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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 21, 1969

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Array T*-\
Under the covers
On page 3, a report on a fight between clubs in SUB and the AMS over booking policy.
The African Relief Services Committee got off the ground at UBC Thursday. See page 6.
On page 7 is a fascinating exchange between students and classes read Malcolm McGregor.
Page 9, where to eat on campus; page 10, more of whaf Vancouver's Women's Caucus is doing; page 28, a report
on student unionism in the Maritimes.
UBC'S
crowded,
inefficient
bookstore
Here's what students think
of conditions there, and
the reasons manager Jack
Hunter gives for problems.
By JIM DAVIES
Long line-ups, slow service, not enough space, lack of
books, and high prices-these are some student complaints
about the UBC bookstore.
One thing that really shakes students up is that they
get a five-per-cent discount on their books, if they can
remember to keep all of their sales slips.
Professors get a 10-per-cent discount immediately
when they buy their texts from the bookstore.
Considering that many sales slips are lost, this means
a seven or eight-per-cent discount advantage for UBC
professors over students.
Bookstore manager Jack Hunter explained this
discrepancy by calling it "tradition".
Long waits for ordered books remain one of the
biggest headaches.
"It certainly gets to be a pain in the neck ordering
books," said Wayne Johnson, graduate studies 7.
"I guess it's all right if you don't mind waiting four or
five weeks for a book."
Some have had to wait longer for books.
"Several of my classmates and myself have had to
wait two months for a text, Social Work With Groups, by
Helen Northen," said Wyn Gladman, social work 2.
The whole thing is disorganized'
The shortage of space is also a problem in the
bookstore. Narrow crowded aisles piled high with crates
of books are not an uncommon sight. However, perhaps
the most frustating experience in the bookstore involves
the seemingly endless line-ups at the cash registers.
"There's just no room, there's too many people and
the whole thing is disorganized," said Mike Nahachewski,
'education 2.
Finding books in the store is yet another problem.
"My biggest problem is that I can never find the book
I am looking for," said Peter Horwood, arts 3.
"I looked for three weeks for a copy of Plato's
Republic to no avail."
Price differences between the UBC bookstore and
those downtown are also a concern.
"There are definitely discrepancies in the price of
books between here and Duthie's," said John Schreiber,
education 5.
"I have noted at least ten or a dozen different cases in
which the book prices are higher here than at Duthie's."
"One specific book that I remember from last year
was Northwest Coast Art, my anthropology 301 text,
which cost 80 cents more at UBC than downtown.
'The slow line-ups have ceased to bother me. I guess I
have become conditioned to them. You can become
conditioned to anything."
One of the few things in the bookstore that students
really appreciate is the magazine stand. There is inevitably
a large crowd around the stand absorbing all of the latest
"news.
"I like the magazines, you don't have to buy them,"
said Horwood.
The bookstore downtown were sympathetic to the
situation of the UBC bookstore.
WE UBYSSEY
Vol. LI, No. 20        VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, T969        <*^^48     228-2305
—dirk visser photo
YUK IT UP, she said laughingly. But all is not smiles and chuckles with the UBC Bookstore.
Bill Duthie of Duthie's book stores said, "I think that
the job of a campus bookstore is very difficult."
"Bookstores on campus don't make any money."
But assistant administration treasurer H. M. Craven
said the UBC bookstore cleared over $98,000 last year.
"There always are students picketing university book
stores," said Duthie.
Ted Fraser, owner of the Book Barrel chain said: "We
thought of opening a university bookstore, however, we
don't know enough about operating such a store and we
were, at any rate, unable to obtain a suitable location..
"I would think that a co-op bookstore would be the
answer for the university."
Currently, the Book Barrel buys used texts and sells
them for half-price.
The campus bookstore, meanwhile, is doing a
booming business. Business is good enough to afford
employment of about 50 staff members. There are 38
full-time staff, six "full time hourly staff," and a handful
of part-time students.
Hunter discussed students' complaints.
"We have no control over late orders," he said.
"Our prices are fair and the shortage of space is only,
I hope, a temporary one."
New site proposed
Hunter was referring to the plans for a new bookstore
on the UBC campus. The plans are still in the air, but the
committee involved in the issue is expected to be releasing
information in the near future.
The latest proposed site of the new bookstore is the
area on Main Mall south of Brock Hall and behind the
library.
Eight students are avidly interested in all bookstore
news. They have been caught stealing from the bookstore
in the last week and their fate rests on the decisions of
Hunter's "superiors". Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 21, 1969
—dave enns photo
NIGEL GOODWIN . . . 'Beatles reflect alienation
Your head is where it's at'
By JENNIFER JORDAN
John and Yoko take off their clothes, but they
are only free of their clothes.
That's because freedom is relative, says actor
Nigel Goodwin.
Goodwin's talk in SUB ballroom Thursday,
illustrated frequently b> records, revolved about the
content and meaning of the Beatle's songs. Nowhere
Man, Eleanor Rigby and She's Leaving Home all
concern man's alienation in society, his lonliness
and continual search for identity. "Shut your eyes,
its all in the head, Look on the inside-that's where
its at," Goodwin said.
Goodwin, a graduate of the Royal Academy of
Dramatic Art presented much of his speech in
booming stage-style, with grandoise gestures and
painfully expressive facial contortions.
Stepping around the litter of books and 45's on
the stage, Goodwin expounded his theory of
individual freedom, enlarging his perspective to
include    references    to    Paul    Simon,    who
"communicates lack of communication," a history
of art forms and the tracing of man's withdrawal
into himself.
"Rembrandt paints what is there in the natural
world, but there is nothing empirical in modern art,
for the art is felt, objectives aren't known
anymore," he said.
Goodwin had few new things to say about the
modern "plastic" world. "Man went soft, he began
to concentrate on materialism. But this is not the
way, for man has to suffer. All the beautiful art and
literature has been born out of suffering."
He said the whole answer to the discovery of
one's identity and the finding of the inner meaning
of life is to look into oneself as deeply as possible.
"It is necessary to blow your mind to find your
mind."
There was a brief mention of Paul McCartney in
Goodwin's rather lengthy talk. "McCartney is dead.
Not physically. He is dead because he has nothing
new to say in his music."
Pro-Panther
films today
The Black Panther Party has
been hailed as the defender of
American black people, and
damned as just another ghetto
street gang. Two films today at
noon in SUB 207/209 take a look
at the Panthers from a
sympathetic point of view.
One film, "Off the Pig",
features interviews with Panther
information minister Eldridge
Cleaver and an explanation of the
Panther 10-point program. The
second Panther film, "Mayday", is
about the May 1969 rallies in
support of imprisoned Panther
defence minister Huey P. Newton.
Also to be shown at the same
time is a film on last spring's
Richmond, California, oil strike.
Students from San Francisco
State College and from University
of California, Berkeley, joined oil
workers on the picket line.
A film on the current
California grape strike will be
shown as well.
The film showing is sponsored
by the Industrial Workers of the
World. Admission is by donation.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) -
Blorgs of all descriptions and
colors united for their annual
mutiplication and addition spree
but were found to be laboring
under a misconception.
Biafra relief day idea ignored
The idea of a Biafra relief day at UBC never
even got to the Alma Mater Society council.
AMS external affairs officer Mike Doyle said
"A Biafra relief day was a silly idea after a Vietnam
day moratorium, there just wouldn't be the
interest."
The Biafra relief day is being organized by the
McMaster University student union. A letter was
sent to the AMS asking that UBC participate in
raising money to buy a plane to fly food into Biafra.
Sociology prof Ron Silvers said he learned from
organizers at McMaster that the letter to UBC had
not even been answered.
Silvers complained that the idea of a relief day
had not even been taken to council. Doyle said
council couldn't be bothered with such things.
"We have invited Stanley Burke to speak and
invited the Nigerian students to present their
position, but a moratorium just wouldn't be
successful," Doyle said.
He also said that the letter had been answered
Oct. 29.
Participating universities are McMaster,
Toronto, Carleton, McGill, York and Dalhousie.
Loyola students sit in
MONTREAL (CUP) - Fifty Loyola college
students blocked the corridors outside the
office of administration president Patrick
Malone for an hour Wednesday in anticipation
of a Canadian Association of University
Teachers investigation into the unexplained
dismissal of a physics professor.
CAUT is expected to announce a
commission of inquiry late this week into the
dismissal of S. A. Santhanam by the Loyola
administration last spring.
A meeting of the colleges 270-man arts
faculty council voted Wednesday night by a
two-to-one margin* to support binding arbitration
by CAUT, and to ask for an immediate vote of
all Loyola faculty on the question, by mail if
necessary.
The 6-hour closed meeting also narrowly
defeated a motion of non-confidence in arts
dean Michael Blaner, who has not supported
arbitration.
The students hoped the sit-in would show
CAUT their determination to have Santhanam
re-hired.
Wednesday (November 19) five students
including student president Marcel Nouvet,
were released from "disciplinary probation"
imposed for their part in a sit-in Nov. 12
protesting the dismissal. Sit-ins have also
occurred Nov. 13 and 14 for an hour each day.
Hearings on the probations have been
postponed indefinitely and may not occur at
all.
The Loyola senate meanwhile will set up a
13-man task force to study restruturing the
senate with an eye to more student
representation. The task force will include four
professors and four students—one each from
the faculties of Arts, science, commerce and
engineering—four senators and Malone as
chairman.
The senate will consider Thursday a
motion from one of the three student senators to
add three more students to the 28-man body.
TYPEWRITERS
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and STATIONERS
4514 W. 10th        224-7818
2 blocks East of UBC  Gates
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12th & Alma Telephone 736-9804
DR. JOHN TUZO WILSON
president of Erindale College
of the
University of Toronto
and the fourth Dal Grauer Memorial Lecturer
will give two public lectures:
ill
'CONTINENTAL DRIFT: The Latest
Revolution in Science"
8:15 p.m. Nov. 25 Totem Park Lounge
•
"WHY DOES THE MOON NOT LOOK
LIKE THE EARTH?"
12:30 p.m. Nov. 26 Hebb Theatre
Dr. Wilson, a geophysicist, is a strong advocate of the
theory of continental drift. He was responsible for
construction of a special laboratory at Erindale College
to study samples of moon rock and moon dust brought
back by Apollo 11. Friday, November 21, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
FILM SOCIETY QUITS PROGRAM
'Members just mechanical AMS employees'
By SANDY KASS
There may be no on-campus
film presentations after Christmas.
Film Society has resigned from
the operation of the SUB film
program and claims, as a result, to
be threatened with loss of funds
and equipment.
In a letter to SUB building
manager Graeme Vance said:
"Members of our club have
become mechanical employees of
the Alma Mater Society rather
than active members of a group of
individuals with a common
interest."
The move follows the general
unrest felt by many of UBC's
clubs that are being affected by an
AMS policy that, so far, hasn't
been made clear.
Possible office reallocations are
being studied by the SUB
management committee and all
profit-making films sponsored by
student clubs have been banned
unless an undetermined
percentage of their profits are
turned over to the AMS.
'WE'RE BEING TRAMPLED'
"Clubs provide all cultural and
entertaining activities on this
campus, and now they have a
feeling of being stepped on," said
Tougas.
"Council is not supposed to be
house mothers. They weren't able
to exert any power like this until
the clubs moved into SUB."
"The AMS realized that Film
Society made a great deal of
money on their commercial
shows, and insisted on this year's
film program being renamed to
SUB Films. The main problem is
psychological. Film Society is
operating the AMS program, and
that in itself is demoralizing.
"We are not opposed to giving
the AMS money, but we are
opposed to waht has happened to
the type of film programming
being done this year."
Tougas said the price of film
showings has been upped to 75
cents and booking has been
slowed   down   a   great   deal,
3 students
to speak
Three students involved in the
computer incident at Sir George
Williams University will speak at
noon today in SUB ballroom.
The three are Rosie Douglas,
co-chairman of the Congress of
Black Writers; Carl Parris, a McGill
grad student; Gordon Saul, staff
reporter for the Uruhu.
Douglas is presently out on
bail, facing 12 criminal charges.
Come hear
this man
Federal minister of finance
Edgar Benson will speak on
"taxation and the student" today
at noon in SUB auditorium.
The five to ten minute lecture
will be followed by a discussion
period.
The lecture is being sponsored
by the graduate students'
association. Benson is the man
behind the government white
paper on taxation which urges
taxation of scholarships and
student loans.
resulting in a much lower quality
of films being shown.
"It takes a long time to book a
good film. Students can only lose
with this kind of set—up," he said.
However, Film Society is still
responsible for bookings.
"We're getting a little tired of
working for the AMS only on the
assumption that we will get
something in return."
In past years, the
administration has let failing
students return to university if
they have worked very hard in a
club. This year, however, there are
no allowances for hard-working
clubbers.
FEWER DANCES
"I don't think the AMS are
aware of how hard it is for a
person who is really working hard
for a club," said Tougas.
He added, "I also feel that the
AMS is unaware of what SUB
management committee . is
concocting in regards to the club
situation."
But Film Society is not the
only club with complaints.
Said Nader Merhady, science
fiction club public relations
officer: "We wanted to show
science fiction films and had the
room and films all booked, but
SUB Films monopolize so much
time there is no chance to show
our films without conflicting
programs."
There are fewer and fewer
dances in SUB this year, possibly
because of reallocation of time
available to them in the party
room. '
"The party room was originally
designed as a lounge," said AMS
co-ordinator Dave Grahame.
"We are, in a way, trying to
curtail the clubs' activities,
because we feel there is a more
important use for the party room.
There are so many kids sitting in
the halls at lunch and other times,
I want a place for them to go.
'The dance club still has use of
the party room at certain times.
How do you decide how to ration
what time to who?"
At the university clubs
committee meeting Tuesday,
Grahame was asked about the
AMS policy changes regarding
clubs.
"The AMS lost a great deal of
money last year on SUB operating
expenses," he said. "We now need
new revenue-producing areas.
Convention facilities are being cut
down to give students more
lounge area, and the money has to
come from somewhere.
NEGATIVE APPROACH
"We don't want to have to take
the money out of general student
fees, so we have decided that
small groups that use these
all-student facilities should pay
for their use. The clubs will be
paying for the operation of SUB
for everyone, not the AMS."
Grahame said with more
money, the UCC will get larger
grants, which will mean that more
money can go back to the
individual clubs.
But UCC chairman Hanson Lau
pointed out that each student
already pays 10 cents towards the
maintenance of SUB.
"If you ask me, this is a very
negative approach to a club's
activities," Lau said.
Floyd Sully, Film Society
executive member, asked: "What
percentage of film profits do we
have to pay to the AMS?"
"I'm not concerned with
percentages," replied Grahame.
"We're not running films for the
precise purpose of making money.
If UBC floods the market on
films, someone is going to suffer
the loss.
"Student groups cannot hold
any money-raising function in
SUB, without contributing to the
pay for a flat rental of space, but
the AMS just won't accept that.
Their prices are just ridiculous.
We're interested in films, not
hassling with the AMS."
But, said AMS treasurer Chuck
Campbell: "As far as I know, Film
Society has never tried to rent
space."
Grahame said the main purpose
of SUB Films is to build up more
money for the operation of SUB.
rather than active members of a
group of individuals with a
common interest. It is, very
simply, a loss of identity, and no
hypothetical monetary
recompense can effectively quell
this emotion.
"Naturally we will remain true
to our verbal commitment and
continue with the showing of the
'SUB Film Program' for the
remainder of this term. Our hope
—bruce stout photo
CARLOS MONTOYA plays to capacity crowd in SUB ballroom Tuesday night. Audience was delighted
by Montoya's musical verbosity as he skilfully played various Spanish songs. Ovation brought an encore
including a Spanish version of the blues song "St. Louis Blues."
maintenance of the building."
"What happens if a club books
a film to be shown for profit in a
non-SUB room?" asked Wayne
Moore, parliamentary council
UCC rep.
"I am in charge of all
on-campus bookings," said
Grahame.
"What happens if a club says
no to your policy?" asked Moore.
"I guess we'll just have to wait
until that situation arises," said
Grahame.
'BENEFITS STUDENTS'
Grahame met with other
executive and SUB management
members Tuesday afternoon. The
main problem discussed was the
reallocation of offices to allow for
maximum student use of SUB.
Financial problems were not
discussed.
"This is not just a film thing,
but a situation concerning the
whole club policy," said Sully.
"Film Society was willing to
"It may be detrimental to Film
Society, but it is a benefit to the
students as a whole," he said.
The following is the text of
Film Society's letter to Vance
Wednesday:
"This memo is to inform you
of our executive and members
decision to discontinue our
participation in the 'SUB Film
Program'.
" "In past discussions it became
evident that your organization
was not only interested in some
financial benefit from club's
activities: your organization
effectively requested complete
control over this film program,
hence naming it the 'SUB Film
Program', rather than a film
society endeavor.
''Barring monetary
considerations,     this
unfortunately has resulted in the
overwhelming feeling that the
members of our club have become
mechanical employees of the AMS
is that discussions between your
organization and our club will
commence immediately to
consider further possibilities in
film society's use of the SUB
Auditorium.
"As always, our concern will
be to provide the best and most
reasonably priced entertainment
for the students and faculty of
this university."
'EXPERIMENT'
Replied Vance: "SUB Films
were instituted experimentally,
and their success or failure will be
reviewed at Christmas. If need be,
I will continue it myself."
He made no comment on what
would happen to film society if
SUB Films went on without it,
but said: "I am somewhat
disappointed. I thought that we
(the AMS and film society )iad
reached a reasonable agreement.
