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The Ubyssey Mar 7, 2011

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 on the fee question
What kind of campus do we want?
A university offers classes, funds research and grants degrees. A campus is the
culture that binds that place together, making it more than just a stepping-stone to
a career. The most vibrant campuses, those that make a university more than simply
the sum of its parts, are those where students lead what happens outside of class.
Where they take charge and organize events. Where those with a project and passion
can do just about anything.
But to make UBC that sort of campus, we need to have the means to do so.
That's the choice you face this week when you vote in the referendum. There are questions on the U-Pass—which obviously need to be extended—and other questions on
bylaw changes and tuition policies for the AMS. But the main question is changing
the student fee structure. It would raise fees by $5 for full-time students and $19 for
those that opt out of the health care plan.
We urge you to vote yes.
The AMS's membership fee of $12.50 is the lowest in Canada for any university over
20,000 students. Almost no other school comes close. It's a fee that hasn't changed
since 1982.
And when UBC was still expanding, and your student union had a near-monopoly
on food and catering services, this was fine. They piled up profits year after year from
their businesses, which in turn made low mandatory fees financially feasible.
Those days are long gone. The AMS ran a six-figure deficit last year, will run another
this year, and is cutting services to the bone. Voting yes would take their fee to
$21—and take your student union out of financial crisis.
It may seem like a lot, but three years ago, students decided they wanted a better
campus when they voted to fund a new $110 million Student Union Building. That
building will be ready in September 2014, but will the group running it be able to
offer more than just minimum services inside of it?
Your student union isn't perfect. You only have to glance at our front pages to see
that. They aren't asking for money they want, though—they're asking for money they
need. Without this increase, they're going be less and less effective in advocating for
students, administrating services and overseeing clubs.
This fee increase isn't just about empowering the AMS. It's about empowering students
to do more.
Voting yes gives clubs access to an annual $70,000 pool of money, and if you've ever
been part of a campus club, you know that a little money goes a long way. This fund
would be there for you.
Voting yes creates a $100,000 sustainability fund, the same type that exists at UVic,
SFU, Queen's and McGill, allowing even one student with an idea the chance to make
our campus a more sustainable place in a direct way.
Voting yes transfers $1 from every student to a childcare endowment fund, supporting
student-parents by creating quality, affordable spaces right here at UBC.
Voting yes means more affordable tutoring from AMS Services, free DJ lessons from
CiTR, and 24/7 news reporting from The Ubyssey.
And voting yes means that we are taking an active step in shaping this university by
directly funding organizations and ideas that we believe are important.
All this, for $5. Even ifyou opt out ofthe health plan and pay $19, it's still a good
deal, and a deal we badly need.
Without it, building the new SUB will putter along and students will still come
together to put on events. Life will go on per usual.
But this week, you can make a choice for change.
There are times where UBC students have risen up to shape our campus—saving the
UBC Farm, building the new SUB, funding construction of War Memorial Gym,
even convincing the government to start construction on the Point Grey campus in
1924. This week could be one of those times.
Let's make this happen, vi 2/U BYSSEY.CA/E VENTS/2011.03.07
MARCH 07,2011
VOLUME XCII,  N° XXXIX
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@uhyney.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Arshy Mann: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Kalyeena Makortoff: kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR NEWS WRITER
Mich Cowan: mcowan@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
SENIOR CULTURE WRITER
Ginny Monaco: gmonaco@ubyssey ca
CULTURE ILLUSTRATOR
Indiana Joel: ijoel@ubysseyca
SPORTS EDITOR
Marie Vondracek: sports@ubysseyca
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate.multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
David Marino: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubysseyca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
print advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
web advertising: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubysseyca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubysseyca
PRINT AD SALES
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WEB AD SALES
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ACCOUNTS
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CONTRIBUTORS
Karina Palmitesta Kait Bolongaro
Will MacDonald Dylan Wall
Nick Frank Amelia Rajala
Mike Dickson Drake Fenton
Jon Chiang     Ragnahild Marie Valstad
David Elop Richard Lam
Chris Borchert
Front cover graphic by Pasil Bucci
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
Itisagreed byall persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
7\V
^» %f^ Canadian
-_*■ qi f^ University
roL        Press
jpe- Rainforest
Alliance
Canada Post
Sales Agreement
#0040878022
EVENTS
CLASSIFIED TUESDAY. MAR. 8
FOUND: Black iPod Video near
SWNG Building. Contact Daniel at
macho_man_dan@hotmail.com
to identify.
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby! Learn
about layout and editing. Expect
to be fed. • Every Sunday and
Wednesday, 2pm.
RESOURCE GROUPS • Are  you
working on a progressive project,
but need funding? Do you have
an idea, but can't get it off the
ground? Apply to the Resource
Groups for funding! Come in,
pitch your idea to us and we will
consider fully or partially funding
your project. • Every Monday,
11am in SUB 245 (second floor,
north-east corner). For more info
email resourcegroups.ams®
gmail.com.
MONDAY, MAR. 7
CITRRADIO VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION
• Interested in getting involved
with CiTR? Swing by our monthly
volunteer orientation session. It's
a chance for you to learn about
what's going on for volunteers at
CiTR, and get to know people involved with the station. • 6:30-
7:30pm, CiTR Lounge, Room 233,
SUB. For more info, email Andrew
afvolunteer@citr.ca.
UBC BEADS AND CRAFTS FUNDRAISING SALE • The UBC Beads and
Crafts Club is holding a fundraising sale with large bouquets of
foam roses, cute sushi cell phone
straps and a large choice of earrings. You can even customize
your own earrings! • Mar. 7-8,
10am-4pm, SUB, in front of Blue
Chip Cookies. Go to ubcbead-
sandcrafts.com for more info.
UNICEF UBC: CASINO ROYALE* Unicef
UBC and Deke are hosting their
charity event, "Casino Royale."
There will be poker, blackjack
and a cash bar. All of the proceeds will go to the Pakistan Relief Fund. • 6-llpm, UBC Global
Lounge, ema/7unicef.ubcams@
gmail.com for more information.
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 9
COASTAL FIRST NATIONS DANCE FESTIVAL »This festival highlights the
richness and diversity of traditional First Nations dance groups
from coastal BC through public
performances, ticketed events
and special school programs.
• Runs until Mar 13, 10am-
5pm, Museum of Anthropology, $14/$12 + HST. For a full
schedule of events, please visit moa.ubc.ca/events or contact
(604) 822-5978 or programs®
moa.ubc.ca.
UBC FILM SOCIETY SCREENING:
TANGLED* The UBC Film Society will be showing Tangled,
the latest film from Disney.
The magically long-haired Ra-
punzel has spent her entire life
in a tower, but now that a runaway thief has stumbled upon
her, she is about to discover
the world for the first time, and
who she really is. • Runs until Mar 13, 7-9pm, Norm Theatre, SUB. $2.50 members, $5
non-members.
ROOMMATE MEET UP • Moving
off-campus next year? Still
looking for that perfect roommate? Speed Renting and UBC
Residence Life are pleased to
offer UBC students a unique
and personalized roommate
meet-up event. These events
offer an informal, relaxed atmosphere where you have the opportunity to meet and mingle
with fellow students! Free food
and refreshments provided. •
5:30-7pm, Marine Drive Residence Commonsblock, $8 entrance fee.
THURSDAY, MAR. 10
HUNGRY4CHANGE* Oxfam UBC
presents Hungry 4 Change, an
annual dinner organized and
hosted by UBC students that
gathers together the community for a taste of the reality
of food distribution inequality.
Featuring speakers from Oxfam Canada as well as a special guest. • 6:30pm, Heritage
Hall, 3102 Main St, $25, $15 for
students. For tickets, visit ox-
famubcrezgo.com or email ox-
famubch4c@gmail.com.
ISSUES ON REFUGEE HEALTH •
STAND UBC is hosting an exciting upcoming event, "Issues
on Refugee Health," a presentation and discussion on the
health of refugees in Darfur.
This seminar will also feature
guest speaker and Sudanese
refugee Abit Adit Elizabeth. It
will open with an introduction
on the health situation of Darfur, followed by a case study
on the impact of the forced removal of humanitarian workers.
• 5-6pm, Global Lounge, Marine Drive Bldg 1, free.
FRIDAY, MAR. 11
UBC FILM SOCIETY SCREENING:
CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: VOYAGE
OF THE DAWN TREADER* The UBC
Film Society will be showing
The Chronicles of Narnia: Voyage of the Dawn Treader, the
third film in the Narnia series.
Lucy and Edmund Pevensie return to Narnia with their cousin
Eustace, where they meet up
with Prince Caspian for a trip
across the sea aboard the royal
ship The Dawn Treader. Along
the way they encounter dragons,
dwarves, merfolk and a band of
lost warriors before reaching the
edge of the world. • Runs until Mar. 13, 9-11pm, Norm Theatre, SUB. $2.50 members, $5
non-members.
CULTURALNIGHT»The Liu Institute will be hosting a cultural
night with the Africa Awareness Initiative, showcasing cultures from around the world
with an emphasis on Africa.
Bring traditional dishes! Ifyou
bring a dish for 7-8 people, you
get in free. • 6-8:30pm, Liu Institute for Global Issues, $10
non-members, $7 members,
$5 VIP members.
SATURDAY, MAR. 12
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
CONFERENCE • Amnesty International UBC is hosting their
conference, "When is a Democracy not a Democracy?"
This small scale conference
provides the perfect environment for discussion and networking amongst students,
professors, speakers and other members of the community. Dress code is business casual. • 1:30-6:30pm, Lillooet
Room (301), Chapman Learning Centre, Irving K Barber. Order tickets via eventbrite.com.
HUGH MASEKELA* The Independent legendary South African
trumpeter Hugh Masekela is
an innovator in the world music and jazz scene and is active as a performer, composer, producer and activist. His
tour in support of his latest
album, Phola, brings him (on
flugelhorn) to UBC, where he
will combine with five other
superb South African musicians to explore his incredible musical history. • 8pm,
Chan Centre, $55.25-$73.25.
LSAT MCAT
GMAT GRE
Preparation Seminars
* Complete 30-Hour Seminars
* Convenient Weekend Schedule
* Proven Test-Taking Strategies
* Experienced Course Instructors
* Comprehensive Study Materials
* Simulated Practice Exams
* Limited Class Size
* Free Repeat Policy
* Personal Tutoring Available
* Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordscminars.ca
Achieve.
At Athabasca University, our transferable
courses can help you expand your academic
options. Whether it's a scheduling confl ict or
a necessary prerequisite, we have over 700
courses delivered online and at a distance,
many with the flexibility of monthly start
dates, to helpyou complete your degree.
Learn more at
www.athabascau.ca
Athabasca University fi
Send us your
events on
Wednesdays and
Sundays before
noon! That's the
deadline!
events@ubyssey.ca
tlT lEUBYSSEYca 2011.03.0 7/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT EDITOR KALYEENA MAKORTOFF»kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER MICKI COWAN»mcowan@ubyssey.ca
Referendum question brings tuition to forefront
5000
4000
3000
2000
r^v  Adjusted for inflation
1000
0
1
Actual Dollars
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I 1
tT
I I I I I I I	
I I I I I I I I I
935
1940                     1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
2010
The changes in tuition rates, both in nominal and real terms, since 1935. GEOFF LISTER GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
MICKI COWAN
mcowan@ubyssey.ca
After successfully getting 1200
student signatures within only
a few hours, a new question will
be added to this week's referendum—"Do you think that the
AMS should lobby for lower tuition for domestic and international students?"
Ashley Zarbatany is one of
the students who were gathering the necessary signatures
to qualify the question for the
ballot. An active member ofthe
Socialjustice Centre, she said
that lowering tuition should be
a priority for the AMS.
