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The Ubyssey Jan 13, 1970

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Array Page 2: More on  the AMS and academic
activities committee
Page 3:  Crisis at Montreal's Loyola University
Page 6;  Chicago Panthers:  murder and its
consequences
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LI, No. 24
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1970
228-2305
New PSA investigation begins
at SFU
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
The American Anthropological Association will send
two representatives to Simon Fraser Univerisity this week
to investigate the administration's handling of political
science, sociology and anthropology department strike.
The  investigating  team  is  made up of Dr. Peter
$600 hole ripped in math building Friday night.
—dave enns photo
Bomb shatters math building windows
Campus RCMP are still investigating the
mysterious explosion that caused an estimated $600
damage to the math building Friday night.
The explosion broke windows, burst a radiator
and scattered plaster in a vestibule at the south end of
the building.
"I'm not even saying it was a bomb that
exploded," said RCMP Sergeant George Strathde.
"All I can say is that there was an explosion."
Early  reports attributed the explosion to an
"unsophisticated man-made device".
"The RCMP took a pile of debris from the
explosion site, but I have no idea what they did with
it," said administration information officer, Jim
Banham.
"In the final analysis, I can only hope this is an
isolated incident.
"I am assuming we won't be invaded by a mass
of people who want to set off bombs at the
university."
Carstens of the University of Toronto and Dr. Laura
Nader of the University of California at Berkeley. They
will arrive in Vancouver Friday.
They are particularly interested in the university's
conduct' towards Kathleen Aberle, a suspended faculty
member.
The team will be looking into the procedure followed
by SFU administration in its dealings with Aberle.
They are interested in finding out whether the
university deals with appointments, reappointments,
promotion to tenure, suspension and dismissal in the
standard way.
The move by the association comes in response to an
appeal sent by the eight suspended PSA faculty members.
The appeal asked that the association send a note of
protest to the SFU administration for its harassment of
the PSA department to the point where the faculty was
forced to go on strike.
If the eight faculty members should actually be
dismissed, the association is asked to censure president
Ken Strand and the SFU administration.
The association is also asked to tell its members not
to accept positions at the university until the university
allows social scientists of varying political opinions
freedom to teach.
"I hope it will bring the Canadian Association of
University teachers back into the picture, ending with a
positive result for all concerned," said Aberle.
The Canadian Sociology and Anthropology
Association was sent a similar appeal. It responded by
asking its members to contribute to a legal aid fund for
the eight suspended faculty members.
So far $3,000 has been contributed to the fund by
faculty and students from all parts of North America.
In the meantime dismissal procedings against the
suspended faculty have been held back, pending the result
of a law suit against SFU launched by Prudence
Wheeldon, one of the suspended faculty.
Wheeldon is questioning the legality of the clause
dealing with academic freedom in connection with tenure.
At the dismissal hearings, the lawyer for the dismissed
faculty argued that the clause was not explicit as to the
degree to which it was binding.
"We don't know whether it is law or simply
something left to our discretion and that of the board,"
Aberle said.
"Our lawyer tried to show that Strand's behavior
toward us was not in accordance with that clause.
"The board refused to comment on this during the
hearings or after it."
The question of whether or not the clause dealing
with academic freedom is binding must be resolved before
the dismissal hearings can continue.
UofT campus cops
supervise hirings
TORONTO (CUP) - Campus police at the University
of Toronto have expanded their job definitions.
Besides ticketing cars, the police now preside in the
interviews of striking employees who wish to be rehired
by campus food service organizations, and single out
strike leaders for management.
Four cafeteria workers at U of T's New College have
already fallen afoul ofthe new arrangement.
The four were among 42 cafeteria workers who
struck December 17 after their employer, Commercial
Catering Co., lost its contract for food services at New
College.
The non-unionized workers demanded that
administrative services food director M. A. Malcolm
guarantee the reinstatement of the workers under the new
contractor, Beaver Caterers. Malcolm refused.
December 18, Malcolm said the strikers would be
re-hired if they agreed to individual interviews. Campus
police presided over the procedure.
38 of the 42 workers were rehired.
The   other four said that  during the  intervie'-
campus police pointed them out to officials from Be*
Catering as leaders of the strike, and said they -
singled out for their actions in organizing the protest Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 13,  1970
You can speak easy at new centre
Speak-Easies are back.
Speak-Easy, a talk and information
centre has been created by social work
students to help fill gaps left by other
student counselling services available on
campus and in the city.
"Because we're students, we anticipate
getting a lot of questions that other
services wouldn't get — like on abortion,"
said Joyce Marvin, social work 2.
"If you want information on where to
get the pill, for example, you will be told
where to go or where not to go without
having to sit through a lecture on
morality.
by Ginny Gait
"We plan'to conduct Speak-Easy in a
very informal manner."
All the problems will be kept
confidential. Any records will be minimal
and will be available to the student
involved.
"In essence, we don't have any files
per se, only enough to give us some sort
of record about the type of problems we
receive," said Marvin.
"We will try to cope with all issues
that arise. We're not being specific about
what we will and won't accept."
"One of the biggest problems students
face on campus is the whole issue of
alienation. They come and stick with
their own small groups of friends. They
don't even know what's going on, what
clubs are available, so we're trying to
establish contacts in all the clubs to, refer
people to as well."
Speak-Easy will operate from SUB 218
every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
from noon to 6 p.m. and from 7 to 10
p.m.
Anyone not wishing to appear in
person can phone 228-3706.
AMS council ousts
chairman of AAC
By JIM DAVIES
The Academic Activities Committee is without a chairman.
A motion removing Elaine Wismer as chairman of the AAC was
passed by the Alma Mater Society council Monday night.
The discussion which preceeded the motion, involving members
of the AMS council, AAC members and students, was extremely
heated.
Stan Persky, student senator and chairman of the Education
Committee under which the activities formerly co-ordinated by the
AAC had been placed, spoke out against the actions of council.
"The Education Committee does not want to do those things
which were previously under the jurisdiction of the AAC," he said.
"It is clear that councillors have taken political action against
the AAC. It is my opinion that if you wish to take political action
against this group, you should be prepared to come right out and
discuss the reasons for the abolition ofthe committee."
Committee retained
The council then moved to reconsider an earlier motion
abolishing the AAC after Persky said that such a reconsideration was
necessary.
After this motion was passed, a discussion largely based upon
the competence of the chairman of the AAC, Elaine Wismer,
followed.
After an exchange of name-calling, AMS vice-president Tony
Hodge said: "If we continue to treat this as a matter oflife and death
and continue to call each other names like fascist pig and fucking
asshole, we will never accomplish anything.
"This organization is pushing one strong ideological line. I
cannot help but wonder if it is in the best interests of students."
Members of the AAC spoke out strongly against Hodge's
premise.
'No discrimination'
"Look at the history of the AAC. It is true that the most active
members are communists, however, there are no discriminatory
practices against non-communists," said Bob Cruise, a member ofthe
Canadian Student Movement.
"Look at the speakers we have had. Many of them are not only
non-communists, but anti-communists.
"A vote to remove the chairman of the committee without
giving any concrete reasons other than some vague charges involving
only their opinions is non-democratic, authoritarian, and totally
incorrect."
Apparently councillors did not agree with Cruise's statements as
they voted to remove Wismer from her position as chairman.
"The reason for the action is simply so that we can get someone
who will better serve a greater number of students," said AMS
president Fraser Hodge.
Members of the AAC said they had been "victimized by petty
AMS bureaucracy."
As councillors left the chambers, AMS co-oordinator Dave
Grahame leaned over to AMS treasurer Chuck Campbell and
remarked, "You will change the lock on the AAC office door won't
you?"
A decision as to who will be the new AAC chairman will be
made at the next council meeting.
San Francisco
Weekend for
YOU & A FRIEND
cor details-See Jan. 23 Ubyssey
FREE!
K
AB*/
>Wento^/zecl
PAYMENT OF FEES
Second Installment Now Due
Payment should  be made at Department of  Finance,
General   Services  Administration   Bldg.   on   or   before
Thursday, Jan. 15, 1970
Information
Ccnfrt
Vrcb in or
iiVe us a cal
Mon. Vltd> fem
us a chance to let our hair down, too.
We're not as square as you think! Behind our   a   water-colour  effect  with   unusual   depth   and
seemingly straight-laced image, there throb some
pretty way-out projects. And people.
Alcan is involved in many unexpected areas.
Because we do a lot more than just produce
aluminum. We and others try to find new uses
for it.
For example, one new use that came to our attention was developed in Belgium and refined by a
Montreal artist. Through a process called
Aluchromie, he "paints" on specially prepared
aluminum panels. The resulting work of art has
perspective, and endless applications in art and
architecture.
And that's just one of the exciting new developments in aluminum.
Alcan researchers and scientists are continually
searching for better ways to do things with
aluminum. And it's not always easy. Often they
tiave to struggle for years to find ways of making
their ideas come to life.
So you see, they aren't the only ones who have
to cope with hairy problems.
ALUMINUM  COMPANY OF CANADA.  LTD
'ai r*
ALCAN
V Tuesday, January 13, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
JESUITS CLOSE CAMPUS
Montreal cops sweep building clean
MONTREAL (CUP) -
Approximately 100 members of
Montreal's riot squad appeared
suddenly on the vacated campus
of Loyola College Monday
evening and cleared 400 resisting
students and faculty protestors
from three floors of the
administration building.
The abrupt move came one day
after the all-Jesuit board of
governors at Loyola closed down
the campus for a week to
"facilitate a freer and more
profitable exchange of views of all
concerned" over the current crisis
sparked by the administration
firing of 27 Loyola professors.
The police were called to the
campus by acting administration
president Aloysius Graham.
