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Array Vol. 76, No. 42
INSIDE
Pow
Photo
Issue
■■■     PACIFIC    OF   THE     WEST PHOTO ISSUE
FOCUS
Vancouver, British Columbia, Tuesday, March 22,1994
UBYSSEY SPECIAL
QUOTE
"If your pictures aren't good
enough, you aren't close
enough."
Page 10
ROSA TSENG PHOTO Collections - Part-time Positions
Credit
Counsellors
At CIBC, we are Canada's pre-eminent financial
company through superior customer service and the
provision of products and services that meet the
evolving needs of a growing client base. These part-time
positions in our Vancouver office are a result of a
consolidation of our Collections function and call for
professionals who share our commitment to service
excellence.
Utilizing an on-line telephone collection system, you will
establish high quality, service-oriented relationships with
clients in order to effectively counsel them on the most
appropriate solutions to resolve outstanding debts. An
enthusiastic, highly motivated collections professional, you
have good general knowledge of financial counselling, debt
consolidation, and collection procedures and techniques as
they relate to multiple, retail lending products. Working
knowledge of on-line collections systems is required, and
negotiating, interpersonal, and good verbal communications
skills are essential. Hours are 3 pm - 8 pm Monday through
Thursday and 8 am to 4 pm Saturday.
CIBC is an organization where diversity is not only welcomed,
but celebrated and where achievement is recognized and
rewarded. We offer competitive salaries, comprehensive
benefits and opportunities for career and professional
advancement. Please send your resume, quoting Ref. V20-
03 in confidence to: The Manager, P/O Box 8100,
Vancouver, B.C. V6B 5Z9 No agency solicitation will be
considered. CIBC thanks all applicants for their interest,
however, only those under consideration will be contacted.
An employment equity employer.
CIBC
CDR
Vancamrer. B C
#610 1040W Georgia Si
V6E 4Hi
(604) 6U -4404
Clljjry. AtU
#1804.801   6th Ave SW
I2P3W2
(403)265 1966
Edmonton. All)
'1010.10303 Jasper Ave
I5J3N6
(403) 4200214
Toronto. Ontario
#1920.121 King St Wesl
M5H 319
(416) 166-2123
CALL OR SEND A
RESUME IF YOU ARE:
• Changing jobs or careers • Unemployed
• Re-entering the job market       • Displaced
• Recently graduated • Relocating
Professionals from the following backgrounds have recently engaged out
services:
• CEOs and top management • Technical and Engineering
• Mid-level managers • Administration • Supervisors
• Entry-level managers • E0P • Educators
• MIS • Finance/Accounting • MBAs/MAs • CAs
• Ph Ds • Retired Military • Human Resources
Call
for a confidential appraisal
interview and begin to plan
for your future today—{604) 688-4404
i
r
comedy club
This year for Passover
showtimes
tue-thu 8:30pm
fri&sat 8:30&10:30
684-3015
15 WATER ST GASTOWN
Traditional Seders at Chabad House
Led by
Rabbi & Mrs. Yitzchak Wineberg
Saturday, March 26th at 7:30pm
Sunday, March 27th at 7:30pm
(Suggested donation Adults $18, Children $10)
Everyone Welcome!
Reservations required, call 266-1313
Lubavitch, B.C.,
5750 Oak Street, Vancouver
Coming Tkf#Ut6cUuj, March 24th
Howto
U^wfe Whuv
Resumes am
Cover Let*
SUB Party Room, 12:30 pm
Bring a friend, cfc'd  (feeei
QUEST SPEAKER
Coordinator of Cooperative Education
Simon fraser University
presented by
Providing a link
between
students &
For information call: 822~90BS        employers.
JobLink
Contact Lens
Replacements
WE WILL INSURE
ANY COMPETITORS
contact lenses for
S15/year and
replace them for
any reason for as
low as $18 per lens.
DENMAN OPTICAL
689-5523
In Denman Place Mall
1030 Denman St at Comox
(free parking-enter off Comox)
Free
Tutoring
forUBC
Students
Drop-in and get help with 1st year
subjects in Math, Physics, Statistics,
Economics, and English.
GET AN EARLY
START ON STUDYING
TUESDAYS and THURSDAYS
7pm to 9pm
Magda's (in the Common's Block of
Totem Park Residence) 2525 West Mall
SUNDAYS
5pm to 9pm
SATURDAYS
lpm to 5pm
Room 205 in the SUB
(Student Union Building) 6138 SUB Boulevard
LSAT - GMAT
MCAT - GRE
WEEKEND TEST
PREP SEMINARS
Sessions on NOW
Call 228-1544
Renert Seminars
Inc. UBYSSEY SPECIAL
Pacific Of the West
Tuesday, March 22,1994
OPTION
Shutter shock: "If you're shy forget it"
Cheryl Niamath Photo
BY BIANCA ZEE
AND MICHELLE WONG
THE glamour of the lens has
been  shattered.    The    bleak
realities ofthe photography industry are
enough to make any photographer hang
up their negatives.