"[Students] are too busy juggling all the demands of having
student loans and having work,
so they can't go out and protest
and lobby for themselves. They
obviously want an AMS that
will do that for them."
But AMS President Jeremy
McElroy said that voting yes for
the question won't directly affect the AMS's decision-making.
"Students aren't voting on a
policy. They're voting on a question that will ultimately shape
policy," he said.
"It's just a question. Whether
it passes, fails, meets the quorum threshold or not, it's an
indication to the AMS of what
students ultimately want them
to do. At that point it's up to
Council to revisit its policy on
tuition, and essentially just to
have that conversation."
McElroy feels the question is
more about semantics, as the
AMS has already been lobbying for lower tuition.
"We've been advocating federally," said McElroy. "We've
had an advocacy arm for increased access and more affordable education. We're always lobbying for [lower tuition], whether explicitly or
implicitly."
However, former AMS President Blake Frederick said
the referendum question is a
chance to send a message to
the government and university.
"We need to stand up in a
unified voice and make it quite
clear that we need financial relief," he said. "It's about sending a message to the student
society, sending a message to
the provincial government.
There are roughly 46,000 students who attend UBC—that has
a huge political impact when
the government is making decisions around education policy."
During his presidency, Frederick filed a human rights complaint to the United Nation
about the cost of education.
He was subsequently censored
by Council for acting without
their consent and was nearly
impeached.
Zarbatany said that students
were enthusiastic to sign the
petition.
"In a few hours we got over
1000 signatures," she said.
"As soon as we said the
words 'lower tuition,' everyone jumped on board. I talked to about 450 students and
maybe 30 of them were against
it," she said. "Everyone else,
when they heard that they were
shocked—'How could anyone
be against it'—I've heard that
multiple times."
A similar question was supported on the referendum ballot lastyear, but failed to meet
quorum.
McElroy said the problem
is not the AMS's position on
tuition, but that the current
political climate is not receptive to reducing tuition due to
"passing ofthe buck" between
federal, provincial and university bureaucracies.
"Lobbying could be a phone
call, a postcard, a letter, a
march, a rally, an online campaign—but who do you direct
it at?"
Frederick disagreed.
"We can, if we want to, effectively convince the government to change their stance on
higher education," said Frederick. "We just need a student
society that will step up to the
plate and recognize that's one
of the most important things
facing students today." tl
-With files from the AMS
VP External Office
Liquor law changes mean massive fines for violators
AMS uncertain what effect changes will have on campus parties
ARSHY MANN
news@ubysseyca
The Province has made changes to laws surrounding Special
Occasion Licenses (SOLs) which
are certain to have a large impact on the way liquor laws are
enforced at UBC.
An SOL is a license that is given to any group that wants to
hold either a private or a public
event that will be serving alcohol. Therefore, any campus party that is not held in a licensed
premise such as the Pit or Koerner's must have an SOL.
According to a press release
from the liquor control branch
ofthe Ministry of Public Safety,
SOL holders will be subject to
the same enforcement penalties
as permanent license holders
such as bars and restaurants.
This means that instead of
the event simply being closed
down if it's found to be violating
liquor laws, the group running
the event can be fined between
$5000 and $10,000-much more
than most clubs or undergraduate societies can afford.
"It certainly puts a lot more
onus on the person that's taking them out to make sure everything is complied with," said
Staff Sergeant Kevin Kenna, the
head of the university division
of the RCMP.
However, the AMS is legally
liable for all clubs and undergraduate societies, which make
up a large portion of SOLs applied for on campus.
"All clubs and organizations
on campus are legally under
the umbrella ofthe AMS, so as
an organization we take liability for SOLs," said AMS President Jeremy McElroy.
He went on to say that the
AMS is currently meeting with
their lawyers, the university
and the RCMP to figure out the
implications of this new legislation. They hope to come to a conclusion by the end ofthe week.
McElroy said that the AMS
was only informed about the
changes two weeks ago, despite
the fact that the Ministry of
Public Safety sent a letter to
UBC in November regarding
the new legislation.
"[We're] quite frustrated with
the lack of communication here,
both between the liquor board
and UBC, the liquor Board and
the AMS, as well as UBC and
the AMS," said McElroy.
The AMS has yet to inform
clubs and constituencies about
the changes, but will do so after the legal implications are
made clear.
According to Kenna, although the new legislation is
much stricter, there have been
very few SOL violations over the
past few months.
"It's been some time since
we've had any [violations] of
any significance and we check
a lot of places," he said. "For
the most part, most of them
have been pretty damn good
about it."
Kenna said that the RCMP
will continue to have discretion in implementing this
new legislation and approach
each situation on a case-by-
case basis.
He went on to say that the new
laws will go into effect immediately, u
An open keg may become a very rare thing on this campus
GEOFF LISTER PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NATIONAL/2011.03.07
NATIONAL
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
Animal testing facility being built at Okanagan campus
University tight-lipped about project due to safety concerns
ROBYN TRAVIS & ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
The controversy surrounding
UBC's animal testing program
is moving east to Kelowna.
Amidst an escalating activist campaign against UBC's animal testing program, a new
care centre is under construction at UBC's Okanagan campus. The In Vivo Research Facility is being built in the basement of the Arts and Sciences
II building and is scheduled to
be open by September.
According to Scott Reid, a
professor of biology at the Okanagan campus and the acting facility manager of In Vivo, the
university wanted to keep the
project low profile in order to
protect the safety of the facility and researchers from those
opposed to animal research.
"The animal care facilities
on any research campus are designed with a couple of things
in mind; one is to ensure the
health and safety of the animals in the facility and also
the health, safety and security
of the people that work in the
facility," he said. "You normally would not find such facilities
labeled on any map, for the protection of both those things."
The construction of an animal research facility must go
through many processes, with
all aspects being overlooked
by organizations such as the
Canadian Council on Animal
Care (CCAC).
Reid said that although it
is not well known, animal research is already happening on
the Okanagan campus.
"We have an existing animal
care facility and we have students who work with animals
at all levels. We have students
who work with wildlife...animals, just not in the research
facility on campus." According
to Reid, the new facility's construction is meant to meet the
growing needs of this education and research experience.
Scott Macrae, director of
UBC public affairs, could not
be reached for comment before
press time.
This growth of UBC's animal
testing capabilities comes at
a time when the university is
once again coming under fire
for its research programs.
Last week, The Vancouver Sun
ran an article detailing a research project that will see the
killing of a number of endangered sea turtles.
"They were brought in for
these experiments [at UBC]
and as part of those experiments, it requires harvesting
the tissues," Bill Milsom, head
of UBC's zoology department,
told the Sun.
"The final experiments require major surgery," he said.
They are necessary to "help us
understand why these animals
have such high mortality when
caught in trawl nets in warming oceans."
The turtle experiments have
garnered international attention and were featured prominently in The Huffington Post.
Last December, UBC President Stephen Toope told The
Ubyssey thathe isn't concerned
by the level of media attention
that UBC's animal research program is recieving
"Top universities around the
world, in order to accomplish
what they're trying to [do] in research, sometimes have to use
animals," he said. "UBC is no
different than a thousand universities in that respect.
"Frankly, what tends to happen with animal rights activists is they go around and target different institutions at different times.
"It happens to be our time,
but universities throughout the
US and UK and Europe have all
experienced this. Frankly, it's
nothing unusual, and I don't
think the university needs to
overreact.
"I actually think the system
is not broken, it functions extremely well, it's very rigorous
and we're meeting all of our obligations, so I would simply say
I don't think there's any need
for further regulation." tl
£
I
\Hi
■
The location of the prospective In Vivo Research Facility.
ROBYN TRAVIS PHOTO/THE PHOENIX
Bunnies chased off of University of Victoria campus
DORIAN GEIGER &
JON-PAUL ZACHARIAS
The Martlet
VICTORIA (CUP) - The University of Victoria will soon be
rabbit-free.
Over the winter months, the
campus' rabbits have undergone a noticeable population
decline. In fact, the university reports that less than ten
rabbits remain on campus today—quite a decline from the
estimated population of 1400-
1600 who called UVic home
just ayear ago.
The university's grounds
workers have been diligently
working to capture the few elusive rabbits that remain. Private individuals have permits
to remove and relocate the animals up until March 31.
Rabbits are Schedule C wildlife—invasive species—according to the Ministry of Environment, and regulations prohibit their relocation without permits, sterilization and fencing.
The two principal permit
holders are Laura Leah Shaw,
who facilitated the movement
of about 285 rabbits to White-
house, Texas, and Susan Vick-
ery who moved over 500 to her
own property in Coombs, BC.
The first action to decrease
numbers was a cull of 102 rabbits in May 2010 after incidents
of athletes twisting their ankles in rabbit holes. Accordingly, the cull sought to eliminate
Poor, poor bunny GEMMA KARSTENS-SMITH PH0T0/THE MARTLET
all the rabbits in the athletic
fields. No other parts of campus were affected.
Many community members
opposed the cull, resulting
in a local effort to relocate
a large portion of the rabbit population. A plan was
formed injune 2010 to move
the rabbits off campus. UVic
agreed to trap the rabbits,
leaving the responsibilities
of transport, sterilization and
eventual housing to the permit holders.
Trapping began in September 2010. Tom Smith, facilities management director at
UVic, said the university wanted to begin in the summer before residence students became attached to the rabbits,
but legalities delayed the trapping until after classes had
begun.
Before the trapping commenced, Vickery made her proposal for relocating the rabbits to her property, but stated that she would only be able
to do this if community support existed.
"My first wish was for a trap-
and-release plan," said Vickery.
Such a policy would have seen
sterilized rabbits re-released
on campus. "But the problem
was creating the community
pressure to push for this."
The university initially offered potential support for a
continuing rabbit population
of about 200 on campus, and
invited volunteers to manage
such a population. The UVic
communications website posted notices to this effect.
"But no one came forward,"
Smith said.
Despite rumours to the contrary, Smith said culls by the
university administration did
not occur prior to 2010.
"Never," he said. "Gardeners who found them... would
capture them and then release
them to the opposite side of
campus, even though they usually just came back."
Support of rabbit removal
also came from nearby residents, who would sometimes
call the administration and request that rabbits be removed
from their yards.
The university's communication's website now states
that any rabbits found on campus after February 28 will be
euthanized.
"Well, we're going to use
common sense," said Smith,
including not killing any baby
rabbits that are emerging from
their dens.
"The grounds staff know
where all the remaining rabbits are," Smith said, adding that
the plan is to have these rabbits
relocated via permit holders.
Any new rabbits that appear,
however—such as newly deposited pets—will be killed.
"We cannot be a pass-through
for people who are abandoning
pets," said Smith.
A total of 927 rabbits, including the 102 that were killed,
have been removed by the university administration.
"Initially we'd catch up to
60 per day, and sometimes 3
at once," said Smith.
As the rabbits became less
numerous, as few as two were
caught in one day. Smith believes the remaining 400-600
were killed by predators.
Smith said the rabbits will
never return to campus. Part
of the reason is their presence
on campus, as invasive species, was always technically
illegal, he said.
"If people bring rabbits here
again, we'll have no choice but
to kill them," he said. "And that's
what we want to avoid at all costs." 2011.03.07/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/5
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CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER GINNY MONACO »gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
ILLUSTRATOR INDIANA JOEL»ijoel@ubysseyca
Keeping up with the Flintstones
Part two of our series on lifestyle eating: the paleo diet
■SERIES
BRYCE WARNES
culture@ubyssey.ca
I am not the caviest of men.
There are few benefits of living in a civilized society that I
could go without. Roads? Essential. Electricity? A must-have.