President Patrick Malone and his
two vice-presidents were in
Quebec City conferring with
Provincial Deputy Minister of
Education Yves Martin over the
establishment of a government
commission of inquiry into
Loyola's affairs. Graham is Dean
of Science.
Shortly before the riot squad
was summoned, Loyola board
chairman Gerald McGuigan issued
a flat refusal to the protestors'
demand that letters of
non-renewal of contract, issued to
the dismissed faculty just before
Christmas, be revoked.
The protestors, who began a
peaceful sit-in in front of
administration president Malone's
office Wednesday had made
revocation of the letters the sole
condition for the end of their
protests.
Shortly after the police arrived
Graham, accompanied by Dean of
Students Roderick Shearer and 98
police, visited the demonstrators
and demanded that they leave the
building.
Graham said that he was legally
in charge of the campus and that
the Board of Governors had
officially closed the college.
Graham did not respond when
the students and faculty asked for
15 minutes to discuss the
ultimatum.
The demonstrators then lined
up by twos and marched out the
front door singing "We Shall
Overcome", on their way out.
The protestors passed an
additional    group    of   police
guarding    approaches    to    the
campus computer centre.
An emergency meeting of
Loyola faculty was called for later
Monday night at a nearby church
— students planned a meeting on
campus for today'but may be
unable to hold it because the
buildings are locked to faculty,
students and visitors.
Graham has reportedly been in
touch by telephone with president
Malone and his subordinates.
Both Malone and deputy
minister Martin were expected to
make press statements later
Monday night.
It is not known how the
forcible eviction will effect the
government inquiry commission,
if and when it is called.
Martin is reportedly interested
in investigating more than just the
current crisis — he favors
amalgamation of the college with
nearby    Sir    George    Williams
University to cut budget costs.
There is a possibility the
commission will not even discuss
the cases of the dismissed
professors, who students and
faculty say were purged for their
support of student efforts to gain
a binding arbitration agreement in
the case of muclear physicist S. A.
Santhanam, fired without stated
cause by the Loyola trustees at
the beginning of the fall term.
SPECTACULAR DISPLAY seen in the SUB lost and found counter beside the information desk. Photographer Dave Enns lensed the
lenses, along with pipes, watches and assorted other valuables that sloppy UBC students leave all over the place. Lost and found is open
every noon.
Quebec govt, may intervene in Loyola shutdown
MONTREAL (CUP) - The Quebec government may
decide to intervene in the current crisis at Loyola college,
but government officials would make no definite
announcement until they had consulted with the Loyola
administration.
The possibility of provincial intervention — probably
through a government commission of inquiry — arose
Friday from a private meeting between Yves Martin,
Provincial Deputy Minister of Education, and four Loyola
professors.
Following the meeting, Martin said that Quebec's
department of education considers "The issue at Loyola a
serious one that deserves our attention."
The meeting with Martin was arranged by the
association of Loyola professors, formed in the wake of
administration firings of 27 faculty on the grounds of
"upgrading academic standards" and preparing for an
anticipated decrease in Loyola's enrollment next year.
But Loyola students and faculty charge that the
administration purged the professors for their support of
student efforts to secure binding arbitration by the
Canadian Association of University Teachers in the case of
nuclear physics professor S. A. Santhanam, fired without
stated cause by the administration at the beginning of the
fall term.
The CAUT is expected to release a report of its
findings in the Santhanam case sometime during the week.
It is not known if the possibility of a government
inquiry will affect the findings of the CAUT report.
Kwok-Wing Lai during his testimony in council meeting.
—dirk visser photo
Student protester
given AMS support
Student council voted Monday to support the rights of foreign
students suffering alleged harassment by the immigration department
for political action in Canada.
The action resulted from an appeal by Kwok-Wing Lai, a
University of Manitoba student from Hong Kong, who was arrested
for participating in the Dec. 30 demonstration at Canron Ltd. in
Vancouver.
Kwok was convicted of creating a disturbance and was given a
suspended sentence.
However, the immigration has since called an inquiry aimed at
deciding whether or not Kwok should be deported.
Council agreed with Kwok and others speaking for him that a
foreign student ought not be tried twice for the same offence and that
he should suffer no more than is allowed by the criminal code.
Said commerce president Brent Bitz: "This is supposed to be a
country with freedom of speech - for Canadians and foreigners
alike." Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 13,  1970
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
JANUARY 13, 1970
Bleah news
Pollution.
Women's liberation.
Viet Nam.
Indian rights.
Imperialism.
PSA.
Board of governors.
Religion.
Social Credit.
Space flights.
CLAM.
Maoists.
The bourgeois press.
Grafitti.
Stan Persky.
Belshaw report.
Heart transplants.
Apathy.
People opposed to apathy.
Vancouver Student Movement.
Bursar William White.
Ecologists.
Bennett.
Revolutionary communists.
Udo Erasmus (by request).
Black Mountain poetry.
DDT.
Academic activities committee.
Cypress Bowl.
Walter Hardwick (by request).
Arbutus development.
The AMS.
Jorge Luis Borges.
Generation gap ravers.
Over-crowding.
Bureaucrats.
Ubyssey critics.
Photographers.
Chauvinism.
Student hacks.
Mail thieves.
The worker-student alliance.
Objectivity.
False Creek.
Bill Willmott.
Marijuana.
Barbara Streisand.
Robert Creeley.
Biafra.
Afro-Americans.
Quebec.
Nietzsche.
Silent majority.
Trudeau.
Troop withdrawals.
Grape strike.
Montreal Canadiens.
These are things, words, people, organizations,
ideologies and all round topics of general discussion and
controversy of which we are sick of hearing.
No news is good news. That's quotable.
Editor: Michael Finlay
News Paul Knox
City Nate Smith
Photo Bruce Stout
Wire Irene Wasilewski
Sports Jim Maddir
Senior John Twigg
Ass't News Maurice Bridge
Ass't City       John Andersen
Managing Bruce Curtis
Page Friday Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
Jim Davies went into paroxysms of
self-flagelation after being forced to
admit there was something he couldn't
do. (Three guesses.). Meanwhile, Brian
McWatters was forced to terminate his
search for a mistress when Robin
Burgess, Ginny Gait and Linda Hossie
greeted him with an overwhelming
round of indifference. The only
application he got was from Bernard
Bischoff.
Peter Ladner and Tim Wilson made
their presence felt, much to the dismay
of their victims Christine Krawczyk
and Sandy Kass. Jennifer Jordan and
Jan O'Brien also worked, need more be
said?
Davies  Ravies (No. 1)
Man, so there you are with this far out chick
that you really want to make it with and you don't
know what to say.
Man, you had better know what to say or she
will think you are on the unhip—like square, man
and there will be absolutely no way she is going to
dig you.
So man, whadya say?
Man, I mean there you are grooving to a wild
axeman who is really doing some hot licks at a gig
and the set is finished — this groupie queen, man
like she's a plastercaster, comes up to you and gives
you that "lay it on me, baby" look.
Like uh, whadya say?
Can ya dig this scene — you are on a far out
trip, like, you have just dropped five caps of acid,
smoked twelveteen joints of wild grass (this is no
weed, man, it's Acapulco gold), pentopped some
great tokes of hash, had the greatest roach
sandwich since the peanut-butter kid, and this
love-child comes up to you and wants to rap for
awhile . . .
Hey cats, whadya say?
Like, there you are listening to boss radio and
they're playing all the toughest sounds, I mean like
the cats are really starting to jam. You have on your
guru meditation outfit complete with psychedelic
beans, imported sandals, and beard and you are in
your guru pad with its op-art posters and freaky
strobe and black light show and this groovy chick
comes up to you and groans for you to blow her
mind . . .
Aaaarrrgghhh! Whadya say?
I mean, like there you are at a big nude-in
wearing only your peace medallion and your Lennon
glasses and everyone is stoned - I mean, like they're
blasted. You're doing your thing hoping that the
fascist pigs won't show up and give all the groovy
heads a bum trip.Men, like everyone's getting
together when this naked nymphlet comes up to
you and you just know she wants you to lay a heavy
on her...
Yaaahhhh! Whadya say?
Like man, can you dig it — there you are at the
biggest pimping protest since Chicago, 1968 and
you have your very own "Smash the Capitalist State
and its Copper Fascist Pig Lackeys" sign and you
are grooving along with everybody singing all the
heavies from the protest bag when suddenly this
buckskinned, headbanded maiden comes up and
lays the peace sign on you . . .
Alright cats, I'll tell you what to say so that
you won't lay a bummer on the chick.
You simply hitch up your blue jeans, scratch
your nose with your roach-holder, and say:
"Hubba-hubba - Man, I go ape over freckles -
Say,    aren't    you    Doc    Finster's    daughter    -
Hotcha-hotcha   —   Twenty-three  skidoo, Amscray
Skeezix,   Soooeee pig-pig-pig - Come with me to my
blue heaven, sugar-lump, honey-pie, baby-doll.
Hip talk is really where it's at; dig me, man?
Heavy!
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Num-nums
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Mr. Davies says that advertising
flavored douche concentrates is
bad taste. I disagree: speaking as a
European I must say that les
canadiennes et les americaines
have rather soured my palate. Not
only bad taste but bad tasting.
Until bidets become part of your
culture, be thankful for Cupid's
Quiver. Bon apetit.
HONORET DE SPANNS
More nums
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
For a while, I had become
resigned to the garbage slopped
out by the university food
services, and at times it even took
on a certain air of palatability.
Then along came Black Cross,
and I saw the folly of my ways
and repented.
Of course, I was also preparing
for the day when the combine
would take umbrage and force the
BlacK Cross to cease and desist.
