the role ofthe AMS president is to represent students," said Parson. "If
that means you're goingto be more productive
through [the] university process then I think
that's what should be done, but if the university process isn't necessarily hearing student input or the student side of things, other means
need to be taken."
He mentioned he was "shocked" when he read
a letter from Community, Sport and Cultural
Development Minister Ida Chong, who is ultimately in charge of UBC's land use and governance. Parson said Chong didn't think there was
consensus within the UBC community about
adopting a representative governance model.
"There are no means of communication for
the students and residents, [or] faculty and
staff, to significantly alter land use planning
on this campus, and there really need to be,"
said Parson.
"I don't think that five, ten years down the
road the status quo would be accepted from the
province as a legitimate governance system."
Parson also hopes to put forward a comprehensive policy advocating for UBC to provide
more affordable housing this year, as well as
improving student mental health resources.
Although Parson said it wasn't necessarily
politics that drew him into the AMS, when
asked to think of one notable figure he'd
model his presidency on, his first thought was
of Pierre Trudeau. "He had a personality, but
at the same time he was able to get stuff done."
Overall, Parson isn't too worried about his
term. "We'll see how it goes this year, but I
wholeheartedly think that it's goingto be a
success." tH
—Laura Rodgers
ART COLLECTION »
Committee to oversee sale of three pieces of art from AMS collection
Laura Rodgers
StaffWriter
The AMS is moving ahead with the
next stage of selling three pieces of
its art collection.
In January, the AMS launched
a yes campaign to sell three pieces
from its permanent art collection,
citing poor storage conditions, insurance costs and false asset boosts as
reasons to get rid ofthe art.
The collection includes paintings
by E.J. Hughes and several Group of
Seven artists, as well as less traditional works including a ceramic watermelon by Gathie Falk and a giant
inflatable landscape bythe NE Thing
Company.
The AMS is forming a committee
to oversee the sale and determine
how the money will be used. A new
AMS Art Endowment Fund will be
created, which will likely be used
to acquire new pieces from student
artists, or to add fundingto the
AMS's artist-in-residence program.
How the fund will directly support
on-campus student art is yet to be
determined by the committee.
Three art experts from the university community will join the
committee, including the AMS Art
Gallery commissioner.
Scott Watson, director ofthe
UBC's Belkin Art Gallery, hopes
to sit on the committee as well. "I
think that the AMS people running
the collection should proceed cautiously," Watson warned.
"You want to get the best price
you can get for [the art]...But the
real concerns are when and why
you sell works from a collection."
Watson said it will be important to
assess the future ofthe collection
and what it means to sell the pieces.
Former AMS VP Finance Elin
Tayyar, who put forward the initial referendum question, said the
AMS is free to sell any art from the
collection. But newly elected VP
Finance Tristan Miller disagreed.
"We will only sell pieces that we
have acquired ourselves; gifts
should not be sold."
Tayyar expects $1 million
from the sale, and that investing the money through the Art
Endowment Fund could generate
$40,000 to $50,000 per year.
Miller was less optimistic, speculating that the sale could bring
in approximately $750,000 and
generate $20,000 annually, once
invested.
Watson said both estimates were
too high. "I'd [exercise] some caution
in usingthose figures..The owner
ofthe picture doesn't get all the
money." Watson said the AMS needs
to expect extra costs, including
auction house fees if the committee
chooses to auction the pieces instead
of sellingthem directly to an interested party.
The AMS has already been contacted by at least six different art
dealers and auction houses. Most
have expressed interest in the highly valuable pieces by E.J. Hughes
and Lawren Harris.
Tayyar thinks that the committee's actions will likely run
smoothly, but the AMS doesn't have
time to waste. "We need to move on
[the sale] quickly because we have a
sunset, as far as the timing goes."
But Watson said there is a balance
to be struck.
"A great deal needs to be sorted
out before anything is done...