"Most people right now don't want
to break in, they want to get out," said
Alex Waterhouse-Hayward, a Vancouver
portrni! specialist, whose stylized images
have graced The Globe and Mail, Western
Living and The Georgia Straight.
"Fashion photography is not the
way to make money," he said. "It is the
kiss of death. Models last for about four
months. The same applies to
photographers. In photography, you're
only as well known as your last photo."
The Argentinian-born Waterhouse-
Hayward, began as a car washer 20 years
ago before being published in a magazine.
Today he said many are abandoning
photography for Photoshop computer
imaging or video cameras. But he added,
there is a revival of black and white
photography.
"People want things that will last.
Photographs that are taken by most people
are with colour negative film. They will
be dust in the next century."
Photos developed onto archival
black and white paper and mounted onto
acid-free matt boards are more durable.
Said rising photographer Vinita
Phord, 25: "My niche in the market is
basically doing archival, quality (black
and white) portraits that can last hundreds
of years. The color wi 11 not fade the same
way a color photograph will fade because
I'm using real oil paints."
Phord attributes herrelativesuccess
in the business to aggressiveness. "You
have to go out there and hustle, you got
to have a lot of ambition and initiative,"
she said. "No one's going to promote
you like yourself."
"If you're shy, forget it, you'll get
nowhere in this field. I have gone up to
people in restaurants and asked them if I
could take their picture," said Phord,
who has a film degree from York
University. "The market is really tight in
Vancouver, and there's a lot of people
coming in from Ontario."
Big commercial photography is not
in Vancouver, but rather Toronto or
Montreal which host the large
advertising firms. Phord's niche in the
photo industry, for instance, barely does
battle with her high studio overhead and
expenses.
Full-colour mailers, pricy business
cards, and magazine advertising can
cost her several thousand dollars. Her
studio alone shared with two
photographers, including the award-
winning Greg Kinch, and a graphic artist
costs $500 a month.
"You have to work a job, two jobs,
three jobs and still have the energy to
take pictures," said Phord, who runs a
greeting card business. "Weddings are a
must to survive." A wedding can garner
anywhere from $500 to $3000.
A photographer adept at food
styling can fetch up to $350 an hour. "A
food stylist is someone who makes food
look good, as if its going to jump out at
you...You have to learn it through
another photographer," Phord said.
"If you have about 1,000 images, then
you can register with a stock agency, at
least you'll get some money that way.
A stock agency is a "big library" of
slides from photographers all over the
world. Clients purchase stock photos
for calendar, poster and greeting card
production. "They have many different
categories like holiday, landscape, travel
photography," Phord said.
She cautioned that CD-ROM has
dented the stock trade as images can be
altered to look unique.
But she said: "It's worth it to
register with a New York agent because
I know a stock photographer (who) made
more money than a whole stock agency
in Vancouver."
But she adds: "You have to take a
lot of pictures...you have to submit a
thousand pictures every few months.
The clients will then buy the rights to the
photos and you get paid quite a bit of
money if it is a picture that is very
popular."
Exceptional talent always finds
room.
But said Waterhouse-Hayward:
"Most photographers here are lousy.
They have really good ideas but the
execution is shitty."
POLITICS
Ex-UBC staffer, civil activist, on top ofthe Hill
BYCATHYLU
■«  OR those who think a job on Parliament Hill is
-^-        enviable for the power, prestige and privileges, here
is a typical day of a Member of Parliament who has the added
duties of being a cabinet member:
5:30 a.m. Get up and have breakfast
7:00 a.m. Meeting with International Trade minister
9:00 a.m. Western/Northern Liberal Caucus meeting
10:30 a.m. National Caucus meeting
12:00 p.m. Speaking engagement at the International
Development Research Council
1:30 p.m. Back at the Hill for lunch
1:45 p.m. Go through briefing notes for Question Period
2:15 p.m. Question Period
3:30 p.m. Departmental briefing
5:30 p.m. Meeting in Prime Minister's Office
7:30 p.m. Home, make phone calls not made during the
day
9:00 p.m. Dinner
9:30 p.m. Do readings for the next day
12:00 a.m. Retire to bed
Tis not a consummation devoutly to be wished. Despite the
long hours and hardships, however, Raymond Chan, the Secretary of
State for Asian-Pacific affairs, is enjoying his new job as MP for
Richmond and feels a "sense of achievement" in becoming a junior
minister. He adds to the schedule above a weekly cross-country trip
to his family in Richmond, B.C.