"We're  not  ready  to  close the
To page 23: see SUSPICION Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 21, 1969
THE UtYSStY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
NOVEMBER 21, 1969
Academics?
Wednesday, the academic activities committee
sponsored a discussion of Canadian poet Leonard
Cohen: literary genius or mercenary hack? The talk
featured one-time Vancouver "poet" Jamie Reid.
We didn't go.
This weekend, the academic activities committee
will sponsor the annual science symposium, this year
featuring eastern "lecturer and biologist" Hardial Bains.
We won't go to that either.
The reason we don't attend academic activities
committee events is that we like a little variety in those
activities that are supposed to stimulate our minds.
But when one event features Jamie Reid, top man
in the Vancouver Student Movement, a subsidiary of the
Canadian Student Movement, and the next event
features Hardial Bains, founder and top man in the
Canadian Student Movement, we don't see much variety
coming.
The Movement calls itself an organization of
revolutionary Maoist communists. It is becoming rather
infamous.
It puts out posters with slogans like: "Trudeau,
Prince of Lackies" and so on* and hangs them over its
literature table in SUB.
It puts out a paper called Vancouver Student that
features the phraseology right from the beginning:
bourgeois, capitalist, lap-dog-lackeys of the grotesque
U.S. war-mongering imperialists... and so on.
It has become quite famous for its "struggle
sessions" with prospective members, a technique that
involves several Movement members hurling questions at
the lone dissenter, shaking off his retorts with rhetoric
and shooting back more questions for which they all
have rehearsed answers.
Its members hogged the microphones at last year's
AMS general meeting and attempted to disrupt the
meeting. Similar things have happened at other
meetings.
Its members attempted to disrupt the peaceful
demonstration of the Committee to End the War in
Vietnam when Trudeau visited Vancouver during the
summer.
In other words,   they are very dedicated people.
They are discounted by the right, they are scorned
by the left and find their only recruits among the lost,
the confused and the cause-less.
We have given up arguing rationally with these
people. We know how they reject argument in favor of
rhetoric, rationality in favor of screaming, logic in favor
of abuse.
But the academic activities committee seems to
like them. Perhaps the fact that committee chairman
Elaine Wismer is a member of the Vancouver Student
Movement has something to do with this.
But we don't like going to discussions when we
know the speaker is committed to an irrational, illogical
philosophy that he will attempt to shove down your
throat.
Editor: Michael Finlay
 Paul Knox
City     Nate Smith
Managing    Moshe Curtis
Photo    Bruce Stout
Wire .Irene Wastlewski
Senior John Twigg
Sports Jim Maddin
Ass't News    Maurice Bridge
Page Friday Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
"It's the ghost of columnists past,"
screamed Nick Orchard, the ghost of
columnists present, as newly
respectable Gabor Mate guided an
Impressionable group of high schoolers
through the office.
Jim Davies demonstrated "the old
swinging, from the chandelier trick"
until Sandy Kass reminded him there is
no chandelier.
FranFran McGrath, Dave Keillor,
Ginny Gait, John Andersen, John
Lingley, Steve Lucas, Robert Bennett,
Jennifer Jordan, Anne Raie, Bernard
Bischoff and Phil Barkworth worked.
Shane McCune was not a good boy
at any time during the day.
In the sports department, Kelvin
Beckett announced his seventeenth
annual campaign for AMS president,
causing Dick Button, Tony Gallagher,
Scott McCloy and Jim Stevenson to
have second thoughts about
democracy.
Today It was Stout who blew it, so
nobody will know who the photogs
were.
LETTERS
Diversion
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Not one laudatory comment
on Kula's cartoon? Am I the only
person not offended by it?
I am anti - Vietnam War and
anti-public valgarity but I hope I
have a realistic enough grip on life
that I can appreciate a diversion
(in the form of an original idea) as
a diversion — not be confused
with the main issues.
The word "realistic " may be
alien to many of your idealistic
readers but is in frequent use in
the outside world.
TONY SMEARS
sc. 4
Nation-rape
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It appeared from the letters to
the editor in The Ubyssey on Nov.
14 that the cartoon by John Kula
published in your paper on Nov. 7
had brought criticism from your
readers. Perhaps I am not in
agreement with those readers
however sophisticated they might
claim themselves to be.
Being a member of the Third
World nations in general and
Southeast Asia in particular, I
have experienced myself
imperialism as a monster which
rapes a nation not only sexually
(women of my country know it
very well) but also socially,
economically and culturally. In
general, it rapes a nation in all
aspects. In this context, the
cartoon has presented before us
one of the essential aspects of
imperialism, however obscene it
might appear from the surface. It
might offend one (as it had done)
if one had failed to rationalize its
deeper meaning. American
aggressors, like their other west
European partners, have raped
innumerable nations in the past
and still are engaged in that
unpardonable act on many foreign
soils. Unfortunately, Vietnam is
one of them. It is a hard fact and
we have nothing to deny it.
I congratulate cartoonist John
Kula for his bold idea, however
controversial it might be.
AL-MUJAfflD
grad studies
Praise
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
May I congratulate your
reporters Ginny Gait and Sandy
Kass for writing a fine article —
The blind man's lot in B.C. (The
Ubyssey, Nov. 18) - and may I
thank you for printing it.
The article was very well
written and organized and the two
reporters have shown a jornalistic
standard and maturaity which is
above their years and experience.
They have, in my opinion,
succeeded in presenting facts in an
unemotional and yet forceful
way, something which not even
professional journalists from the
two Vancouver papers have
accomplished as yet. Reporters
too often fall into the trap of
creating sob stories when dealing
with the problems of blindness
and the effect of such efforts
usually perpetuate i public
misunderstanding, rather than
eliminate it.
I hope that the article will
eventually go beyond the
university, which deserves nothing
but praise for its efforts in the
equalization of opportunities, into
the community where many just
do not understand.
PAUL E. THIELE
head, Crane Library
Women
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It would seem that if the
average Canadian woman had as
low mentality as is credited to her
by the women's liberation
movement (Nov. 18 issue), she has
nothing to gain by being
"liberated". It is incredible to
believe that   "women are forced
to  consume „ goods  and services
they don't want or need".
Advertising cannot change
basic motivation; at best it can
only reinforce and rechannel
existing patterns. If advertising
runs contrary to the individuals
predispositions it is likely to be
rejected or negatively interpreted.
Therefore, if a "box of shit" is
produced and sold, there is at
least one individual in the
ecomonomy who has use for it or
a predisposition to buy it.
The article claims that
marketing creates a waste of
resources. Advertising was one of
the functions that Marx in the
mid-nineteenth century
condemned as parasitic; this
philosophy was perpetuated in
Russia until the 1950's. At this
point — conincidental with large
increases in the economy, Russia
decided that indeed, advertising
was a most necessary function,
precisely the premise on which
our economy has operated since
its inception.
The Liberation News Service
bemoans the fact that more
dollars are spent for advertising
than for the poverty program.
Individuals are presently taxed at
the rate of about 20-30 per cent,
corporations at nearly 50 per
cent. How the government
chooses to spend the funds
allocated to it is surely no
reflection on the firm, the
advertising agency, the media or
the consumer. One solution to
this "imbalance" is to effect a
policy of 100 per cent taxation.
This, however, might create
problems in the economy beyond
solution by even the women's
liberation movement.
I protest the unreasonable and
meaningless exerpts taken out of
context by the News Service in
order to "prove" the sinister
intentions of advertising. The
shop-talk reprinted from the N.Y.
Times and Advertising Age is
simply a message from one
advertiser to another and is a poor
basis on which to condemn the
industry.
I imagine,that advertising men
would love to have a fraction of the
influence over consumption
patterns imputed to them by the
liberation movement.
TERRY ATKINSON
comm. 3
Listen to the women's
cosmetic ads on radio or TV or
look at them in newspapers,
magazines: do you have any idea
what would become of a woman
who failed to use her vaginal
deoderant or forgot to Fabulash
her eyes? My God, she would be
stoned like a leper by males and
females alike. It makes you
wonder what women did before
Max Factor, Revlon and Chanel
No. 5 came along.
Somewhere along the line, such
things have become wants and
then needs. At one time they were
neither. You tell us how that need
came to be. OK?-Ed.
More Women
Editor, The Ubyssey,  Sir:
Re: The Woman Market and
the Women's Caucus arricle (The'
Ubyssey, Nov. 18).
So Big Business, through their
blackhearted, unscrupulous
agents, the magazines, are
corrupting and oppressing
American womanhood (assuming
such a thing exists!). The writers
are indeed, to paraphrase, putting
shit in a box for their readers to Friday, November 21, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
buy, the very thing they accuse
business of!
Both articles expose a knitting
circle mentality and the always
present martyr complex of the
poor oppressed American female
of the type of the authors. Let's
face facts; business does not just
pick on women as the articles
infere (sic) but it picks on
anybody and besides does not
create needs, especially where
"creative" girls are involved.
From such comments as "...
women are forced to consume
large quantities of goods and
services they really don't need or
want" (forced?) and other
statments inferring (sic) that
females just do mechanically what
advertising tells them without
exercising any thought of their
own it must be assumed that such
girls are either simple or lazy and
thus such types are best off doing
housework that "doesn't require
much thoughf'-maybe they refer
to their own housework.
The whole theme of the article
appears to be that females in
America are oppressed by man
and for business and thus being
made sub-human — poppycock!
Maybe the real problems of these
women are those created by
themselves or maybe their
problems are in their poor simple
minds and don't realy exist
otherwise.
Come on Ubyssey, surely even
you can find better more
intelligent articles to fill your
pages or are you turning into a
crying towel
D. McCRIMMON
law 2
P.S.   Any   woman   who   thinks
would surely be insulted by the
articles.
You said it, not us.-Ed.
Dump
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I want to address myself to
both the editor of The Ubyssey
and the reporter who wrote the
article "Two-day moratorium
rehashes Vietnam atrocities" (A
poor headline, but that is not
what I am writing about).
I wonder why it is so common
for newspaper reporters to be
guilty of inaccurate reporting and
sensationalism. In my talk entitled
"The Ecological Effects of the
U.S.-Vietnam War", which I
presented at the teach-in on
Friday, Nov. 14, I quoted Pfeiffer
and Orians (Scientific Research,
June 23, 1969) as saying that
tigers were attracted by gunfire
and were on the increase. The
Ubyssey reporter saw fit to
change this to "... man eating
tigers . . . have overrun
Vietnamese jungles."
Your reporter has made the
Ubyssey,    the    Vietnam
moratorium   and   myself   less
credible. Perhaps the credibility of
The Ubyssey and that of myself is
not    all    that    important,    but
through   your   crummy   writing
(and this includes the headline)
you   have    done   the   Vietnam
moratorium   a   great   disservice.
JAN    DE    VRIES
asst.    prof
department of soil science.
More Dump
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I am writing in objection to the
editorial policy of The Ubyssey. I
find it very warped and
unnecessarily biased in the
criticism, of people holding
different viewpoints, and I think
that it is very sad that people can
have their letters answered with
such comments as "You
ill-begotten meathead!" Though I
laugh at these retorts instinctively,
I believe that this is an attempt at
silencing opinions contrary to the
editorial position. Obviously you
have your right to an opinion, but
in humiliating someone for his
opinion is wrong and contrary to
the democratic freedom which we
are able to enjoy. As John Stuart
Mill put it, "The worst offense of
this kind which can be committed
by a polemic, is to stigmatize
those who hold the contrary
opinion as bad an immoral men."
I believe that you have been doing
this and I hope that it will be
stopped. Another example was
your retort to Professor
Willmott's criticism of the
Vietnam cartoon, in which you
expressed your amazement at
Professor Willmott's lack of
knowledge of the "real" meaning
of the cartoon. Obviously he was
not alone, as other letters in the
paper showed. One more example
of your lack of concern for a.
reader's opinion was the Friday
letter defending the war games,
followed a few pages, later by
another article obviously mocking
these games, and showing no
concern for those in favour of
these games. I hope that you will
realize my point and correct your
error.
CHRIS HARVEY
arts 2
That "ill-begotten meathead"
wrote a letter slandering one of
our reporters. For someone who
so casually casts slurs when he is
himself so clearly in the wrong,
we have no respect and can only
treat him accordingly. Most
newspapers would not give him
any space to begin with.
Professor Willmott sent a
reasonable letter objecting to a
cartoon whose meaning he had
mistaken. Reasonable, at least, up
to the point where he took it
upon himself to deliver a
patronizing, pseudo-hip remark
that   "... man,   you just  don't
know where it's at." Willmott is
not divine where the Vietnam war
is concerned, he is just another
person with another opinion,
informed, we suppose, to a greater
or lesser degree than others.
To reasonable letters, we give
reasonable replies.—Ed.
War Notes
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It may be of interest to those
who signed the petitions to Prime
Minister Trudeau and to President
Nixon, protesting the War in
Vietnam, to know that a telegram
was been sent with 485 names to
the Prime Minister, and a telegram
without names to the President.
In sufficient'money was collected
from signers to send all the names
to Washington.
The original petitions with
signatures will be sent to the
Minister for External Affairs, Mr.
Sharp, and as a letter to the editor
of the New York Times.
We have obtained copies of the
telegrams and they will be
displayed as soon as possible in
the AMS' glass-enclosed bulletin
board on the ground floor of
SUB. The telegram to Prime
Minister Trudeau is approximately
eight feet long.
UBC MORATORIUM
COMMITTEE
Oppression
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In the recent (Nov. 14) edition
of The Ubyssey, there appeared
an article concerned with the
Unemployed Citizens' Welfare
Improvement Council and their
fight for equality and justice for
the poor, the unemployed, and
other oppressed groups in society.
In the headline which read
"Mussolini is our welfare
minister" I was credited with
writing the story.
Firstly, that headline should
have read "Our Problem is not
Theoretical; Our Problem is
Food". Secondly, I wish to point
out that I was not the author of
this article. This was a general
news release by the group itself,
and should not have been credited
to me or any other individual
person.
For the sake of accuracy, could
you publish an erratum to that
effect?
JEFF MARVIN
We make the headlines, not
you. We regret that the article was
attributed solely to you, but this
was our understanding.-Ed.
Poop Poop
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Once again our senator and
Ubyssey reporter Jim Davies has
done a fantastic job. His article on
grafitti was timely and
informative and presented in the
now-traditional Davies style
"facts" that no-one could hope to
collect without hours of
"poop-house"    visitation.
However, Jim Davies, being what
he is, persevered and with much
risk to his honor and reputation
forced himself to spend his
precious time collecting grafitti. I
hope you realize what we think of
you, Jim.
Written by anyone else, the
article might be called perverse,
but written by Jim, it's
normal—just one of the dirtier
aspects of the job. I can disagree
with Jim's sparkling treatise on
only one point: the picture
accompanying the article makes it
hard to believe that "UBC's biffys
aren't necessarily full of shit."
Keep up the good work, Jim—on
Teaching next year?
Trustees Information Day
NOVEMBER 25
District Displays and
Student-Trustee
Interviews
9:00 - 3:30
Second Floor, SUB
What Is A Trustee?
9:00-10:30 & 2:00-3:30
SUB Aud.
Dean Scarfe
Trustee Advisory Comm.
to bigger and better things. Today
the biffy, tomorrow the barn!
ROD STRINGER
engl
More poop
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
How long must we endure this
obscene excuse for a newspaper?
This is the last straw! The graffitti
story by Jim Davies was without a
doubt an all time low in The
Ubyssey tradition.
My parents were shocked, and
rightly so. The Ubyssey has given
them the impression that our
university is now a haven for
perverts.
A CONCERNED READER
Dear concerned:
I recognize your handwriting.
Lower Buchanan, stall number
three, just to the left of the flush
handle.—Jim Davies.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 21, 1969
AFRICAN GOVTS. PERSECUTE  DISSENTERS
'False view of communist ideology'
By GINNY GALT
The African liberation
movement has hit UBC.
The organizational meeting of
the UBC African Relief
Committee was held Thursday in
SUB 125.
Paul Jones, arts 2, a speaker at
the meeting, described the scene
in South Africa today.
Amongst other things, he said,
South African natives suffer from
low wages, repressive government
policies, apartheid and
exploitation.
Jones, who spent two months
in South Africa, said native miners
earn the highest wages, $20 a
month.
"South Africa has a fantastic
set of laws, unequalled anywhere
in suppression," said Jones.
'TYRANNY GO'
A United Nations special
committee report on the South
African government's apartheid
policies found the principal
repressive legislation to be the
suppression of communism act of
1950.
The act defines communism as
"besides the usual definition, any
doctrine or scheme which aims at
bringing about any political,
industrial, social or economic
change within the republic of
South Africa."
"The government hopes to gain
the support of the western world
by saying that it is against
communism," said Jones.
The UN report found the
definition of sabotage, another
punishable offense to be "so wide
that it includes any wrongful and
wilful act whereby the accused
damages or tampers with any
property or person of the state."
"Another act, act 37 of 1963,
states 'any commissioned officer
may from time to time without
warrant, arrest or cause to be
arrested any person whom he
suspects, on reasonable grounds of
having committed or intending to
commit any offence under the
suppression of communism act',"
said Jones.
"It is called tyranny 90,
because a person arrested on this
charge can be placed in
dentention for 90 or 180 days
with no trial, no appeal, and no
opportunity- to contact his
family."