Sometimes you think you're going
to solve a problem, but then create
further ones by solving one." 13 if
l2l The
Unaccomplished
Mission
Apologies of a Sex Addict The Fourth
War
Filles Rouses 81 Supplement 103.05.2012
Dead On Your Feet
Tristan Koster-Pickering
Maysaa had stopped sweating. It
was somethingthat she noticed
suddenly. It was no less hot though,
no less oppressive on the road that
she walked. The sun still scorched
the earth and baked her skin, her
lips were still cracked—but they had
stopped bleeding.
Maysaa's steps were getting slower, and every one brought her closer
to her end by smaller amounts. Her
feet dragged a little more each time.
She had walked with poise once,
with her head held high.
Raja couldn't walk any more.
When they left their home she
had walked with her mother, her
little hand clutched in Maysaa's.
The journey was much harder for
someone so small though, and she
couldn't go on by herself after the
first day. Maysaa picked her up and
wrapped her scarf around Raja to
give her some small protection from
the sun. Maysaa's hair swung freely
now in thick, dirty knots.
"Hooyo," Raja whispered, "where
are we going?"
"I told you Raja, we're goingto
the camps. So you can have a drink."
"I'm not thirsty hooyo." Maysaa
had given the last ofthe water to
Raja before they had started to
walk, four days ago.
"Well I am," Maysaa said. "We'll
put some water in a cup, and you can
drink it when you are thirsty."
When they had started walking,
each death in their small desperate caravan had been a tragedy.
When someone fell, the march had
stopped and people tried to help.
When they couldn't help, they
would dig a shallow grave and say a
few words before moving on. Now
they left people where they fell, and
they would say a quiet prayer as
they passed by.
"Will aabe be there?"
Maysaa's mind fell back into
memory. She thought about her
husband shouting at the men in
the jeeps with their guns. Maysaa
remembered the men said that they
needed the food and water for their
war. She remembered when they
told her husband to beg for his life,
and the gentle pop that came when
he refused. That's when she took
Raja and they started to walk.
"Yes, yes dear, he will be there.
You have to hang on, for aabe."
Maysaa wanted to cry, but she
- didn't have the tears. There were
only the awful wracking sobs that
nearly brought her to the ground.
Somehow, Raja lifted herself up a
little and wrapped her skinny arms
around Maysaa's neck.
"It's okay hooyo."
When the sun set they stopped
because they couldn't see the road
anymore. Their feet were glad for
the rest, but the cold meant that
those who fell asleep often did not
wake up. All night Maysaa kept
careful watch over Raja, rocking
her gently and asking her answer
questions to keep her awake.
"How many goats did we have
Raja? I forget."
"Six hooyo."
"That's right, and how many
cows were there?"
"Nine hooyo." Maysaa frowned.
"Nine? Weren't there only eight?"
"No hooyo. One had a baby in the
spring, remember?"
Of course. Maysaa remembered
the calf now, a young healthy bull. It
seemed so long ago, but the memory
of his first steps still made her smile.
He had been the first ofthe herd
to die. When the drought started,
his mother's milk dried up and he
would spend all day and night calling to her for food. All his mother
could do was be close to him, and
she died soon after he did.
Sunrise brought relief. The gathering light warmed her body and the
still cold air soothed her burns from
the days before. Itwas in the morning after they started to walk again
that Maysaa saw the white tents of
the camps.
"There it is Raja, we're almost
there. Are you thirsty today?"
Maysaa looked down at her
daughter, her eyes were closed.
A murmur went around as others
saw camp. It didn't bringthem happiness; most had resigned themselves to dying on this road, and the
hope of a different fate was a cruel
trick to them.
Maysaa thought only of Raja. She
clutched the girl close and tried to
run but she fell. She didn't trip, her
legs couldn't hold her any more
Maysaa fell on her side, she felt
the cold ground on her face and
arms. She felt Raja, still and quiet
beside her. She heard the shuffling
footsteps as others passed by with
their small prayers. She closed her
eyes.
"Hooyo?" Maysaa felt a hand on
her cheek.
"We should go hooyo. Aabe will
be waiting."
MAYSAA
REMEMBERED
THE CALF
NOW, A YOUNG
HEALTHY
BULL IT
SEEMED SO
LONG AGO,
BUTTHE
MEMORYOF
HIS FIRST
STEPS STILL
MADEHER
SMILE. HE
HAD BEEN THE
FIRST OF THE
HERD TO DIE.