As expected, the
assholes-for-minds society (AMS)
has championed the cause of the
over-dog and its related bitches;
alas, all  to  soon  I will have to
return to eating sewage.
And I wouldn't be at all
surprised to see the prices go even
higher after the monopoly has
been restored. Who knows, maybe
the university food services have
found the cure for
pollution . . . feed it to university
students.
THE HAIRY PLANARIA
Hacks
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I feel that Jim Davies' story
about the academic activities
committee (Ubyssey, Jan. 9) was
unfair to me. While he succeeded
in reporting slanderous remarks
made about me, he didn't tell
what I said at the public meeting.
I reported the following:
1. that I opposed the student
council motion to transfer AAC
to the education committee,
2. that I viewed it as a political
attack by the AMS disguised as an
administrative manoeuver,
3. that, immediately upon
being informed of the motion I
phoned the AAC chairman and
told   her   I   would   oppose   this
motion    at    the    next    council
meeting,
4. that the education
committee met, and despite a
representation from Art
Smolensky, the mover of the
motion, voted unanimously to say
our committee was opposed to
this motion, judged the situation
to be immoral, and wanted the
student council to reconsider its
action.
My account of the actions and
position of the education
committee was not challenged at
this public meeting by the
Vancouver Student Movement
(VSM) or other students present.
Thus, the only one who is a
"hack" (who does the job
perfunctorily, without care) is the
reporter (witness) who doesn't tell
what's said, who can only see
interest in the possibility of
sensationalism.
STAN PERSKY
education committee
Poverty, ecch!
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Re: "The editor's stomach
makes a complaint." Ubyssey,
Friday, Jan. 9, 1970. Tuesday, January 13, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
MORE LETTERS
After reading your article,
especially the line: "I cannot help
but think that our treatment
might have been better had we
dressed differently . .. "—I cannot
help but think that if you dress
like a bum you can expect bum
service.
ANN SAUNDER
pharmacy 1
P.S. Whatdaya say to that?!
So bums, people down on their
luck and unable to afford the
nice, neat, Sweet Sixteen clothes
that you probably wear are not
entitled to the same service given
high society debutantes such as
yourself? Oh, miss, you are in big
trouble. Perhaps the soggy mass
that appeared on my plate more
closely resembled your mushy
brains.—Ed.
Pure
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In the last issue of UBC
Reports, the administration had
openly admitted that war research
is being carried out at UBC.
If it were not for the
underlying tragedy of the
situation, one might be amused by
the tawdry rationalizations with
which the officials are trying to
decorate facts. Their most often
repeated excuse that the
pentagon-financed research is
"pure science with no direct
military application" is a piece of
phraseology unfit to stand up to
analysis.
What reasons does the military
have to support a particular
research project? One must
remember that the military,
unlike a private corporation,
cannot make large charitable
contributions even as a public
relations gesture. In fact the
fundamental difference in this
respect between the Pentagon and
a private corporation is that the
Pentagon is not financially
autonomous. In asking the U.S.
Congress   for   a   point-by-point
approval of its budget, it must
make a detailed account of how
its expenditures are related to
military objectives. These
expenditures are their subjected
to extensive examination and
debate; especially since
inflationary pressures have forced
the U.S. government to reduce its
military budget and scrap a
number of "non-essential"
military projects. Thus the only
reason that the Pentagon could
have for financing a research
project is that the project
promotes, directly or indirectly,
some military objective.
One must conclude that the
artificial distinction between
"pure" and "applied" science is
simply a verbal subterfuge for
evading moral responsibility.
Making napalm undoubtedly
involved investigating principles of
"pure" chemical science. It is a
characteristic of contemporary
research projects that they involve
a complex network of people
working at different levels of
abstraction, and the more abstract
aspects of the project are
designated "pure". But THAT is
merely a logistical distinction with
no relevance to the ethical
ramifications supporting them.
Or are we to conclude that
everyone is a pure scientist except
the man who pulls the trigger?
PETER KORNYA
science 6
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I see by your first issue of the
new decade that The Ubyssey gets
better and better as time passes.
The calibre of the stories, whether
they be news stories, sports stories
or feature stories, are of a quality
much higher than the standard
maintained by the downtown
dailies and even by the
underground paper.
Congratulations on what appears
to be a very enlightening spring
semester.
SEYMOUR JACOBSEN
arts 3
San Francisco
Weekend for
YOU & A FRIEND
For details-See Jan. 23 Ubyssey
U.B.C. GATE BARBERS
it INTERNATIONALLY TRAINED HAIRSTYLISTS
it UP-TO-DATE TECHNIQUES WITH CRAFTSMANSHIP
it ARNOLD EPP-CORRECTIONAL HAIR CUTTING
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Special Prices for Students and Faculty
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For details-See Jan. 23 Ubyssey
IMC FILM SOCIETY which in 1967 brought you the uncut "HIGH" now presents
LARRY
KENT'S
FACADE
MO AOMITTANCt TO MASONS UNDfft )•
Warning:    VERY    FRANK    TREATMENT   OF   SEX
R.   W.   McDonald,   B.C.   Censor
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:        16, 23, 30 1 7:
AYS:   17, 24, 31 J 9:
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BCLC 2 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 13, 1970
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MONDAY THRU THURSDAY I
8 hearty men wanted
to   lead   expansion   of
renowned  boys' school
You may have read about St. John's
in WEEKEND, or seen CBC's penetrating documentary on this unique
Winnipeg school, where encouragement to think comes first; where
students (and teachers) learn to
snowshoe up to 50 miles or paddle
canoes up to 16 hours a day, retracing routes of the early explorers;
where building men of character is
the motivating challenge of a hearty
staff.
Now a second St. John's has been
established in Edmonton, and others
will be opened across Canada to
meet continent-wide applications for
admission. To do this we need men
of immense vision and courage.
They should have at least one year
of university, and be prepared to
complete their degrees under Company direction; they should be prepared to work up to 80 a week,
sometimes more, for a salary of 31
a day plus food, clothing, shelter
and necessities for themselves and
their families; they should like
people, be able to think logically,
use the English language effectively,
laugh easily. They need not be
Anglicans, but should be prepared
to examine the Christian faith and
reach honest conclusions. Interviews Jan . 15-21. Write: Company
of the* Cross, c/o Anglican Church
of Canada, (37 W. Hastings St.,
Vancouver.
Chicago   Seed   writer   Marshal   Rosenthal   writes
about the recent murder of Black Panther leaders Fred
Hampton and Mark Clark, and outlines its implication
for various segments of the city.
Y
ACT I - A BROTHER FALLS
OU can kill the revolutionary but you can't kill
the revolution. You can jail the liberator but you
can't jail liberation. You can run the freedom
fighter all over the country but you can't stop people
from fighting for freedom.
"So said Fred Hampton and so say we." With
those words spoken by Mrs. Meeker White — whose slave
name belies her — Fred Hampton's bullet-ridden body
was buried in the Bethel Cemetery outside of Haynes-
ville, Louisiana.
Up North in Chicago, meanwhile, * the long-run
Theater of the Macabre played on, adding new dimensions to entertainment.
The Chicago production of "Hair" was viewed by a
group of psychologists who then analyzed the play in a
post-production onstage discussion. Michael Butler, producer of "Hair," was so moved by their presentation that
he distributed a videotape of it to all "Hair" companies
so that the actors "will know what they are doing."
State's Attorney Edward Hanrahan was an actor in
the Murder of Fred and he knew what he was doing without the help, thank you, of effete psychologists. He understood his role so well that after the play he took it
upon himself to write the first review: "We wholeheartedly commend the police officers for their bravery, their
remarkable restraint and their discipline in the face of
this Black Panther attack, as should every decent citizen
in our community."
There was a difference between the critical reactions to Butler's and Hanrahan's productions, however.
Whereas the underground press stood almost alone in deploring the exploitation of their culture by the "Hair"
people, the black community, from the NAACP to
Breadbasket to Rayner to the thousands who passed
through the bloody stage at 2337 West Monroe, felt as
one in knowing the filthy lie perpetrated by producer,
director and stage manager Hanrahan. For the first time
since the murder of Martin Luther King. Jr. the black
community along with the heretofore rhetorical members
of the white radical community saw in deathly colors
the reality of a pig (i.e., non-human) pbwer (i.e., anti-
evolutionary) structure (i.e., non-responsive).
Fred Hampton and Mark Clark were murdered on
December 4th. Four other members of the Black Panther Party were wounded in the same raid after a "legal"
search warrant was issued by the Circuit Court. (To better understand the word "legal," we recommend "The
Conspiracy Trial" now in its 12th week at the Federal
Building, or read a small portion of the scenario printed
on page four for your edification.)
Twelve hours after Fred Hampton and Mark Clark
were killed, the apartment of Bobby Rush, Black Panther
deputy minister of defense was raided. Bobby Rush was
not at home, but an unregistered derringer and a small
amount of pot were alleged to have been found. Because
he wasn't at home with his wife and children, Bobby
Rush is alive today. A warrant was issued for his arrest
and he turned himself in to black policeman in front of
3,000 people at an Operation Breadbasket meeting so
that "they wouldn't kill me."
Four days after the two Illinois Panther party
members were murdered, 300 cops attacked the Los An-
I
geles offices of the Black Panther party at which they
were held off for close to five hours by 13 Panthers. On
December 10th, fifty helmeted. club-swinging police
attacked 250 people demonstrating support for the Panthers in front of their bullet-riddled office. Thirty people
were injured in the attack, including California state senator Mervyn Dymally and UCLA Communist philosophy
professor Angela Davis. Both are black.