There are also morality acts,
concerned with mixed sex, laws
prohibiting political parties of
more than one race, and laws
which forbid colored people to be
represented on government.
"Another problem in South
Africa is the exploitation of native
people," said Jones. He gave the
example of the Portuguese in the
country of Angola.
"Portugal has been in Africa
longer than any other European
country, and it has done the least
for the people.
"The Portuguese government
has decided that its duty in Africa
is to make sure that all the
Africans are working, so they're
all contracted out for labor. They
have a choice of either forced
work or jail."
Thirty students concerned with
the native Africans' struggle went
to the meeting in the hopes of
setting up a relief program.
A group was formed at Simon
Fraser University last January to
help liberate the natives in
Angola.
Larry Field, president of the
SFU African relief committe,
explained the aims of his
organization.
PROMOTE STRUGGLE
"Our aims are to provide
assistance in getting the goods
they require, to publicize the
plight of the southern African
people, and to promote the
struggle which is going on in
southern Africa", he said.
"We chose Angola for several
reasons. It is the most advanced
and well organized of the
southern African countries with
the MPLA (Popular Movement for
the Liberation of Angola).
"Because of this contact, we
are able to ship supplies such as
tents and clothes to Angola."
The SFU group has already
sent 3^4 tons of supplies, including
used clothing, electronic supplies,
radios and tents to Angola.
Jones said UBC's group will
probably be assisting Angola as
well this year.
"We will help Angola because
we are just now getting started
and SFU has already started a
"St. Clair paper
no longer jolly'
WINDSOR (CUP) - As president of St. Clair College, Dr.
R. C. Quittenton reported a month ago he was upset when the
student newspaper, the Saint began promoting what he called
"morbid sentiments"—such as front-page posters on the
Vietnam war—and was no longer "jolly".
Then in its Nov. 10 issue, the Saint reprinted a poem by
imprisoned Black Panther chairman Bobby Seale that used the
four letter word for sexual intercourse.
Well. That was just too much.
At a meeting Thursday Quittenton told the two editors,
Greg Parent and Ted Welch, "Either you clean up this fucking
paper, or I will."
The editors reported he used the four-letter word meaning
sexual intercourse several times in his monologue with them.
Quittenton then treatened to withdraw office space and
the college's facilities in putting out the paper—in effect killing
it—and returning all student funds to the students instead of
giving them to student groups.
"If another issue of the Saint appears that is obscene, by
my standards," Quittenton wrote the student council, "then I
will.. . deny the use of tax supported facilities and equipment
for the preparation of this paper."
The student council apologized, the two editors were
fired, and everyone lived happily ever after.
program there," Jones said.
"In each southern African
country there is a major liberation
movement. This year we'll
probably aid Angola, and next
year we'll help someone else."
DEMAND COMPLIANCE
Angola's revolution started in
1961 after several months of
underground work. The series of
uprisings began after the African
parties had been banned and
executions were started.
Jones said the proposed
constitutional aims of the relief
committee   are  material  aid for
people in southern Africa, the
spreading of information and
demanding Canadian compliance
with the UN recommendation on
Apartheid.
Canada abstained from voting
on apartheid in a recent (Nov.
15) UN general assembly meeting.
Another proposed aim is to
conduct research into all aspects
and encouraging increased
knowledge on the African
situation.
"In this respect UBC's African
studies department could be a lot
better than it is now," Jones said.
U.B.C.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
On student participation
Enlightening exchange
The following exchange of letters points up the authoritarian, elitist view of life and
education that is far from dead at UBC. McGregor, a self-proclaimed reactionary, is head of
the classics department and a long-time foe of student participation in the university
decisions which affect their academic lives.
Dr. Malcolm McGregor,
Department of Classics
Dear Malcolm:
The Graduate Student
Association and the Alma Mater
Society have recently become
aware of the lack of available
information on the extent to
which UBC students, both
graduate and undergraduate, are
involved in or exposed to the
decision-making process within
departments. The purpose of this
questionnaire is to collect detailed
information on this matter for the
use of any interested parties on
campus.
Attached is a list of the types
of decision-making bodies found
in many departments, and several
questions pertaining to them.
Please fill in the information
requested, indicating if any of the
bodies listed are not found in
your department, or if your
department has decision-making
bodies not included on the list.
Please return the form by
campus mail, to Jim Bell,
Vice-president, Graduate Student
Association, Graduate Student
Centre, Campus Mail.
Art Smolensky,
President,
Graduate    Studeent
Association.
Mr. A. Smolensky
Student Union Building
Dear Mr. Smolensky:
I am horrified by your letter of
October 10 and even more
horrified  by   the  accompanying
questionnaire.
In this Department students do
not sit on committees. They have
nothing whatever to do with
appointments or admissions.
While it is true that students often
come to my office with
suggestions, to which I listen
carefully, I do not insult them by
assuming that they have the time
for these matters that are not,
strictly speaking, their business.
So far as most of the items
mentioned in the questionnaire
are concerned, students are
incompetent to participate. My
graduate students do not hold
office on the campus; they are
professionals, a carefully selected
elite. My door is always open to
students and my inpression is that
my own students are not
unhappy.
I have no intention of wasting
my time filling out an impertinent
questionnaire.
Very truly yours,
Malcolm F. McGregor,
(unsigned)
Dr. Malcolm F. McGregor,
Department of Classics,
University of British Columbia,
Campus Mail.
Dear Dr. McGregor:
Thank you very much for your
unsigned letter of November 10,
1969 addressed to my friend Art
Smolensky.
Your feelings of horror are
duly noted and J wish to take this
opportunity   to   express   my
feelings of extreme disgust at your
asinine attitude towards students
as conveyed by your letter. I wish
to   point   out   that   there   was
nothing impertinent whatsoever in
the questionnaire sent to you as
head of the Classics Department;
It was merely an attempt to
ascertain the degree of student
participation in the various
decision-making processes in our
university. Naturally,    I
acknowledge your right to
continue living in the dark ages
and shield yourself from all
attempts on the part of students,
faculty and administration to
improve our university but I do
not feel you have the right to
inflict your archaic authoritarian
Come voice gripes
about The Ubyssey
By MICHAEL FINLAY
Ubyssey Cataclysm Editor
Hey. Wanna dump on The Ubyssey?
Or maybe even praise us. Or maybe start a riot or throw flowers
or quote the gospel according to Robert Shelton or Chairman Mao
(whichever is your wont?)
All these and many other things will be fair game, more or less,
at the wowser-dowser, sooper-dooper, wild and wunnerful meeting on
The Ubyssey on Thursday.
The noon meeting, which will probably be in the ballroom, will
feature a panel discussion on the paper and will be open to all
students who wish to listen, bitch, defend or rave.
The great gathering is sort of the result of the displeasure of
AMS ombudsman Sean McHugh, who says he has received a number
of complaints about The Ubyssey.
The meeting was suggested by The Ubyssey after McHugh made
reference to abolishing the paper and allocating its funds elsewhere.
The AMS finance committee is now invesitgating the feasability
of establishing a second campus paper. Both the Rho, a paper
financed by the inter-fraternity council and the Cornerstone, put out
by a group of engineers and scheduled to make its debut next week,
have made preliminary requests at student council for funds.
McHugh said Thursday that the panel members at the meeting
will include two Ubyssey staffers, two persons opposed to The
Ubyssey and two persons judged impartial by McHugh.
AMS president Fraser Hodge intends to be chairman.
Complaints against The Ubyssey include opinions that the paper
is biased, inaccurate, too far left-wing in editorial policy,
unrepresentative of the campus, cynical, oblivious to campus news,
vulgar and tasteless.
It is also alleged that students do not pick the paper up because
they are sick of The Ubyssey's general outlook and policy.
The Ubyssey will be represented by editor-in-chief Michael Finlay
and news editor Paul Knox. No other panelists have yet been
announced.
attitudes on those poor students
who, incidentally, are not beings of
inferior quality to yourself, and
are unfortunate enough to have to
deal with persons of your nature.
Might I also point out that
your membership on the
Presidential Selection Committee
which had four student members
was, in fact, a gross inconsistency
with your expressed beliefs and
that your resignation from all
such committees in protest of this
point would indeed by gratefully
received. In short, the sooner all
influences of your type are
withdrawn from our University,
the better off we shall all be.
J Yours truly,
Fraser D. Hodge,
President.
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Appointments for interviews are being made at
the Student Placement Office. Company and
Job   Information   Booklets  are  available  there. Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 21, 1969
KLAN  GAME
BY CAREY  LINDE
Up the social debitors
I got a phone call the other night from some
guys starting up a Social Debit Klan Club on
campus. I would have loved to have been able to
accept their most generous invitation to join.
Unfortunately for me, my life insurance company
will terminate my policy if I join any organizations
capable of perpetrating violence. What a drag, man.
It was with some reluctance that I declined to
join in on the first action event they have scheduled.
They are going to sit in on the next meet of Senate.
They will demand from that collection of egg heads
that UBC purge itself NOW of all courses tainted
with that imperialist theory from Europe called
"evolution".
Always one to dig a good demonstration (the
Peace Arch was such a groove) its a real bummer I
can't join them.
Agnes Flipps will be made the official witch,
her duty being to fly her broom from class to class.
Any student or professor caught leering into those
demoniac genetics books (Suzuki and Harger will
be the first to go), will be dragged off to the pig
pens to visit their ancestors.
The prisoners will pay their heavy debt to
society by providing the city with free labor when
they move the Berlin Wall to Vancouver. Tom
Terrific has offered to buy it from the East Germans
if Victoria will give Vancouver a Civic Square. The
Gaglardi Boys will supervise the heretics as they
rebuild the wall in its original form around the
beautiful Civic Square. Nobody with hair longer
than one and five eight inches will be allowed
inside the wall to enjoy the wonderful park. Harold
Fairyless will be made the Master Measurer of the
People's Hair.
Burp Price has asked the Federal Government
to agree to having its contribution to the proposed
first narrows crossing fund spent elsewhere. The
Social Debit Klan Club of UBC has suggested that a
tunnel be put in, starting up in Kitsilano under the
headquarters of Hysterical HaroldKidd's Revengeful
Ratepayers, and running down to under the
proposed Civic Square. This way the Divinely
rightful owners of Kits can get down to the Square
without having to wade through the unwashed
masses, soiling their saintly splendor.
You can immediately see how difficult it must
have been for me to turn down that seductive offer
to become a founding member of the Social Debit
Klan Club at UBC. I'm busy checking out insurance
companies, looking for a new one. With luck, and
WAC on my side, I'll find a way to join the Klan
and wear the sheet for Social Debit.
Zoology committee
reverses decision
By MURRAY KENNEDY
Ubyssey Academic Reporter
The saga of Robin Harger has been completed.
Harger has been offered a new two year contract by the
personnel services committee. The contract was the result of the
committee's reversal of a zoology department decision that Harger not
receive any appointment past June 1970.
Last January, Harger was informed he was being put on a one
year terminal contract after statements he had made about philosophy
of science and research were made public.
At the time, Harger was teaching a course on the history of
philosophy and biology. His views on research apparently did not
coincide with those of some of the senior members of the department
and for this reason he was to be removed.
This year Harger is no longer teaching the course and seems to
have stepped back into line in the eyes of the department.
The new two year contract means that Harger will be around
UBC for at least three more years. The basic contract must be
followed by a one year terminal if a professor is to be replaced.
Harger said he is not doing anything different this year except
for the fact he is not teaching the philosophy course.
"The state of my research is the same as it was before this
problem developed, or rather it is the same as it was developing to be
before," he said.
Zoology head P. A. Larkin said the Harger situation has merely
been reviewed and the department decision changed. "Harger will be
allowed to continue long as he keeps up his research," he said.
Chamber music coming
Chamber music buffs can satisfy their appetites Tuesday with
the Foerstrovo Trio.
This trio from Czechoslovakia, including Ales Bilek, Frantisek
Pospisil and Valclav Jirovec, will be playing in the SUB auditorium at
12:30.
The group was first formed in 1956, taking its name from the
composer and national artist Josef Foerster. Since that time they have
toured internationally, made numerous television and radio
appearances, and gained a large following.
The concert is a special events presentation. Admission is only
50 cents.
A professional career with
Mcdonald, currie & co.
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
Our representatives will be pleased to discuss your
plans for a career in Chartered Accountancy during
their annual recruiting visit at the University of
British Columbia.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1969
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 2,  1969
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1969
There will be openings in the Vancouver office of
our Firm as well as throughout Canada for 1970
graduates in Commerce, Science, Arts, Engineering
and Law.
Please contact the Student Placement Office to arrange a convenient time for a personal interview
on campus or to obtain a copy of our recruiting
brochure.
If the dates of our visit do not suit your time schedule,
you are invited to call Mr. R. G. WIGINTON, in our
Vancouver office, at 682-7821.
look into
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Mercantile because of the men. the scope for
innovation and the dynamic stimulating atmosphere that prevails. And through First
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When we visit your campus — look into
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Affiliated with First National City Bank, New York Friday, November 21, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
Guess who's
coming
to dinner?
It's vs — ail 21,000 of us.
According to reporter Shane
McCune, here's where to go.
Food services on campus are a major problem from
everybody's point of view.
The prime target for criticism is the SUB cafeteria.
Strolling through the cafeteria one crowded noon hour, I
received a variety of reactions to price and quality of
food:
"It's like Macdonald's, only more expensive."
"I don't buy hamburger here anymore."
"I'm a biology student, and the food here reminds me
ofthe animals I dissect."
"The food isn't bad, but the prices are too high."
"The prices are okay, but the food is awful."
'Everything's the shits'
On two occasions I was referred to a graffito in the
SUB games room washroom which said: "Flush twice—it's
a long way to the cafeteria."
One fourth year type leaned back in his chair and
declared: "The coffee's the shits. So are the sandwiches,
milk and those 'sticky buns.' All of them are the shits, and
overprices ... but the dinners are great!"
Most SUB patrons, however, are first year students,
many of whom bring lunches and buy only milk or coffee.
Among all the adverse comments, there was only one
expressing enthusiastic support of the caferteria. It came
from a home economics student, who considered, all the
criticism of cafeteria food grossly unfair.
"They have a really good dietician here," she said.
"They offer well-balanced meals at very reasonable rates.
They use only the best foods with the highest protein
content, especially the hamburgers."
Next to prices, the greatest source of discontent is the
overcrowding and sterile atmosphere.
But you don't have to eat in the SUB cafeteria. Food
services also run the Bus Stop restaurant next to the
bookstore, which offers the same kind of food but with
slower service.
The Bus Stop doesn't seem to have as many regulars
as the SUB caf, but again, many students, staff, and
visitors will often buy coffee to go with a bag lunch.
And then there are the Bam and the Ponderosa, with
McCUNE, BLAIR
more contrived (and in the case of the Ponderosa, sterile)
atmosphere.
These are frequented mostly by engineers, and to a
lesser extent, forestry and education students. Both have
fairly good food and reasonable prices, and fair-to-poor
service.
The Buchanan snack bar is relaxed, patronized alomst
exclusively by students with classes nearby. They also do
their biggest business in coffee and coke to go with bag
lunches.
There is another snack bar in the bowels of Memorial
gym, but its main business is coffee and coke for students
and coaches.
The only profiteering cafeterias on campus are in the
Village.
The Hong Kong kitchen offers a respectable menu of
authentic Chinese cuisine, while Franco's pushes an
inexpensive, inedible line of Italian food and other
western dishes.
The eat: THE place to eat
The Village Cafe is the embodiment of all that a
modern American restaurant is, and as such manages to
stay in business.
And now we come to the best eateries.
First, for those who are willing to go a little out of
their way for a good meal, there is International House. A
popular Chinese buffet and an Indian curry dinner cost
only 85 cents.
But THE place to eat is the cafeteria under the old
auditorium. It has everything-a friendly, if somewhat
garish, atmosphere; an inexpensive Chinese buffet; and the
best, strangest, people.
Even the staff is easygoing. Among the customers I
talked to almost all of them thought highly of the people
there.
Of course, if you don't wish to support food services,
there is the Black Cross booth outside the cafeteria in
SUB.
Black Cross is even making money—and right now
they're having meetings to decide what to do with it.
interview in relaxed, informal setting.
—bruee stout photo
Finally, I spoke to Ruth Blair, head of food services
since 1954. She admits that students don't buy food with
higher prices than last year, but predicts still higher prices
for next year.
Concerned about the lack of space in the SUB
cafeteria, she is awaiting approval of a snack bar and
ipossible extension in SUB.
The decision rests with SUB management, so don't
curse food services when you can't sit anywhere to eat
your lunch.
Miss Blair is also awaiting a move by SUB
management to crack down on the Black Cross booth. She
doesn't feel that the Black Cross is cutting into her
business, but that it is unsanitary and illegal.
Miss Blair had a few caustic remarks for The Ubyssey,
too. She resents the "bad image" the paper has given food
services in the past. For example, she asked why The
Ubyssey condemned price hikes without investigating
their causes.
When I investigated their causes, Miss Blair told me a
significant portion of food service expenditure goes to the
extra staff needed to clean up the mess left by faithful
patrons.
Her point was well-taken.
I doubt if even half the students who use the cafeteria
return their dishes to the belt on a tray. Instead they leave
them on the tables, uneaten pie crusts and all, which
means more work for the caf staff.
15-cent coffee next year?
The only definite changes Miss Blair anticipates for
the cafeteria next year is a rise in prices, which will
probably include 15-cent coffee.