While many have viewed Chan's appointment to the cabinet as
a triumph for more ethnic representation in government, Chan
himself sounds more like Diefenbaker's unhyphenated Canadian.
Chan has noted that his political popularity cuts across ethnic
lines. "There are 80,000 voters in Richmond, only 10 per cent of
them Chinese, and I won with a 20,000-vote majority," he has said.
"I've always felt at home in Canada," he said in a recent
interview. Chan still remembers an old lady at the bus stop who
greeted him with, "Welcome to Canada!" when he emigrated to
Canada 25 years ago.
Chan conceded that people may feel "special passions for
problems in your mother tongue country," but "every conflict we
address we have to look at as Canadians."
Growing resentment against recent immigrants is due to "lack
of communication," said Chan.
He thinks that the Chinese community in Vancouver, for
example, "has to build more bridges."
"Because we are so successful, we create a comfort zone, and
don't venture out," he said. "We have to remember that we are
Canadians."
The Tiananmen incident in June 1989 politicized Chan,
formerly a UBC TRIUMF researcher, and restaurant owner.
Now as the junior minister for the Asia Pacific region, Chan's
views on supporting trade with China differ from human rights
advocacy groups. Ironically it was his concern about human
rights in China that also alienated him from some members ofthe
Chinese community. In fact, as leader ofthe Vancouver Society
in Support of Democratic Movement (VSSDM), Chan was
kicked out of China for making contact with dissidents. On his
latest visit, as a junior minister, they rolled out the red carpet.
"Through more contact we can help to promote awareness
of human rights and open good government," he said.
Our foreign policy toward the Asia Pacific region is twofold, according to Chan. Canada wants to "help developing
countries to develop good government that respects human
rights," as well as promote trade between Canada and Asian
nations.
Chan said that "the potential is huge" in Asia, and comparable
to the American market. No doubt Chan's ability to speak
Mandarin and Cantonese, and personal understanding of Chinese
culture, has proven to be assets in promoting more trade between
Canada and Asian countries, in an increasingly competitive
world economy. No doubt that Chan's ability to work 16-hour
days has also proven to be an asset. Tuesday, March 22,1994
Pacific Of the West
UBYSSEY SPECIAL
PHOTO ISSUE
\^iis4^^%Sl-^'%^~^:^i^ :':- v.v? '
Birds of prey find comfort in human hands
The OWL
centre boasts a
seventy-five
percent release
rate.
"Sweet Cheeks," a juvenile bald eagle with a broken shoulder, gets a helping hand from Colleen, one of the centre's
volunteers.
If it weren't for the efforts of
the volunteer staff of Owl Orphan
Wildlife Centre, injured hawks,
falcons, eagles and owls would prey
no more.
' Owl Orphan Wildlife (OWL)
is a refuge centre and hospital in
Delta for injured birds of prey,
ranging from tiny saw-whet owls
no larger than an adult hand, to bald
eagles whose wing-span would
cover a small car.
Last year OWL staff treated
211 raptors, of which seventy-five
percent fully recovered and were
released back into the wild—an
impressive success rate. Patients
rarely return to thank their caregivers, but for the staff, watching a
rare bird return to the skies is reward
enough. Birds that could not be
released, generally because they
have lost the ability to fly, live at
the centre's observation park.
Some birds do not recover.
On the day photojournalist Ma
Chia-nien spent at the centre, a
juvenile eagle had to be put to
sleep. The picture at the bottom
right represents what is possibly
the most difficult task for OWL
staff to perform at the refuge centre.
The.OWL centre had its
beginnings as an ad hoc home-
based animal hospital fifteen years
ago, with neighborhood children
bringing in sick birds for treatment.
Since that time, OWL has grown
into a fully-fledged raptor refuge
centre occupying five acres of land,
or approximately two football
fields.
The staff now treats birds from
all over the lower mainland,
sometimes using an ambulance to
pick up injured birds. The centre
continues its work through limited
funding and donations.
Colleen allows "Hot Foot," a barn owl, to dry its wings after giving it a bath.
A Possibly the toughest job at the refuge is having to "put
down" a bird. This eagle was afllicted with a massive
foot infection. Bev Day (left) feels for the bird's heartbeat
then pronounces the bird dead. UBYSSEY SPECIAL
Pacific Of the West
Tuesday, March 22,1994
PHOTO ISSUE
Photography
by
Ma Chia-Nien
"Puffy"—one of the refuge's permanent
owls.
One of the more daunting tasks at the centre is placing food inside the
cages of the birds. Photogapher Ma Chia-nien learned to duck quickly
while photographing inside the eagle sanctuaries.