Within the past six months, more than 40 Panther
leaders and about 125 members have been arrested, and
many are facing charges which could lead to life imprisonment. In the few years the Party has been in existence,
thirty-eight Black Panthers have been murdered. David
Hilliard, the Panther Party's national Chief of Staff was
arrested on December 3rd in downtown San Francisco
for saying "We will kill Richard Nixon" at a November
fifteenth antiwar rally in Golden Gate Park. (Hanrahan's
police did kill Hampton and Clark, "Hair" kills the audience every night, Hilliard spoke the word "kill.")
ACT II - HOLD THE PRESSES!
T is only the hard-core fearfuls who are accepting
Hanrahan's vicious vaudeville. Only the Chicago
Tribune and the readers they represent would
accept, without investigating, photos which purport to
show bullet holes in the woodwork next to the back
door which "proved" that the Panthers fired back at the
"restrained and disciplined" officers. Every other
metropolitan paper in Chicago sent a reporter back to
the apartment to check out the Tribune's "Exlusive."
The bullet holes turned out to be old nails in the
woodwork.
And a picture which Hanrahan claimed to be of a
bathroom door turned out to be a picture of a bedroom
door.   There are no bullet holes in the bathroom door.
The third photo in the Tribune-Hanrahan story showed a
"bullet hole"  in the apartment's front door.     Mike
Royko, writing in the December 12th Chicago Daily
News, observed—"This hole was supposed to be evidence
that somebody in the living room fired a slug through
the door with a 12-gauge shotgun.    Yet, there are no
holes in the wall a few feet beyond the door. Somehow
a big slug that could tear a big hole in a thin door
wouldn't have the momentum to travel a few feet more
and dent a plaster wall.
"This final point, however, appears to be irrelevant
at this moment, because Hanrahan's men have since gone
on TV and changed their version of how the battle began.   They had told the Tribune the battle began with
that big bullet coming through the closed front door,
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vestigations."
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UJIUDOV
$tAfS Tuesday, January 13, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
iecked.   But on TV they said the first
iem after they got into the apartment."
rse 12th of December, Hanrahan moved
: destruction-production to television,
s department of WBBM-TV to film a
upted by commercials ("Wipe out un-
i odors"?) re-enactment of the raid,
at the station Thursday night attempt-
oversee the editing of the film," re-
TV critic Norman Mark, "but left be-
ng been asssured the air version would
mts."
r Hanrahan, the Chicago Tribune, and
;t get ready for the third act-"ln-
ACT III - INVESTIGATIONS
I groups and individuals have called
iating investigations: the Chicago Bar
has    asked    for   a    "blue-ribbon"
is Leonard, head of the civil rights
tice Department who resigned from
;st  organization, only after public
him: the Cook County Bar Assn., an
lawyers;  the   Internal   Inspections
the   Chicago   police   department
:ellent work in the aftermath of the
ion?); the daily papers (one of which*
nti-Hanrahan story on the eve of the
feeling out the city's attitude, has
terately); and our old friends in the
ity    who    continually    call    for
der to expunge their guilt-feelings
aving chosen to "work within the
arn anything from history we should
/ that Investigations only investigate,
and write reports. That's all. There
tission, a Kerner Commission, a Civil
There have been hunger commis-
immissions. They've been televised,
d filed. Doctoral candidates read
them.  Commissions are boring, in-
We know Fred Hampton and Mark Clark are dead,
and we know they were murdered at Hanrahan's direction. Nobody, not even the Chicago Tribune or WBBM-
TV, is disputing that. A commission is not needed to
make a six month investigation in order to conclude that
Hampton and Clark were shot and killed by the state's
attorney's police. What we have to do is to move, by
every means necessary, to get on to the important business.
EPILOGUE
THE  murder of Fred  Hampton and Mark Clark
brought us at the Seed closer together than we had
ever been. We saw the blood in the apartment and
saw that it was ours. We responded in a way we knew
best — putting together and distributing 35,000 copies
of a two-page Seed Extra headlined "When One of Us
Falls,  1,000 Will Take His Place," we worked closely
with the Black  Panther Party helping to produce a
Bulletin    from    their    headquarters    to    the    black
community;  in  the  past  two  weeks  we have given
speeches in the white middle-class communities from
which we came in order to raise money for the Fred
Hampton Scholarship Fund, the Breakfast for Children
program, and the People's Free Health Clinic, We are the
same blood in the same struggle ...
class communities from which we came in order to raise
money for the Fred Hampton Scholarship Fund, the
Breakfast for Children program, and the People's Free
Health  Clinic.     We are the same blood in the same
struggle...
Except—our community is not occupied by a
police army in the same way that the black community
is; our community does not have the same high rate of
unemployment as the black community has; our community does not have the same degree of exploitation by
merchants and landlords as the black community has;
our community does not have the same infant mortality
rate as the black community has; and cur community
has not seen their brothers killed in their beds like the
black community has.
Our community resides high on the slope, above
the valley. We can afford dope and records and concerts
and books. But we're not going to be free until our
brothers and sisters in the black community are free.
We're not going to be free to get on with the important
work of solving ecological and environmental problems
until we're all free. And this isn't going to happen until
the twin monstors, Fear and Racism are slain - through
every means necessary.
We are no longer living in a make-believe theater.
revolution
UP
, TIGHT?
j   Anti-Up-Tight Baubles
j For details-See Jan. 23 Ubyssey
WHAT'S A LIFE WORTH?
Today's complex world finds many in conflict with law and
order. Learn how you can assist in keeping lawbreakers out of
prison and help them to function in the community.
PROBATION -A CHALLENGING CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Film "Price of A Life", depicting a probation
officer at work, will be shown at
Rm. 106, Buchanan Building — 12:30 p.m.
on January 19, 1970
Make Appointments Now  For
Campus Interviews — January 22 & 23
Student Placement Building
Visit Our New Varsity Branch
4517 W. 10th Ave. (1 blk. from UBC Gates)
ffrbank'i
Downtown Brentwood Park Royal
10% Special UBC Discount-Students & Faculty
NOTICE
Re-Late Payment of Fees
A late payment fee of $20 additional to all other fees will
be assessed after JANUARY 15, 1970, this fee will be increased to $30 after January 30, 1970. Refund of this fee
will be considered only on the basis of a medical certificate
covering illness or on evidence of domestic affliction. Students who are unable to pay their fees on time owing to
new Canada Loan or Bursary arrangements not having
been finalized should see the Finance Department prior to
January 15, 1970. Appeals must be made by February 15.
If fees are not paid in full by February 16, 1970, the registration of students concerned will be cancelled and they
will be excluded from classes.
If a student whose registration has been cancelled for
non-payment of fees applies for reinstatement and his
application is approved by the Registrar, he will be
required to pay a reinstatement fee of $10, the late
fee of $30, and all other outstanding fees before he
is permitted to resume classes. Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 13, 1970
Major power influence
prolonging Mid East war
By LINDA HOSSIE
Interference of the major powers is keeping the Middle East from
peace, the vice president of the Canadian Jewish Congress said
Monday.
"If the Russians hadn't supported the Arabs and if the British and
French hadn't entered into it, I'm sure there would have been a peace
by now," Allan Rose told 150 students in Buchanan 205.
Rose said a stop to the Middle East power play is not likely.
He said the Soviet Union is playing an imperial role in the middle
east and is using the Arabs to achieve its geographic goals.
Rose cited the early Soviet support of the Jewish nationalism,
against British imperialism as an example of "Soviet insincerity."
"The real tragedy of this war is that it is a war between right and
right," said Rose. He said the war is not between the Arabs and the
Israelis, but between Arab and Jewish liberation movements.
Rose criticized El Fateh, the Palestine National Liberation Front.
"The whole thrust of El Fateh is a war of terrorization against
civilians," he said.
"In the short term there may be new -wars between Israel and the
United Arab Republic, but in the long run there may be possibilities."
Rose said he based his optimism on the coexistence that once
existed between Arabs and Israelis and on the changes that are
occurring in the U.A.R.
He said the young people of the more advanced Arab states, such
as Egypt, see the hopes for Arab socialism and the abolishment of
feudalism destroyed by the present conflict.
It is this feeling that will help pull the two countries together, Rose
said.
"Israel would give up the Sinai Peninsula if the Arabs would
. negotiate a peace," Rose said. He said there is a possibility of setting
up a situation under which Palestine would decide its own fate.
"1 believe that a commonwealth for Jews and Arabs is probable,"
lie s;iid.
Willmott speaks
Anthropology and Asian
Studies prof Bill Willmott
continues his lecture series on the
U.S.-Vietnam war today at noon
in Angus 104.
Willmott's topic today is "The
changing face of war".
PATIO
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WORRY BEADS
For details-See Jan. 23 Ubyssey
WPM - WPP x No. of Pages
TIME [Minutes]
Peter Sol 3rd year UBC student applies this formula for pleasure and profit.
This formula is less complicated than the work which confronts Peter Sol each
day as he studies at the University of British Columbia. It is the formula for
determining a readers average words per minute — the number of words per
page, times the number of pages divided by the time in minutes. In Peter Sol's
own words "The Evelyn Woods course teaches the individual a very confident
method for reading more actively and efficiently. I have benefited in that I
now read technical material at about 2000 wpm with good recall. Would you
believe that it only takes me an hour to read and enjoy a popular novel? I
highly recommend this Reading Dynamics course for anyone who wants to learn
to read more material in far less time."
DOES READING DYNAMICS REALLY WORK?
Attend one of this week's scheduled presentations and see what you are capable
of doing. See how you can fully expect, after the basic 8-week Reading
Dynamics course, to pick up and thoroughly enjoy reading a complete novel in
an hours time ... or TIME Magazine in 25 minutes, cover to cover, without
skimming or skipping.
At the presentation, you will witness a young man pick up a book he has never
seen and, turning pages faster than most of us read paragraphs, absorb and later
recite every detail. You will receive a portfolio of information, see a film and ask
questions freely. Bring your friends.