Annan Kazemi
Cutie pie, you're my sky, air-breath
and
Wind...
Every time I fly away
you're
What sends me in.
I have touched your message
That flutters in
the
air,
And delivers a shock
A sudden
vibrant
ring;
And I bend to touch the key
To feel the whisper
That it sends.
Oceans have become are
atmo-sphere
And galleys a vessel
Beneath the
skin;
A wave that never crests
And offers an instant
Whisper at your fingertip.
T«LK
reach and Learn in Korea
Tne TaLK (Teach and Learn in Korea) program, funded by the
Ministry or Education, Science S- Technology or Korea, invites
young, adventurous college students and recent graduates
who are seeking to broaden their horizon by expanding their
multi-cultural experiences as well while gaining a hands-on
teaching experience in the Republic of Korea.
1. Eligibility
Nationality: Applicants must be a citizen of one ofthe following countries where the national
language is English: Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, U.K. or U.S.A.
Education: Applicants must be enrolled in a Bachelor's program and have completed at least
two years of study or have obtained an Associate's degree in the aforementioned countries.
Recent college graduates and graduate students are also eligible.
2. Benefits
Monthly stipend(KWR1,500,000), round-trip airfare, accommodation, cultural experiences and more
3. Term
6 months or 1 year (Starting August 2012)
4. Application Deadline
May 31,2012
For more detailed information, please visit www.talk.go.kr or contact
the Korean Consulate in Vancouver at vancouver@mofat.go.kr or 604-681-9581 Sports»
03.052012 | 9
VOLLEYBALL»
Drive for five complete, 'Birds take gold
UBC women's volleyball team wins fifth straight CIS title in five-set battle with Alberta
Drake Fenton
Sports Editor
At one point on Sunday night, the
UBC Thunderbirds women's volleyball team was on the precipice of
havingtheir streak of four consecutive national championships come to
an end.
In the fourth set, down two sets
to one, the 'Birds held a slim 10-9
lead over the University of Alberta
Pandas. With a national title on the
line, UBC exploded. They went on a
10-3 run to push the game to 22-14. It
was a change in momentum Alberta
would never recover from.
In a five-set battle (25-21,15-25,
19-25,25-20,15-12) UBC captured
CIS gold for the fifth straight year in
a row.
"We found a way," said UBC head
coach Doug Reimer. "I couldn't be
prouder of this group."
Until last week UBC was the
unquestioned favourite to win nationals. They were ranked No. 1 in
Canada all season and finished the
year with a 18-2 record.
Then they met Alberta in the
Canada West final. In five sets the
Pandas dethroned the 'Birds, and
entered the CIS tournament as the
No. 1 seed.
UBC began nationals in unfamiliar territory. Alberta had proved they
weren't invincible, yet it didn't appear the T-Birds received the memo.
They cruised through the quarterfinals and the semifinals, dispatching
their opponents with relative ease.
As fate would have it, Alberta did the
same.
In the first set of Sunday's gold
medal game, Alberta overwhelmed
UBC offensively, taking a quick 10-6
lead. The T-Birds doggedly pursued
the Pandas through the remainder of
JAYRAUTIN/COURTESYTHECIS
UBC celebrates their fifth straight national title. The 'Birds currently hold the longest running championship streak in Canadian university sports and the second longest in UBC history
the set, eventually findingthem-
selves down 20-16.
With the pressure mounting,
UBC's experience took over, propel-
lingthemto go on a 9-1 run and win
the set.
"I think ofthe first set as symbolic ofthe rest. We were able to hang
in there and turn things around,"
said Reimer. "A lot of teams, when
they are getting it handed to them
and when it's not what you are expecting to happen...they kinda go
away. We never did."
Their ability to persevere became
essential in the second set. Alberta
came out flying and absolutely
dominated the 'Birds. They played
with confidence and UBC simply
looked over-matched. The Pandas
opened with a 6-0 run, and defensively were able to neutralize UBC's
Kyla Richey, who was named CIS
MVP earlier last week.