^ Many people spread a tar-like substance on the roofs of their homes to
keep birds away, not realizing that the tar eventually prevents the bird
from being able to fly. Karla and Colleen (right) use butter to remove tar
from the wings of an owl. Tuesday, March 22,1994
Pacific Of the West
UBYSSEY SPECIAl
PHOTO
Graham Coleman
visits the Mosquito
Coast in Hondouras
where the Garafuno
tribe, an African-
Indian mix, inhabit
six villages
dependent on lobster
and conch fishing
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Tel: 873-4343
Application Deadlines
Winter Session
1994-1995
UBC students intending to transfer for the Winter Session
1994-95 to one ofthe undergraduate degree programs listed
below must submit a complete "Change of Faculty" form to
Undergraduate Admissions in the Registrar's Office by the given
deadline. Please note there is a processing fee of $17.00.
Degree Program
Deadline
Fine Arts - Studio
March 31
Fine Arts - Theatre
April 01
Music
April 15
Applied Science
April 30
Agricultural Sciences
April 30
Arts
April 30
Commerce
April 30*
Dietetics
April 30
Fine Arts - Creative Writing
April 30
Forestry
April 30
Home Economics
April 30
Landscape Architecture
April 30
Nursing (Four Year)
April 30*
Pharmacy
April 30*
Physical Education
April 30
Please note new deadline date for these programs
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Templine has a number c
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If you have a positive and profes:
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For more information, please call Vancouver. UBYSSEY SPECIAL
Pacific Of the West
Tuesday, March 22,1994
Ted Young-Ing shoots Los Angeles riot leftovers
Lisa Kwan catches beggars perched before the Paris
Opera House and sandblasters in Vancouver
»TS$
emporary and
a variety of offices,
i as:
fig*
afions •
Ic Relations •
ounfing •
]nal work attitude, you
e while learning more
community.
LINE
les Company
32-8367 or Victoria: 388-4166
The AMS is starting up working committees
on the following issues:
Safety,
Childcare,
Student Loans,
Academics
(inc. tuition, entrance, etc.),
Housing...
This is YOUR opportunity to get
involved and make a difference!
We will be meeting over the
summer as well as during the
school year, and welcome your
contributions at any time.
71ITIS Please contact Leah Costello,
Coordinator of External Affairs,
at 822-2050, or drop by SUB
250 for more information.
k
"Building a Better World
Through Our Own Actions"
.© *****,
1994 SPEECH
CONTEST
rules:
• your speech must deal with
your own life
• open ro all Canadian
citizens or landed immigrants
16 through 25 years old
• essay deadline:
September 10, 1994
prizes:
• First Place Senior Winner:
Round Trip to Nepal, where
you'll represent Canada at
the International Youth
Speech Festival
• Scholarships awarded in
both categories:
$500-$100
Represent Canada at the International
winner tiiavii^ to I™" Speech Festival
KATHMANOU, NEPAL |
For information brochure and an official entry
form, contact the organizing committee:
R.C.C. International Canadian Office
201 - 7545 Cambie Street,
Vancouver, B.C. V6M 2P8
Phone: 323-0540 Fax: 323-0520 8 Tuesday, March 22,1994
Pacific Of the West
UBYSSEY SPECIAL
1*1
Transport Canada
Aviation
Transports Canada
Aviation
PUBLIC NOTICE
TRANSPORT CANADA IS LOOKING FOR TRAINEES
TO BECOME AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS.
Transport Canada - Air Traffic Services Pacific Region is accepting
applications for air traffic controllers for the Vancouver Area Control
Centre, Richmond, B.C.
QUALIFICATIONS
Are you at least 18 years of age?
Have you successfully completed secondary school,
or an equivalent?
Are you a Canadian citizen or landed immigrant?
Are you in good health?
Do you have normal colour perception and good eyesight?
Do you have excellent hearing and diction?
Are you decisive?
Are you good at basic mathematics?
Are you willing to work shifts?
Are you willing to dedicate a period of time to a training program
that entails hard work, study, and short-term relocation?
If you've answered "yes" to these questions and are interested in
receiving more information about a career as an air traffic controller,
simply fill out the coupon below and mail it to: Transport Canada -
Regional Staffing Officer, Suite 620, 800 Burrard Street, Vancouver,
B.C. V6Z2J8
cX
NAME:
ADDRESS:
POSTAL CODE:
TEL:
NAME OF YOUR COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY:
Transport Canada is an equal opportunity employer.
Canada
If you haven't visited Greece yet.
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RIGHT HERE... Without going
to Greece! Try our unique menu,
including Spanakopita, Saganaki,
Moussaka, Souvlakia, Kalamaria,
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DAILY SPECIALS FOR
LUNCH AND DINNER.
Take out, Catering,
Weddings, Birthdays.