Thursday, January 15th
12:30 p.m.
Buchanan Building — Room 202
Be the
Guest of
READING
DYNAMICS
at a
Short
Presentation
SEE WHY HUNDREDS
OF U.B.C. STUDENTS
HAVE TAKEN THIS
AMAZING READING
IMPROVEMENT COURSE.
• COMPREHENSION
• RETENTION
• STUDY TECHNIQUES
• RECALL PATTERNS
1900 W. BROADWAY - 732-7696 Tuesday, January 13, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  9
Moratorium committee organizes 'taxpayer rallies'
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CUP) -
The Vietnam Moratorium
Committee announced last week
it would concentrate its efforts on
the organizing of nationwide
"taxpayer rallies" for April 15,
and would start a campaign
service to help political candidates
to the Vietnam war.
The organizers said the 15th of
January, February and March
would be designated as "peace
action day"', but said they did not
expect major activities o:i those
days.
The rest of the time between
now and April would be devoted
to convincing Americans that U.S.
president Richard Nixon's
Vietnam policy will not bring an
end to the war.
Co-ordinator Sam Brown said
Nixon has "a policy for
continuing the war, not for ending
it," and added that "It will take a
strong educational effort to
convince people of this."
The April 15th rallies are
scheduled to coincide with the
last day for filing U.S. federal
income tax returns;
demonstrations and meetings
would take place at local Internal
Revenue Service offices.
The committee expects to have
resources to aid 50 to 60
candidates for the U.S. senate
and house of representatives.
Students protest against oil co.
CALGARY (CUP) - More than 100 students
demonstrated outside Gulf Oil's head Alberta office
Friday, protesting that company's role in the
Nigeria-Biafra conflict.
The protest followed a speech by former CBC
broadcaster Stanley Burke, currently touring
western Canada to raise support for Biafra, urging
students to put pressure on oil companies making
money out of the war.
Burke toid 600 University of Calgary students
the war continues because a number of oil
companies, including Gulf, Shell and British
Petroleum, have 1 billion dollars invested in the
Biafra-Nigeria oilfields.
Food blitz distributes
$2,000 food vouchers
Last month's food blitz has been termed a "moderate success"
by members of the Unemployed Citizen's Welfare Improvement
Council.
The 100 participants collected $2050 on campus and in
surrounding areas such as Shaughnessy, Kerrisdale,Oakridge, and Point
Grey. The money included $1700 from individual donors, $250 from
the Alma Mater Society and an anonymous contribution of $100 and
was used to buy food vouchers for the needy.
"Students have to recognize the various socio-economic
problems that exist, and try to broaden their span of interest by
contributing to such projects," said UCWIC spokesman Jeff Marvin.
A meeting is tentatively planned for January 22 to discuss a
possible forming of Friends to UCWIC, which will be concerned with
making people more aware of the issues related to poverty.
trtii&A
EAT IN * TAKE OUT • DELIVERY-
'3261 W.Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
rf
LEARN MORE ABOUT CUSO
Come to information meeting
Tuesday, Jan. 13, 8 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
film, talk on development, Third World
CUSO returnees will answer  questions.
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
- Theatre Excitement --
EXIT THE KING
Eugene lonesco's
ABSURD, INTRIGUING AND MOVING PLAY
JANUARY 16-24 - 8:30 p.m.
Directed by Klaus Strassmann
STUDENT TICKETS — $1.00
(available for all performances)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES
Monday, January 19, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, January 22, 12:30 p.m. Matinee
Tickets: The Frederic Wood - Room 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
•^
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Noon Hour-SUB 215
*
TUESDAY—Joseph Fulton, Roman Catholic
WEDNESDAY-Joseph Fulton, Roman Catholic
Bernard Warren, United Church
Sponsored by University Religious Council
THURSDAY—Gerald Brown, Roman Catholic
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.doubts about Jesus Christ as Lord and Saviour things happening at
PENTECOSTAL
HAPPENING'
With   United  and   Roman
Catholic  Churchmen
This coming week will see prominent Roman Catholic and
United Church clergvmen on camDus talking about "Mv Pentecost". Their experience of the "baptism in the Holy Spirit" has
caused" quite a stir among Christians of every denomination,
and sounds like a return of the miraculous events which mad.:
the early Christian Church.
THIS STANDS ALONE
Finish University and what do you have? A job, security—peace
;f mind? This is what I thought during my third year out here. Many of
is are still living in a dream world.
My dream was shattered last year when I found out what kind of
nerson I really was. My self-revelation came shortly after I read a book
vhich a student handed to me in the SUB-"The Cross and The
Switchblade" (An account of how people hooked on heroin kick the
wbit with the help of Christ). In the book author Dave Wilkerson tells
>f the baptism in the Holy Spirit, a spiritual experience that causes
"me remarkable changes in people.
A Sunday-School dropout, I avoided churches like the
>lague—yet here was something real. My search reached a climax when I
eceived the experience during the summer.
To conceive the idea of a living, personal God is intellectually
ifficult. However, since I encountered Him, I can say "God is not
ead!" 'Gordie Tong, Zoo! 4'
FREE
BOOKS
Dave Wilkerson's book THE
CROSS AND THE SWITCHBLADE—an account of drug
addicts turning fo Christ and
kicking their habit — will be
available at the meeting' sponsored by the Full Gospel Students in SUB 215 this week.
The books are supplied by the
Pentecostal Chaplain Bernice
Gerard and are free on request.
Three men from the United
and Roman Catholic churches
will be telling their own experiences of this new movement of God at noon each day
this week in SUB 215.
Bernard Warren, B.A.Sc.,
B.D., is a civil engineer (Toronto 1950) who entered the
United Church ministry in
1956. After experiencing the
baptism in the Holy Spirit,
and speaking extensively of it,
he was cited in the controversial article: "Tongues: Blessing
or Babble?" in the United
Church Observer.
Bernard Warren will be
speaking Monday at 8:00 p.m.
in the Lutheran Campus Centre, and in SUB 215 on Monday  and Wednesday at  noon.
COMMERCIAL
Discuss a problem or your
latest inspiration by calling
MU 5-9181 during the Sunday
Line program, CJOR 600, 9:30-
10:00 a.m., and 11:30 a.m. Or
phone 266-9275 for an appointment on campus with Chaplain Bernice Gerard.
Father  Joseph  Fulton, O.P.,
will be at U.B.C. through an
invitation extended by an inter-
church campus group. He will
speak in SUB 215, Tuesday
and Wednesday at noon. The
Wednesday meeting will feature Father Fulton in dialogue
with Bernard Warren of the
United Church on "The Christian Presence in the University." This presentation, as
well as a 3:30-5:00 coffee hour
with Fulton and Warren at the
Faculty Club, will be sponsored by the University Religious Council.
Father   Gerald   Brown,   a
young Roman Catholic priest.
was until recently public relations and communications
director of the St. Thomas
Aauinas Seminary at Kent.
Washington. He is now a Doctoral candidate at the University of Washington, and also
serves as assistant priest at the
Church of the Blessed Sacrament. Seattle, where he is s
leader in the Penecostal youth
movement. He will be,in SUrf
215 on Thursday noon telling
of his work and his encounter
with God. Page   10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 13,  1970
TUESDAY
STUDENT   INFORMATION   CENTRE
Speak Easy Monday,  Wednesday, Friday  12-6 p.m., 7-10p.m.,  SUB  218.
PRE-MED   SOC
Dr.   Copp,   head   of   physiology   dept.,
,     speaks noon, Westbrook 201.
WOMEN'S   LIBERATION   MOVEMENT
Meeting on day care, abortion educationals, noon, SUB 207.
INTER-PROFESSIONAL    EDUCATION
Panel "To Tell the Truth", 6:30 p.m.,
SUB 125
GERMAN  CLUB
Discussion of polka party and ski trip,
noon, I.H.
DEPARTMENT OF   MUSIC
Beethoven Bicentennial Concert Series
No.   1,  recital hall,  Music Bldg.
LEGAL   AID
Legal aid panels ev*ery Monday, Tuesday and Friday, SUB 237, 237A.
SCM
Vietnam  Series,   Bill Willmott,   noon,
An.   104.
AIESEC
Meeting,   noon,   SUB  210.
IWW
The Wobblies are coming! ! !
'tween
classes
WEDNESDAY
ARSC! ! !
Organizational meet,  noon, SUB 224.
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK
Spring info meet, sometime, SUB 119.
CUSO   FILM
Film on development,  noon, S'UB 211.
MORATORIUM  COMM.
General open meet,   noon,   SUB 105A.
FOUR   STRINGS
Dept.   of   Music   presents   the   Purcell
Strinfi   Quartet,    noon,    in   the   recital
hall,   music  building.
AYN   RAND  SOC
Organizational   meet,   noon,   SUB   113.
NEWMAN   CENTRE
- General meet,   noon,   SUB   117.
BEFORE   TEETH
Pre-dcnt'il   Soc.   general   meet,    noon,
SUB   115.
THURSDAY
CONSERVATIVES
PCs present Robert Stanfield, 3.30
p.m.,   SUB  auditorium.
CHAPLAIN   COMM.
Anglican-United church chaplain committee meets 1:30 p.m., SUB 207.
Students  invited.
T'BIRD WAR GAMES
Generals and interested privates meet
in SUB 115.
NDP  CLUB
General  meet,  noon,  SUB  117.
FLYING  CLUB
General meetn, noon,  SUB 213.
SKY   DIVING
General  meeting,   SUB  111.
HILLEL
Mr. Schlomo Argov speaks on "Reality
and the Arab Myth", Bu. 205.