To conclude,.here is a review of what to eat and
where, based on a few pointers I wrote in my notebook:
• In the SUB cafeteria,   chili and ice cream cones.
• In the old auditorium,Chinese food and people.
• At International House,Chinese food and curry.
• At Black Cross, coffee.
Bon Appetit.
Representatives of
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Also, interviews for Summer Em'ployment will be held
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NOVEMBER 24 and 25
We invite you to arrange an interview through the Office
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Copper Cliff, Ontario; Thompson, Manitoba Friday, November 21, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 10
Student mothers need
better child care centre
By SIBYLLE KLEIN
and CANDACE PARKER
For too long have we been talking about the
exclusion of minorities from the university, like the
working class and the native people, without ever
giving any thought to another minority group, all
those women with children, ,who are excluded
because the university has failed to recognize the
need for adequate child care centres.
A recent survey conducted by CUE (Continuing
University Education, a group of mature women
students)  substantiated  the   need  for   day  care
Sibylle Klein and Candace Parker, two UBC
students, wrote these two articles as part of a
campaign by Vancouver's Women's Caucus to
publicize its work. The Women's Caucus was
featured in a Ubyssey special on Tuesday.
services on campus. They state in their September
bulletin: "women with small children are returning
in ever-increasing numbers to renew their studies,
and good quality supervision of their pre-schoolers
is of prime concern to them."
We had heard about Simon Fraser University's
innovative approach to child care and went up the
hill to see for ourselves. We found the child care
centre housed in one end of the cafeteria. Students
seized this area 18 months ago to start to organize
an ongoing child care program. The administration
did not recognize the group until this year when the
space was formally allotted to them.
The centre is run on a co-operative basis with
parents contributing four hours a week of their
time. There is a fee of $ 15 a month. The fees pay
for a full-time teacher and supplies. Children can
come to the centre as soon as they can walk. The
centre: seemed to us like a really good place for kids
to be. It's run very democratically; parents feel that
it is their centre; they make the decisions on what's
best for their children. We heard only positive
comments from fathers and mothers who happened
to be present during our visit.
Thirty children attend the child care centre at
SFU which has a student population of 6,000. What
facilities are available at UBC, four times as big?
At present there are two places which take care
of the university community's children, Acadia day
care centre and Kinder-care, both in the Acadia area.
The two centres provide for 47 children
between the ages of three and six. Day care is filled
to capacity with a waiting list. Kinder-care has room
for 17 presently and expects to expand to 25 within
the near future. Fees are $50 monthly at Acadia day
care, and provincial subsidies can be applied for.
The same subsidy arrangement exists at Kindercare
where fees are $45 a month. Both places hire
professional teachers and teaching aides.
A child study centre also exists on campus
where children can go for 2% hours a day;
enrolment is closed.
It needs no further elaboration to see that a
crying need exists. CUE looked into the problem
and found that it could not deal with it beyond a
very makeshift arrangement of referring mothers to
private homes near the university. In actual fact, the
problem has never been adequately articulated. But
how many unvoiced needs are there of women who
think that it is their private "misfortune" which
they have come to resign themselves to? Not to
mention those women who have been conditioned
to accept the cliche that the roles of student and
mother cannot be combined and have therefore
never considered the possibility of taking up studies
again? Thus the ubiquity and immensity of the
problem has never been allowed to come out into
the open.
To break with this old pattern of each woman
regarding it as her individual problem, the only way
to develop new approaches and effective solutions is
to act as a group. Contact Candace Parker at
738-2278 or Sibylle Klein at 736-4968.
'Health Services should
have anti-preg devices'
By SIBYLLE KLEIN and CANDACE PARKER
Did you read the birth control pamphlet distributed by the
AMS on our campus. Most of us did and really appreciated AMS's
attempt to start being relevant to students' needs.
And then AMS wasn't content to merely mouth liberal rhetoric;
it actually went ahead and put some of the implications expressed in
the pamphlet into practice. It installed condom dispensers in the
men's washrooms in SUB. Great!
■»
Did the AMS go far enough?
The suspicion exists among UBC women that they cannot get
birth control devices or pills through the Student Health Services. Is
this so? If it is true, this strikes us as particularly hypocritical
following the liberal stand of the AMS on birth control in general.
Surprised by the apparent hypocrisy, we decided to find out
whether we could get birth control on request. So one of us went to
the Health Services to ask a doctor for pills. The request was received
quite matter-of-factly by the doctor (although the nurse seemed to
lose her cool when she found she was dealing with a "MISS.")
The student obtained the prescription without any further
questioning. Asked whether this was the general policy of the Health
Services, the doctor stated that there is no explicit policy, but that the
decision is left to the individual doctor. What are the criteria on which
he bases his decision? The doctor responded that age and "maturity"
are the considerations. What's maturity? Well, he said, if the girl is 17
or so and doesn't look as if she knows what she is getting into ...
While there are apparently some doctors who will not prescribe
pills at all, this one expressed some sensible feelings. Making birth
control devices inaccessible to unmarried women serves no purpose,
he thought. It doesn't discourage premarital intercourse ("You are
going to do it anyway, are you not?')
We wonder if the contradiction in this doctor's views are
common in the Student Health Services: he recognizes that girls have
sex without adequate protection and yet limits it to women who look
and act "mature." The so-called "immature" first and second year
students have greater need for birth control than older women who
have already been forced off campus to find adequate methods of
protection.
Is the AMS aware of the hypocrisy here? Is student government
protecting women's rights? The AMS will install a dispenser in SUB;
will they now take action to see that STUDENT Health Services takes
an open stand on birth control for women on request? Dispensers
dispense without regard to age and maturity—and so should our
doctors!
•HEAVEN
-HELL
This week
WIGG1
SYMPHONY
Next week
HIGH FLY1N
BIRD
3730 wt 10th. ave.
224-1415
G
R
A
D
70 GRADS    p
Grad Photos this year are being taken by our own
Extension Department at UBC, on East Mall opposite
the north end of C-Lot. The dates for pre-Christmas
sittings are Nov. 17 through Dec. 5. Students wishing
Grad. Photos in time for Christmas should make an
appointment now at the Extension Department, in
person or by phoning 228-3228.
All grads receive a mounted 5x7 portrait. Copies and
enlargements will also be ready for Christmas, and
may be ordered at the following prices:
4x5- $1.50
5 x 7 - 2.00
8 xlO - 4.00
11 xl4 - 7.00
16 x20 - 13.00
H
O
T
O
S As we rapidly, and irrevocably approach the happy
Xmas season this year, Page Friday this week gets a bit
ahead ofthe game by offering you - it's pfaithful pfew
pfreaders - a merry merry merry Xmas pfresent(issue.
(There will possibly be another one next week: but one
never knows, does one,..)
Therefore, in accordance with the merry season,
you will see, in this week's senter spred, a poster, a
metaphysical mind poster - which we here present to
you, to ponder, to experience, to place in full view on
your wall abouve your desk. Our way of saying merry
merry to you this year.
Furthermore, here on the cover above you, you
see the work of that mystic, that visionary, William
Blake, who is presently partaking of a festival in his
honor at the UBC Fine Arts Gallery. This Festival -
which includes many various events and continues for
the next two weeks, - promises to be a total event. A
Calander of its individual parts is inserted above, in the
center of the Blake engraving.
So give this festival your support and attention ...
it will be worth it.
So, having thus made our existentialist statment,
in the form of our Xmas present, we, the Pf people, ask
you to consider the state of existence, the state oflife
and art, on this campus as we approach the termination
of another term. Consider... and let the mind
meander onward.
FRED CAWSEY
NORBERT RUEBSAAT
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Son of Horror
Horror films have had me by the throat for over 35 years,
beginning with the Boris Karloff versions of Frankenstein and
The Mummy, and the Fredric March version of Dr. Jekyll and
Mr. Hyde. Actually I never got to see more than the trailer of
Jekyll, because my parents saw it too, and declared the Steatham
Astoria out of bounds for the following week. It included an
excellent view of what happened to March's face and neck when
he had drunk the transforming potion, a much more horrifying
and haunting effect than any of Karloff s galvanic awakenings or
stumbling pursuits.
The major arts, including prime literary forms like poetry
or the novel of society, can perhaps be validly approached out of
pure, or mere, intellectual curiosity. The minor genres, such as
science fiction, jazz, the Western, and the detective story, can (I
think) only be deeply appreciated and properly understood by
the addict, the bulk consumer who was drawn to the stuff in late
childhood for reasons he could not have explained then and
would have a lot of trouble explaining now. It seems widely
agreed, for instance, that the essential qualification for any
decent film critic is to have spent a disproportionate amount of
his early life in cheap cinema seats, swallowing everything he saw
in a completely uncricitical way.
Such valuable persons rarely say anything about horror
films. Never having acquired much of a taste for the effects of the
actual contents of these fables, your average commentator will
see the behavior of Dracula and his chums, not as cavortings both
abominable and harmless, but as symptoms of the sickness of our
scoiety and all that. Thus a prominent writer on stage and screen
explained that The Incredible Shrinking Man, a Hollywood
fantasy of 10 years ago with science-fiction as well as horror
elements, was really about the American male's terror of not
being able to satisfy his wife. I had thought that, with the rather
boring but necessary difficulties of the 4-foot-high hero out of
the way, the picture settled down to being "about" things like
thy6-inch-high hero's encounter with the household cat, or the
1-centimeter-high hero's resourceful and daring battle with the
spider in the cellar. But I am a bit of an addict.
It still goes on. Some time ago, Francis Hope discussed
horror in the English magazine New Statesman, concluding,
perhaps a tiny bit predictably, that the appetite for it (horror, not
the New Statesman) was "diseased" and to do with our society
being very violent and very dull, with Vietnam and too much
telly. This is an example of — among other things — that
historical provincialism whereby so many of even our more
literate contemporaries take Hiroshima as the Year One. Have a
look at this — quoted, with a lot more fascinating material, in E.
S. Turner's Boys Will Be Boys:
"... Shriek followed shriek in rapid succession. The bed
clothes fell in a heap by the side of the bed - she was dragged by
her long, silken hair completely onto it again. Her beautiful,
rounded limbs quivered with the agony of her soul. The glassy,
horrible eyes of the figure ran over the angelic form with a
hideous satisfaction — horrible profanation. He drags her head to
the bed's edge. He forces it back by the long hair still entwined in
his grasp. With a plunge he seizes her neck in his fang-like teeth —
a gush of blood and a hideous sucking noise folows.
The girl has swooned and the vampire is at his hideous
repast!"
Today, horror itself is not safe, when Jonathan Miller can
"adapt" James' splendidly horrific Oh, Whistle and I'll Come to
You, My Lad, for television. Knock out the horror along with
three words of the title, substitute a revue-level character-sketch
portentously   photographed,   in   Marienbad   style,   against   an
ipS 2WOi
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 21, 1969 Film
Kingsley Amis digs the heebie-jeebies or eeky freakies that tingle the spines ofthe
innocents and]or give goose bumps to virgin young boys and girls.
unmeaning background, and earn a whole column—not altogether
laudatory, it is true, but. still disgracefully respectful—in Hope's
Statesman article. Next spring, Miller might care to give us an
adaption of Frankenstein as the case-history of someone who had
been forbidden to play with his little sister's dolls, and whose
monster, of course, never does more than twitch occassionally.
To define the horror film more closely, even if only to
enlighten those who have never been to the cinema, I might
attempt an exhaustive list of the permitted varieties of fiend and
kobold. In addition to those already mentioned, one would have
to include witches, werewolves, zombies and other members of
the voodoo circus, agents called up by black magicians,
reanimated corpses of several sorts, and somnambulists—as in
what may well still be the best of all these extravaganzas, The
Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919).
Besides sharing an antique flavor, those catalogues are all
supernatural beings. They may get switched on by somebody who
calls himself a scientist, but it is always taken for granted that the
science is not real. Frankenstein's bubbling retorts and arcing
terminals are understood as nothing more than a colorful and
enjoyable prelude to the main business of the evening, a monster
waking up and very soon turning unfriendly. In other cases, the
point is underlined by making the scientist a mad scientist. The
merely anti-social or bloody rude scientist, as seen in The
Quatermass Experiment (film version), or A for Andromeda (TV
serial), is a hero-figure of science fiction, in which the science,
however perfunctory or absurd, is meant and taken to be real.
This distinction is so firm in practice that very few films
stand anywhere on the borderline of the two genres. Apart from
the adventures of the incredibly shrunken man, I recall chiefly
The Fly (1958) and its successors. Here the hastiest of
mumbo-jumbo was run through with the palable design of
proceeding to the disagreeable activities and physical appearance
of a fly with a chap's head and a chap with a fly's
head-especially him. Even science-fiction science surely ought to
have balked at the idea of giving both these characters some kind
of human intelligence.
The Man With X-Ray Eyes (1963) is another such that I
recall, not only with actual distaste but also with some
embarrassment. I was one of a board of judges that awarded it an
award or an honorable mention of something at a great hoolee in
Trieste in that year, the First International Exhibition of the
Science-Fiction Film. Now comes my opportunity to clear myself
at the bar of world opinion by declaring that the picture won its
laurels without the assistance of my vote. (My American
colleague thought it was rubbish too, but the French and Ialian
majority went on about its relation to the contemporary
consciousness, I believe it was.)
Well, The Man in question led off with "scientific"
mumbo-jumbo, went on with "comic" stuff about the hero seeing
through people's clothes (even those few years ago, what we saw
of what he saw fought shy of the region between waist and knee),
and fairly got into its stride with him seeing through practically
everything, building, hills, the earth itself. This promising idea
was wrecked by the garishness fo the forms and patterns he saw
instead, and quite shoved aside by a painfull concentration on
physical changes in his eyeballs, which went from goden to black
to I don't know what. Finally, he encountered an evangelist who
told him what to do if his eye offended him, and he did it. Both
of them.
Tradionally, the golden age of horror fell between the two
wars, perhaps even in the earlier part of that period. I wonder
what we should think of the highlights of Lugosi - Karloff -
Chaney cinema if we could see them today: crude, incompetent
and slow would be my guess. Horror from Hollywood boomed as
the Second World War grew more intense (thank you, Francis
Hope), though in quantity rather than quality. The Spencer Tracy
version of Dr. Jekyll was the best of these films that I remember,
but some particularly fearsome episodes in the British-made Dead
of Night surpassed it. From 1945 or so until 1957 or so, science
fiction reigned almost supreme in a general terror-horror-fantasy
area. These years produced such masterpieces as The War of the
Worlds, Forbidden Planet and Them!, and such non-masterpieces
as The Thing From Another World (predictable-pretentious) and
The Creature From the Black Lagoon (straightforward hokum).
Then came the great horror revival, still happily in full flood.
The American contribution to this has concentrated to a
remarkable degree on Vincent Price as protagonist, whether
receiving or dealing out assorted gory treatments, and on the
works of Poe as source material. I have not seen all these efforts,
but of those that I have, not much stays with me, apart from a
very good nasty moment, when the living corpse of Monsieur
Valdemar improved on Poe by getting up off its bed and closing
with some merely human malefactor. Price, though inclined to
jump the gun by acting jittery a long way short of the graveyard
gate, is at least adequate to these roles; the trouble lies with Poe,
whose individual stories contain too little material for a
full-length film and so have to be thickly padded out or, just as
bad, combined. More simple, he was a terrible writer.
The British part in the renaissance has been ably headed by
Hammer Films, in the first years a largely non-specialist
organization, though with, among others, some respectable
science-films to their credit: the first two Quatermass storier—the
third followed in 1967—and an oddly underrated chiller, X—the
Unknown. (Seeing this in a double bill with The Fiends took days
off my life.) Hammer have come to lean largely on two excellent
actors, Peter Cushing, who tends to be Frankenstein, and
Christopher Lee, who tends to be Dracula. Cushing conveys to
perfection the fanatical devotion to "science," plus the belated
though energetic remorse, that suits a decent-minded reanimator
of corpses; Lee, with great physical presence and skill in
movement, makes the eccentric Count an accomplished man of
the world when off duty, as well as a deadly wielder of the
canines.
Cushing and Lee joined, or rather opposed forces in the
Dracula of 1957. This was a minor turning-point in cinema
history and Hammer's first bigcommercial success;it pulled and
still pulls in audiences in dozens of countries, reportedly
outgrossing My Fair Lady in the Philippines, which says a lot for
Filipino good taste. Dracula was an artisitc success too, with
expertly maintained tension and some fine sudden shocks, like
the moment when one of the subordinate vampires gets the
prescribed stake through the heart while inactive, and changes in
a twinkling from beautiful young girl to horrible, very old
woman. At the same (or a similar) juncture, blood spurted up
over the executioner's hand. The critics put on a show of moral
concern about this detail, I seem to remember, and now would be
my chance to chew over the rights and wrongs of horror, whether
it is good or bad or indefferent for you, etc., if boredom at the
prospect did not utterly deter me. Let it be established, if it ever
can, whether violence on the screen in general does harm, before
we legislate about a genre so very far removed from the
experience of the audience.
What is the basis of the appeal of horror and the horror
film? Like Mark Twain on a dissimilar occasion, I have an answer
to that: I don't know. All the other answers I have come across
are, to me, quite unreal, connecting neither with horrific material
as I read and see it nor with my feelings as I do so. You may get
some light on this-you will certainly get plenty of information
and entertainment—from Carlos Clarens' illustrated survey,
Horror Movies, which saved me a good deal of checking-up time
while preparing this article. Or you might care to look up Freud's
paper on The Uncanny, and ponder on instantaneous
wish-fulfillments and the power of the castration complex. And
the best of Transylvanian luck to you.