For Reservations Phone:
736-2118 or 736-9442
2272 West 4th Ave.,
Kitsilano, Vancouver, B.C.
Student
Storage
lock**5 $20/M^tfl
NEIGHBOURHOOD
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872-2822
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OPTION
INDEPENDENCE: Strolling from
FROM PAGE 11
turf, and vice-versa. Though
Toronto Star ghost riders cruising
the city at night and one-armed
legend Paul Watson in Somalia
gave legitimacy to its existence,
the "two-way" became extinct in
Vancouver long ago. Perhaps
exciting journalism did too.
Today the world's best stories
are pushed to excellence by a high
calibre one-two punch, double play
by a photographer and writer. The
best works carry signatures of a
writer thinking in images and a
photographer thinking in words. In
Vancouver, there is virtually no
such thing. Communication
between photographer and writer
is all but severed.
For some reason, most writers
are inept at working with
photographers in an adrenaline
pumping collaboration. Writers do
not care about pictures even when
they mean good play. It is an
enigma.
In recent years, the retreat of
local    photojournalism    has
the stroller first, walking on
accelerated with its increasingly
unemployable skills.
Notwithstanding, this newsroom has
seen a series of social advances. For
what is still a male-dominated field,
photography here is being
spearheaded mostly by women who
are equipped with some ofthe latest
computer technology such as
Photoshop.
The best...must roam
the world like
nomads or contracted
mercenaries to earn
their stripes.
Cover editor Rosa Tseng, who
seems to be patterning herself after
Annie Lebowitz, has been a Best of
College Photography Competition
finalist for the past two years for the
Los Angeles based Photographer's
Fortune magazine. She has also
taken pictures for BC Report
magazine and the Eastern Express
newspaper in Hong Kong. Her work
is on exhibit now at UBC bookstore
and AMS Art Gallery.
water next! chunc wonc photo
Colleague Cheryl Niamath also
known for exhibits in the city was
selected by Emily Carr College for
a special photography program in
Florence, Italy. Photo editorSiobhan
Roantree, who was preceded by Sam
Green and Rebecca Bishop, is one
the premier hockey photographers
in the city. And upstarts Lisa Kwan
and Jemi Fung appear quite
promising.
The times, however, have
changed drastically for
photojournalism. There is very little
career incentive to shoot, making
editors spend more time on
solicitation than editing for visual
impact. And the pros in the city are
showing little leadership with shots
that are more set up or standard than
spot or imaginative. Our numb,
remote control eyes have seen almost
every image once before. There is
no prize to chase in Vancouver.
The best photographers, people
like the reclusive three-time Capa
Gold medalist Nachtwey, must roam
the world like nomads or contracted
mercenaries to earn their stripes.
"We have waited too long
for our freedom"
Nelson Mandela
FUNDRRISER FOR THE
with
Cozy Bones
Scibble
Mamadu
Drumming by:
Joseph Pepe Danza
Jack Duncan
Joel Simbrow
Khuzzwayo
AFRICAN   NATIONAL CONGRESS
All Proceeds to the ANC Youth League
FRI MARCH 25-8pm
$7 Tickets available at all
Ticketmasters & GDC Office, SUB 237B
Grad Student Centre Ballroom. No minors.
Speakers
« Member oi B.C. ANC Community
■ Joyce Misenheimer, exiled South African
Sponsored by GSS, Koerner's Pub & Pathfinder Bookstore UBYSSEY SPECIAL
Pacific Of the West
Tuesday, March 22,1994
SPORTS
Pow power hits home again
REPEAT SOFTBALL CHAMPS: (Back) Charles Nho, Wayland Wong, Dave Peppin, Chung
Wong, Harold Park, Don Mah, (Front) Deanna Ho, Cindy Wong, Doreen Lang, (Missing)
Franka Cordua-von Specht
In its first game, POW won 27-
0 over a fun group from Totem Park
IT turned out that March 13 was residence called the Danglers. Their
a beautiful day to hold the UBC poor right fielder had no glove, and
Intramurals Spring Softball   being a right-handed catcher, POW
BY CHARLES MHO	
T turned out that March 13 was
beautiful day to hold the UBC
Intramurals Spring Softball
Tournament. The rains that sprinkled
during the pre-breakfast hours gave
way to threatening, but dry, overcast
skies. Some 16 teams in two
divisions, sharks and guppies, were
warming up while underneath the
cover of a roof, the BBQ grills were
being prepped for the flood of hungry
ballplayers to come.
POW was attempting win its
second straight Intramurals softball
tournament and had for this purpose
a brand new $120, cherry-red, end-
loaded, 30 oz., Easton bat.
had none to offer her. POW offered
to end the game before finishing the
last at bats and the offer was
graciously accepted.