HBO? Couldn't live without it.
So the paleo diet didn't seem
like an obvious fit for me. It
tries to emulate the nutritional intake of humans before the
invention of agriculture. Just
thinking about the fact that
agriculture had to be invented rearranged my perspective
on food. Grains, dairy, sugar,
legumes and the sweeter varieties of fruit are all parts of
my daily diet that originated
12,000 years ago with some
dudes near the Tigris and Euphrates figuring out how seeds
worked. Suddenly, Breaking
Bad seemed less fundamental to my way of life.
I'd gotten into the habit of
grabbing lunch or dinner at
work or between classes, usually something from the Delly or
another SUB food outlet. But the
kinds of food I could grab on the
go don't fit into hunter-gatherer
feeding habits, so I started preparing food every night for the
day to come. I might make a couple of hamburger patties to put
in the fridge, which I could fry in
the morning and take for lunch,
plus a salad of spinach and tomatoes and an avocado (Tomatoes
are a no-go, say some paleo-di-
eters, because they're from the
New World and wouldn't have
Pork shoulder generally tastes better than it looks.
DAVID MARINO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
been available to our ancestors.
I say they're Eurocentric). Avocados were a godsend: portable pockets of complex fat that
didn't need to be cooked. I'd
never been a fan of the fruit
outside guacamole, but that
changed over the course of this
experiment.
Early in the week I slow-
cooked a pork shoulder and
roasted some carrots and beets.
That chunk of pig kept me going
for three days, serving either as
lunch, dinner or both. Fat gives
meat a lot of its flavour, but I'd
never actually made a point of
eating it as a source of energy.
With most of my calories coming from animal protein and the
few carbohydrates I could eke
out of root vegetables, I began
going out of my way to eat the
squishy white bits ofthe animal.
I'd feel full for about half
an hour after eating a plate of
eggs, a slab of pork roast or a
couple of hamburger patties;
after that, though, I'd be hankering for something else to
eat. The greatest change I noticed from this diet was the
way my blood sugar stabilized.
Following my regular eating
habits, I tend to spike violently—maybe a little hypoglyce-
mically—between stuffed and
starved, with little room in between. With the paleo diet, I
was faintly hungry most of the
time, but not in a way that was
distracting or sapped my energy. According to ajuly 2010 article from the Globe and Mail,
the first two weeks on a paleo
diet are the most uncomfortable, after which point appetite begins to wane and it becomes comfortable to go long
periods without eating. Since
this experiment fell well within that time limit, I can't speak
for the long-term effects of a
caveman diet.
Also, you're not supposed to
drink alcohol when you're on
the paleo diet. I gave up on that
part early on. You'd be amazed
by how much a few shots of vodka can make you not care about
abstaining from sandwiches.
Avoiding booze is supposed to
be better for your health, but
teetotalling has ulterior benefits. When you've been drinking, it's easier to bend the rules.
I ruined my almost flawless record by sneaking a bag of Dori-
tos while having beers at the Pit.
Paleo is the Fight Club of diets. Nutritional theories aside,
most of its appeal is built on the
fact that it harkens back to a
mythical proto-masculinity that
revolves around physical mastery of one's environment and
killing things with sticks. Even
the most devoted paleo disciples are buying their grass-
fed hormone-free heirloom beef
products from Whole Foods or
enviro-conscious butchers, and
kicking it with their cave-pals
at the local CrossFit gym rather than crouching around a fire
ringed by the shining eyes of
predatory animals.
The reported effects ofthe paleo diet are subjective at best,
and there's no evidence that it
benefits a human's health in the
long-run. Cutting refined sugars and processed food from
your diet and limiting your intake of starches while exercising on at least a semi-regular
basis is bound to have positive
effects on your health. You'll
probably lose weight, too. But
a radical change in "lifestyle"
isn't necessarily, well, necessary. If you're really attached
to the idea of a pre-agricultur-
al lifestyle, you could try chasing down ayoung deer and bludgeoning it to death with a sharp
rock, living in a tent made of
hides and dying of a nosebleed
at the age of 24. Personally, I'd
rather just avoid eating junk
food and go for a run once and
a while. That's the civilized way
to go about it. tl
-■-*
PALEO STAPLES
Unprocessed meat
TSeeds-C
Avocados
Spinach
Judging CiTRs new vinyl comp by its cover
i MUSIC
GINNY MONACO
gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
It began as a clandestine meeting at Dairy Queen.
On Februrary 24, CiTR and
Mint Records released Pop Alliance Compilation, a vinyl collection of Vancouver indie bands.
Work on the project started last
July as a discussion between Duncan McHugh and Shena Yoshida
over Blizzards.
"The vinyl was... unique," says
McHugh, host of CiTR's Duncan's
Donuts. "It's been a long-time
dream of CiTR record nerds to
try and put out a record, but it's
quite expensive. [Mint] had some
funding and so they bankrolled
the whole thing. They said, 'You
guys pick the bands and we'll take
care ofthe expenses.'"
The final selection includes
Fine Mist, No Kids and Slam
Dunk, groups that can often be
heard on McHugh's show. "The
whole idea was that there is
a tremendous metal scene in
Vancouver, there's a great noise
scene, a great hardcore scene.
There's so many bands doing all
sorts of niches that we want to focus on pop."
There is no doubt that the vinyl record as a medium is experiencing a resurgence. McHugh
feels it is more than an Urban
Outfitters novelty. "There's a
warmth to records thatyou don't
get any other way. There's just
a permanence to putting something on vinyl that doesn't exist
in any other format.
"Music fans are flocking to it
and it's not because it's easy to
walk around with records. You
have to want to own a record to
buy one."
A large part of McHugh's love
of the record format is the artwork and, coincidentally that's
where Pop Alliance Compilation
has drawn the most criticism.
David Barclay's cover art features
an appropriation of the Ellen
Neel Kwakiutl totem pole outside Brock Hall. The image is superimposed with the likenesses of Dan Behar, Tim Hecker,
Nardwuar and other notable figures from Vancouver's musical
community.
Each copy of the record includes Barclay's artist statement, which begins, "For over
50 years, 'college rock' has been
dominated by an elitist cultural
RAGNAHILD MARIE VALSTAD PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
lexicon, reinforced by the institutionalized racism ofthe post-
secondary education system in
Canada and the US."
Barclay goes on to speak of
CiTR's support for "unlikely artistic voices that have become
iconic local anti-corporate, anti-racist figures." The statement
then suggests to people, "Contact
the UBC President Stephen J.
Toope about the university's diversity, land use and artifact
re-appropriation."
As to the criticism, McHugh
says, "They're entitled to their opinions. I stand by the art. I certainly
had hesitations about using that
symbol but he convinced me it
was a worthwhile use of it." va
"Representing the CiTR
community as aNoithwest
Coast-style totem pole...is
a deliberate combination
oftoth the uneasiness
and the splendor ofthe
stations contemporary
cultural history CiTRhas
encouraged and supported
unlikely artistic voices that
have become iconic local
anti-corporate, anti-racist
figures (Joey Shithead) and
impoitent songwriters and
musical innovators (Dan
Bejar)..."
ARTIST'S  STATEMENT,  DAVID
BARCLAY 2011.03.07/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/7
Radio station banned from BC university
i NEWS
^Vas^-
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HTnnN"-
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Vancouver Island University says rowdy
party was enough to give station the boot
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UNIVERSITY   |
Orange, California 92866 ■ www.chapman.edu/law
ABA Accredited ■ Association of American Law Schools
DANIELLE POPE
CUP Western Bureau Chief
VICTORIA (CUP) - One British Columbia university has
received a lot of static as of
late after its student radio station was banned from hosting
events on campus.
Radio Malaspina Society
(RMS), known in Nanaimo as
CHLY 101.7 FM, was recently
banned from campus for hosting a party last October that
resulted in "the destruction
of property trespassing, illegal alcohol and drug use, disrespecting security and general debauchery," according
to Vancouver Island University officials.
On December 8, Rie Kelm,
VIU infrastructure and ancillary services executive director, sent the station an official letter saying they would
be banned from campus for
one year, with the organization's standing on campus under review.
"Radio Malaspina was issued written requirements,
verbally and via email, regarding expected conduct at this
event," Kelm said in the letter.
"The signature on the contract
indicates that expected conduct and behaviour were made
aware to all parties involved."
Because RMS operates at
an off-campus office, the station is not being physically removed from any on-campus
facility. Still, the inability to
host student events could severely impact the station in a
number of ways—namely, the
ability to draw their needed
60 per cent student representation on the RMS board of directors, which would breach
the BC Society Act and possibly jeopardize the station's license to broadcast with the Canadian Radio-Television Telecommunications Commission.
Simon Schachner, president
of the RMS board of directors,
thinks the university is being
heavy-handed with the issue
and that many of the problems have stemmed from a
lack of clarity surrounding
the incident in question.
He also says the nature
of such an event—a Halloween dance that was approved
by VIU officials to run until
4am—should have been an indicator to the university that
rowdy behaviour was possible and that people may consume alcohol before coming
to such an event.
"It seems like the university was not prepared to host
an event like this on campus,
which is a learning experience
for all of us," said Schachner.
"We do understand their concerns, and we've learned that
their space is not appropriate
for nighttime events. But I
think it would be more appropriate to say, 'No more night
events' than to ban us from
campus altogether."
In addition to the October
party, the radio station also
hosts daytime community
concerts, DJ and film showcases, sponsor and fundraising events and student-participation activities, all traditionally on campus. The
station also offers students
a chance to get involved with
broadcast radio and even host
their own shows.
Toni O'Keeffe, communications director for the university, maintained that because
the event was approved as a no-
alcohol activity, station members both broke and disregarded their agreement.
"We have many third-party
organizations use our facilities, and never before have we
seen our property left in such
a disarray," said O'Keeffe. "We
have verbal reports from staff
and students saying the whole
thing was a gong show."
While VIU officials have listed the accounts against the station, when RMS asked the university to provide evidence for
the allegations, the university
refused to do so.
"We don't have to prove to
them this evidence was true,"
said O'Keeffe. "It's all right
there, and we have testimonials from our staff and security.
"This is a private property,
and they broke the agreement
to use our property in a respectful manner. It's their own
actions that got them here."
O'Keeffe says the ban is, in
part, to take a stance against
"inappropriate behaviour" the
university does not agree with.
"We have a responsibility
to rent our facilities to organizations and groups with like-
minded values, and we don't
want to convey that we support these destructive values,"
O'Keeffe said.
She said the university does
recognize the station's value
on campus and added that
VIU officials have offered to
meet with the station to further resolve the issue, though
no meeting had occurred as of
press time. She said removal
of the ban will be based solely
on the results of such a meeting and a declaration of goodwill from RMS towards the
university.
Steven Beasley, VIU students' union executive director, said that while the radio
station operates independently ofthe students' union, the
students are taking a supportive official stance.
"We support lifting the ban
[on RMS] and believe they add
something integral to the campus and community," said Beasley. "The university does present a legitimate case, in terms
of their concerns for a high
level of safety, but... we think
it's important for student opportunities that the radio station maintains a presence on
campus."
Beasley said he believes
both sides can come together
to solve the problem—and remove the ban—as soon as the
parties sit down and negotiate.
However, he said the facilities
themselves could be the biggest problem in the mix.
"The university does nothave
very good facilities for this kind
of event [the October RMS party]," said Beasley. "The cafeteria where the event was held is
a multi-use facility. It's as much
of a classroom as it is a cafe."