POLITICAL   SCIENCE   UNION
Meeting   to   discuss   aims   and   objectives,   programs,   SUB   211.
FRIDAY
LIFE   SCIENCES   CLUB
Dr. Moyls, head of Grade Studies,
speaks on the How, When and Wherefore of Grade Studies. SUB room 207,
209.   Open   to  everyone.
DEPARTMENT OF  MUSIC
University Concert Band, recital hall.
Music   Bldg.,   12:30   and  8:00  p.m.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Bernard   Warren   speaks,   noon,   SUB
125.
DANCE  CLUB
Dance, SUB party room, 8:30 p.m. to
1:00  a.m.
SATURDAY
SAILING   CLUB
Boat    repairs    at    UBC    Thunderbird
Stadium,   9:30  a.m.
SUNDAY
UBC   SSC
Super rally (Little T'Bird), start small
Blot  10 a.m.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
In The Village
(Next to U.B.C.  Barber Shop)
WE  SERVE GOOD  CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE  PRICES
For Take-Out  Service
Ph. 224-6121
Open Every Day
4:30  p.m.  to  11:30 p.m.
u PIZZA
PATI0J
EAT IN .TAKEOUT. DELIVERY.
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
Lease violation may force Black Cross out
Black Cross will have to be bodily
hauled out of SUB before it will close,
said Kathie Middleton, Black Cross
spokesman.
The Alma Mater Society last week told
Black Cross they will have to close their
food selling operation because they were
violating the SUB lease.
"Food services is the only authorized
supplies of food," AMS president Fraser
Hodge said during a meeting Friday
between the AMS executive and Black
Cross.
"AMS co-ordinator Dave Grahame,
brought up the fact that Black Cross was
violating the lease in an executive meeting
before Christmas," Hodge said. "It is part
by Jan O'Brien
of the responsibility of the job to see that
the terms of the lease are fulfilled.
Hodge said he first became aware of
Black Cross's position during a discussion
with administration bursar William White.
White said ancillary services have to
operate independently of the university
and food services didn't appear to be
making money. He said any competition
would hurt food services.
"Black Cross is a non-profit
organization that is operating for the
convenience of students," said Middleton.
"We are not cutting into food services'
profit as Black Cross patrons won't buy
or can't afford food services products."
The Black Cross grosses about $25 a
day.
"It is the principle involved. The rights
are given to a certain group and must be
backed up. Twenty-five dollars is $25 and
after a number of years it builds up,"
Hodge said.
Black Cross hopes to avoid the legal
hassle by operating on a minimum
donation system like that used by Sunday
movies before they were legalized.
"Fraser shrugged his shoulders and
said he guessed it would be okay to use
the donation system," Midddleton said.
"I don't really know how you would
interpret the donations, we have lawyers
working on it," Hodge said.
Contemporary0
• — - 1970     •
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
THIS   WEEK   AND   NEXT:
in   "viatic   Poxes   Lassorn*   Loby
* Ideas   Show   S("H   Gallery
ic Freeplay Continues   (Abashed)
* Next   Week   Look   Out   for
"THU   GROUT   FOR   MUSIC"
Wanted Information
13
Lost 8c Found
14
Rides & Car Pools
15
HIDES TO AND FROM RICHMOND
Accommodating   lour.    274-2025.
Available   for   summer   as   well.
Special Notices
16
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT
Rika   has   attained   majority.   Con-
gratulations!	
HAVE A SPACE ODYSSEY WITH
Guided   Meditation.
A highly creative way—two step by
step instructions on a 12" LP record
— $6.60,   by a  Western  Yogini:
Swamj   Sivananda   Radha
sharing   ancient   techniques   studied
in India under Swami  Sivananda in
tha   Himalayas.
Ashram    Records,   Box   9,
Kootenay  Bay,   B.C.
BOB DYLANS PREVIOUSLY UN-
publisbed Tarantula now avail-
able  U.B.C.   bookstore.	
ACADIA REUNION JAN. 24. ALL
Ex-Acadians $1.00. Phone 732-6608,
731-0580,   873-1285.      	
OUT IN THE COLD?
DATES + SKI
•
Phone P.Y.C. - 434-2636
*
FREE  Ski  Membership  Girls  18-23
Beginners Welcome!
SAVK ON BLANK TAPE PHILIPS
C-90 Cassette $3.15. Call or see
Peter Jim 320 Okanagan House.
Phone   224-7876  or  224-9062.	
Anglican-United   Church   Chaplaincy
Committee
A general meeting to discuss the
future of Chaplaincies on campus
will be held on Thursday, Jan. 16
at   1:30   in   SUB   207.   All   interested
students   are   invited.	
PRE MED  SOC  MEETS  TUESDAY
noons  "Wes.   201.   All  welcome.	
THEATRE
1(1   filles.    5   Hommea,   Requis.
Linda.  277-7193,  De 6 p.m.  A  9 p.m.
WHY   PAY   HTGH   AUTO    INSUR-
ance   rate   if  you   are   20   years   or
over   and   have   good   driving   record you  may  qualify.  Phone  Ted
Elliott,   2.99-9422.
17
Travel Opportunities
TRAVELLING   OVERSEAS ON A
BUDGET*;
Then visit your Youth Hostels information desk which is open every
Wednesday from 12:30-1:3(1 p.m. opposite the information desk in the
Students Union Building.
Canadian Youth Hostels Association
1406 West Broadway
Vancouver 9,  B.C. Tel. 738-3128
CLASSIFIED	
Rates: Students. Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 75* 3 days $2.00. • •
Commercial—3 Unes, 1 day $1.00; additional line* 25«; • FESTIVAL EVENTS        •
4 days price of 3. .    ^ $^ ^^ ^^R    •
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and •     rpccT*Kir;c *i*>    *
are payable in advance. • •**>
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication. ••••••••••••
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Wanted-Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1961 FORD FAIRLANE SPORTS
Coupe. V8 Automatic, 2 door hardtop. Needs right side repair and
paint $450.00. Phone Pete, 731-8625.
'62 V.W. DE LUXE. GOOD CONDI-
tion. $450. Contact George 435-
5733,   6-8   p.m.
Motorcycles
25
1965 HONDA S90, HELMET. MUST
sacrifice to pay fees. First offer
$125   takes.   John   224-4146.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Miscellaneous
33
ARTIVORK POSTERS DRAUGHT-
ing and photographic darkroom
work done very cheap. John Kula,
224-4146.	
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS SPECIAL-
ists in Graphs, Maps, Charts, Illustrations. Scientific displays and
advertising.   Phone   733-4506.
Photography
34
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
RUMOR HAS IT THAT ALL
Farmer's daughters in the Valley
have been naturally inseminated
by blue and gold blorgs in anticipation of the Farmer's Frolic
Jan.  24.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Theses, essays, etc. Neat
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Phone 321-2102       	
FAST ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy, 738-8794 — 35c page, 5e
copy.	
COMPETENT      TYPING      (DOCU-
ments, theses, essays, general) my
y   home.   Sr.   Legal   Secretary-Bookkeeper,   excellent   references.   946-
4722. __	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced essay and thesis
typist. Reasonable rates. 321-3838.
Forestry Term Papers.	
TYPING OF THESIS, REPORTS
and papers. Phone 684-2654 after
6 p.m.	
TYPIST   —   ELECTRIC
Please   call   224-6129
TYPING, PHONE 731-7511—9:00-5:00
after  6:00  phone  266-6662.	
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPING, 35c
page theses, essays, general. Call
Mrs.   Duncan   228-9597.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
PART-TIME SALES HELP, WEEK
days and weekends. Aggressive,
fashion minded sales gals for
young groovy boutique shops. Previous sales experience preferred.
Apply in writing to 1178 Hamilton,
Vancouver* 3.
Help Wanted, Female, Cont. 51
Opportunity for women student*!
with a min. typing speed of 35
wpm    —    vacation     employment.
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
VANCOUVER    LIMITED
684-7177
Help Wanted—Male
52
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Children's Aid has a number of
fatherless boys, ages 11-15, who
urgently need a stable, mature male
to act as "big brother" It's a challenging, rewarding volunteer job requiring about 3-4 hours once a week.
For more information, call Mrs.
Olive     Johnson,      Children's     Aid
Society,   733-8111,  local 211.	
WANT TO DO SOMETHING IM-
portant with your life? See a challenge to one person in a thousand
in our ad elsewhere in this paper
headed   "8 hearty  men "wanted."
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
SWIM COACH REQUIRED: KAM-
loops Swim Club for months of
May, June, July & Aug. Apply to
Kamloops Aquatic Club, Box 752,
Kamloops. For further information
contact Lynda at 228-9536.
DO   IT ! DO   IT ! DO  IT !
Do your thing by being an Evelyn
Wood Reading Dynamics representative. Enquire at Student Placement Office.
Work Wanted
54
GRAPHS AND CHARTS EX-
pertly done for theses, publications, etc.  Call Vana 298-6805 eve.
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
BEST ELECTRIC JAZZ BASS IN
the world! Burns—$600 new, sell
for $300.  Jack,  224-9660.
Tutoring
64
WANTED THIRD OR FOURTH
year Eng. major; Geog. major to
tutor second year student, 942-
4281.	
EXP. TUTOR IN 1ST AND 2ND
year Math & Chemistry by gradu-
ate.   Phone   738-5603.	
TUTORING IN MATH - PHYS. -
Stat by instructor (Ph.D.) $5 per
hour.   Ph.   733-6037.   Eve.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
STILL AVAILABLE — $1.00
at the Bookstore,
AMS  Publications  Office
and Thunderbird Shop
100% DOWN SKI JACKETS AND
imported track suits still available Memorial Gym 305, Mondays
and Thursdays, 12:30-2:00 or phone
683-3442. Ask for Hank lowest
prices.