The third set played out in a similar fashion, with UBC never truly
looking like they were in contention.
It took the emotion of UBC's
spectacular fourth set comeback
to swing momentum back into the
T-Birds' favour.
"We just really knew that
Alberta's an amazing team and we
had to take every point seriously.
We're not invincible," said second-
year outside hitter Lisa Barclay. "So
we had to come out and play, we
learned that last weekend. Coming
out we really wanted this and fought
really hard, so I thought we deserved it in the end."
Barclay led the 'Birds with a game
high 12 kills. She also added 5 service aces and 1.5 blocks. For her offensive prowess, Barclay was named
the tournament's MVP.
In the fifth set, with fear and
doubt thundering in the minds of
Alberta's players, UBC took control
ofthe game. Leading 8-7, the 'Birds
scored 5 quick points to put the
game out of reach and keep UBC's
dynasty intact.
With the victory, the women's volleyball team became only the second
team in UBC history to win five consecutive national champions. And
with only Richey and Rayel Quiring
set to leave the program, next year
they will have a good chance of extending what is currently the longest
running championship streak in
Canadian university sports.
But right now, the team is content
to celebrate—or, as Richey tweeted
hours after the game:
"I don't really know what's happening right now. But I like it." 13
Get to the Point!
NOW     ,  dM
SERVING
BRUNCH
SAT & SUN, 11AM - 3PM
HOURS:
n:ooam - io:oopm M, T, W, Sun
ii:ooam - n:oopm Th, F, Sat
www.food.ubc.ca
the
point
grill
Building #4  2205 Lower Mall
(Marine Drive Residence)
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JAYRAUTIN/COURTESYTHECIS
Fifth-years Kyla Richey and Rayel Quiring are presented with the CIS trophy. They have won CIS gold every year they've been at UBC
CHANCE TO EAR
Summer?
www. P ro perty Sta rsJobs.com Opinion »
B Editor- Rrian Piatt
03.05.2012 | IQ
Sent back in time to dominate the court
GENIE CHEUNG/THE UBYSSEY
The Last Word
Parting shots and snap judgments on today's issues
Let's see more of UBCs creative
writing talent
Our annual literary supplement is
a chance for readers to get to see
creative writing from some of our
most ambitious and talented students. It makes us wish that there
were more opportunities to see
their work.
The good news is that there is—
ifyou know where to look. UBC's
English department publishes a
twice-annual journal called The
Garden Statuary (TGS), which features creative and academic writing
from undergraduate students. The
work is published on TGS's website,
which isn't ideal for reaching new
readers but is better than nothing,
which is what we had before.
TGS is brand new, having published its first issue in December
2011, and we hope it survives because it seems very odd that English
would be one ofthe only undergraduate programs to nothave a journal
featuringtheworkof its students.
UBC's creative writing graduate
program also produces a literary
magazine—but students in the program can't contribute to it. This is
an understandable rule to prevent
nepotism, but it unfortunately takes
away a prime venue for some of
UBC's most talented writers.
We will continue to publish our
literary supplement every year,
and we hope it inspires more UBC
students to find ways to distribute
their work.
UBC facilities should serve the
whole community
In recent years, the university has
been trying to build a new Aquatic
Centre. We think this is a good
thing, as the current building is
getting very old and isn't energy-
efficient. But what isn't good is that
UBC's plan for the new building
ignores what members ofthe community want.
A group called Friends ofthe
Aquatic Centre has spoken out
against the proposed changes for a
number of reasons. Most importantly, UBC would like to do away
with the high diving board (the
only one left on campus), eliminate
the deep end that the diving club
uses, and decrease the amount
of recreational swimming space
available.
In short, the group wants the
Aquatic Centre to remain open
and accessible to all, not transformed into abuildingthat almost
exclusively caters to competitive
swimmers.
Of course, these days "open and
accessible to all" isn't UBC's first
concern when they build facilities.
It's about what donors and elite
users want. Consider the fate of
the UBC Tennis Centre, which was
rebuilt two years ago and became
less accessible to the public and
more focused on training competitive players.