While Beasley was not at
the October event, he believes
there should be more transparency around the accusations against RMS, and that
this should be an opportunity for the university and radio
station to find out what type of
events currently do and don't
work on campus. 8/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2011.03.07
For all you
do, this
supplements
for you
JONNY WAKEFIELD
culture@ubyssey.ca
There are
a couple of
key talking
points in any
discussion
of Canadian
nationalism:
bilingual-
ism, multiculturalism,
hockey and
beer among
them. The last one has been
the topic of a considerable
amount of scholarly research,
to the point that it seems any
introductory politics or history course requires a discussion of Molson's "I am Canadian." Grant McCracken, author
of "Advertising: Meaning or Information?" says that consumers turn to such ads is search of
"concepts of what it is to be...a
member of a community or a
country."
So what does it mean when
the most persistent answer to
that tiresome "what is Canada"
question is a ten-year-old commercial in which peace, order
and good government are deployed to sell beer?
It's a particularly interesting
question on an international
university campus like UBC,
where most of the biggest in-
tra-faculty and campus wide
events involve kegs, and the
occasional Molson sponsorship. In the next few articles,
we'll look at the question from
a few angles we find interesting. In Russia, for example,
beer was essentially a soda,
classified as a foodstuff. Now
Putin is moving to reclassify
beer as alcohol. We had UBC
professors and students from
Russia weigh in on the role of
alcohol in that country's self
definition.
We also talked to students
who choose not to define the
university experience by beer.
We spoke to Aiman Erbad, a
director of the Muslim Student
Association from Qatar, and
asked if Canada or the university environment had tested
his beliefs about alcohol. He
said no. Kind of an open and
shut case there.
And we took a look at the
Brewers' Association of Canada, a shadowy trust-like organization that lobbies for 97 per
cent of breweries in Canada.
They were fairly forthcoming.
Still, is this big fish defining
beer, and consequently Canada, in its own image? Reporter Mike Dickson says maybe.
So sit back and spend a few
minutes with these articles.
Have a cold one. Or don't. Regardless, cheers, tl
i
BEER: THE REAL
UNIVERSAL
LANGUAGE?
MIKE DICKSON
Contributor
Quick, name the organization that represents a whopping 97 per cent of the
volume of beer sold and consumed in
Canada.
Exactly.
The Brewers' Association of Canada was
formed in 1943 when brewers realized
there were advantages to be gained
Brewers' Association of
Canada: A quick primer
dodged a bullet by winning an exemption to Canada's new labelling regulations. They require food and beverages to show any hidden allergens,
glutens or sulphites in their product—
which the BAC successfully argued was
akin to stating the obvious for a beverage made from barley. Wine and spirits
are still prone to the new regulations.
Though the Conservatives' well-publicized cutting of
nni       r^ *-• ' corporate taxes
1 he Conservatives has been well-re-
by banding togeth
£SESES£d£ cutting of corporate taxes SSffifubc."
try especially when  has been well-received by
it comes to govern-       1 , . 1 /
the BAC: Canadian beer is
the second highest-taxed
in the world.
ment relations.
"We talk with the
government about
a wide range of issues, anything we
find that can affect
our members," said
Andre Fortin, director of Public Affairs
for the BAC. "These issues can be everything from corporate taxes to labelling
initiatives."
The lobbying power of the BAC was on
display recently when the beer industry
att
and Molson—who,
together with Slee-
man and Mooseh-
ead, comprise the
majority of beer
volume represented by the lobby-
Canadian beer is
the second highest-taxed in the world.
Those worried about little-guy microbreweries that make up the other three
per cent should know that though they
stand apart from 'Big Beer,' they also
reap the benefits ofthe BAC's activities.
Arguably
the biggest
advantage
they offer is
the usage of the industry standard bottle.
Bottles are recycled, the glass is re-used
and breweries can buy a share in the operation to greatly cut down on bottling costs.
"Smaller breweries often occupy a larger portion of the consumer headspace
than large ones," said Mark Simpson, a
brewing consultant for Dockside Brewers. "I think the Brewers Association of
Canada's activities are positive, a benefit to the entire industry and I respect
what they do." tl 2011.03.07/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/9
In Russia, beer=food. Until last month.
KAIT B0L0NGAR0
Contributor
In a bill adopted by the Russian State
Duma last week, beer will now be classified as alcohol. Since 2005, beer was officially a foodstuff in the former Soviet
Union and widely available for purchase
at kiosks and near schools. The beverage is the most popular in Russia due to
its widespread availability and it is consumed by people of all ages.
In fact, most Russians don't even think
of beer as alcohol.
"Beer isn't considered alcohol," said
Peter Petro, a professor in the Central,
Eastern and Northern European Studies (CENES) department. "It's like pop
and costs the same [as pop]. Vodka and
hard liquors are considered alcohol. If
you ask for alcohol on a train, the [steward] will tell you there is no alcohol and
offer you beer or wine instead."
"Ten years ago, people could drink
it on the streets," said Irina Goundar-
eva, a Russian-Canadian Masters student in the French, Italian and Hispanic Studies department. "It is very common for people to drink beer, especially in the summer when it's refreshing
on the beach and in the parks. Even in
the zoo, beer is sold."
The Kremlin claimed introduction of
the bill was due to a severe health crisis
due to the large amount of liquor consumed in Russia. The World Health Organization estimates that Russians consume 32 pints of pure alcohol per capita
per year, more than double the recommended maximum.
There are accusations that Putin is
simply using new concern over health
as a mechanism to increase state revenue through higher taxation on beer
and create higher profits for beer companies in Russia.
However, Petro and Goundareva disagree.
"This is a big health concern," said Petro.
"I don't see much of a personal agenda. Russia is the largest natural gas producer in the world. [Russia] has paid
off its foreign debt and is enjoying high
economic growth. It's in a good position
compared to other countries who have
mortgaged their grandchildren's future."
"Putin might just pocket the revenue
and show it's better for the [Russian] people," says Goundareva. "[New regulations]
are better to protect young people because kids as young as 13 were drinking
it and alcohol impacts the development
of the nervous system and the brain. If
the government cares about the people,
they should limit its consumption." vl
JONNYWAKEFIELD ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
Not imbibing an easy—and religious—choice for some
GINNY MONACO
gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
In North America, many people
associate university with books
and beer. But the promise of alcohol that attracts certain students to
faculty and AMS events is the very
same thing that keeps others away.
"I don't like those events," said
PhD candidate Aiman Erbad, Director of Education of the Muslim Student's Association. "It
throws me off, being in the company of those that are drinking
is not something that I usually
do. I think it's wasting my tuition
money."
Erbad is originally from Qatar,
a country that has banned the importation of alcohol. It is illegal
to drink or be drunk in public,
though alcohol is sold in licensed
hotel bars and restaurants and is
legal with a permit.
Erbad's first introduction to alcohol came with his move to the
University of Washington in 2004.
"Itwas a big change when I moved
to the dorms," he says. "There is
a big drinking culture, especially
freshman year. It was a little bit
weird. I shared my room with a
roommate and he used to drink.
The smell was a little funny."
Despite his discomfort with alcohol, Erbad accepts that, for many
students, it is a large part of the
university experience. His sense
of UBC community is fostered
through involvement with the
Muslim Student's Association.
"I think we can't really push for
people to change simply because
we don't accept it. It's part of the
society that we live in here. But
this is something that doesn't represent us." til 10/UBYSSEY.CA/REFERENDUM/2011.03.07
FIVE QUESTIONS, FIVE CHOICES
WHAT YOU'LL BE VOTING ON THIS WEEK
U-PASS QUESTION
DO YOU SUPPORT AND APPROVE A $30.00 MONTHLY
U-PASS FEE, BEGINNING 1 SEPTEMBER, 2011,
ENDING 31 MARCH, 2013?
TUITION QUESTION
FROM NOW ON SHOULD THE AMS LOBBY FOR
REDUCED TUITION FEES FOR BOTH DOMESTIC AND
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS?
This question is required by the provincial government for
UBC students to join the Lower Mainland-wide U-Pass program. The fee was negotiated between the AMS, UBC and
the provincial government and Translink. UBC does not have
the option of keeping the current rate of $23.75 per month
beyond August 2011. It will require students to show their
student card as well as their pass when entering a bus.
Students will also have to pick up a new pass each month.
Created by petitioners who gathered 1200 signatures, the
question asks for the AMS to re-examine their policy on tuition increases. Currently, the AMS's stance is that increases to tuition are fine as long as they are due to inflation. If
this question passes, it would require the AMS to revisit
that policy and lobby both the government and university
to reduce tuition. Whether it passes or fails is a message
from students on how they want the AMS to handle fees.
FEE QUESTION
DO YOU SUPPORT AND ACCEPT ADOPTING THE
STUDENT FEE STRUCTURE AS PRESENTED?
OLDZFEES
NEW FEES
AMS Membership
$
12.50
$
21.00
Student Spaces Fund                                                                           $                       15.00        $                         15.75
Resource Groups
$
1.50
$
1.50
External and University Lobbying and Advocacy                            $                          3.50       $                           4.00
AMS Refugee Student Fund
$
2.50
$
2.50
Sexual Assault Support Services Fund                                              $                          3.00       $                           3.25
Student Services
CiTR
$
9.00
$
$
7.00
5.00
Sustainability Projects Fund                                                               $                            -           $                          2.25
International Projects Fund
$
-
$
0.25
Student Clubs Benefit Fund                                                                $                            -           $                           1.50
Childcare Bursary Fund
$
-
$
1.00
Student Legal Fund                                                                              $                          1.00       $                           1.00
AMS Financial Assistance Fund
$
12.00
$
12.00
Ubyssey Publication Society                                                               $                          5.00       $                           6.00
AMS Athletics and Intramurals Benefit
$
21.00
$
21.00
AMS Health and Dental Plan Fund
214.37
TOTAL
$
314.37
$
319.37
ITAL FEE CHANGE
$5.00
Full-time students paying all fees will see a fee increase of $5 a year; while those who opt out of the
health plan will see an increase of $19. With the exception of the Student Legal Fund, Financial Assistance Fund and Athletics and Intramurals Fund, all
fees will be indexed to inflation.
Under the new structure, three per cent ofAMS-
specific fees collected will be placed into a fund
so that students with financial need can apply to
have their fees reimbursed. Students can opt-out
of paying for the Health and Dental Plan, as well
as Resource Groups, CiTR and Ubyssey fees. All
students will pay the same amount regardless of
classes taken should the question pass. If this
referendum question fails, the current structure
will stay in place.
STEP1
Log into the Student Service Centre using
your Campus Wide Login.
"EP2
ck on "web-vote" unde
d records" headi]
K
*■
V*
STEP 3
Click "vote"
on each of the
individual
questions.
BYLAW Ql
DO YOU SUPPORT AND APPR0\
TO THE AMS BYLAl
1. Executive turnover/Elections:
Moving Executive turnover from
February to May 1. Moving Executive elections from January to
a date between February 15 and
March 15.
2. Lowering quorum: Reducing quorum at general meetings from 1000
students or 2% of AMS members
(whichever is less) to 500 or 1%
(whichever is more; i.e., quorum will
never be less than 500) in the hope
of achieving quorum more easily and
thereby being able to conduct business at annual general meetings.
3. Removing Executives: Changing
the procedures for removing Executives (and also Council Senators) to
accord with the Society Act. Eliminating the power of Council to remove Executives (and Senate Caucus to remove Council Senators).
Executives and Council Senators
will only be able to be removed by
a 75% vote at a general meeting
or in a referendum.
4. Executive remuneration and status: Stating that remuneration for
Executives (and other elected and
appointed officeholders) shall be
determined by Council in the Code
and deleting references to outdated
honorarium payment levels currently in the Bylaws. Clarifying that Executives are not employees.