(Reprinted from L.A. Times
west Magazine)
pf 3hree.
Friday, November 21, 1969
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 21, 1969 v%
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Friday, November 21, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
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Eclectic Electric Art
flavin show
By OLGA RUSKIN
Take up electrical engineering if you want to
make a mark on the art world. It'll give you a
better background for coping with today's art
forms than a school of art.
New York's Dan Flavin, whose retrospective
has just opened at the Vancouver Art Gallery,
didn't stay in art school too long, and no
wonder. He's found his medium of artistic
expression with the fluorescent light tube and
not the paint tube, though the exhibition does
have some of his early "poems and washes" and
"icons". The latter are a combination of art
objects and light bulbs, and mark the progression
towards Flavin's ultimate work with light and its
qualities.
A long hallway lit with colored fluorescent
tubes leads one to the exhibition, though a small
sign with "Untitled (To S.M.) 1969" on it makes
one realize that this is really one of Flavin's
works. It does seem to be the fashion nowadays
to call works "Untitled", for the current group
show of American artists at the Douglas Gallery
has this same characteristic. But then technology
does not stretch the imagination.
A fluorescent light tube is a light tube, is a
light tube.
At first, it's a bit different to consider the
fluorescent tube as a medium for sculpture, as
say, with marble if he isn't a sculptor, is he a
technician?) After all, the fluorescent lighting
one encounters in stores, schools, and homes is
considered functional rather than beautiful.
And yet, when one encounters Flavin's pure
white and simple "Monument for V. Tatlin"
after coming through the entrance exhibit, one
can see that light, as manifest in the fluorescent
tube, can possess an austere beauty to it, like a
Corinthian column.
In "An Artificial Barrier of Green
Fluorescent Light, 1968", the snake-fence type
of fluorescent tubes across the floor looks white
but casts a green light in the room. And when
one re-enters an adjacent room containing
"Alternating Pink and Yellow" (colored tubes
placed along the periphery of the floor) one sees
only the pink hues in the room.
Fun and games? No, Flavin's purpose is to
demonstrate the various qualities of light, as also
in "Untitled (to Heiner Friedrich) 1969"
contained in a room with purple lights, in which
white objects take on a luminous quality.
You might find it hard to appreciate
everything in this show, as I did. To me,
"Alternating Pink and Yellow" and "Untitled (to
the innovator of Wheeling Peachblow") seemed a
bit theatrical. I almost expected some
vaudevillean character or Shirley Temple to come
out and do a tap dance routine where these were
displayed. "Pink our of a corner (to Jasper
Johns)" reminded me of some lighting fixture in
the ladies washroom of a railroad hotel.
Undoubtedly, there will be a variety of other
reactions to this exhibit.
Well, today's Medicis can be industrial
companies as one small notice on the wall of the
Gallery reveals. "We thank the General Electric
Company, Cleveland, Ohio for Donating the
Fluorescent Tubes Used in this Exposition."
Thomas Edison should also be thanked.
pf 6ix
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 21, 1969 i-J.        *      '     J '- ...
books s
ummer of the Black Sun
By FREDERICK T. R. CAWSEY
It says on the jacket that Summer of the
Black Sun begins where The Catcher in the Rye
ends.
That's a pretty big order to fill, but I think
author Bill T. O'Brien has done just that with
his intense, hard-hitting first novel.
For Billy Louper, a certified "crazy", the
unreal is real and time has no meaning. He is a
resident of Green Lawn mental institution,
which he calls the "laughing academy", and he
would like to get out; or maybe he wouldn't.
At any rate, Louper, relates the whole mad
scene for us with painstaking and painful
honesty and also even manages a black laugh or
two about his situation.
It would have been easy for O'Brien to
become very maudlin about this subject or to
merely chronicle the life in a loony bin.
But O'Brien has gone much deeper than
that; he has dug down into the mire of human
emotions and come up with a compelling
account of the paranoia, confusion, and absurd
humor that fills the head of a manic depressive.
O'Brien's language is clean and forceful. He
understates his case, gets tough when he has to
but never fails to be compassionate with young,
Billy Louper.
O'Brien makes us like Louper. It is through
Louper that the machinery of a breakdown and
the ensuing confusion is revealed.
We see the comradeship and the desperate
tragic-comedy of the inmates. We sense their
smugness about their condition and their fear as
they roller-coaster through their now manic,
now depressive days.
SUMMER OF THE BLACK SUN BY Bill T.
O'Brien. Prism International Press in
association with November House. $4.95.
The agony of not being able to
differentiate between actual and imagined
events plagues us too.
Louper manages a few wry jokes and often
doesn't finish his anecdotes before he takes off
on another tangent.
He becomes, after all, very human,
commanding our sympathy and our respect for
his honesty.
Summer of the Black Sun is like a
nightmare in which you are the victim without
knowing why, how, or by whom everything
around you is being twisted.
For Bill T. O'Brien it is a very auspicious
first novel. For readers it is an exhilarating dive
into the black world of madmen.
Summer of the Black Sun is available at the
UBC Bookstore and in the Creative Writing
Department office in Brock Hall.
(Bill T. O'Brien, 26, is a former UBC
student and currently works as a welder and
emergency repairman for the B.C. Hydro Gas
Division.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7 VERY GENERAL Hot
Poop this week — as we
approach the ides of Xmas.
THERE ARE a few things
happening this week: As you
see on the cover of this issue
(Page Friday)the UBC Fine
Arts Gallery's Festival -
Visionary Forms Dramatic
and Blake Festival - begins
today, and continues for the
next two weeks. A calendar
of the scheduled events
accompanies William Blake's
cover art.
* * *
AT THE Dorothy
Somerset Studio (that's
underneath the Freddy W
Theatre) John Brockington's
production of Bowen's The
Fall and Redemption of Man
continues tonight and
Saturday. (John's final
presentation this year before
going on a leave of absence.)
THE MUSICAL
Undergraduate Society (we
hear) is putting on some kind
of general campus Happening
today, to celebrate music's
patron saint Cecelia. (It's
good, at least, to see the
music people setting forth
from the solid confines of
their oh so finely protected!
building.)
**- * *
CARLOS MONTOYA
played at SUB ballroom on
Tuesday - but our reviewer
thought it was a drag (NO
SPUNK, I SAY!!) so we
didn't include the rcveicw
anyway.
*  *  *
THE CRUCIBLE by far
the best, most turned-on and
widely-experienced play that
the Freddy W. has staged this
year was held over, and
climaxed Wednesday night.
One of the few real artistic
events seen on campus this
year. (Let's have more!!)
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THE     UBYSSEY Friday, November 21, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 19
Sex course comes to UBC
UBC students will soon be able to dispel their
misconceptions about sex.
Sex education is coming to UBC. A student
organized course on human relations and sex
education will be held Monday evenings beginning
Jan. 12.
The topics covered will be normal sexual
physiology, sexual deviancy, legal implications of
human sexuality, religion and sex, Gestalt therapy
as related to love and sex, population dynamics and
explosion, contraception, venereal disease, cultural
attitudes, morality and today's values.
"The course is designed to help students with
their personal and professional needs in the area of
human sexuality," said one ofthe course organizers,
Isobel Semple, nursing 4.
She said every professional dealing with people
had to be able to discuss this area easily.
"There is no comparable course offered in any
faculty at UBC," said Miss Semple.
"We hope to stimulate some action on the part
of faculty by the response to this one, although last
year the course received a lot of financial support
from the various faculties and teaching groups
throughout the province."
She said the course format will consist of
lectures held in the SUB ballroom, with the group
then breaking into seminar groups of about 10
people each.
"The course is non-credit, but last year those
who took the course received certificates showing
their participation in case it would be useful later
on," she said.
Registration will be held on the main floor of
SUB Monday, Wednesday, Friday and on the first
night of the course. Registration fee will be $2. The
course will be restricted to 1,000 people on a first
come-first serve basis.
Miss Semple is issuing an appeal for seminar
leaders. She would like anyone who is interested
and is competent to lead discussion in this area to
contact her at 261-4476.
Indians declare sovereign state
SIX NATIONS RESERVE (CUP) - Fed up
with government "trickery, deceit and theft,"
Indians of the Six Nations Iroquois Confederacy
near Brantford, Ontario, November 12 declared
themselves a sovereign state separate from Canada.
In a declaration sent to Ottawa and the United
Nations, spokesmen for the reserve's 5,000 residents
and 4,000 non-resident members said they would no
longer be governed by the Ontario and federal
governments.
The declaration says that through the centuries
.Indian lands "have eroded, by trickery, deceit and
theft to small portions which are now in danger of
being taxed and dissolved into oblivion."
The declaration refers to the Department of
Indian Affairs White Paper on equal opportunity for
Indians that would remove many of the privileges of
Reserve Indians, permit the sale of reserve lands,
and make these lands subject to taxation.
An added irritant is a proposal by Ontario
Hydro to use a six-mile, 900 foot wide stretch of
reserve land to connect a power station 60 miles
south of Brantford to its grid system. Ontario
Hydro's insistence that the department of Indian
affairs endorse all contracts with people on the
reserve has made the company disliked there.
Senators
want your
suggestions
Would you like your uncle to
receive an honorary degree from
UBC?
Are you passionately interested
in the plans for the new
Sedgewick Library? Or would you
like to be able to attend UBC
senate meetings?
Whichever it is, the student
senators want to hear from you.
Every year UBC (or more
precisely the senate tributes
committee) awards honorary
degrees to three or four
individuals.
The committee is now
generously considering suggestions
from students. If you have
someone in mind, then send in the
name of your candidate and the
reason you think he deserves the
degree to Peter Brock, senate
tributes committee, SUB 100B.
On the other hand, ifyou want
to talk to the architects about the
new Sedgewick plans or to library
officials about library policy in
general, leave your name and
phone number for the attention
of Drina Allen or Peter Brock in
SUB 100B and they promise to
arrange a meeting.
If you want to sign a petition
asking for the senate meetings to
be moved to the SUB auditorium
go to (you guessed it) SUB 100B.
Far out!
PANGO-PANGO
(UNS)-"Like, man, I just want to
get away and figure some things
out in my head."
This was how 19-year-old Ann
Arky described her feelings to her
grief-torn middle-class parents
Monday after she dropped out of
university.
"Where have we gone wrong,"
wondered the red-eyed Mrs. Arky.
POPULAR MISCONCEPTION
Insurance is dull and
so are the people that sell it
This misconception has been circulating for years. It was
probably started by a life insurance agent who wanted to keep his
favourite resort in Tahiti from becoming overcrowded.
We've heard somewhere around 168 misconceptions just like this one.
Why don't you drop into the placement office and ask about
Crown Life's Graduate Career Programme.
We'd like to talk about some misconceptions.
Crown Life
INSURANCE COMPANY - TORONTO, CANADA
B.C. MAINLAND AGENCY
1550 West Georgia St., Vancouver 5, B.C., Tel. 682-6511
CROWN LIFE REPRESEOTATNOL
ON CAMPUS PECEMBER 1st and 2nd, 1969
***r.* -'" *.* ••"•**■ v./' --Ssi*"! .-•»*«>' -*-r%3
.-,;~t '      ..**-i- -,   *'
€<Do you really
want to use
what you've
learned?11
How many graduates move into jobs that
fail to exploit the education they've received?
"I've had every chance to use both
mathematics and my interest in business
here," says Bill Cuthbert (B.Sc. in maths, at
U.B.C.) who joined London Life's actuarial
department when he graduated in 1966.
"After three years, I've served in two
divisions and expect to move into another
within a year."  Bill also has completed four
examinations leading to Fellowship in the
Society of Actuaries.  "The studies not only
lead to professional status," he says, "but
they also pave the way to advancement."
Perhaps most important about his job, Bill
says, is "a feeling you get of contributing
toward something useful."
There's a challenge waiting for you, too,
at London Life.
For further information consult your
placement officer, or write to the
Personnel Dept., Station 160A,
LONDON LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
London, Ontario Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 21, 1969 Friday, November 21, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 21
BUST SCENE
Your friendly local narcs
By JIM DAVIES
Today, boys and girls, we will discuss what it's
like to be busted.
If you are busted by the Vancouver "narco
squad", you must be prepared to be embarrassed,
humiliated, insulted, sworn at, and on occasion,
"roughed up".
On Friday, Nov. 14, at 11 a.m. a friend of
mine, Mrs. Marjorie Roberts, was involved in a bust.
She was lucky, she was expecting it. On the
previous Wednesday, some of her friends, who had
her phone number, were busted. On Thursday,
Marge's roommate, Mrs. Joanne Rowland, remarked
on the phone, "Wouldn't it be weird if this phone
was tapped."
"That't right," replied a strange voice.
Did you ever get that feeling that something
wasn't quite right?
Sure enough, come Friday morning, there were
three men in grey flannel suits walking around the
apartment house.
"I was almost positive, looking through the
window, that they were narcs," said Marge.
Upon hearing a knock, she answered the door.
The three men entered, the one in the lead flashing
a badge, saying, "We're going to search the place."
She was rudely pushed aside and one of the
officers stood beside her while the others began
their search.
"Have you got a warrant?" she asked.
The officer flashed a search warrant but
wouldn't let her touch it.
Two more officers entered the room, making a
total of five. Three of them began firing questions at
her then two joined in the search while the other
kept her in the living room.
Hearing all the noice of the searching in the
bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom, she asked if she
could see what they were doing in the other rooms.
The officer told her she could not.
Hearing the noise, the man from the apartment
above, who coincidentally had been busted minutes
before by the same group of officers, came down to
Marge's apartment to investigate.
He was quickly told by one of the officers to
"get out of here you fueling animal."
"You have no right to tell him to leave my
apartment!" said Marge, who was relieved to see
someone she knew.
"Yes we do," replied the officer.
The man returned upstairs, taking Marge's five
year old daughter with him, at Marge's request, as
the child was very frightened.
Marge's daughter did not leave the apartment
soon enough, however, to escape hearing her mother
being called a pig and a tramp.
After the ordeal, having found no narcotics but
leaving the apartment a terrible mess, the lead
officer, identified by Marge as Abe Snidanko,
vowed: "We'll be seeing you again."
"I don't understand it," said Marge after the
ordeal. "I have lived here 3Vi years and I have never
had a complaint from the neighbors."
"I only hope my daughter isn't emotionally
affected after seeing her mother treated like that,"
she said.
The man upstairs was caught with some hash,
but no arrest was made. His treatment makes
Marge's situation look like a tea party. As a point of
interest, he still hasn't got the door back on its
hinges.
It is likely that the police are saving his arrest
for one of their fabled "drug roundups" in which
they gather in about 80 offenders. This way, they
obtain maximum press coverage, link marijuana and
hash with heroin offenders and show the public
what a huge problem the "drug scene" is in
Vancouver.
Consider yourself warned!
Panel discusses education problems,
finances, possible future changes
By PHIL BARKWORTH
Some students who are at
university shouldn't be here,
social credit MLA Robert
Wenman said Thursday.
Wenman was speaking at a
panel discussion in ed. 100
sponsored by the education
undergraduate society.
"The number of university
students exceeds the number of
jobs requiring degrees," Wenman
said. "Too many students go to
universities and there are not
enough students going to
vocational and technical schools."
Wenman, MLA for Delta,
handed out a pamphlet prepared
by Dalhousie University showing
the advantages of B.C.'s
educational system. He said he
felt the facts would be more
credible if they didn't come from
the government.
Eileen Dailly (NDP-Burnaby
North) called for decentralization
of the department of education.
She said the two groups who are
most informed about education
are the British Columbia Teachers'
*   .. „ '»x. -** <-.-.. *%*r." v ; -..  -.-
Federation    and    the    British
Columbia School Trustee's
Association and these two groups
should have a bigger voice in
education.
At the end of the discussion
former Alma Mater Society
President,    Dave    Zirnhelt
questioned the government's
desire to find out what students
want. He reiterated AMS
president Fraser Hodge's recent
statement that talking to the
government is like talking to a
brick wall.
WENMAN: "not enough jobs
Pit becomes centre
for tight-wad drinkers
Things are looking up, the Pit's management reported
Thursday.
Erwin Epp, manager of the student pub, claimed a
membership of over 650 and said last Friday's attendance was
over 300.
"People are finally realizing this is a way to have a good
time without spending too much money," he said. "The music
is great now."
Tonight the Pit is featuring the Dirt Cheap Rock Band.
Another band regularly appearing is the Hudson Car Pool.
PLAYHOUSE 2
MARIO  FRATTI'S
Study in Revolution
CHE GUEVARA
Directed by David Gardner
NOV. 25 - DEC. 6
ARTS CLUB THEATRE
1181   Seymour
Students V6 price Mon. to Thurs.
Vancouver Ticket Centre — 683-3255
SUZUKI
MOTORCYCLE CENTRE
Parts  -  Service  Accessories
Discount   Clearance   on
Low  Mileage   Demos.
1969
2185 W. Broadway
731-7510
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just  One   Block  from  Campus
In The Village
(Next   to   U.B.C.   Barber  Simp)
WE SERVE  GOOD CHINESE FOOD
AT    REASONABLE    PRICES
For  Take-Out  Service Ph. 224-6121
OPEN  TUES. - TO - SAT.
11:30 A.M. TO 10 P.M.