UBC is a public university and
a de facto municipal government
for nearly 20,000 people. When
determining the future ofthe local
swimming hole, they should heed
local concerns. Sadly, their depth of
empathy is nearly as shallow as the
new pools will be.
A welcome change in tone from
the AMS on Gage South
Development in Gage South has
been a contentious subject over the
past year at UBC. A group of students has been working to mobilize
the campus to fight against non-
student housing by creating petitions and attending open houses to
voice their opinion.
Throughout this time, however,
the AMS has been fairly passive, at
least to the public eye.
But in the last few months, their
tune has changed. Rather than
just politely reminding students to
fill out surveys, the AMS is finally
starting to stand up against what
it doesn't want. In the February
edition of their newsletter, AMS
Insider, the AMS flatly stated that
they don't support non-student
housing in the area, saying (with
student in bold font), "This is the
student heart of campus."
This is a welcome change, and
a stand that the AMS shouldn't be
afraid to take. A certain amount of
backroom negotiating is understandable, but when students are
expressing their wishes to keep
Gage South as a student-centred
area, the AMS should be leading
from the front. That's the point of
having a student union in the first
place.
Healthy skepticism is required
when it comes to food labels
Canadian consumers have become
much more conscious over the past
decade about the products that they
buy. Nowhere can this be seen more
than with the rise of fair trade coffee, somethingthat's on our mind
with the beginning of Fair Trade
Week at UBC.
However, "fair trade" has become synonymous with "ethical,"
which is problematic for many reasons. As with any label, one needs
to look into the background of it
to make sure it actually delivers
on its promise; for example, foods
labelled as "natural" don't yet have
any regulations saying what that
actually means.
Critics of fair trade often point to
licensing fees and an insistence that
farms be run as cooperatives as
ways that the poorest farmers can
actually be hurt by fair trade. This
doesn't mean that fair trade may
not give a net benefit. But it means
that, especially at a university, we
should continue to think critically
about what we buy.
Correction
The March 1,2012 issue of The
Ubyssey had a story on the new
biomass plant being built for UBC.
A sentence at the beginning of the
story referred to problems at "university plants" in the United States.
However, this left the false impression that more than one plant was
constructed.
As the University of Montana
project was cancelled before anything was built, the sentence should
have referred to problems with
"university projects." The Ubyssey
regrets the error. <U
The AMS's calm year
Editorial
Last Wednesday, the new AMS executives officially took office. This
means it's time for us to take a look
back at the presidency of Jeremy
McElroy.
McElroy's term began with an
election scandal and ended with the
groundbreaking ofthe new SUB.
For a time it seemed possible that
McElroy would never even have a
chance to be president, but last year's
elections administrator chose not to
disqualify him for the anonymous
website he co-created. He recovered to have a fairly stable year as
president.
The most obvious point to make
about McElroy's term is that he successfully avoided a giant scandal on
the scale seen by the last two presidents (the UN complaint under Blake
Frederick and the Gaza donation
under Ahmadian). It's rather silly
that we feel the need to congratulate
a student union president on not embarrassing the organization, but such
is the recent history ofthe AMS.
The one time this year that the
AMS did make it into newspapers
across the country was due to excitement over their plans to have a
student-run brewery in the new SUB.
The brewery is one of those rare
AMS projects that is attention-grabbing, tangible and realistic. It will
likely be something that the whole
executive team can be proud of years
from now.
A student fee referendum and
an executive wage increase both
happened during McElroy's term,
though he and the other executives
do not hold much responsibility for
either. Most of that work was done by
other AMS members.
On the policy front, McElroy
made some progress in smaller lobby
campaigns. But his biggest push
was to get the AMS to become a full
member ofthe Canadian Alliance
of Student Associations, and he was
never able to get Council's support.
Perhaps the biggest effect McElroy
had on the AMS is one that was easy
to miss. Under Ahmadian's presidency, the AMS began negotiating
with the university in a behind-the-
scenes manner, as opposed to public
messaging. McElroy continued this
strategy, rarely attempting to rally
student popular opinion behind any
ofthe AMS's policy positions. This
marks a more professional style of
negotiating, but it also abandons the
only real weapon that the AMS has
in its arsenal: students themselves.