BYLAW QUI
DO YOU SUPPORT AND APP
CHANGES TO THE AMS B
1. Renaming five positions: To comply with current practice, the four
current Executive positions other
than President will be renamed so
that they will all be called Vice-Presidents (e.g., Director of Finance will
become Vice-President Finance).
Also, "Secretary of SAC" will become "SAC Vice-Chair."
2. Other name changes: "General Office" will change to "Administration Office," "Registration Number" to "Student Number," and "alternate" to "proxy."
3. Gender neutrality: Replacing "he"
with "they" or "he or she" or the
title of the position held.
4. Minor editing: Changing "the
Council" to "Council." Removing
unusual capitals and unnecessary
commas. Correcting typographical,
grammatical and numbering errors.
5. Summer School Association: Deleting references to this defunct
association.
6. Constituency names: Updating
the list of Constituencies to reflect
the addition and removal of Schools
and Faculties, and changes in their
names.
7. Clarifications: Clarifying the meaning of "Special Resolution" by stating it means a resolution as defined
under the Society Act passed by a
75% majority. Clarifying that "the
Clerk" means the Clerk of Student
Court.
8. Using the AMS website and
newspapers besides The Ubyssey: Allowing notices to members
to go on the AMS website or other 201E03.07/UBYSSEYCA/REFERENDUM/11
JESTION #1
/E THE SUBSTANTIVE CHANGES
VS AS PRESENTED?
5. Public relations: Stating that the
meaning of "public relations" will be
as defined by Council in the Code
in order to clarify the scope of the
President's role with respect to public relations.
6. VP Responsibilities: Giving the
VP Academic the additional responsibility of working on such matters
as academic development and campus planning; moving the duty to receive job applications from the VP
Academic to the VP Administration;
changing the VP Administration to
the VP Student Affairs and giving
that Executive the additional duties
of promoting AMS events and generally improving student life. Also
changing the titles of the four Executives besides the President to
call them Vice-Presidents.
7. Records restrictions: Altering
the current bylaw allowing all AMS
members to view all AMS records
to permit Council to adopt a policy
pursuant to which records can be
kept confidential where disclosure
would be harmful to the financial or
economic interests of the AMS or
the security of the SUB or a computer or communications system,
as well as where disclosure would
disrupt an ongoing investigation, violate solicitor-client privilege, or reveal in camera discussions.
ESTION #2
'ROVE THE HOUSEKEEPING
VLAWS AS PRESENTED?
electronic notice boards in addition
to the established methods of giving notice. Allowing other campus
publications to be used to give notice instead of The Ubyssey. Allowing the AMS budget to be published
on the AMS website or other electronic notice board or any campus
publication instead of in the first issue of The Ubyssey after approval
ofthe budget.
9. Changing when Council members
take office: Removing the requirement that Council members representing Constituencies take office
at the time of the AMS annual general meeting (something that never
happens). Stating that the student
Board of Governors (BoG) representatives become Council members after they attend either a BoG
committee meeting, a BoG retreat,
or a full BoG meeting (and not just
a full BoG meeting).
10. Changing the VP on Senate Caucus: Changing it from the VP External to the VP Academic, Caucus being more connected to the VP Academic portfolio.
11. SAC non-voting members: Allowing representatives ofthe General Manager and the VP Finance
instead of the GM and VP Finance
themselves to attend SAC meetings.
12. Records: Altering the current
bylaw allowing all AMS members
to view all AMS records by saying
that access will be subject to applicable privacy laws and other laws.
Also allowing records to be moved
out of the main AMS office.
BOTTOM OF THE BARREL:
UBC'S STUDENT UNION FEES DEAD LAST
There are 16 English-speaking universities with more than 15,000 full-time students in Canada that have publicly
available detailed information on the amount of money their student unions manage. UBC currently has the lowest
fees. The totals were based on a student taking two terms of 15 credits per year and is the total of general student
union fees, building maintenance, student newspapers and radio stations, sexual assault support services, resource
groups and student services with an AMS equivalent, and sustainability and clubs fees. If the referendum passes,
fees at UBC going to student unions/newspapers/radio stations will be the second lowest, after York. See www.
ubyssey.ca for a full breakdown of the fees. Ryerson, Carleton and the University of Toronto were not included due to
a lack of posted information.
1. McMaster
$110.05 "Organization fee" doesn't
include health care or transit pass
2. SFU
Includes $4 fee for
"Sustainable SFU" fund
$117.28
3. McGill
Includes $2.50 for "Environment
Fee" and $4 for "Campus Life Fund'
i
4. Western
Includes $9.30 for the Gazette newspaper, which prints four times a week
1
5. Queen's
Fees for the Environment Fund and
clubs are opt-outable
6. UVic
Includes $5 fee for
"Club and Course Unions" fund
I
7. Guelph
Not included are fees for clubs, including 12 cents to "Science for Peace"
I
8. Ottawa
Includes $4 fee for "Sustainable
Development" and a $2.12 club fee
9. Concordia
At $7.50 each, their sustainability and
club fees are the largest in Canada
$89.26
h
10. Waterloo
Their student union is called
"FEDS." There's no Win that!
I
11. Calgary
Their executives are among the
highest paid in Canada, making
$35,160 each in 2009.
1
12. Alberta
Not included is the $17.99
students pay towards bursaries
h
13. Saskatchewan
Students also pay a $110
Infrastructure Fee for their new building
I
14. Manitoba
Includes $2.50 fee to the University Recycling and Environment Group
1
15. York
If UBC passes the fee question, York
will will have the lowest fees for their
student union in the country
16. UBC
Unlike most schools on this list, UBC's
fees aren't set to inflation
49.50
$17.25
l
I 12/UBYSSEY.CA/G AMES/2011.03.07
GAMES & COMICS
COMICMASTER, BY MARIA CIRSTEA
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Submit your comics
to our website at
ubyssey. cal volunteer I
submit-a-comic.
VIRGINIE MENARD |
production@ubyssey.ca
tlTHEUBYSSEYca 2011.03.07/UBYSSEYCA/ADVERTISEMENT/13
amS Insider weekly ^
student society     a weekly look at what's new at your student society 07.03.
The AMS Referendum: March 7th -11th
CHANGE YOUR AMS
Better services, clubs and events
KEEP THE UPASS
The AMS Referendum will ask students to change the
AMS fee structure and bylaws to improve services,
clubs, events and accountability. The general AMS fee
has not changed since 1982 and voting yes will mean
more than $800,000 in new funding for student
activities and initiatives for only $5 more per year for
most students.
The UPass program was expanded by the BC government to all post-secondary students in the
lower-mainland. In order to keep the UPass students, must Vote Yes or the program will not continue.
Leam more at
www.ams.ubc.ca
CAREER
DAY™'
March 16-17
10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Main Concourse, SUB
Come to the SUB to meet
recruiters looking for
UBC students to hire!
Bring your resume!
[nterested in participating in the Grad Class Council?
The Grad Class Council is comprised of graduating students from faculties across campus.
The objects ofthe organization are to promote, direct and control all Grad Class activities
and to encourage full participation by all the members. It also presents the University
with suitable gifts, both as a symbol ofthe Class'indebtedness to the University, and as
memorials of each particular Grad Class.
Please direct questions or email your application to crystallhon@gmail.com no later
than Midnight on March 14th, 2011.
www.ams.ubc.ca/student-government/student-admin-commission/grad-class-coLincil/
STAY  UP TO  DATE WITH  THE AMS
Facebook:
UBC Alma Mater Society
y
Twitter:
AMSExecutive 14/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/2011.03.07
SPORTS
EDITOR MARIE VONDRACEK»sports@ubyssey.ca
UBC wins fourth straight national banner
T-Birds become most decorated CIS volleyball team ever
The T-Birds jump with national domination-sized joy for the fourth straight time. YAN DOUBLET COURTESY
OFTHECIS
MARIE VONDRACEK
sports@ubyssey.ca
The Thunderbirds became the
most decorated team in CIS
women's volleyball history
thanks to a dominating gold
medal win over tournament
host the Laval Rouge et Or in
straight sets (25-16, 25-18 and
25-14).
UBC's four-year championship run is the third-longest
in history trailing only the six
consecutive banners won by
Alberta (1995-2000) and Winnipeg (1983-1988). It marked
the eighth national title for
the T-Birds since the inaugural CIS championship in 1970,
one more than Alberta and
Winnipeg.
"Looking back over these last
four years, we're very thankful
and very grateful. Ifyou look at
it, there were a whole number
of years where we had a reputation as a good program with
good people but always falling
that little bit short," said T-Birds
head coach Doug Reimer. "The
success the team is having now
wouldn'thave happened without
everything we've done over the
last 15 years. This culture began more than four years ago."
The whole bench brought
something to the table all weekend, a necessary trait due to the
loss of middle Jessica von Schilling, who fell to a leg injury in
the week prior to the nationals.
Rookie middle Mariah Bruins-
ma took her place in the rotation and received support from
her teammates all across the
floor throughout the weekend.
"I think we're growing right
now. These last two weeks have
been special. It's absolutely rewarding," said Reimer, prior
to arriving in Quebec City. "A
lot of these players have had
a taste of national championships, and once you have a
taste you want more."
The palate-wetting began
with a tough quarter-final
matchup against the Sher-
brooke Vert et Or. UBC jumped
out to an impressive start, piling up 15 kills on .379 hitting
while holding Sherbrooke to
-.091 and just five kills, but the
Vert et Or responded with 10
kills on .200 hitting to take the
third set 25-23.
"All of the Quebec teams,
when they get on a roll and play
good defence, are tough to play
against. We've seen it before at
nationals," said Reimer after
the match. "The middle part of
the match they out-served and
out-passed us. They also gained
confidence the longer they were
playing, so itwas important for
us to come out with a good effort
like we did in the fourth set."
The T-Birds responded to the
challenge with another strong
fourth set to take the match 3-1
(25-13, 25-18, 23-25, 25-12). Ray-
el Quiring had a big match for
UBC with 10 kills on .304 hitting to go along with five service aces.
"I thought Rayel had a very
good game energy wise. She did
a lot for us," said Reimer. "She's
just one player that can take a lot
of positives away from today's
match. For a lot of our players,
it's their first time playing significant minutes at the national championship. Even for our
veterans, it's still the first round
and it's definitely a different atmosphere here."
Despite the third set lapse,
Reimer was happy that his team
showed the character he knew it
had. "Our expectation of how the
first round should go is sometimes not the most realistic and
it's probably better to struggle
a little bit and then come back
tomorrow even more focused,"
said Reimer. "We're happy that
we bounced back from a bad set,
like we did in the Canada West
final, and that we can be comfortable making some in-game
adjustments."
In the semi-final 3-0 sweep
of Alberta (25-17, 25-15 and 25-
22), UBC created a gap that was
almost impossible to overcome.
"I was prepared for a very
long and tough match—that was
my expectation. I don't have the
feeling that Alberta didn't show
up to play. I think we won that
match," observed Reimer after
the key win.
With the win, the Thunderbirds earned a seat in the final game of the tournament
for the sixth time in the last
seven years, with a chance to
be the best in the country and
in history.
In the Sunday afternoon final,
UBC hit .352 as a team while
holding Laval to .034. UBC also
out-blocked Laval 8-1. Playing
in the final match of her stellar
university career, UBC's Canadian national team member Jen
Hinze was named game MVP for
the winning side. Hinze put in
eight points and fellow national team member Kyla Richey led
the 'Birds with points in the final with 18 points and 16 kills.
CIS player of the year Shanice Marcelle added 13 kills in
the banner win and expressed
exhilaration after the match.