SUNDAY & MONDAY 5 TO 10 PJ.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
NON-FICTION PAPERBACKS
Specializing in Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393 W. 10th Ave. 224-4144
WORKSHOP ON
AFRICA
DISCUSSION ON
DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA
SATURDAY, NOV. 22
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
FREE
11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
EVERYONE WELCOME
FREE
NEW FILMS FROM PEKING
(Colour — English Commentary)
(1) "The Anti - China Atrocities of the New  Tsars; Soviet
Revisionists' Provocations on the Wusuli and  Heilung
Rivers."
(2) "Grand Opening of the 9th National Congress of the
Communist Party of China  in  Peking."
(3) "The Cock Crows at Midnight"
(4) "First Red Guard Rally with Chairman Mao Tse-tung."
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1969 at 12:00 NOON ONLY
OLYMPIA THEATRE
2381 Hastings Street (at Nanaimo)
Admission: $1.00 Children: 50*2
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANCY
Representatives from
•  PRICE WATERHOUSE & CO.
will be interviewing on Campus
• November 26-28
and are interested in meeting
• 1970 Graduates
who might be considering a professional career
in accounting with an international firm.
• Commerce background not essential
For further details contact the UBC Placement Service *%
Page 22
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 21, 1969
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-BILL COSBY
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SPECIAL
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RECORDS-a great £H6P
GIFT FOR        /
CHRISTMAS /  S.U.B. Friday, November 21, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 23
Charter flight
to Expo 70
goes May 21
Osaka-saka-saka to me.
The Alma Mater Society has
chartered a plane to take students
to Expo 70 in Osaka,   Japan.
The plane is due to leave
Vancouver on May 21 and will
return June 10. Total cost of the
flight is $340.
Applicants for the flight must
be members of the AMS of
faculty members.
i enns photo <
PAUL  McCARTNEY   is  alive   and   well   in   Vancouver. Note
symbolic coffin.
Suspicions of fix
by Film Society
From page 3
door on anybody's face just yet."
Tougas   summed   up   Film
Society's feelings.
"Regardless of the
consequences, it is better to get
out completely than to pretend to
exist," he said.
But if a motion goes through at
Monday's council meeting to
freeze Film Society's bank
account, then the society won't
have to pretend.
The motion follows suspicions
that Film Society has "fixed" this
week's on-campus film programs.
CONFLICTS
The regular SUB Film
presentations were cancelled by
the distributors, because the films
"just weren't ready."
At the same time the English
department is sponsoring "Who is
Afraid of Virginia Woolfe", a
course film that was scheduled
last September.
Film Society is running the
show and booked the film, but
the English department was
responsible for booking Hebb
Theatre, where the film is being
shown. The department also
agreed to charging a nominal
admission price, just to cover
operating expenses.
Film Society chairman John
Bennest said Thursday: "I was
recently approached by Chuck
Campbell and warned that if
'Virginia Woolfe' was not
incorporated into the SUB Film
program, he would move at the
next council meeting to close our
account."
Campbell later denied any such
intention.
However, any outstanding
debts of Film Society still have to
be paid by that account, frozen or
not.
"The AMS would still be
responsible for paying them," said
Bennest.
Bennest admitted that without
its account, the club could not
function past the end of the first
term. If this happened, it could
mean an end to all on-campus film
presentations, denying students
and faculty of service and
entertainment.
However, loss of money is not
the only threat that is facing Film
Society.
'WHERE DO WE STAND'
Bennest said he has seen an
AMS memo stating that after the
last SUB film presentation, Film
Society wil be denied the use of
the projection equipment that the
society itself bought and paid for.
The locks on the equipment
will be changed, and only those
persons authorized by Grahame
will be allowed to use it.
"This would probably have to
be ratified by council though,"
Bennest said.
"I simply don't know where
we stand.
"When we undertook to run
the SUB Film program, we
assumed that we would still have
the right to show other films as
well.
"A   very   confusing   situation
exists and its hard to say why."
Spouses,    parents
dependents are also eligible.
and
Further information on the
flight and accommodation in
private homes while in Japan is
available from the AMS office.
PATIO
EAT IN •TAKEOUT- DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
Presents
CAVALCADE
OF LECTURES
at
HILLEL HOUSE
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 25 - 12:30 P.M.
Dr. Max Walters - Prominent Canadian
Heart Specialist will  speak About
Your Heart.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28 - 12:30 P.M.
Dr. Abraham Carmel - First Catholic
Priest to embrace Judaism in 1,000
years, will speak on Why I Became
A Jew.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 2 - 12:30 P.M.
Dr. Maelor Vallance — Prominent Canadian Psychiatrist, will speak on a
Psychiatrist's Approach to Life.
ADMISSION FREE TO STUDENTS
If you think
you can cut itf
Alcan has a job
foryou./^
' «■«-
**EEK.
Alcan is one of the world's largest
aluminum companies. And a continually
expanding organization.
So it's a good place for you to grow.
At Alcan, graduates from almost
every faculty find they can extend their
skills in exciting new areas. You'll find
science graduates working on systems
analysis and operations research; commerce and administration grads might
become involved in production, purchasing, traffic, systems or personnel; engineers can become active in costing and
financing of special projects; social scientists might take part in some aspect of
technical developments. In short, there
are no rigid barriers.
And we offer interested graduates
as much responsibility as they can handle.
We're a goal-oriented company and
believe that good work, initiative and
ingenuity deserve recognition.
That's why an Alcan employee who
seeks it will find that opportunities and
responsibility grow in direct proportion
to his interest and contribution.
Not to mention more tangible rewards.
In fact, it's worth a trip to the Alcan
recruitment office on campus to find out
more. Especially if you're interested in a
good deal more than just a job.
Alcan is on campus next week, so
come on over and chat a while.
We've got the opening if you can
cut it.
ALUMINUM COMPANY OF CANADA. LTD    ' ALCAN
'Al  •—AM    '• Page 24
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 21, 1969
TODAY
ENGLISH  DEPT.
"Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf** at
7 and 9:30 p.m. in Hebb Theatre.
DEPARTMENT   OF   MUSIC
UBC choral union recital at noon and
8 p.m., recital haU, music building.
LEGAL AID
Legal advice every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at noon in SUB 237
and 237-A.
IWW
Film showing, noon, SUB 207-208
CUSO
Free films on CUSP and Peace Corp
volunteers,  noon, SUB 125.
SINCLAIR-DICKIN   FAN   CLUB
Sinclair   and   Dickin   will   speak   at
Totem Park—Salish Lounge, noon.
YOUNG  SOCIALISTS
"Soviet  writers  fight for  a  Socialist
Democracy",   8   p.m.,   1208   Granville
St.
CAMPUS   CRUSADE   FOR  CHRIST
CATGIF,   9   p.m.,   2181   S.W.   Marine
Drive.
PRS-LIBRARIANSHIP  SOCIETY
Short general meeting, noon, Bu. 225.
MOTHER  EARTH TRIBE — IWW
Films on Black Panthers—Mayday and
Off the Pig plus Richmond Oil Strike,
12:30-2:30,   SUB   207-209.
UBC   DROPOUTS
General  meeting,   noon,   SUB  111.
CLASSICS CLUB
Meeting with a dramatic presentation,
8 p.m., Penthouse of Bu.
SPEAKERS   AND   AMS
Sir George William Crisis, noon, SUB
ballroom.
GEOGRAPHY CLUB
Richard Rohmer speaks, noon, Geography-Geology  Bldg.
VANCOUVER   STUDENT   MOVEMENT
Meeting, 8 p.m., 2233 Columbia St.
UBC   NDP
Executive   meeting,   noon,   SUB   113.
UBC  HOCKEY
UBC Braves vs. VCIT, 8 p.m.  at Winter Sportes Center.
PROGRESSIVE  CONSERVATIVES
Meeting with John Pearkes,   8 p.m.,
748  Robson   St.
LIFE SCIENCE
Dr.   Campbell   speaks,   noon,   Bi.   Sci.
2000.
IRANIAN   STUDENT  ASSOCIATION
Dance and Beer Party,  8-12 p.m., International House,   25  cents.
FINE ARTS GALLERY
Opening of the Visionary Forms Dra-
matlc and Blake Festival, 12-9:30 p.m.,
Fine Arts Gallery. Continuous reading by the Vancouver Poetry Front
of Blake, to culminate in a celebration
of the  artist,  7:30-9:30.
LEGAL AID
Legal    advice    given   every   Monday,
Wednesday   and   Friday,   noon,   SUB
237 and 237A.
STUDENT TRAVEL  CLUB
Bus trip to San Francisco over Christmas holidays.   For  info,   call  Ted   at
731-3706.
'tween
classes
SATURDAY
UBC DROPOUTS
Novice    skydiving   competition    at    9
a.m.  in Abbotsford.
CVC
Dance, 8:30-1  a.m.  in SUB ballroom.
AFRICAN   WORKSHOP   COMMITTEE
Discussion,   11   a.m.-4  p.m.,   Graduate
Student Centre.
UBC   DROPOUTS
Novice competition and party, 9 p.m.,
Abbotsford.
SUNDAY
PRE-MED   SOCIETY
Seminar at 7:30 p.m. in SUB 215.
MALAYS   IN-S'PURE   CLUB
Dinner   and   dance,   5   p.m.,   International House.
SPEAKERS   COMM.
Sir   George   Williams   Students,   7:30,
SUB ballroom.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Seminar   discussion,   7:30   p.m.,   SUB
215.
MONDAY
UBC  SPORTS  CAR  CLUB
T-Bird rally meeting, Monday, 7 p.m.
NOT Wednesday, SUB 212A.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting for Xmas party,   noon,  SUB
105B.
COMMUNITY   INFORMATION
Meeting, noon, Council Chambers.
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
West Indian lunch every Monday.
TUESDAY
SAILING  CLUB
General   meeting   and   lecture,   noon,
Bu.  104.
HILLEL
Dr.  Max Walters speaks, noon, Hillel
House.
UBC  SCOTTISH   NATIONALISTS  CLUB
First meeeting, noon,  SUB 105B.
WEDNESDAY
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Dr. R. Lear speaks, noon, SUB 113.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Tickets  on  sale  each  noon  till Wed.
for Prof.-Student Beer Party on Wed.,
Ang. 24.
CIASP
Training meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 119.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Dr.  HeUiwell speaks, noon, SUB 125.
SCEL
Dr.   Miller speaks,   noon,  SUB  111.
THURSDAY
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Teach-in,   noon,  Ed.  202.
RELIGIOUS   STUDIES
Prof. Chaim Rabin speaks, noon, Bu.
205.
MONDAY
FRENCH   DEPT.
Mr.   Driss Chraibi speaks,   noon,  Bu.
217.
TUESDAY
POLITICAL  SCIENCE
Prof.   L.    Lipson   speaks,    noon,   Bu.
100.
ENGLISH   DEPT.
Dr.    Jean   Hagstrum    speaks,    noon,
Frederick Lassere Bldg.  102.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 75*4 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25*ts
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. ot B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
EARTHAIRFIREWATER
FESTIVAL 70
FESTIVAL 70
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE AND FREE FOOD. THE
Swamp and the Viceroys Friday,
Nov. 28, 9:00 p.m. Hallmark Hall.
5550 Fraser. Tickets $1.75 from
NDP  Club,   SUB  216C.	
WIGGY SYMPHONY IN PERSON
Thurs. to Sun. This week only.
Dance 9 to 1. Doors 8 p.m. Heaven
and Hell, 3730 West 10th Ave. 224-
1415.	
SOUL DANCE C. V. C. PRESENTS
The Trials of Jason Hoover—SUB
Ballroom, 8:30-1:00 Sat., Nov. 22
—Groove and get rid of your pre-
exam blues.	
CAMPUS DANCE, FRI., NOV. 21,
9-1, SUB Ballroom. Mix 'n mate,
guys   J1.25,   girls   $1.00.
Greetings
12
HAPPY      BELATED      BIRTHDAY,
M.   Cathy.
Wanted Information
13
Lost & Found
14
LOST RING FRI. NITE THE BARN
Reward.    263-3056.
LOST: URGENT PLEA. REWARD
offered for return of wallet, notes
and books in school bag. Lost on
Chancellor Blvd. Thursday. 224-
9193  after   4   p.m.
Rides & Car Pools
IS
MOBILITY FREEDOM
$18.00 per month. Including insurance. See the volume dealer in "Two
Wheel Freedom" for details. Hi
Performance Honda, 3712 W. 10th
at  Alma.   Phone  228-9077
RIDE WANTED FOR TWO PER-
sons from Lougheed Hwy. and
Bainbridge.  Phone  298-1564	
CAR POOL FROM VICTORIA AT
Marine, 8:30-5:30 daily, requires
one   passenger.   Phone   325-1036
Special Notices
16
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rate if you are 20 years or
over and have good driving record you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott,   299-9422.
LICENSED DAY CARE CENTRE
has vacancies; location, 1550 West
33rd   Ave.,   261-6711
BLOW-UPS (2'x3') MADE FROM
photos taken in our studio or from
good negatives or prints. Black-
lights, largest selection of posters
in B.C. Jokes gifts, cards. Post
Office. The Grin Bin. 3209 W.
Broadway. 738-2311 (Opposite
Liquor Store & Super Valu).
WIFE OF STUDENT DESIRES
poodles to clip. Expert work, reasonable,   Lorna,   733-6881.
AQUA SOC. DIVE TO GALIANO
Is. this weekend Nov. 22-23. Two
days of great diving. Sign in
Club's lounge.
SIGMA CHI HOUSE—RATES ON
request for room only, weekly or
monthly. Meal tickets or full room
and board. 5725 Agronomy Rd.
224-5*530.	
EVERY MONDAY EVENING FROM
Jan. 12 - March 16th you are given
an opportunity to hear a variety
of speakers on the topic of human
sexuality. Sign up in SUB Monday, Nov. 24, Wed. 26th & Friday,
28th  at  12:30.
Be it gals or guys...
we specialize in what you idolize
PERSONALLY YOURS DATING
CLUB
Phone 434-2636
2121   Kingsway —  Rm. 203
AUTHORITY — WHO CAN TELL
me what to do? What's so special
about the Bible? Topic for Open
Forum this Sunday, 3 p.m., 2556
Highbury at 10th (Alma 'Y' by
arrangement).	
CO-ED VOLLEBALL, WED., NOV.
26, 7 p.m.-ll p.m., W.M.G. Every-
one  welcome.	
FREE SKIING — FREE ROOM
and board at Whistler Mtn. for
Part time housekeeping and babysitting.  Call  932-5422.
NEED RIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO
about December 20. Share gas &
driving.  Phone 731-3056
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS PRODUC-
tion of Graphs, Maps, Illustrations
and Formulations. Scientfic Displays. Advertising.   Phone 733-4506
Special  Notices—Cont'd
16
COME AND HEAR RICHARD
Rohner speak about Mid Canada
Corridor,   today  noon,  in GG100.
AFTER THE RAPE OF CZECHO-
slovakia, the Foerstrovo Trio got
out, so see them in political asylum, Tues., Nov. 25, SUB Aud.,
12:30 p.m.,  50c. Special Evens.
ACADIA      DAY      CARE      CENTER
vacancy.    Mrs.   Campbell,   228-3149
Travel Opportunities
17
OVERLAND TOUR TO KATMAN-
du. May to August 1970. E. Wilks,
No. 45, 2560 Whiteley Crt. N. Van.
STUDENT   TRIP   TO   SAN   FRAN-
cisco    over    Christmas    holidays.
For   info,   phone   Ted   at   731-3706
weekdays   between   6-9   p.m.
Wanted-Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1968 RENAULT 10, EXCELLENT
condition. Leather seats, radio.
Ph. 683-8631 (8:30-5:00), 874-2568
after  5:00.   Ask  Miss  Miao.	
1961 CHEV. BELAIR FOUR DOOR
auto. 6, very clean, $475, eves.
327-8220,   good  tires.	
'60 VOLVO 544, PHONE 738-6784.
Back of 2315 W. 8th. Asking, $500.
Must sell. 	
1961 V.W., 40,000 ML, GOOD TIRES,
reconditioned motor, radio, very
clean.   Call   collect,   532-1071	
1964 CORVAIR MONZA—4-speed, 2-
door, radio, good condition. Call
Jim  Milljour  at  872-2035.	
1967 T.R. 4A, B.R.G. I.R.S. 228-8124,
4449  W  14th  Ave.
MUST SELL '65 HONDA, $850.00.
Excellent cond., new Pirellis,
snows, luggage & ski rack. Eves.
733-9293
'64 LANDROVER, EXCELLENT
condition.  New   tires.   Ph.   736-6840
1962 CORVAIR AUTOMATIC, WINE
colour, radio, four doors. Good
condition. Phone 224-3186 after 5
p.m.
'56 NASH METROPOLITAN, IN
good running order. Just $75.
Phone Wendy after 6:30 p.m.,
736-5724	
1965 SPRITE, 27,000 MILES Excellent condition, $860. Phone
255-9151   day,   or   224-6670.	
1959 HILLMAN CONVERT. GOOD
condition. Must sell, $100 cash.
Ph.   261-5290
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating 8c Copying 32
Miscellaneous
33
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS PRODUC-
tion of Graphs, Maps, Illustrations
and Formulations. Scientfic Displays. Advertising. Phone 733-4506
Photography
34
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
HEAVEN AND HELL CUSTOM-
ers wanted for Thurs. and Sun.
Due to overcrowding on Fri. and
Sat. nights. This week, Wiggi Symphony Thurs.-Sun. 3730 West 10th.