In game two, POW beat the
Boxcars, also of Totem, 18-7.
Then a confident 2-0 POW team
came across the Bats, Mounds and
Balls from the Commerce faculty.
In a close contest marked by great
defensive plays and close calls at
home, BMB prevailed 10-9.
"We might have won if we won
the coin toss" said POW captain
Don Mah, loser of every single toss
that day.
The playoff round pitted POW
against a physically huge group who
must of thought they were in a beer
league. They won in screaming and
taunting, POW, the game 13-2
thanks to clutch hitting by Wayland
Wong and Cindy Wong.
The championship game for the
Sharks division was played while
most teams had gone home for the
day. POW, reaching the finals for
the third straight year, came out on
top 11-7 over Gage residences'
Unlawful Cargage—POW's nod for
most sportsman-like team of the
tournament—to win for the second
time this school year.
TAKE THE CREDIT!
Your Future in
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Tel:   (604)432-8786
KNOWLEDGE THAT WORKS
BRITISH COLUMBIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
NCAA BRIEF Is it just me
or is this years' NCAA mens basketball
tournament lacklustre and, so far, boring
compared to previous years? Where are
the buzzer-beating shots like two years
ago when James Forrest of Georgi a Tech
beat Harold Miner and the USC Trojans
on a last second trey to which courtside
analyst Al McGuire yelled "Holy
Mackeral!" three times?
This year there is no mystique of
an all-freshman class such as Michigan's
Fab Five. No over-powering, trash-
talking dominant team like the Runnin'
Rebels of Larry Johnson, Stacey
Augmon and Greg Anthony.
What's hurting this years tourny
is, in part, the officiating. What's with
all the charging calls? It seems a guy
can't drive to the goal without some
defender sliding under him while he is
in the air and falling down to emphasize
the point. This exact scenario has
happened to Rick Branson of Temple,
Keith Booth of Maryland and many
others this year.
There are upsets every year. Boston
College ousting defending champion
North Carolina is certainly huge. And,
oh, the Kentucky Wildcats are gone too.
The reason why this is not a surprise has
to do with Travis Ford not being a
complete point guard and the team's
ridiculous new uniforms. Who
would chose those playful striped zebra
colors over their old classic Kentucky
blue? Wearing the old jersey instilled
pride and brought out the best, or so
former Wildcat Ail-American Jamal
Mashburn said.
Finally, POW's first team Ail-
American team: Jalen Rose, Michigan,
at the point; VoshonLenard, Minnesota,
shooting guard; Donyell Marshall,
Connecticut, swinger; Glenn Robinson,
Purdue, power forward; Joe Smith,
Maryland, at the pivot. Of that group
there are four juniors and a freshman.
LONDON
FLIGHTS
from $598 return
Price is for full time student with ISIC.
Flights are subject to availability and conditions apply.
Plu& Eurail and Britrail Passes on the spot!
See TRAVEL CUTS for full details:
Lower Level, Student Union Building 822-6890
£? TRAVEL CUTS
Wm VH Canadian Universities Travel Service Limited
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Women Students' Office Sexual Harassment Office Student Health Outreach Ho^
Did You Know?
According to a Statistics Canada Survey
on violence against women, that:
One-half of all Canadian women have experienced at least one incident
of violence since the age of 1 6
Almost one-half of women reported violence by men known to them and
one-quater reported violence by a stranger
One quarter of all women have experienced violence at the hands of a
current or post marital partner (includes common-law unions)
More than one-in-ten women who reported violence in a current
marriage have at some point felt their lives were in danger
For more information or help, call:
Women Students'Office           822-2415                AMS Safety Hazard Line 822-SAFE
Sexual Harassment Office 822-6353
Student Counselling 822-3811
WAVAW/Rape Crisis 255-6344
Student Health Outreach'
R.C.M.P.
822-4858
224-1322
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II
DENMAN OPTICAL
689-5523
In Denman Place Mall, 1030 Denman St at Comox
1 hour free parking-enter off Comox Licensed & Diploma'd Opticians 10       Tuesday, March 22, 1994
Pacific Of the West
UBYSSEY SPECIAL
For inquiries on
works l*y
Cheryl Niamath
CaB 739~$m
Pow
Editor
Effie Pow
Managing Editor
Michelle Wong
Senior'Editors
Steve Chow
Chung Wong
Charles Nho
Bianca Zee
¥hoto Editors
Lisa Kwan
Jemi Choi
tyzvs Editors
Sara Martin
Graham Cook
Taivo Evard
^sia'Bureau
Hao Li
Ma&faiCBuTeau
Karen Young
'Toronto'Bureau
Sharon Lindores
USA correspondent
Raul Peschiera
CoverThoto Editors
Rosa Tseng, Steve Chan
Cheryl Niamath
meportersAPfiotograpfiers
Karen Go, Ellen Yeung,
Sam Green, Julie Lee
David Buchanan, George King,
Tessa Moon, Michi Lyle,
Ted Young-Ing, Cathy Lu
Advertising
Lyanne Evans
822-3977
SUB 241K
6138 S.U.B. BLVD
VANCOUVER, B.C., V6T 1Z1
A Ubyiiey Special Edition,
Tel: (604) 822-2301    Fax: (604) 822-9279
See works by Rosa
Tseng at the UBC
Bookstore and the
AMS Art Gallery tat
SUB on display now
For more info:
<v, 263*2285 .