"It's just an incredible feeling to win with 18 of my best
friends. Everyone contributed
this weekend, it really was a
group effort and an amazing
end to a great season." tl
THUNDERBIRD ATHLETE COUNCIL
ATHLETE OF THE WEEK
SHANICE MARCELLE
Shanice Marcelle has earned athlete of the week honours for her performance at the CanWest final four championship last week here at UBC. Marcelle was recently named CanWest MVP and
last weekend she certainly proved why. In the semi-final game against Manitoba, the 'Birds won
3-0 and Marcelle had 12 kills on .440 hitting and an impressive four aces.
In the CanWest final the following night, Marcelle executed some crucial plays to lead the team
from being behind at 2-1, onwards to a 3-2 win, earning the 'Birds their third straight CanWest victory. The team competed this weekend in the finals at nationals in Quebec City, where they won
their fourth straight national championship banner, tl
—Amelia Rajala
CIS player of the year YAN DR0ULET COURTESY OFTHE CIS 2011.03.07/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/15
Basketball domination in fourth straight CanWest title
Alex Murphy played the game of his life in his final match as a Thunderbird at War Memorial on Saturday. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
DRAKE FENTON
Contributor
Saturday night the UBC men's
basketball team certified its
ranking as one of the top programs in the country, defeating
the University of Saskatchewan
Huskies 107-100 to win the Canada West championship.
During the last eight years
UBC has been a perennial powerhouse in CIS basketball, and
Saturday's victory garnered
them their fourth Canada West
title in that span. Though the
victory was special for the team
as a collective whole, the crowd
of 1743 people at War Memorial Gym knew the night truly belonged to fifth-year guard Alex
Murphy and his career-high
34-point evening.
"Alex Murphy..what an unbelievable performance," said UBC
head coach Kevin Hanson.
Moments after the game
concluded, an ecstatic Hanson
pulled Murphy to the sideline for
a hug and whispered into his ear.
Chuckling while he recalled
the moment, Hanson relayed
what he told Murphy: "I asked
him if he wanted [the gym] to
be renamed 'The Alex Murphy
Court.'"
The praise Hanson loaded
on Murphy was by no means
undeserved. Along with his 34
points, Murphy added eight assists and four steals. More astonishing, however, was his spectacular 21 for 22 from the foul
line. Murphy's versatility Saturday night even extended off
the court; at one point, midway
through the game, he grabbed
a mop and began wiping sweat
off the court. His performance
was a fitting end to a five-year
career, as Saturday marked the
last time he would play for UBC
at War Memorial.
"It's an emotional [experience]
more than anything else; I've
put in a lot of time here. It feels
great right now," said Murphy.
Post-game, Murphy and his
teammates may have been emotional, but maintaining poise in
clutch situations was what defined their play for the majority of the contest.
In the third quarter, with 20
seconds left on the clock, UBC
held a narrow 67-66 advantage.
Following a Balraj Bains foul,
Saskatchewan's Nolan Brudehl
stepped to the line with an opportunity to drain two shots and
propelled the Huskies to their
first lead of the night.
Perhaps it was the roaring
crowd, or perhaps his nerves got
to him. Whatever the case, Brudehl faltered and missed both of
his shots. UBC's Graham Bath
scooped up the rebound after
the second shot and moments
later he was down the court
driving the lane. Bath's lay-up
didn't find any netting, but he
was able to rebound his own
shot. On his second chance he
capitalized. The basket closed
the quarter and put UBC up 69-
66. It was the closest Saskatchewan came to a lead that night.
Burdehl's missed foul shots
came to define the Huskies'
night. They went 24 for 38 (63
per cent) from the foul line and
an abysmal 11 for 20 in the second half. UBC, on the other hand,
went 34-40 (85 per cent) on the
evening.
A lack of consistency and poise
in the clutch might have hurt the
Huskies' chances at victory, but
their all-out effort kept the game
within an arm's reach throughout the night. Guardjamelle Barrett, who was named the conference's MVP the night before,
ended the match with 35 points.
"[Barrett] was single-handedly keeping them in the game. We
tried to double-team him but he
got through double teams and he
got through triple teams. I was
running out of ideas, as a coach,
for what to do with him," Hanson commented.
With stopping Barrett proving exceedingly troublesome
and big men Kamar Burke and
Balraj Bains both fouled out of
the game, UBC responded in the
fourth quarter in the only way
that seemed applicable—a relentless offensive attack.
"We ended up going small ball
at the end, with five guards playing out there," said Hanson.
Guard Doug Plumb chipped
in 10 of his 18 points in the
fourth quarter and 11 of Murphy's points came in the final
frame. UBC finished the quarter
with a game-high 38 points. The
Huskies were unable to match
UBC's pace and the T-Birds'
"small ball" produced lighting
quick transitions down court
that proved too arduous for Saskatchewan's defence.
The Alex Murphy-led 'Birds
will be heading to the CIS national championships next week
in Halifax as the No. 1 ranked
team in the nation. UBC will be
looking to avenge their second
place finishes in the previous
two years, tl
Harry Jones—an inspiring rugby student-athlete
DRAKE FENTON
Contributor
Overcoming adversity has
been something that UBC rugby product Harry Jones has become quite used to in his athletic career. He has represented Canada three times at the
junior national level as well as
playing nationally with the senior men's seven's roster. Compared to the competition overseas—Australia, New Zealand,
South Africa—Canada is not a
rugby superpower. Thus Jones
has played and battled against
opponents with much more invested and developed programs.
In 2009, when Harry travelled to Japan with the U20 national team which he captained,
the skill level of his opposition
was readily apparent.
"We played a team from Australia and a lot of their guys
played in Australia's Super 14
league. That's arguably one
of the best rugby leagues in
the world; obviously, playing
against guys at that level is
tough," Jones said.
National accomplishments
and accolades aside, Jones is
first and foremost a UBC student. He is a fourth-year student in the Sauder School of
Business. It's with the varsity
men's rugby team during the
school year where he has perhaps faced the biggest adversity of his career.
For the lastyear and half, up
until this semester, Jones has
been forced to act as a cheerleader on the sideline rather than a
game changer on the field. He
was diagnosed with Osteitis pubis— an injury caused by inflammation of the joints in the pelvic region, causing acute and
chronic groin pain. Performing sustained physical activity
with this type of injury eventually becomes impossible.
Initially, Jones battled
through the pain and played
with the injury. He suffered
through it while playing in Japan with the U20 national team,
and continued to play with it
while representing Team BC (in
the summer of 2009) in a senior
men's national competition.
By the end of the competition, Jones had nothing left in
the tank. "My body was physically unable to handle it any
more," he said. "After the end
ofthe [Team BC] competition I
was unable to do anything for
about five months. I couldn't
work out, I couldn't run, all I
could do was rest. During that
time watching [UBC games] was
really hard and frustrating; I
wanted to be out there with the
guys." Ayear after that, which
consisted of nothing but rest,
rehab and school, Harry was
medically cleared to play again.
Bram Newman, the rugby
team's head medical trainer,
described why the injury left
Jones out of rugby for such an
extended period.
"It is something that has
a fast onset with pain, and it
is something that can linger
around for a long, long time if
not treated properly from the
get-go. With Harry's case there
were a few road bumps [in diagnosing the injury] but once
we figured out exactly what was
wrong we immediately began focusing on getting him healthy."
Since returning from injury, Jones has proven that his
presence was worth waiting
for. He has produced tries in
three of the four games he has
played. His return to the field
is one UBC head coach Spence
McTavish is excited about. "Harry's always been one of our top
players," said McTavish. "We're
glad to have him back in the
line-up, he's a big help. There's a
noticeable difference with him
out. He's a guy out there that has
some pace and decision-making
abilities and that makes him a
big addition."
Yet a successful recovery and
a return to rugby is hardly surprising in Harry's case; toughness and the ability to overcome
adversity run in his blood.
Harry has twin brothers, Ben
and Charley, who are two years
his senior. For over five years,
while completing undergraduate and graduate work, each has
predominately played for the
varsity squad. Like Harry, each
has suffered debilitating injuries which they've had to overcome. Ben has torn his ACL (knee
ligament) three times, most recently at the beginning of this
season. He expects to return to
play again next year. Likewise,
Charley has torn ligaments in
his knee and has also suffered
intensive pelvic injuries. On two
separate occasions his season
has been cut short by injuries.
He currently captains the UBC
squad.
Charley, who plays in the
back line with Harry, is excited
to once again be reunited with
his brother. "We read the game
the same way. A lot of the times
we pick what the other person
is going to do and feed off that.
It really makes it a lot easier to
play." When on the field together you might compare them to
the Sedins—minus, of course,
the red hair, goatees and Swedish passports.
UBC will shortly enter the
heart of its season flying down
to California to play archrival
Berkeley.
Harry expects to be healthy
and ready for the contest. His
Jones out of reach of his competition. RICHARD LAM PH0T0/UBC ATHLETICS
plan for keeping his body fresh?
It's notyour typical male sports
cliche.
"I didn't want to admit this...
but I recently started doingyoga.
It rejuvenates the body after the
beatings we take on game day."
Jones's yoga will come in handy as he and his team compete
in the National Invitational University Rugby Sevens Championship, which will take place at
UBC at Thunderbird Stadium
from March 11-12. UBC students
with their student cards will get
free entry to all matches. For the
full schedule, go to www.rugby-
canada.ca. \J 16/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/2011.03.07
Mike Liambas leaves UBC for the pros
Upon a two game suspension, Liambas pursues ECHL contract
MARIE VONDRACEK
sports@ubyssey.ca
Mike Liambas will be playing hockey next year—but he
won't be doing it for the UBC
Thunderbirds.
His UBC coach, Milan
Dragicevic, confirmed to the
Vancouver Sun on Thursday that
Liambas would pursue opportunities in the East Coast Hockey League (ECHL) and stressed
that he was not condoning Li-
ambas's actions. Dragicevic
felt that any further penalties
against Liambas would be unfair after his two-game suspension for causing an injury to Alberta Golden Bears captain Eric
Hunter last weekend.
"If this was any other player
besides Mike Liambas, if this
had happened to anyone else in
our league, he would have got
the two game-suspension and
it would be a done deal," said
Dragicevic. "But because it's
Mike Liambas, with his past
and his reputation, they are
making this into a big deal.
There is nothing in the referee's
report that says Mike did anything besides instigate a fight."
Liambas came to UBC with
an infamous reputation, having
been banned from the OHL for a
hit that resulted in a skull fracture for Ben Fanelli ofthe Erie
Otters. After being cut by the
Toronto Maple Leafs in training camp last September, he
came to UBC for a chance to
play hockey while pursuing his
education.
"When we recruited him last
year, we recruited him because
he was a character player," said
Dragicevic. "We understood he
was dealing with an extremely
difficult situation," referring to
Liambas's ban from OHL hockey. "But he was a leader on all
the teams he's played on and
he has a passion to play hockey, all of which we are looking
for in a player on our team."
Now that Liambas is no
longer a Thunderbird, he has
signed a contract with the Cincinnati Cyclones of the ECHL,
playing in his first game Saturday against the Toledo Walleyes
and racking up two shots and
seven penalty minutes—including one fight. Though Liambas
has declined all comment and
his teammates have refused
to speculate on his motives for
Liambas, number 24, squeezed out of the CIS. DAVID ELOP PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
leaving, he has the support of
his team.
"He knows what direction he
wants to go in, one where he's
pursuing professional hockey
in the minor leagues," said veteran fifth-year teammate Max
Gordichuk. "If that's what he
wants to do, it's what he's gotta
do. If he doesn't want to be in
school right now then he needs
to do what will be good for him."
Dragicevic felt that Liambas's time with the 'Birds had
helped prepare him for future
hockey endeavours. "Over his
six months playing with us he's
really improved on his play.
He's learned a lot and worked
his way into the line up, even
playing on the penalty kill and
the power play for us."