224-1415.
STARTING JANUARY 12 th. HU-
man Sexuality Course. Sign up in
SUB next Monday, Wed. and Fr.
at   12:30.	
SOUL DANCE, C.V.C. PRESENTS
the Trials of Jason Hoover. SUB
Ballroom, Sat., Nov. 22, 8:30-1:00.
All   welcome.
Scandals—Cont'd
37
MYSTERIOUS HAPPENING IN
SUB Ballroom. This Friday 9-1.
Guys $1.25, girls $1.00 to see.
THE WILD WILLY ZOOM ROCK
and Roll Band. Dirt cheap enter-
tainment.   985-5727  or 733-5293.
AFTER THE RAPE OF CZECHO-
slovakia, the Foerstrovo Trio got
out, so see them in political asylum, Tues., Nov. 25, SUB Aud.,
12:30 p.m.,  50c.  Special Events.
Sewing 8c Alterations
38
Typewriters 8c Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPING, 35c
page (10 copy) call Mrs. Duncan
228-9597.
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Phone 321-2102.
TYPING OF ESSAY ETC., DONE
neatly, efficiently, and quickly.
30c a page. Phone 224-0385* after
5 p.m.	
NEED A TYPIST. FAST, ACCUR-
ate typing done in home. Phone
325-3668   (script   type).	
SKILLED TYPING OF ESSAYS,
theses and Phd.'s. (Campbell form
and  style).  RE 1-3700	
EXPERT TYPING: THESIS, 35c a
page; Essays 30c a page, 5c per
copy. Fast, efficient service. Ph.
325-0545	
COMPETENT TYPING (Documents, theses, essays, general)
my home. Senior Legal secretary-
bookkeeper, excellent references.
946-4722	
HOME TYPING, ELECTRIC. Experienced. Reas. rates. Telephone
738-7881
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
JON'S PIZZARAMA RESTAUR-
ants requires part and full-time
wairesses. Attractive girls, 18-25.
Apply in person only, 2676 West
Broadway. Shifts available at all
four   restaurants.
GIRLS: GUARANTEE YOURSELF
a job for this summer. Phone Mr.
Stevens at 526-7821 from 10-5
soon!
Help Wanted—Male
52
JON'S PIZZARAMA RESTAUR-
ants require young men with
cars for part-time general kitchen work. Apply in person only,
2676   West   Broadway.
Help Wanted-
Male or Female
53
NEED EXTRA MONEY?
FULL   or   PART-TIME
Excellent  Opportunity  Needs
Exposure
—  Mon.-Fri.-  After  6   p.m.   —
685-0903 or 738-6404
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction Wanted
61
Language Instruction
61A
QUALITY  LANGUAGE TUTORING
and
CERTIFIED   TRANSLATIONS
CONVERSA-SCHOOL    OF
LANGUAGES
1603   W.   4th   at  Fir  — 736-5401
Chargex Cards Accepted
Music
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
84
EXP. TUTORING IN CHEMISTRY
and MATH, by Graduate. Phone
738-5603
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
NOW AVAILABLE — $1.00
al Ihe Bookstore,
AMS Publications Office
and Thunderbird  Shop
TWO PAIRS WOOD SKIS, 205;
185 cm. Double boots, ladies 8-9.
732-6480.	
EMBROIDERED SUEDE AFGAN
coat $100.  Vest $50.  Ph.  228-8802.
CUSTOM BUILT TWO - MANUAL
portable organ, two Jensen 15 in.
speakers in boxes, Bogen Challenger 50 amplifier. Phone Bernie
298-5810.	
VR 17 207 cm. SALOMON BIND-
ings, unused about $150 — 224-9853
Tom Rm.  14 leave phone number.
KOFLACK SKI BOOT, SIZE 9. 985-
1146 after 6:30.	
BRAND NEW, UNUSED KNEISSL
White Star Racer RS skis, 200 cm.
$140.00. 224-5142.	
NEW LANGE SKI BOOTS, SIZE
9, Standard $99. Phone 228-8700
or   921-7276	
AMPEX STEREO TAPE DECK:
S. on S., S. with S.; Echo, 3
heads, cost: $379.95. Offers? Also
other   goodies.    224-5194	
100 METAL STACKABLE CHAIRS
and dolly, $6. each. 200 wooden
chairs, $1.55 each; also 8 folding
tables, 3x8, $8 each. For further
information   contact   939-3180
FIBREGLASS SKI BOOTS, SIZE
11%.   Men's.   Lee,   879-2839	
BAUER     GIRLS'     SKATES,     SIZE
6%;    case   guards,    266-7688   after
4:00.	
SALE   XMAS    .    .    .    CLEARANCE
Sale.   Reductions from  30 to  50%.
Quality    power    and    hand    tools.
Hansen    Industrial    Tool    Supply,
1535   W   3rd   Ave.     Ph.    736-0371.
Limited stock,  so hurry!!	
FRIG. AND STOVE FOR SADE OR
rent.   Trombone for sale,  only $50.
Call   254-6196   after  6:00.	
SKI     BOOTS,     TYROL,     SIZE     11,
poles like new, $40.   Ph.  224-3596
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE
Rooms
61
ROOMS ON CAMPUS, FURNSHD.
Full facilities, $40—dble; $70-sngle.
2250  Wesbrook,   224-5745	
LIVE CHEAPLY ON CAMPUS !
Room with kitchen privileges,
only $50. For male students. Board
available for $45. TV, plus weekly linen. Very quiet. Also large
lounge, 5760 Toronto Rd. 6T phone
224-0327
ON CAMPUS ROOMS; STUDY
lamps, mirrors, towel hangers,
w/w carpets, shoe cupboards;
room only $60 mo. Room and
board $115 mo. Sigma Chi House,
5725   Agronomy   Rd.,   224-5530.
STUDENT HOUSE ROOM TO
rent. $35 month—use house facil.
kit.   etc.   ph.   873-1117.	
ROOM, BOARD $70. STUDENT
must be clean - cut, responsible.
Transportation available; Chinese
welcome. John Anderson, 6391
Fleming,   Van.   15.	
FEMALE STUDENT ACCOMMO-
dation. Reasonable. Phone 261-0844
NEAR GATES—2 ROOMS, USE OF
kitchen, bathroom, basement.
Available Dec. 1. $75. Ph. 224-9380
(except  weekend).	
LGE. B'SMT. ROOM, $55 MO., IN-
cludlng telephone, cooking facilities, private entrance. Male senior student only. Available Dec,
4562   W.   13th   Ave.
Room 8c Board
83
LIVE ON CAMPUS PHI KAPPA
Sigma. Colour T.V.,- Sauna, 5785
Agronomy  Road.  224-9684.	
SIGMA CHI HOUSE — LARGEST
room on campus; two lounges, and
dining hall. Free room cleaning
service, laundry, color TV, good
food. Come out and see us, 5725
Agronomy, 224-5530. Evenings.
ROOM, BOARD,, GOOD FOOD,
clean house, two minutes from
SUB, 2120 Wesbrook Cres. Phone
224-5243  or  224-9073
Furn. Houses 8c Apts.
83
L H K SUITE, LARGE UPSTAIRS
rooms. Close to Gate, suits 2,
furnisher $110, or unfurnished.
Available now,  228-8084	
LOOKING FOR FEMALE GRAD-
student or Ass.-prof, to share 3
Br. house. Rent $80. Phone CR
8-8763.   Granville   &   65th.	
CO-OP HOUSE ROOM FOR GIRL;
Heads preferred, $42.50 and utilities,   1563 West  66th.   Tel  266-2127
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED SECTION Friday, November 21, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 25
FRUIT DROPPINGS
BY NICK ORCHARD
What we need: a hero
The theory has been put forward that apathy
runs rampant on our campus because there are no
strong personalites to guide us out of the darkness
of our individual warblings.
In simple terms, the university needs a hero.
Easier said than done.
The Ubyssey will accept applications until 4
p.m. Monday, although we put little faith in the
right person stepping forward and offering his right
arm, especially when the entire campus would
rather see a good pair of legs.
Our first stipulation, therefore, is a fragment of
the student body with sex appeal. That eliminates
just about all the girls on campus.
The second requirement is a leader with guts
and determination, thereby eliminating most of the
jnen.
Also required is a knowledge of at least five
languages, judo, karate, druidism, hinduism and the
life cycle of a clam.
It beomes apparent that our search must go off
campus, dredging our life-blood from the polluted
streams of the city.
If you think I'm going to suggest Tom Terrific
then you wouldn't even recognize a hero when you
saw one. I'm talking about the Batmen, Sinbad
Sailors and Spidermen of our culture.
Now that you've got the general idea, accept
the fact we need someone new to this department
so that when he throws himself bodily from the bell
tower everybody will wonder in amazement and
flock to his cause, whatever it may be.
Since it is becoming apparent that everybody is
once again about to accept the lie of Christmas, and
the voice " from the rear screams "For Christ's
sake, how did Christmas get its start?", I
recommend Santa Claus as prime candidate.
And why not? Students need someone they can
identify with. Here's someone with a strong affinity
with kids. He has a beard, long hair, and dresses
weird. What more could you want?
Think about it, and next Christmas Eve leave
him a hero's medal with the bottle of Coke. If he
can change the meaning of Christmas, he can
certainly change this university.
Charge dropped against radical
Perhaps Mastroianni's greatest performance in
Nobel Prize Winner Albert Camus' masterpiece!
MARCELLO MASTROIANNI
THe STRaNGeR
IN COLOR
Varsity
224r3730*'
4375 W. 10th
This Sunday Only
Doors Open 1:30 P.M.
Showing at 2:00 P.M.
SASKATOON (CUP)-Saskatoon city police
will take no action against a board of trade
commissioner who slapped a radical aldermanic
candidate three weeks ago.
City prosecutor Ben Wolff told the candidate,
Richard Thompson, Wednesday that while there
"may have been an assault in law" when Bert
Salloum struck him, "it would be of such a frivolous
nature that the Crown could not proceed on it nor
would the court entertain it."
Salloum struck Thompson at an election dinner
for local candidates Oct. 29, after Thompson and
other radical candidates showed "no respect" for
the gathering by remaining seated while the head
table party entered, and smoked during the playing
of the national anthem.
When Thompson and the other candididates
from the Committee for a Socialist Movement,
running for alderman or school board in Saskatoon,
tried to press charges Oct. 29, they were told their
statements were incomplete, Thompson said.
"A police station is "not a place for children's
fun and games," said Wolff Wednesday. "I consider
(Thompson's) conduct deplorable."
Thompson and other CSM candidates have
engaged a lawyer to handle the prosecution against
commissioner Salloum, who has refused to
comment on the case.
Alternative to CUS
still a possibility
OTTAWA (CUP)—At least 16 major universities will meet here
late next month to discuss starting another national student union.
Hugh Segal, vice-president of the University of Ottawa student
council, said Thursday he sent invitations to all Canadian universities
after the Canadian union of students folded last month.
So far Segal says he has received affirmative replies from 15
universities, including Sir George Williams, McGill, Montreal, Queens,
Western, Waterloo, York, Windsor, Dalhousie, Brock and Mt. Allison.
Several western universities have said they will also attend the
conference.
The conference was called to see if Canadian university students
want some kind of national organization, Segal said. But it will be up
to the individual universities to make recommendations.
"Whatever is proposed, we must steer clear of the political
pitfalls that destroyed CUS," he added.
Intramural Notices
BASKETBALL—'Nov. 21, 12:30- Grad
Studies vs. For II (ct 2); Kappa Sigma
vs.  En*** V (ct 3).
—Nov. 24, 12:3th Dentistry vs. Ed I
(ct 1); Totem I vs. Arts I (ct 2); Med I
vs. Eng I (ct 3). 7:00: Eeta I vs. PE I
(ct  1); PE VI vs.  Dekes (ct  2); Fiji II
vs. Ed IV (ct 3). 8:00: DU I vs. Union I
(ct 1); Alpha Delts I vs. Union n (ct 2);
Alpha Delts n vs. PE JTV <ct 3). 9:00:
Ed H vs. DU II (ct 1); Eng1 IV vs. Phi
Delta (ct 2); Place Vanier I vs. Com I
(ct 3). 1.0:00: Sam I vs. For I (ct 1); MBA
vs. Law I (ct 2); Kappa Sigma vs. Fiji
I (ct 3).
Handicapped children
need better  facilities
Residential facilities for B.C.'s physically and mentally
handicapped children are sadly lacking, a spokesman for the
Lower Mainland Society for Residences for the Physically
Handicapped said Thursday.
"With the exception of Woodlands and the shockingly few
hospital wings in our province devoted to caring for the
disabled, facilities are virtually non-existant," Kathy Schink
said.
The society is largely made up of the parents of the
handicapped children. They are asking donations, monetary or
otherwise, from the public for the purpose of building a home
where their children will be given better care and attention than
normally possible.
They begin a publicity campaign next week and need
help.
Interested persons should contact Mrs. Schink at
733-3018.
'MAGIC LOTUS LANTERN'
Love story of a famous Chinese
fable. Music by Shanghai Music Institute Symphony Orchestra. Best
film produced in China before Cultural   Revolution.
Plus:
"MY LOVER IS YOU"
in Cantonese
Shown at
OLYMPIA THEATRE
2381 East Hastings (near Nanaimo)
on Nov. 22 Saturday at 2 - 6 p.m.
STUDENTS: $1.00
OBJECTIVE: CAREER
The Regular Officer Training Plan fs for bright
young men looking for a meaningful career. You
undertake a complete university education with
a degree in arts, sciences, or engineering plus
full military training. Result: you graduate as a
complete man: well-educated, with an officer's
commission in the Canadian Armed Forces. Act
now because we begin selecting candidates early
in the New Year. For full information, visit:
CANADIAN ARMED FORCESw
RECRUITING CENTRE
545 Seymour St., Vancouver — 666-3136
THE REGULAR OFFICER TRAINING PLAN
Give It Some Thought!
A.M.S. CHARTERS 70
NOW BOOKING
VANCOUVER-TOKYO, MAY 21-JUNE 10
$340-°° return
Accommodation available in private homes in Expo area
*
OTHER CHARTERS
VANCOUVER - LONDON RETURN — MAY 16-SEP. 3/70
VANCOUVER-LONDON RETURN — JUNE 6-SEP. 2/70
VANCOUVER-LONDON ONE-WAY — SEP. 14/70
WE CAN ALSO MAKE YOUR GROUND ARRANGEMENTS
2-5 P.M.
228-2980
For Applications and Information
A.M.S. TRAVEL
Room 237B, SUB Page 26
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 21, 1969
Basketball team opens season
against two prairie schools
The UBC basketball Thunderbirds open the Western
Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association season
tonight at War Memorial Gym with an early must-win
game against the tough University of Manitoba Bisons....
The Bisons have already accumulated an impressive
7-0 won-loss pre-conference record including a win over
Loyola University of Montreal. Manitoba, along with UBC
and the U of Alberta (Edmonton) are rated the top clubs
in the western conference and tonight will be the first
indication of how the league stacks up.
The Bisons are led by the last year's WCIAA scoring
champion Terry Ball, a 6'3" guard with a great scoring
touch and Ted Stoeszjwho is listed as a 6'5" guard.
UBC enters the opener with a much smaller team
than last year's club but they move the ball extremely
well and have shown evidence of stronger outside
shooting.
Weekend
Ice News
The Thunderbird hockey team
opens its Western Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Associate
season in Winnipeg this weekend.
The Birds play the University of
Manitoba Friday night, and the
University of Winnipeg Saturday.
Their shorter schedule this
year, only 14 games, means every
game they play will be vital, and
preseason reports have them
stacked up in third place in
league standings behind U of:
Alberta, Edmonton and Calgary
teams.
Last year Manitoba beat the
Birds, and although UBC is
stronger this year, it would appear
they will have a game on their
hands yet.
Meanwhile, UBC hockey fans
will be able to watch the Braves in
action on their home ice at the
Winter Sports Centre Friday 8
p.m. when they host BCIT and
Saturday 8 p.m. when they take
on the only team that has beaten
them this year, the Grandview
Steelers.
Friday nights game pits the
Braves (2-0) against BCIT (1-3)
and UBC coach Don Fiddler is
looking for thier third straight
Pacific Intercollegiate League
game win.
Saturday's game is bound to be
more of grudge match, as in their
last meeting the Steelers squeaked
out a 5-4 decision, but Fiddler
thinks the Braves have improved
enough to reverse the score, and
add a few points also.
The Birds however are being hampered by minor
injuries. Centre Terry MacKay has a bad cold and forward
Derek Sankey sprained an ankle in yesterday's scrimmage,
but both are expected to start tonight.
The other starters will be speedy guards Ron Thorsen
and Alex Brayden and possibly! the team's outstanding
performer Bob Molinski.
The veteran forward is certainly the club's top
defensive player and has the delightful knack of coming
up with strong games in important situations.
Last year during the rash of injuries, Molinski came
up with numerous brilliant performances causing coach
Peter Mullins to call him "a real game player."
Saturday evening Molinski and the Birds will host the
University of Winnipeg whom if last year's team is any
indication, should prove to be a weak link in the
conference.
SPOR TS
The Wesmen, who open their season tonight against
Victoria on the island, were defeated 117-59 in a
non-conference game at UBC last year.
Other teams in the WCIAA include the other Alberta
schools in Calgary and Lethbridge and the universities of
Saskatchewan (Saskatoon and Regina).