FRIDGE GOOD CONDITION. $2(j7
228-3471.   Diana.	
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER IN
good condition. Phone 731-0797
after  6:00  p.m.   $25.00.	
NEAR NEW STEREO. HALF
price. Great condition and sound.
Phone 738-7447 between 6 p.m.
and   7   p.m.
Misc. For Sale, Cont.
71
FREE     PASSES    TO    GUESTS    OF
Invitation    'tiD/'TO   booklet   holders
to" movies,  restaurants, nightclubs,
etc.   Now only $1.50 at SUB Infor- *
rnation.
RENTALS^ REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
GIRL TO SHARE BSMT. STE. ON
W. 15th—$40. month. Ph. 731-8874
after 5:00.	
SLEEPING ROOMS SUITABLE
senior male undergrad or grad.
224-1754.	
2 LARGE BEDSITTING ROOMS,
kitchen privileges, use of phone.
$50.00   month.   CaU   733-9762.	
ON CAMPUS ROOMS, STUDY
lamps, mirrors, towel hangers,
w/w carpets, shoe cupboards,
large bunks. Sigma Chi House,
5725  Agronomy,   224-9620.	
ROOMS, STUDENT HOUSE USE
of house facilities. $35.00 month.
Ph.   873-1117.	
ROOM, USE OF ALL FACILITIES
for female non-smoker. Board optional. On campus. $45 mo. Call
224-7374   after   5   p.m.	
DOUBLE ROOM, BATH, SEPAR-
ate entrance, 4th & Sasamat, two
students desired, $75 month. 224-
0891.	
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE
bsmt. ste. near gates on W. 13th
Avail,   immed.   Ph.   228-9277.	
LIVE ON CAMPUS FOR LESS!
Room plus kitchen privileges for
male students, $50 a month. Board
if desired $45. Quiet accommodations only 5 min. from classes.
TV, large lounge and study room.
224-0327 or come to 5760 Toronto
Rd. 	
Room & Board
82
EXCELLENT ROOM AND BOARD
for quiet senior male student, 4595
West Sixth,  Phone 224-4866.
ROOM AND BOARD — MALE.
Close to UBC. Good meals — table
tennis.  738-2305.	
SIGMA CHI HOUSE — LARGEST
rooms on campus; two lounges
and dining hall. Free room cleaning service, laundry, color TV,
good food. Come out and see us.
5725  Agronomy,   224-9620,   224-6374.
DOUBLE ROOM ACCOMMODA-
tion available in University residences at Totem Park, Place
Vanier and Fort Camp. For details contact Office of Director of
Residences  or phone  228-2811.
ROOM AND BOARD PLUS RE-
muneration offered in exchange for
baby sitting, cooking and light
housekeeping. For six months. Urgent. Office: 228-2225. Home: 266-
9544.	
SINGLE M. OR F. SOUTH VAN.
Car   necessary—terms   AM   1-9423.
ROOM, BOARD $75. FEMALE STU-
dent. Near Mcdonald bus. 261-0804.
Furn. Houses 8c Apts.
83
SELF-CONTAINED SUITE, PRI-
vate entrance, upper story of
house. Suitable one male faculty
or staff.  224-1754.	
GIRL STUDENT TO SHARE FUR-
nished modern apt. ir. West End.
Call MXT 1-7707.      	
GRAD STUDENT TO SHARE
house with 3 of same. Phone Boh,
Kanji, or Rick. 263-9603, 5:30-7:30
p.m.	
FEMALE STUDENT WANTED TO
share 3 bedroom suite with 2
others.  Angela.   733-9339.	
WANTED — GIRL 30 TO 40 TO
share 2 bedroom furnished penthouse apartment with same. Kitsilano District $85.00 per month
plus telephone and hydro. Tele-
phone  731-3639.	
GIRL TO SHARE TWO ROOM
basement suite Feb. 1st or immediately $55. Phone Carol 224-
7338. Tuesday, January 13, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
Hockey Birds split
Basketball power
triumphs again
Friday night UBC Ice hockey
Thunderbirds took a good
measure of talent, a pinch of
spirit, mixed in the University of
Alberta Golden Bears and showed
why they could well be the best
team in the league.
The Birds pulled an upset as
they trounced the league leading
Bears 10*4.
They narrowly missed
repeating the performance
Saturday afternoon against the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs,
but the strain of two tough games
in two days caught up to them in
the third period, and the Birds
picked up five straight penalties,
which cost them three goals and
the game. The final score was 7-5.
The weekend leaves UBC in
second place with a respectable
3-2 record, considering all but one
of these games have been on the
road. This is good enough to nail
down second, just behind Alberta
and University of Calgary, with
identical 4-1 records. Calgary's
only loss so far had been to
Alberta.
The Birds put on their best
display of skating and
puckhandling this season as they
literally ground Alberta into the
ice. A particularly good
inducement to hard skating,
according to coach Bob
Hindmarch was that "it was so
cold in that rink the guys had to
keep skating to keep from
freezing."
Up to now the Albertans have
considered themselves the class of
the league, and had been rumored
(by them of course) to be the
fastest, best hitting, hardest
skating team in the league. There
now appears to be a little doubt
about these claims.
As far as hitting goes, the only
significant check the Bears made
all night was when UBC
defenseman Lawrie Vanzella
caught a stick in the throat.
As usual, UBC's number one
line of Wayne Schaab, Barry
Wilcox, and Tom Williamson piled
up points. Williamson fired in
three for his first hat trick with
the Birds, while Schaab kept the
rest of the scoring leadership
hopefuls at bay with two goals
and three assists. Wilcox rounded
out his evening with two goals and
two assists.
The rest of the UBC goals were
picked up by Dwayne Biagoni,
Roy Sakaki, Mike Darnborough
and Ken Lemmen. Lemmen and
Norm Parks, up from the Braves
to replace John Marshall and the
ailing Larry Watts, both played
strong games.
Hindmarch was also extremely
pleased by the performance ofhis
defense, who put out their best
performance to date.
Saturday the Birds played as
well as could be expected after a
physically hard game the night
before.
Calgary merely held a free
skating session Friday and
dumped in 15 goals against
UVic.
The game was more or less
even for the first two periods,
with the score sitting at 4*4 going
into the third. But the penalty
parade caught the Birds and
Calgary benefitted with three
goals. Wayne Schaab again had a
productive night with two goals,
one in the last minute of play.
Other scorers were Barry
Wilcox, Jeff Wilson and Doug
Buchanan.
The UBC Basketball
Thunderbirds remained
undefeated in Canadian
competition on the weekend as
they convincingly thumped the
Universities of Calgary and
Alberta.
The final scores were 109-73
and 92-57 respectively and
unfortunately for the Alberta
teams they were indicative of the
play. In the Calgary game on
Friday evening, 1,200 fans
watched the Birds dominate the
contest which saw Ron Thorsen
walk through the Dinosaurs'
pseudo-defense to notch a career
high of 26 points. Much of the
story could be drawn from the
rebounding results as the Birds
had more offensive rebounds than
Calgary had defensively and
finished with a total of 76, 20 by
Derek Sankey who managed
another career high.
Saturday evening the former
league leading Golden Bears came
into town after taking their lumps
on Friday from the University of
Victoria Vikings 78-70. As
expected, the Birds ran them off
the court using their quickness to
break a tight 1-3-1 defense.
Alberta coach Barry
Mitchelson said after the game,
"We played our worst ball of the
season on this B.C. trip. If we
don't hustle our butts, we're not
The Big Block club will
hold its monthly meeting in
SUB rm. 105-B Wednesday.
Topics of discussion will
include finalization of the
plans for the luncheon as
well as committee reports.
Also, the attendance
competitions are still on,
with the swim club, hockey
and basketball teams each
opposing the field hockey,
soccer  and football teams.
going to make the playoffs."
After watching the Bears on
Saturday that doesn't seem
difficult to believe. Thorsen was
again the leader as he ended with
19 points in 30 minutes of playing
time as well as gathering 10
assists.
The Birds continue their
WCIAA schedule next weekend in
Winnipeg as they meet the
University of Manitoba Bisons on
Friday and the University of
Winnipeg Wesmen the following
night.
BASK   STATS
University of Calgary (73) Amulung
5, Weiland 15, Bennett 16, Galan 16,
Newcombe 11, Thomas 10.
University of B.C. (109) Brayden
14, Molinski 16, Matheson 3, Kainer 7,
Hawkins 4, Sankey 20, Hoy 6, Thorsen
26, MacKay 7, Mills 6.
University of Alberta (57) Morris 5,
Bain 8, McMillan 5, Melnychuk 6,
Pomietlars 5, Nowak 10, De Klerk 18.
University of B.C. (92) Brayden 12,
Molinski 18, Matheson, Kainer 2,
Hawkins 5, Sankey 12, Hoy 11,
Thorsen 19, MacKay 8, Mills 5.
SKI TEAM NEWS
The UBC Men's Ski Team
captured overall first place in their
first intercollegiate competition at
Mount Bachelor, Oregon this
weekend.
The eight member Thunderbird
team was the only Canadian
entrant among 13 universities
competing in the three-event meet
sponsored by University of
Oregon.
Considering that many of the
American skiers are on athletic
scholarships and are allowed
midweek practice, Birds coach,
Dave Turner, is extremely pleased
with his team's performance.
In team standings, UBC took
first place in the 12 km
cross-country, second in the
slalom and fifth place in the
downhill race to give them a
narrow overall margin ahead of
second place U of Washington.
Intramural
Notices
INTRAMUMURALS-SCHEDULE
Curling:  Jan.   15; 5:00  p.m.:  Eng. VI
vs.  Eng.  X,  Rk.  1; Eng.  XIV vs.  Eng.