Gordichuk expressed joy in
playing with Liambas. "He's an
extremely nice guy with a tremendous work ethic. He's also
a great student but most importantly, he simply loves hockey."
Two weeks ago Friday, many
described Liambas' actions as
an attack, saying that he sucker-punched Hunter's blind side
from behind and drove him into
the ice, resulting in facial cuts
and a 'concussion.'
On Tuesday, Hunter said to
an Edmonton journal reporter, "I think the concussion side
of it was precautionary. There
were a lot of symptoms when
it happened, subtle symptoms
on Saturday and they started
to dissipate from there.
"To say if itwas a concussion
or if it wasn't a concussion, I'd
say it probably wasn't, just seeing where I'm at right now. But
you have to sort of take those
precautionary steps when it
happens."
The details of Liambas and
Hunter's altercation are still
contested, since game footage
didn't capture the incident in
its entirety.
"All you could see is the
gloves come off and then the
film follows the puck," Canada West men's hockey convenor Bill Seymour said.
"So you don't see anything.
Then (the camera) comes back
and Liambas is on top of him...
it's not a very good video; we
don't have six cameras like the
NHL.
"Liambas certainly has his
reputation and his past will certainly play a part," he added.
Though he may now be in Cincinnati, UBC head coach Milan
Dragicevic stood beside his passionate former player. "There
was no pre-meditation. Our
player got speared, there was
no call and he retaliated.
"We support Mike Liambas
as a person 100 per cent and
we are going to support him
through this as well." tl
More sports funding in NCAA move? Probably not.
Equal male and female scholarship allowance will create three possible scenarios
DYLAN WALL
Contributor
'Moving to the NCAA will offer
our athletes more opportunity for competition and scholarship and help keep Canadians from moving south ofthe
border.' That is the argument
to move to the NCAA, but that
belief is not shared with all
UBC varsity athletes.
Although most believe the
switch will foster more competition, some disagree that
changing to the NCAA will
result in more scholarship
funding.
"If UBC were in the NCAA
there would be more competition, at least for volleyball
anyways," said Garret LaValley, T-bird volleyball player. "Our volleyball team has
played games against Hawaii
in the past and won, and Hawaii has normally been in
the middle of the pack in the
NCAA." Certainly it would
be more competitive than in
Canada, where UBC's volleyball program has consistently been one of the best in the
country.
But when it came to scholarships, he was doubtful. "I
don't know whether or not it
would change the amount of
funding for athletes."
He has good reason to be
uncertain. According to the
UBC Review Committee Report, released in January
2011, the university spends
80 per cent of its scholarship
limit for CIS sports and only
32 per cent for NAIA sports.
The limit in the CIS is $5500
per athlete given to a maximum of 70 per cent of the athletes in each sport. Similarly,
the NAIA also caps its number
of scholarships and places a
$16,000 limit on each athlete.
The move from the CIS to
the NCAA Division II would
allow individual scholarships
to increase up to $16,000 and
extend from 175 athletes (70
per cent of UBC athletes) to
203.5 (109 for males and 97.5
for females). However, if the
limit is expanded, will that actually result in more funding
from the university?
Athletes are skeptical. A
football player who asked to
remain anonymous said, "I
don't know if it would mean
an overall increase [of scholarship funding]. We haven't
talked about it at all, really.
But I think you may see more
money go to star athletes and
there will be less left for average players."
He went on to say the move
to the NCAA may attract more
American players. And, "in
football, there is a stigma that
American players are better. I
think you may see more scholarships go to Americans and
actually be taken away from
Canadian athletes." This would
be counter-productive in trying
to keep athletes from moving
to the States.
Finally, the NCAA has limits to the number of male
scholarships in comparison
to female scholarships. From
a distance this looks good:
equality among men and
women. However, in varsity
sports, there tend to be many
more male athletes. This is
largely due to football, which
at UBC involves almost 100
athletes.
SFU swimmer Sara Pfeifer
put it best: "Scholarships for
males have to equal those for
females. Since there are way
more male athletes than females, [UBC] has three options:
add female sports, offer more
money to females, or cut male
funding." Most schools in the
USA have done a combination
ofthe three.
But more importantly, if university funding does not increase at UBC, male scholarship funding would have to decrease. When it comes to supporting Canadian student athletes, the switch to the NCAA
may actually do more harm
than good, "u 2011.03.07/UBYSSEY.CA/REFERENDUM/17
REFERENDUM LETTERS
ON UBYSSEY AND CITR BIAS
This week's AMS referendum
has highlighted serious concerns
with the independence of our major media. Both CiTR radio and
The Ubyssey newspaper are tied
into the same fee question as the
ones for the AMS. Although they
are incorporated independently,
the fee question on the ballot requires you agree to fees for all or
none. But why? The radio and the
newspaper have a fair amount of
influence on campus. If the AMS
had separated the fee question for
the media, then the media would
not have to make a strong case
for the AMS fees. But tying them
together has already shown that
the AMS's strategy is working.
The CiTR radio has been pumping the vote-yes message. The
Ubyssey paper has produced a
video advertising the random
slush funds that the AMS is proposing. They know that if students
vote against the new fee structure, the media will not receive
any funding. But if the media are
not covering the referendum critically, do they even deserve extra
funding?
When independent media give
into bribes by the leadership, the
community does not get the critical perspectives it deserves.
The media had the choice of
separating itself from the AMS
on the ballot and should have
done that. I will consider giving
them extra funding when they
maintain their independence and
bring a critical perspective on issues on campus. Until then, I am
voting yes only for the U-Pass.
— RaelKatz
QUORUM SHOULD BE HIGH
I was surprised to see that the
AMS is trying to lower the number of students required to pass
bylaws in an annual general meeting from 1000 to 500. For an organization that represents more
than 48,000 students, how can
the AMS expect to change its bylaws with the votes of merely 500?
Bylaws of the AMS act like the
constitution of a country. They protect the community against personal political agenda of the leadership. Justlike every country has
a formula to change its constitution, the AMS's current bylaws require that at least 1,000 students
show up to a special meeting or
that AMS runs a campus-wide referendum with over eight per cent
of students voting and more than
50 per cent of voters vote in favour.
In the past, AMS has only managed to change bylaws by running
a campus-wide referendum—a
democratic process. That's because the AMS has never been
able to bring 1000 students to a
special meeting. But the AMS is
now trying to change its bylaw-
changing formula to by-pass the
uninvolved students.
The AMS is running a referendum to get students to reduce
the number of students required
to pass a bylaw in an annual general meeting from 1000 to 500.
That's the average number of students paying attention to the AMS
regularly!
AMS is a multi-million dollar
organization that levies fees on
48,000+ students and speaks on
our behalf to the government and
UBC, so it has to be accountable
to us all. A mere 500 quorum is
too small for changing the bylaws. If the AMS is having trouble bringing 1,000 students (that's
less than .02 per cent of us) to a
meeting, it should do a better job
in communication and making itself more present instead of just
lowering the quorum.
—Rebecca Souchuns
HEALTH PLAN CHANGES RISKY
The AMS has delivered on two
things very well so far: the U-Pass
program and the Health and Dental insurance. I am pleased with
both, but I don'tlike the risks that
the proposed fee referendum
exposes our health insurance
plan to. Firstly, let me say that
I'm disappointed that the AMS
has not made it clear in its vote-
yes campaign that students don't
have to vote yes for the proposed
AMS fees to keep their U-Pass. U-
Pass and fees are separate questions on the ballot!
Secondly, the AMS is taking
$14 per student out of the current Health and Dental Plan and
shifting it into other funds—some
random funds without very good
definition or relevance to regular
students. The AMS says thatithas
negotiated a deal with its insurance-provider for the same coverage at a lower price. Very well-
done, but they are not telling us
about the other relevant annual
negotiation.
The AMS negotiates with its
insurance-provider an annual
payment based on students' usage, which varies yearly. In the
past, when the AMS paid the insurance provider less than the
total it collected from students,
the rest was saved in a designated reserve fund. In other years,
when the AMS had to pay more,
it took it out of the reserve.
The new fee structure essentially eliminates the designated
reserve fund. That means that in
a year when students use their
coverage a lot more, the AMS
has to either cut coverage or increase fees in the following year.
Unacceptable!
I am grateful for my U-Pass
and I am voting in favour of it. I
am voting against the new fees,
because I am not willing to risk
lowering my insurance coverage in return for random funds
that only benefit a small group
of students.
—Eric Goldstein
WHY I SUPPORT THE AMS
REFERENDUM QUESTIONS
The last general fee increase by
the Alma Mater Society of UBC
Vancouver occurred in 1982.
The fee is not tied to inflation,
Do you have Type 2 Diabetes?
The University of Victoria, Centre on Aging, Ladner
Office, is conducting important research on
self-management programs and needs individuals
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for their study.
Programs available in various Lower Mainland
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Remuneration provided.
If you would like to receive the program and
participate in the study please call:
Natalie Gauthier at 604 940-9496 or by email:
n.gauthier@eastlink.ca
University
of Victoria
Centre on Aging
meaning it is now worth less
than half its original amount.
Despite the decreasing value
ofthe fee, services and resources that the AMS runs have increased over the past 30 years.
In fact, the AMS provides services that are usually offered
by university administrations.
From the Sexual Assault Support Centre to the Advocacy Office to the AMS Foodbank, the
AMS runs services that help students in times of need. Additionally, the AMS provides space
and funding for over 350 clubs,
lobbies on behalf of students to
create joint programs like the
U-Pass, provides subsidies for
students in financial need and
employs hundreds of students
in its variety of food and beverage outlets in the SUB.
The purpose of the referendum is to allow the AMS to maintain these services and the level of support it provides to students. It also allows the Society
to grow and better meet student
needs. The AMS resource groups
and the related fee increase are
not "slush funds"; they represent and support the diverse
backgrounds of AMS members.
If the referendum fails, there
will be significant funding cuts
to the valuable services listed
above. Voting yes for the new
fee structure and the more efficient bylaws will make the AMS
a sustainable organization that
can increase the availability of
resources students demand.
It's unfortunate that the important day-to-day work of the
AMS has been overshadowed by
a few negative highlights in recent history. I chose to coordinate this referendum because
I know that these changes will
allow UBC's student society to
function more efficiently and
provide the greatest support to
students.
—Alyssa Koehn
Head ofthe Vote Yes Committee
VOTE YES FOR U-PASS, NO FOR
FEES AND BYLAWS
The U-Pass is a great deal and is
a separate question on the ballot, so you can vote in favour of
it while voting against the new
fees and bylaws—something that
the AMS's vote yes campaign is
not explicitly telling us!
The substantive changes undermine democracy as the AMS
is proposing to lower the number of students needed to change
future bylaws from 1000 to 500!
Allowing the AMS to rely on
merely 500 students to change
its bylaws, which are fundamental to protecting us against the
personal agendas of AMS leaders, is irresponsible and undemocratic. How can the AMS call it
representative for 500 insiders
to determine the fate of 48,000+
students?
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Having met with the new AMS
Executives, I've concluded that
despite their good intentions,
they rushed into creating a fee
structure without consulting
students. They did consult, but
only with those who directly benefit from the new funds.
In my investigations, I also
learned that the AMS's so-called
deficit is only an "accounting"
deficit and not a real one. And
even the "accounting" deficit is
projected to be at $140,000, so I
asked why the AMS was asking
for an extra $800,000. It turned
out to be a strategy to drum up
support!