The most prominent example of
this has been the Gage South consultation. While a student group led
largely by Sean Cregten and Neal
Yonson mounted a strong campaign
to oppose non-student housing in
Gage South, the AMS has largely
remained quiet on that issue. But as
we note elsewhere on this page, the
AMS is now taking a much more aggressive and direct tone—and it's no
coincidence that this is happening
while McElroy is leaving and Parson
takes office.
McElroy's term was a mostly calm
one that caused little controversy.
Consideringthe debilitating scandals
that came before him, that makes
him the best AMS president in at
least three years. But students would
be justified in feeling underwhelmed
that the one time they really noticed
their student union this year was
when it announced a new brewery. 13
Academia goes to work
Perspectives
» Gordon Katie
There is a fundamental tension
that pervades all academia, and it
manifests itself most clearly when
controversial political issues come
to the fore.
Historically, universities have
thought of themselves as depositories for knowledge. In this view,
professors are dispassionate and
impartial stewards who protect the
fruits of inquiry from the capricious whims of social, political
and cultural oscillations. Partisan
politics and social activism are not
the realm ofthe academy; our community is not that ofthe everyman,
it is the community of scholars past
and present—from Plato's Academy,
to the medieval monasteries, to our
present day.
However, this view has faced a
barrage of challenges. The left tells
us that the academy, shaped by
dominant discourses, constructs
cultural hegemonies that advance
narrow class interests. The right
tells us that our ivory tower elitism
renders us ineffectual—even pernicious—by disconnecting us from
common people and their common
experience.
These challenges have caused
a pronounced shift in the way the
academy situates itself in the broader community. From the teach-ins of
the 1960s to the community service
learning initiatives of today, our
universities are more engaged than
ever before.
Accordingto UBC's strategic
documents, we are to engage locally and internationally, utilizing our
knowledge and expertise to stimulate social change in service ofthe
public good. Nevertheless, many
faculty have cautiously entrenched
themselves with the old guard.
For fear of losing their academic
credibility and political legitimacy,
there has been a reticence to take
on the "issues facing humanity in
the 21st century" (to borrow UBC
phrasing).
But today, I have never been
more inspired by my professors.
In the wake of Bill McKibben's
November visit to UBC, a number of concerned faculty created
UBCC350, a group dedicated to
advocating for meaningful climate
action. The question was put quite
bluntly by Bill McKibben: "Ifyou
are not goingto take action on the
most pressing issue facing our civilization, what are you saving your
legitimacy for?"
They heard the message. A network of leading professors from a
variety of disciplines joined with
student activists, committing themselves to gettingtheir hands dirty.
This Thursday at 5pm in Irving
K. Barber room 182, a few of those
professors and students (myself
included) will be speaking at a
UBCC350 event about the Northern
Gateway pipeline and BC's rising
coal exports.
By bridging the gap between
activism and academia, UBCC350
is exemplary of what a university
ought to be—a centre for dialogue,
and a powerful agent for progressive
social change. 13 »
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—^——^—^—^——
ZTOW& (His
Karen Armsfrong
will be lhere.
Will you?
Co-mMyfJuHv uv 7^\e^uHv
' For undergraduate ancl graduate shjdente
Thursday March 29, 2012, 9 am-2 pm
Chapel of Hie Epiphany, Vancouver School of Theology
6030 Chancellor Boulevard, UBC—main campus
Facebook: "Karen Armsfrong Sfudenf Conference on Compassion"
Confacf Aliya Hirji af aliya@vsf.edu for more info
TED Talk Prize Winner 20C
DR. KAREN ARMSTRONG
Inspired rhe "Charter for Compassion"
Endorsed by: Dalai Lama &
iw>iPiaaiiit]iwni[i
SIMON   FRASER   UNIVERSITY
CENTRE   FOR   DIALOGUE
The principal sponsor in Karen Armstrong's 12 Days of Compassion Visir is Simon Fraser Unwersily's Cenire for Dialogue.
Hosted by lona Pacific
Inter-religious Centre at
Vancouver School of Theology

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