XII,   Rk,   4;   Ed.   vs.   Totem,   Rk.   5;
Kappa Sigma vs. DU, Rk. 6; Eng. I vs.
St. Andrews, Rk. 1; Arts vs. Dekes, Rk.
2.
Basketball: Jan.  12; 12:30: Med. I vs.
Totem I; Dent. I  vs. Ed. I; Eng. I vs.
Arts I.
7:00 Ad. I vs. Beta Pledge; Union II vs.
Dekes; AD II vs. Beta II.
8:00: PE IV vs. Ed. IV; Eng. IV vs. PV
II; Phi Delta I vs. DU II.
9:00:   Beta   I  vs.  DU. I; MBA vs PEI;
Law I vs. Union I.
Jan.   14:   12:30;  Eng.  II   vs.  Med.   II;
Eng. VIII vs. Dent.; Beta vs Dekes.
7:00: Arts Eng. vs. Eng. VII; PV V vs.
PV IV; PV VI vs. Eng. VI.
8:00 VCF vs. Ed. Ill; Union III vs. PE
11; Phi Delta 11 vs. Carey Hall.
9:00:  Eng.  Ill vs. Totem II; St. Marks
vs. Aggies; Law II vs PV III.
10:00: PV I VS. For I.
Hockey: Jan. 13. 6:20, Eng. vs. Grad
A; 7:35, Aggie vs. Beta; 8:50 PE vs. Phi
Kappa Sigma. Jan. 14: Rk. 2, 6:40, St.
Marks   vs.   Comm.   B;   7:55,   Law   vs.
Grad  B,  9:10: For vs. Union. Jan. 15;
Rk.  1; 6:20; Arch. vs. Kappa Sigma;
7:35; Ed. vs. Du; 8:50; Phi Delta vs. Psi
U.
Co-Recreation     Curling     Bonspiel;    is
being   held   on   Jan.   23-25.   All  those
wishing     to     participate     must     be
registered with either Men or Women's
intramural   offices  no  later than  Jan.
15.   Teams  consist   of   2   men   and  2
women. There will be a $4.00 entry fee
per person.
Wrestlers
downed
The UBC Wrestling team was
taken to the mat 31-13 by Pacific
University, Saturday at the
Women's Gym.
Tony Defonzo won by default
while Bob Grafton took his match
by decision and Taras Hryb won
by a fall, the only UBC winners.
Hryb was the outstanding
performer according to coach Paul
Nementh. "He was leading 18-0,
before he took the fall." he said.
A major problem for tTTe Birds
was the 15 points they gave up on
forfeiting three weight classes.
MADDIN
CAN'T
COUNT
AGRICULTURE U.S.
Presents
AGGIE WEEK
Jan. 19 to 24
Farmer's Frolic
Jan. 24
PROVINCIAL
BURSARY CHEQUES
Available Now
at Cashier's Dept., 3rd Floor
New Administrative Bldg.
UBC FILM SOCIETY which in 1967 brought you the uncut "HIGH" now presents
LARRY
KENT'S
FACADE
MO ADMITTANCE TO Pf KSONS UNOfft tt
Warning:    VERY    FRANK    TREAT-
MENT    OF   SEX
R.   W.   McDonald,   B.C.  Censor
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS
16, 23, 30 1 7:
AYS:   17, 24, 31 J 9:
00
&
00
SUB AUDITORIUM    Sundays:    18,25,  1     7.00
^ J^ Special admission price for this presentation only        * ^
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
MECHANICAL
ENGINEERS, '70 GRADS
Canada's largest manufacturer of telecommunications
equipment will be holding interviews at
University of British Columbia
JANUARY 19 and 20,1970
Principal plants, offices and laboratories are in
Montreal, Toronto, London, Belleville and Ottawa.
For information and an appointment, see your
Placement Office.
NORTH ERN   ELECTRIC
COMPANY LIMITED Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 13, 1970
Extraordinary  motions
Student senators want Wednesdays meet to
discuss class size, pollution, Americanization
By LEO TOSCANELLI
On the second page of the agenda for
Wednesday's-senate meeting, buried amidst detailed
reports from the curriculum committee and other
senatorial bumph, three motions look a little out of
place.
They are the first motions made by the new lot
of student senators, and some of the first senate
business this year that gets beyond the necessary
but trivial approval of the last meeting's minutes
and settling the date of next week's meeting.
For starters, student senator Stan Persky will
move that all classes be limited to 25 students,
starting next September.
The first reaction of some senate big-shots to
this was quiet chuckling at the absurdity of it all.
But Persky insists he's not being Utopian, or
merely nagging the senate.
"Whether or not we limit enrolment (he
considers overcrowding separate from enrolment
restriction problems) we must end overcrowding if
our university is to mean anything," he explains in a
policy statement distributed to senators with the
agenda.
"It (ending overcrowding) can be done given
the resources available now. It may require some
basic re-examination of how many courses we have
students take and the amount of credits we allot for
those courses.
"That is, it is possible to decide that a 3-hour
course gets 5 units. One hour equals one unit isn't
part of Mosaic law."
Persky leaves open the option of classes of up
to 120 students for "team-teaching" programs.
The opponents of Persky's motion will
challenge his underlying assumption that big
classes are necessarily bad. Persky isn't scared of a
little debate, even if he loses the argument, but
promises he won't stop there.
"Should this motion fail, I will serve notice of
motion that, as of September, 1970, classes of more
than 100 students be prohibited (again, excepting
programmes of group teaching, which would be
limited to working units of no more than 120)," his
statement says.
Persky's other motion, which will be ruled out
of order, but which he plans to defend on the senate
floor, calls for a study and evaluation of what UBC
is doing about pollution, to be made public in a
report to the community.
The motion also asks senators to accept "the
principle that the university has a positive
relationship to the community, and as an example
of such, some portion of its resources and talent be
committed to the solution of this social problem of
pollution."
The    senate    agenda    committee    ruled   this
multi-point motion out of order for several reasons.
One is that it contains more than one motion.
Student senator Peter Ladner will also
introduce a motion: that the senate authorize a
study to find how many profs at UBC at Canadian
citizens.
He claims a man's citizenship is an indication of
his commitment to the community and so should be
of concern to the university.
Two other motions proposed by Ladner were
thrown out at the agenda committee for being
outside the senate's jurisdiction. He proposed senate
support for abolition of the two-year tax holiday
for foreign professors and senate recommendation
of advertising all academic vacancies within Canada.
(At present few Canadian academic vacancies
are advertised within Canada, preventing qualified
Canadian grad students from getting jobs because
they don't know about the vacancies.)
The senate meeting starts at 8 p.m. Wednesday
on the second floor of the old administration
building. You're supposed to phone or notify the
registrar's office beforehand to get on the list of the
lucky 30 who can attend.
York U loses last nominee for pres
TORONTO (CUP) - York University lost its
third and last nominee for administration president
Thursday when A. D. Allen withdrew his name
because he opposed the presidential selection
procedure.
The withdrawal of Allen, dean ofthe faculty of
arts and science at the University of Toronto, is a
direct challenge to the board of governors'
insistance on keeping most of the power to choose a
successor for retiring president Murray G. Ross.
Allen said he believed York's new president
should be chosen by a committee representing all
parts of the univerisity — students and faculty, as
well as the academic senate and board of governors.
The decision came only three days after the
withdrawal of John Saywell, dean of York's arts and
science faculty. Saywell also attacked the selection
procedure and said that the academic senate should
have "the preponderant voice" in the selection of a
new president.
Under present procedure the board would not
be bound by a vote of senate — made up of
faculty and a few students - on the new president.
Allen said this procedure "failed to take into
account the needs of all parts of the university."
Saywell and Allen were both nominated by a
presidential search committee in December. A third
nominee, McGill University vice-principal
(academic) Michael Oliver, withdrew shortly after
his nomination was prematurely revealed in the
Toronto press.
THE MANY FACES OF FOLK
VOL I
B'nai Brith Hillel Foundation
and
Special Events
RABBI
SHLOMO
CARLEBACH
The   Great   Folk   Singing   Rabbi
WED.# JAN. 21
12:30 P.M.
SUB BALLROOM
Admission 50c
UP
TIGHT?
Anti-Up-Tight Baubles
For details-See Jan. 23 Ubyssey
*-.
Summer Employment Opportunity
FIELD SUPERVISORS
RED CROSS WATER SAFETY SERVICE
Several vacancies exist for the summer 1970.
The Field Supervisor hai broad experience in aquatics, holds the Instructor
certificate of the Red Cross and Royal Life Saving Society, is a self starter
able to work well with volunteers  and  has  a flair for public  speaking.
Applications,  detailing  experience and qualifications,  addressed to
Director of Water Safety Service, The Canadian Red Crass Society,
4750 Oak Street, Vancouver 9, B.C., will be received until January
30, 1970.
APPLICATION
FOR GRADUATION
"Application for Graduation" cards are now being mailed to all students in Fourth Year Arts, Music, Science,
Commerce and Fourth Year Elementary and Fifth Year
Secondary Education, and will be available in departmental offices for students in the graduating years of
all other faculties. All Students who expect to graduate
this spring are requested to complete and return both
cards to the Registrar's Office (Mrs. Kent) as soon as possible, but not later than  February 16,  1970.
"Application for Graduation" cards are available in the Registrar's Office and students in
these graduating years who do not receive
cards in the mail should check their addresses
in the Registrar's Office.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the student to
MAKE APPLICATION FOR HIS DEGREE. If the student
does not make application, his name will not be put forward
for approval by his Faculty and by Senate.
NO APPLICATION - NO DEGREE
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