As you can see from the fee
table, it creates random slush
funds without any detailed definition on who will decide how
the funds will be spent and for
what—contrary to how the AMS's
previous funds in previous referendums were presented. Most
notably, all fees are tied together so students can't choose. This
forces those benefiting from the
funds to push for them. The
Ubyssey newspaper is already
pumping it strongly as they're
receiving fees. The total fee adds
up to $19/student, which AMS
considered to be unappealing
to voters. So they transferred
$14 out of the Health and Dental plan to these new funds in
order to reduce the payable extra fee to $5—although you'll pay
the full $19 ifyou opted out of
the insurance plan.
But this shift of funding severely exposes our Health and
Dental plan coverage to the risk
of being cut substantially in the
future. I've explained it in detail
on www.noQuickBuck.ca.
Additionally, discussions at
AMS Council confirmed that
most funds have no plans attached to them. Most discussed
was the sustainability fund
($100,000), present because
students are said to care about
"sustainability."
Finally, the AMS wants more
money for its services but it has
not optimized them recently. For
example, the cost of Safewalk is
currently higher than transporting the same people in a limousine! Why has AMS not found a
better way of addressing safety?
Or running Safewalk with volunteers like the rest of Canadian campuses do?
The AMS needs to start over
and create a better fee structure
in consultation with students.
Details on my investigation
and an entertaining video of an
AMS President impersonator are
at www.noQuickBuck.ca.
—Nick Frank
Head ofthe Vote No Committee
The "no" side out-
lettered the "yes" side
five to one this week
(the other two will be
posted online). Can
the yes side recover?
Tune in Thursday! Or,
alternatively email us
your 300-word or less
letter to feedback@
ubyssey.ca.
Justin McElroy
co ordinating@ubyssey ca
U      lEUBYSSEYc 18/UBYSSEY.CA/FEATURE/2011.03.07
Tke
Student depression on the rise:    ^
How is UBC coping?
JONNY WAKEFIELD
culture@ubyssey.ca
Like any student, Joanna Chiu was
nervous when she was entering
university. She was anxious about
doing well, about living on her own
andaboutmeetingnewpeople. She
lived in Vanier and started going
to parties around rez.
Things started to get heavy.
"I started drinking and experimenting with drugs for the first
time," she said. "It was very
overwhelming."
Joanna, who said she was sheltered during high school, was unsure of how to control herself in an
environment she called a "hook-up
culture." She was sexually assaulted and developed an eating disorder. For Joanna, all the stresses of
university were compounded by
an overwhelming sense of guilt.
Bythe middle of second year, she
was at the end of her rope and felt
like dropping out.
"It led to a prolonged emotional hangover," she said.
More students than we may
think find themselves in similar
situations. Recently a pair of studies looking at mental health on
university campuses revealed just
how common problems of depression and stress-related mental illness are among students.
The National College Health Assessment (NCHA) generally gets
the most attention. The NCHA is a
comprehensive health survey for
university students compiled by
the American College Health Association and usually has around
300 schools in the US and Canada participating. The numbers
are startling.
Across the board, students reported feeling more and more depressed each year, with the numbers for UBC students notably high.
Thirty-six per cent of UBC students
who took the 2009 survey said
that in the last year they had felt
so depressed that it was difficult
to function—compared to an average of around 30 per cent for university students in general. Fifty-
seven per cent of UBC respondents
said they had felt that things were
hopeless—the survey-wide average on that question was around
45 per cent.
The numbers for students diagnosed with depression are increasing as well. In 2000, ten per cent
of NCHA respondents had been
diagnosed with depression in the
lastyear. In 2008 that number was
18 per cent.
Why are today's university students showing such high levels of
depressive symptoms? And why
does it seem as though students
who go to UBC are more depressed
than at other universities?
DREAMS UNFULFILLED,
GRADUATE UNSKILLED
One theory is that increased stress
and depression is due to a perceived lack of opportunity after
graduation. The National Post suggested that "the reasons behind the
problems may include the pressures of a society that no longer
guarantees success to
young university graduates," when discussing the
NCHA.
Dr Elizabeth Saewyc, a professor
at the UBC School of Nursing and
an author of a survey on the mental health of students who used
campus health services, said that
stress definitely is a factor.
"There's a lot of pressure on doing well in university" said Saewyc. "Long-term, it does affectyour
abilities—moreso than ever."
However, she said that anecdotal evidence that students become
more stressed when they draw
closer to graduating wasn't validated by her study.
"We didn't find that. We actually found higher rates of depressive symptoms among those in the
first year of going to university."
Saewyc said student depression
may be largely due to another ailment—homesickness. "When distressing things happen [as a new
student], you don't have your social network that has been there
immediately at hand," she said.
"You'll be developing a new one—
but that will take a while. And that
can be stressful."
Cory a third-year Arts student, struggled with depression
in his second year. He said that
the culture in Gage Towers made
it difficult to develop a supportive network.
"First year, you're really integrated and the RAs try and getyou
into stuff," he said. "But as soon as
you hit second year and you're outside of that environment...there's
no social aspect to university."
STIGMA
Dr Patricia Mirwaldt, head of UBC
Student Health Services, said that
rates of depression—which appear
to be up across all facets of society—could be explained partly by
reduced stigma. In essence, it may
be that the number of individuals who suffer from depression
has remained the same but there
is a higher rate of reporting now.
"Fifteen years ago if you were
depressed it was pretty unlikely thatyou would see a doctor for
it," said Mirwaldt. "People would
really suffer in silence."
Though society at large has perhaps made strides towards understanding depression and anxiety,
for those who experience these
disorders, the stigma is still very
real. Joanna said that this stigma
was a major factor for her in deciding whether or not to seek professional help.
"I think depression and anxiety problems are very misunderstood," she said. "In general, people think it's kind of a privileged
[person's] disease or disorder-
something that people should get
over and not even have to seek
help for."
Cory agreed that the stigma surrounding depression was intense
and made it difficult to seek help.
"You're pretty much alienated. It
happened with my roommates.
As soon as they found out I went
through these periods where I
didn't
want to talk
to anyone, they
just kind of shut
down."
When Saewyc saw that UBC's
rates of actually
diagnosed depression
were higher than the NCHA average—16 to 17 per cent compared
with 11 to 12—she argued it's possible that it could be connected to
this kind of reduced stigma.
"What that would sort of suggest is that UBC is a little better at
reaching out and getting help for
their students," she said.
REEVALUATING
Saewyc's study found that those
who used campus health clinics
were twice as likely to consider
suicide than the rest of the student population. Partly because of
this, UBC is in the process of reevaluating how it deals with student mental health.
According to Cheryl Washburn,
head of Counselling Services,
the UBC VP Students office made
mental health a priority in 2009.
They've implemented a number of
new programs focused on prevention, including a website, livewell-
learnwell.ca, and an early alert system so students, faculty and staff
can report students who seem to
be struggling.
Additionally the system for appointments and referrals has been
streamlined—the vast majority of
counselling appointments are now
same-day she said. Counselling
Services employs a total of seven
full time counselors and six part
time, some of whom are pre or
post-doctoral interns.
OTHER SCHOOLS
Other schools are having a very
difficult time meeting the demand
for counseling services. Dr Ellen
Taylor, head of Counselling Services at the University of Washington, said they are now operating at full capacity following a
huge increase in first-time users.
From fall of 2009 to fall of 2010,
first-time appointments went up
30 per cent.
"Itwas at 30 per cent but I think
that's because we couldn't get them
in any more. Itwas a tremendous
increase," said Taylor.
The result is increased wait
times for appointments.
"During our peak time, [wait
times] get up to three to four
weeks for a first appointment,"
she said. "That's unacceptable to
most health care professionals,
students and staff."
STRETCHED TO THE LIMIT
With huge cuts to the social safety net in Washington looming, UW
is just trying to maintain current
levels of service. "UWhas consistently tried to prioritize that safety net for students, but in the current budget climate, I think it's
trying to hold as steady as possible," said Taylor.
The numbers suggest that UBC
Counselling is also operating at
capacity. Both Washburn and Taylor said that increases in staff are
followed almost immediately by
increases in the number of students accessing services. So with
so many students in crisis, why
don't universities simply allocate
more resources to their counselling services? Taylor said that the
argument isn't that easy.
"Trying to identify the actual
demand is almost impossible, because it is so influenced by our capacity to meet that demand," she
said. "It's a matter of weighing
pros and cons, because ifyou give
resources to mental health then
you're not giving them to something else."
"I think that [Counselling Services] is doing a really excellent job
with the resources we have," said
Washburn. "We certainly would
benefit from increased resources, there's no question about that."
VISIBILITY
When it comes to getting help for
students who are struggling with
depression, providing resources
is only half the battle.
CONTINUED PAGE 19... 2011.03.07/UBYSSEY.CA/FEATURE/19
For one, students need to know that
those resources exist. Many students
struggle with mental health concerns without even knowing that the
university offers counsellors free of
charge to students. Cory said a combination of stigma and lack of knowledge of university services led him
to rule out speaking with a counsellor as an option.
Students also have to feel like the
treatments offered are worth their
time. When Joanna was feeling especially distressed, she made an appointment with a UBC counsellor. It
didn't go well.
"I talked to a Masters student, and
I [felt] he wasn't that professional,"
she said, adding that the counsellor
seemed ill-equipped to discuss sexual
assault and eating disorders. "That first
experience with a counsellor has to be
really good for the student to want to
continue treatment. I didn't see anyone
after that. I didn't think it was helpful."
STRUCTURAL CONCERNS
Giving students resources can only
do so much. There maybe something
about UBC itself that makes students
more stressed, anxious and depressed.
For one, the majority of UBC students have to commute to campus.
Both Washburn and Taylor acknowledged that a commute can be a major
cause of stress.
"I think that students who live on
campus would have more ready access
to connections with other students
ACCORDING TO THE FALL 2009 NCHA, STUDENTS
REPORTED THAT OVER THE PAST 12 MONTHS THEY:
|   SURVEY-WIDE AVERAGE
UBC
FELT SO DEPRESSED IT WAS
DIFFICULT TO FUNCTION
30%
36%
FELT THINGS WERE HELPLESS
45%
57%
HAD BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH
DEPRESSION
12-13%
16-17%
and resources," said Washburn. "We
may be less successful at effectively
connecting commuter students to resources and supports."
Commute lengths may also be a part
of UBC's higher rates of depression
and depressive symptoms, she said.
"[The commute] takes a certain
amount of time out ofyour day. It limits the degree to which you can engage
in some ofthe activity thatyou might
otherwise be able to take advantage
of on campus. It's a very real kind of
challenge."
UBC's status as an international
school also makes it hard on some
students, said Saewyc, whose study
found Asian males had a higher risk
of depression. "[UBC has students]
moving from totally different countries. Struggling with culture, struggling with being very far away from
all your friends and family can create some challenges."
THE COST
Though more students are reporting
feeling depressed, many are still not
getting help.
"In our study of those who reported enough symptoms that they would
probably qualify for depression, a third
had not gotten help," said Saewyc.
The costs of not getting help are
high. "Diagnosed depression [has
been] associated with everything
from increased risk of self inflicted injury dropping out, attempting committing suicide and accumulation of credit card debt," the
study found.
The university has its own concerns. The NCHA has found that
stress, depression and anxiety are
consistently ranked in the top ten
factors negatively affecting academic performance.
"Depression isn't something you
have to live with, but it can have a
big impact on your schooling, your
ability to get a good job, ifyou don't
get help for the distress you're feeling right now," said Saewyc.
Both Cory and Joanna said they
no longer feel depressed. After
weathering the storm of university pressures, they said they were
able to find a better mental balance. But succumbing to the anxieties of university is an increasingly common story and Saewyc said
she is worried that not enough is
being done.
"If rates of depression and distress
are increasing in university then obviously we need to do more to figure
out what's going on that makes universities a more stressful place than
they used to be," she said.
"Doing well in university costs
more. There's more on the line." va
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