In Our Time
At times they must move like intelligence operatives monitoring an
unraveling event, anticipating every move like a sniper.
David Loh has his sights on a Pulitzer Prize
BY CHUNG WONG
NOT EVERY picture tells a
thousand words.
Only the best will articulately relay a
story up front and capture what Henri Cartier-
Bresson called the "decisive moment."
Too often, photos appear like flat, silent,
still-life when compared with the footage of
a newsreel, particularly in an era when hardhitting gritty realism photos are being replaced
by soft stylized art: what former London
Observer war junkie Don {Unreasonable
Behaviour) McCullin called consumer images
to sell newspapers and magazines.
A photo is a newspaper's store front, a
reader's window to a powerful witness
experience.
A good photo will retain in-depth details
that cannot be grasped by the shallow
experience of video news images moving in
split seconds. The skilled photographers
capitalize on an ability to conceptualize, to
penetrate an experience and freeze it for reader
analysis. They prepare intuitively for a
decisive moment in time, a frame which
embodies the full gravity of an event. They
portray non-fiction with the absorbing quality
of a brilliant painting.
At times they must move like intelligence
operatives monitoring an unraveling event,
anticipating every move like a sniper.
Agence France Presse last summer
converted this newsroom into a command
post just to position itself for a good shot of
Bill Clinton and Boris Yeltsin meeting at
UBC president David Strangway's cliffside
home. The mood ofthe newsroom resembled
the euphoria of The War Room, with its
scurrying staff, crackling radios, makeshift
negative hang lines, TV monitors, maps and
portable computer image scanners for the
wire. There was a constant watch on all
competition and a scramble of shooters. All
this to jockey for one good moment.
The rush included AFP shooter Mandel
Ngan, a former photo editor here, known for
his attachment to image detail and texture.
"Always capture the eyes," he used to say.
When Ngan departed for AFP in Hong
Kong five years ago, he left behind a legion of
talent. Steve Chan, who moonlighted for The
Vancouver Courier, was known for his ability
to frame the supernatural in sport. He
meditated until they came: the volleyball dig,
the soccer head, the slam dunk, the Hail Mary,
and the rugby touch.
His infamous 105 mm lens gave you an
idea of how close he stood to the action. The
dent in the lens hood said more. He too aimed
for a statement from "the eyes."
He battled the harsh lights of War
Memorial Gym and the scratched glass ofthe
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre. Not too
mention rain and nightfall. He circled the
arenas and gyms and positioned his strobes
DON MAH PHOTO
like a ringmaster.
Then there was his colleague, the ever
tenacious and vocal David Loh, the Pit burger
flipper, whom The Globe and Mail ranked as
the number two amateur news photographer
in the country after only a year's experience
in photojournalism. The 1993 World Press
contestant stalked cities and jungles searching
for a Magnum moment, brushing elbows,
every now and then with Black Star shooters.
He had high aspirations; he wanted a Pulitzer
Prize by 1996.
He pulled every book on photojournalism
off the shelf. He read voraciously about the
Magnum masters or his "uncles" as he would
jokingly term them. There was uncle Eugene
(Smith), uncle Henri (Cartier-Bresson), uncle
Sabastiao (Salgado), and of course, uncles
Robert and Cornell (the Capa brothers). Those
who hung around Loh have Magnum seared
into their minds.
In Hong Kong recently, Loh went on a
shoot with the legendary Toronto Star shooter
Boris Spremo, the man who speaks few words
but spins many with his award-winning breathtaking photos. On another day, he spotted
Magnum photographer Chris Steele-Perkins,
the current World Press contest champion,
covertly taking pictures in the streets with one
body, an Olympus dinosaur. The Magnum
shooter stressed working imaginatively with
one lens instead of "letting different lenses do
SEE NEXT PAGE UBYSSEY SPECIAL
Pacific Of the West
Tuesday, March 22, 1994       11
PHOTO CAREER from previous page
the work."