The Association now has established a playoff system
which is equally dependent on the final standings and on
geography. The top four clubs make the playoffs and each
team proceeds to play the club nearest in location. The
semi-finals and finals are best two-out-of-three affairs with
the eventual winner going to the Canadian Intercollegiate
Athletic Association finals in Hamilton to represent the
west.
The Birds are hopeful of embarking on that journey
to Hamilton tonight against Manitoba.
Game time is 8 p.m. with the Jayvees going against
Vancouver City College at 6.
—bruce stout photo
READY TO START! UBCSCC Ralleyette chairman Gordon Mowat gives instructions and time to
driver Dave Gagnon while navigator Harvey Boyle worries whether he can keep to the proper route.
The Sports Car Club runs small rallies about once a month on Thursday afternoons. The events are
open to all persons at the University, and are a lot of fun. Why don't you turn out the next time.
Woman basketballers open season
BASKETBALL
The WCIAA Women's basketball season begins
Friday and Saturday in the Memorial Gym. Game
time is 4 p.m. on both days, with Lethbridge as the
opponent.
FIELD HOCKEY
This weekend the Women's field hockey team
will travel to Victoria for the Pacific North West
championships.
As UBC has won division A for the past four
years, they hope to make the sweep once again.
Dropouts
Fall-in
The UBC dropouts are holding
. a fall-in at Abbotsford.
The campus skydivers sponsor
their first intra-club novice
competition Saturday at the
Abbotsford Sport Parachute
Centre, with trophies being
awarded to the most stylish
jumper, and to the most accurate
jumper.
The accuracy competition is to
see who can hit a dot in the
middle of the field while the style
section consists of points for
proper exit techniques as well as
body position during free-fall and
landing form.
Most of the students who will
be in the competition have had
somewhere under five jumps. In
the airplane, they will be listening
to Lea Johnson, the club safety
officer, who will tell them when
to jump, and then will judge their
style from the plane.
Lea has more jumps than
anyone else in the club, with
about 550 to his credit.
According to club spokesman
Jim Stevenson, luck will play a
larger part than skill in the
competitions, especially if the
weather is anything but clear skies
with a light breeze.
After the competitions,
everyone, spectators included, is
invited to stay around and pass
the gas, sort of a two-feet-on-the-
ground introduction to the sport.
George & Berny's
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Save 40% off Diamond Rings from regular stock. These rings include
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■-»tanuAnijimLNU'L-KWfui'UMiu>i-juoiw<niuM<n<>un'j-imi<iii> Friday, November 21, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 27
Team Spotlight
The Ubyssey's ace sports photographer DICK BUTTON was
pressed into service as team manager recently for the Birds
hockey team. Here he gives his impression of the job.
You walk into the dressing room and you're gripped by the
tension which engulfs the whole world.
Two goals up, and 40 brutal minutes left. The pressure is worse
now than the start of the game. This team beat us last night by two,
they'll be trying harder now that they're down.
Somebody keeps saying, "They're not going to score guys,
they're not going to." Someone tells him to shut up, quit talking
about it.
The goalkeeper is the most on edge. He had a rough game last
night. A lot of goals were scored. He's playing very well tonight.
He hardly moves during the period break, just stares at a spot on
the opposite wall. He has confidence in his defense tonight,
particularly the new one playing a regular shift.
Linemates talk over little points which may make the difference
between a goal and another save. The power play hasn't been going
well. They aren't shooting enough.
A defenseman notes aloud that the ice is in good shape tonight.
Why don't they flood the ice between periods though?
The coach enters. Congratulates the team on their first period
play, then makes a strategy point—the wingers not dropping back into
the slot to cover up.
The bell rings. The guys pour out ready to skate flat out, and
rack up the goals. Everybody has encouraging words for the
goaltender.
The second period is a kaleidoscope of motion on the ice.
There's almost a fight, a few heavy checks. Nobody gets hurt.
Back into the dressing room. More oranges and a few ice packs.
Things are a little more related now. No scoring in that period,
but a number of good chances. The main thing is we held them out.
The forechecking is working well tonight, really keeping them
bottled up. The defense is standing up strong, too. There are no
breakaways tonight.
A few more words from the coach, some encouragement all
round, the bell, and back out onto the ice.
The third period goes by a little slower. The hockey is good, but
we definitely have the edge.
They come close on occasions, but excellent goaltending and a
fine play by a defenseman preserve the shutout.
Play gets a little rough in the last few minutes as the outcome is
finally evident.
We picked up two more goals this period on a breakaway and a
deflected point shot.
The team skates off the ice a very happy bunch, particularly the
goalie. It's his first shutout for quite a while. The whole team played
well tonight.
The dressing room is quiet, but happy. Ihe players dress slowly,
savoring their well earned victory.
It's going to be a miserable trip back in the morning, but now
everyone drifts off to celebrate.
The bus has to be packed, dressing room cleaned up, and all the
other little chores. But it's a lot easier when you win.
The UBC Winter Sports
Centre will soon be opening
its new facilities. There are
conflicting reports as to the
exact date when the two new
ice rinks will be ready, but
most frequent rumor is
December 1.
Rugger squads
set for action
After this weekend's match
between the Birds and the
Meralomas the first half of the
rugby season will be officially past
tense.
Varsity will endeavor to
correct the ailments that plagued
them through the entire first half,
save occasional flashes of winning
Play-
Last weekend they seemed to
have cured the ailments that beset
them.
While lopsided wins have been
recorded by the Brids this season
(notably 25-0 over University of
Alberta) they have shown an
inconsistency to move the ball
and finish plays.
But against the Capilanos they
played the brand of rugby that
should epitomize their
inter-collegiate action.
unbeaten last season to win the
Junior Men's Open championship.
The UBC Junior team are
favorites for the junior title, but
the open men's title will likely go
to either Vancouver Olympic club
or Vancouver Optimist Striders.
Race time is 11:00 a.m.
Saturday when the midget
women's division start off on the
194 mile course.
The open races will be run over
six miles starting at 1:30 p.m.
Hockey team faces final
Both the Thunderbirds and Braves field hockey teams play their
next to last games before the Christmas break this Saturday.
Both games are at Hillcrest Park by Capilano Stadium. The
Braves start at 1:00 p.m. while the Birds go at 2:30 p.m.
For the Birds it is a must game if they hope to win the first
division championship. Their game is against league-leading Hawks A
who defeated the Birds in their only previous meeting.
The Birds are in fourth place in their division, five points behind
co-leaders, Hawks and Jokers.
In the less competitive second division, the Braves should have
an easy time against Vancouver A. The Braves have the ability to
defeat every team in their division except the leaders, Hawks B who
have defeated them twice so far this year.
Tracksters
set relays
November is the month when
UBC hosts one of the most
significant track meets in the
Pacific Northwest.
The Pacific Northwest
Championships is in its 22nd year.
This year there are well over 350
athletes entered.
The meet has grown from a
jumbled intercollegiate and small
high school meet to a six division
race.
Runners range from the midget
womens class through two boys
high school races to the open
women's and men's races.
During recent years clubs have
been using this meet to
supplement sparse programs in the
Interior. Teams from Prince
George, Kamloops, Vernon,
Vancouver Island, and the Fraser
Valley give the races a Provincial Championship flavor in
the High School division.
The    UBC   teams   emerged
Intramurals — see page 25 _
The problem that few fans
seem to realize is that the Birds'
opposition is possibly the finest in
Canada.
According to Coach Donn
Spence: "The brand of rugby
played in B.C. is better than
anywhere else in Canada. Any one
of the top four teams in the city
league would have little trouble
from opponents.
Coach Spence realizes that if
his team does not place well in
inter-collegiate play he stands
open to the rankest criticism.
But the coach is right. With the
experience gained from the Miller
Cup series the Birds, barring any
complications, will place well.
It turned out to be an
exceptional weekend all-round for
UBC rugby teams.
In second division action the
Braves soundly beat the Capilano
seconds 11-3, while in third
division play the frosh team
dispensed with Royal Roads 12-6.
The hit of the weekend
though, were the fifths composed
predominantly of players from
the football team. They bested
the Trojans of Senior Men's C
20-19 in one of the more exciting
games recorded this season.
Maybe you're in the wrong
sport, men.
Back to upcoming play, if the
Birds beat the Meralomas they
will jump from the depths of the
cellar to fourth place.
Unfortunately for our squad they
will be without the services of
regulars Bob Bishop and Ian
Prattis. The coach feels though,
that their replacements are more
than competent.
As an extra added attraction,
the frosh squad play BCIT to
decide a leader for their division.
The catch to this happy turn of
events is that UBC must win by
20 points, owing to the three
way tie for first place.
BUSY  "B"
BOOKS
Used  University Texts
Bought and Sold
146 W.  HASTINGS
Opposite Woodwards
681-4931
DEAN'S
RESTAURANTS
Full
Dining
Facilities
Take-Home
Service
PIZZAS - CHICKEN
HAMBURGERS
4544 W. 10th 224.1351
56£8 Yew at 41 tr    266-7188
Hours: Weekdays 7 a.m. ta 11 pjm.
Sundays   10  a.m.  to  11   pjn.
Collegiate
Basketball
Opener
FRI. NOV. 21 -
UNIV. Of MANITOBA "BISONS"
SAT. NOV. 22-
UNIV. OF WINNIPEG "WESMEN"
MEMORIAL GYM
8 p.m.
Prelims. — W.C.I.A.A. Women 4 p.m.
— Jayvees 6 p.m.
FREE
U.B.C. STUDENTS
iX        FREE ti
FREE
VARSITY SPORTS CENTRE
"YOUR VARSITY SKI SHOP"
UMITED SUPPLY
A fantastic new
fibreglass ski
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SPECIAL SALE
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4510 W. 10th Ave.       J"** 2 B'°c*« 224-6414
Outside The Gates Page 28
T H E     U BY S S EY
Friday, November 21 > 1969
Maritime student unionism:
crying in the
wilderness
By Ron Thompson, Canadian University Press
Who knows. One day the tribulations of starting
a regional student union may rival tales of Joey
Smallwood as bed-time stories for grandchildren in
the Maritimes. Such a union really has been a long
time coming.
And after a number of false starts, university and
college students in the Atlantic provinces tried again
in October, this time through an organization rather
un-affectionately known as the Federation of
Atlantic Student Councils.
The federation is only supposed to last a
year-hopefully, referenda on the region's 12
campuses in the spring and fall of 1970 will okay the
founding of the Atlantic Union of Students.
The union would be a first for Canada in two
aspects. It would be a voluntary union, controlled by
its membership, rather than a federation of student
council types from each campus. It would also be the
first regional union of students in the country.
That's the goal of the federation, then-not to
act as a policy-making body, but to pave the way for
such a regional union. Its job will be research,
education and propaganda.
Two fieldworkers have been hired by the
federation to take the concept and rationale of a
maritimes union to the region's twelve campuses. The
two - Kathy Walker and Skip Hamblin - both have
previous organizing experience: Walker, with the
Women's Liberation Movement; Hamblin with the
Company of Young Canadians in community/labor
projects.
Talking to campuses
They will be talking on the campuses, not only
to student council types but to meetings of campus
interest groups. The message they take with them will
be supplemented by the results of research initiated
by the federation.
The research—it will probably go on should the
federation and the union both fail to gel—has
broadly-defined parameters:
• cultural disparity and educational priorities of
provincial governments;
• policy and program needs of Atlantic students
as could be implemented through formation of a
regional union;
• structural problems of relevancy and
communication between student council and the
student body: reform mechanisms which would
increase their validity as policy-determining
organizations; and
• the basis for a continuing analysis of the
social, cultural and economic situation of the Atlantic
region and its students.
Such a union is burdened with difficulties in
coming into existence. Not the least of these is that
student councils, the major stumbling block to most
student unionism, are the organizations that founded
the federation.
The founding conference in Charlottetown in
October had all the earmarks of a (God bless them)
congress of the late Canadian Union of Students:
with the traditional appeal to "mandates", or lack of
them, and calls for membership referenda.
In the end, only half the campuses joined the
federation. Two more did so provisionally: while the
region's largest universities—New Brunswick and
Dalhousie—stayed out, claiming they had no
mandate.
But despite this—and despite the contradiction of
student councils organizing towards a voluntary
regional   union—there   are  good reasons  to augur
success for those who see the need for such an
organization.
In the Maritimes, perhaps more than anywhere
else in the country, the need for regional organizing,
research and action by university students is rooted in
the history and economics of the region.
Students all. over the North American continent
are beginning to grapple with the inseparability of
problems in the university and in the society. In the
Atlantic region, they are slapped in the face with this
reality.
The Maritimes universities are a completely
integrated aspect of the clumsy response by existing
federal and provincial governments to problems of
regional underdevelopment.
When the students gathered in Charlottetown
this October to found FASC, they met in the
birthplace of confederation—103 years earlier
delegates to another conference had gathered to
discuss the broadening of the tax base—capitalism
then needed money to build railroads to extend itself
westward: the Maritimes had temporarily been
exploited to the limit.
Primary industry
Economically, the region remains structurally
underdeveloped. Indeed, in capitalist terms,
development of the Maritimes can be considered
disfunctional.
Primary industry, as in most of Canada, remains
characteristic; highly mechanized extraction of the
region's mineral resources, exported elsewhere for
manufacture.
Lack of social capital (i.e., a highly-trained work
force) and abundant natural resources makes the
introduction of light and heavy manufacturing
industry prohibitive, in a capitalist context.
The response to this underdevelopment by the
federal government and various economic agencies
has been one of 'pork barrel', social welfare
capitalism—the expenditure of vast sums of money
trying to buoy up the regional economy, and
simultaneously attract employment-providing
industry.
Capital-intensive industries are to be set up to
lure labor-intensive investment. Ancillary services,
like roads, and tax incentives are the bait offered
potential industries that will set up in the region.
The idea is, if you guarantee profits through such
subsidies, capital flows in to reap the profits.
The negatiye effects of this kind of artificial
development can be read today in the lives of the
people of the Maritimes.
Pork barrelling
The region is heavily dependent on federal
handouts—60 per cent of the current PEI provincial
budget is subsidized from the federal coffers. With
the existence of this 'pork barrel', traditional political
parties compete for it, and resistance to any real
econimic change is severe—the region has the lowest
rates of organized labor, strict anti-labor laws,
incredible unemployment, and extremely reactionary
courts overseeing the whole.
It's a policy which uproots the people from their
culture.
Industries such as fishing are starved out as
"uneconomic" while huge sums are spent subsidizing
the development of larger—and without federal and
provincial aid, equally uneconomic—industries. The
little people as always take it in the ear.
The unversities are crucial to this kind of
development. Through them is channeled not only
the development of the necessary "social capital" for
the new capitalism, but also the re-culturation of the
society: the training of the managerial and technical
elite for the new culture of the Maritimes.
So important is such capital to the
artificial-insemination brand of capital development
programmed for the Maritimes, that Newfoundland,
one of the poorest provinces in the country despite
its natural wealth, was able to—indeed had to—set up
the first fully subsidized university education (if only
for a couple of years) on the continent.
In this light, the constant regeneration of
fumbling attempts towards a regional student union
begins to make sense. It's no abstract idea fallen from
the sky. It comes out of the growing recognition by
Maritimes students of the political relevance of what
happens in their universities, of the social and
economic context in which they find themselves,
even on the campus.
Dealt in vacuum
The development towards such a union can be
traced through the history of the region's student
organizations.
Prior to 1967, students operated through local
councils affiliated simultaneously with CUS and a
regional mini-CUS, the Atlantic Association of
Students.
But these organizations were largely irrelevant to
the needs of the region's students. Dealing primarily
with student concerns in a vacuum, they created an
anomy in students resulting in their eventual
rejection.
Student councillors met in 1967 at Antigonish,
Nova Scotia. Convinced, most of them, that what was
wrong was national and regional structures, they
dissolved the AAS into four provincial student
unions, which were to meet annually as the Atlantic
Student Conference.
But there was dissent even then, in Antigonish.
"We came to build AAS, not kill it," said King's
College student president Steve Hart. "ASC will only
be an exchange of ideas, not a political entity."
But the newly-formed Ontario Union of Students
was the model, and Dalhousie student president
Dennis Ashworth held sway.
"Provincial unions can do a lot of effective
political work," he said.
In the already-crumbling CUS, a note of warning
was raised. The new president-elect Peter Warrian
looked for a return to regional organizations in a few
years, when the trend set by the OUS proved
unfeasible for the rest of the country.
A lot of rhetoric
It looks now as though Warrian and Hart were
right. CUS is dead and the AAS has been resurrected
in a new federation with new goals—the building of a
voluntary regional student union.
Council members have recognized the
conservativeness of student councils, weighed down
with the representativity game and the braking effect
of what they have termed the "silent majority".
There is a lot of rhetoric surrounding the FASC:
one student councillor at St. Mary's University has
claimed the arrival of "participatory democracy ...
this revolution ... not to be ignored."
SMU councillor Danny Mullally has put out the
call to students, ""crying in the wilderness ... to you,
Joe Student ... to you...behind the test
tubes... too busy for anything but studying and
memorizing those formulae."
And maybe, in the end, it will be only another
false start, degenerating into nothing more than
another student bureaucracy.
There is the contradiction of student councils
trying to set up a voluntary region-wide participatory
organization. There are the constant problems of how
to get such an organization functioning in reality.
So maybe this time they won't pull it off.
But there is still almost a determinism to it
all-students throughout the country will be watching
to see what happens-it's been a long time coming.

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