While appraising photos which
failed to sketch a story, Steele-
Perkins' favourite line was "by the
end of the day, I could do without
it." The photographer, he stressed,
has to rid distractions and embrace
story-telling images, including
visuals for who, what, where, when,
why and how. Like Steele-Perkins,
Loh is obsessed at properly
recording an event and providing a
fresh angle.
Loh, recently offered a job with
Associated Press in Malaysia, is an
editor's photographer. Self-taught,
Loh is known to blitz wire service
offices like Reuters for an update
on the latest technology in the
industry. One seldom solicits effort
from him. His biorhythms are
centred around photography so the
Prize does not elude him.
His silent colleague Don Mah,
a former shooter for BC Report,
retired for a year after a visit to
Buddhist temples in Asia but is
slowly creeping back. Mah's
character is much like the reclusive
Magnum phenom James (Deeds of
War) Nachtwey, the Time contract
shooter and Robert Capa incarnate.
He prefers to remain invisible behind
his camera. He aims to capture naked
emotion in the dizzying heat of the
action. He is the type to jump into
the middle of violent protests to
capture the human spirit of dissent.
"If your pictures aren't good
enough, you aren't close enough,"
he would say, citing Capa. He
followed the five Ps: patience, plan,
persistence, passion and "phocus."
Two years ago, the community-
minded Mah pioneered a special
Young Visions project at UBC
arranging point-and-shoot cameras
to be sponsored for children at
Jericho Hill School For The Deaf.
In a spread, the students presented
OPTION
what they saw but could not hear.
There have been many others
of course. Dan Andrews was known
for his broad use of grey scale in a
frame and precision printing,
fashioning his work after Ansel
Adams. Paul Thomson, a pupil of
Ted Grant, was adept at including
many stories in his mis-en-scene
compositions, and at utilizing film
to its optimal potential.
Childcare,
Student Loans,
Transit,
Safety,
Housing...
rams
k
External
Affairs
Committee
...if these are your issues,
this is your committee.
Make a difference!
The AMS is now accepting applications for
(6) Student-at-large positions on the
External Affairs Committee.
Applications can be picked up from
Terri Folsom in SUB 238 and are due back
to her by Friday, March 25, 1994.
If you have any questions,
please call Leah Costello,
Coordinator of External Affairs at 822-2050,
or drop by SUB 250.
| Hey IlOu! |
^ Are you a student with ^
^ an interest in art? ^
^ Trie AMS Art Gallery ^
^ Committe wants you.      ^
^ Pick up an application ^j
^ rorm in SUB room ^
g? 238 and det involved ^
wi
ithart
on campus
I
W////////^^^^^^
The part-time Orestes cook
souped film and printed pictures
like he smoked a cigarette. He was
smooth. There was also John Manis,
the second coming of Steve Chan.
All of these shooters were
endangered species in a city that
would not hire photographers even
to replace those who had died.
They were often misunderstood
by those who owned them, self-
centred writers and news editors
ignorant of photographic
composition who come close to
insulting the profession. And some
photographers like myself have
defected to the dark side to become
solely writers, for the big league
unions in the city could not have it
both ways. Photographers could not
afford an invasion of writers on their
SEE PAGE 8
PEPSFCIUNC.
CAREER INFORMAT.ONSESS.ON
Hostess^ntft^e^ Company respresentatives inv^ry^j^fo join them for
a Ca/6^&IP*"''^a''"'nn coccinn run hohalf <-vf Doric i-f^r. IwW \
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anc
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ith divisions world-wide.
PepsiCo. Inc is a $22<fpon orgginizati!
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Please join ui for Piz^4nd Pepsi to discuss tr^se^citing caree/
opportunities^        5   y f"' \ /
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Whenr
y
Where:
Wednesday, 30 March ±9^4\
5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
The Forum in the David Lam
-Management Research Centre-
oy
A lunch-time symposium sponsored by
The Faculty Association
and the
Alma Mater Society
Is our Campus in Decline?
Teaching and Learning
AT UBC
A public forum for student, public, and faculty opinion on UBC's
physical, intellectual, and social condition in the '90s
Thursday, March 24, 1994
Law Theatre, Rm 101
Faculty of Law, UBC campus
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
Speakers will include:
Dr. G. Spiegelman, Professor of Microbiology, UBC
* Teaching and Learning in a Crumbling Campus
Mr. W. Dobie, President, UBC Alma Mater Society
Ms. S. Hoenie, Graduate Student Society
* Learning Conditions, Personal Security, and Quality of Life at UBC
Dr. N. Guppy, Professor of Sociology
* Accessibility to UBC—Keeping Faith with British Columbian Families
Dr. W. Bruneau, President, UBC Faculty Association
* Where Do We Go From Here?
Admission Free - All Welcome
Free coffee and cookies will be available at the end of the symposium.
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