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The Ubyssey Sep 9, 1969

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. U, No. 1
p*
X VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1969
228-2305
AMS GM tightens grip
roon photo
LUSCIOUS NUBILE young co-eds such as this fair specimen lie everywhere in the grass near Spanish Banks,
eagerly awaiting the lascivious looks of concupiscient frosh and frat men.
SUBureaucrats battle over
firing of games room czar
By MAURICE BRIDGE
Something is rotten in the state of SUB.
Or so it seems since the firing last month of
SUB games room manager Dermot Boyd.
Boyd was dismissed by AMS treasurer Chuck
Campbell who said the firing resulted from a
re-appraisal of the position and a decision that the
job could be done equally well by a student.
Actual decision to dismiss Boyd was made by
several AMS executives. New SUB building manager
Graham Vance and AMS general manager Ron
Pearson were also asked for opinions.
Boyd was originally hired last year by a vote of
student council.
Troubles began after the firing when Boyd
supporters questioned the dismissal and initiated a
groundswell campaign to get him back.
Their speculation that Boyd was fired because
he represented a threat to Vance's position as
building manager has proved inconclusive so'far.
(Vance became building manager after former
manager Dave Cooper left the position during the
summer. Before leaving, Cooper recommended in a
letter that Boyd succeed him.
(Boyd is said to have expressed interest in the
job but Campbell told council only Vance wanted
the position.
(Campbell said the availability of the job was
not advertised because of its temporary nature.
Vance was hired on an interim basis until January
and Boyd was dismissed several days later.)
Campbell said in an interview that he has never
heard of the letter Cooper left. At least one member
of the AMS administrative staff said he personally
saw the letter.
AMS vice-president Tony Hodge said that
despite   Campbell's   claim   that   only,, Vance   was
interested   in   the   position,   several   names   were
discussed in executive meetings.
Former games area worker and SUB
management committee member Mike Flynn,
co-signer of a letter to student councillors inviting
them to an informal meeting on the matter
Thursday night, said:
"SUB management has lost control of the
building. It's a hard thing to admit when you don't
have power anymore, and you're just not going to
come up to a meeting and say, 'OK, we've lost
power, what do you want us to do about it'."
"There was a coup in that building this
summer. Peason and Campbell took over."
"Dermot Boyd told me when he was fired,
Chuck Campbell told him 'we're sorry about this,
but you did a really great job.' If he did a really
great job, why did they fire him?
"Why didn't they put him somewhere else?
Because they had to get him out ot the building,
because he kicks up too much trouble."
Campbell said there was "some dissatisfaction"
with Boyd's work. Pearson refused to comment.
"A student doing the same job provides the
same service and costs less," said Campbell.
"Handling worked in the games area* I know
quite a bit about it," said Flynn. "And I know what
no part-time student can do the job that Dermot
Boyd did."
Legality and constitutionality of the firing is
vague. The AMS code says SUB management
committee is responsible to student council for "the
staffing of AMS areas within the building", but
Campbell and ombudsman Sean McHugh agree the
code is only a guideline and not legally binding.
Boyd has been in Belfast, Ulster, for the past
week due to personal reasons and is expected to
return shortly.
PEARSON
'Arrogant pro' retained
as editor threatened
Students come and go but Ron Pearson stays.
That was the basic outcome of Monday night's student
council meeting when councillors voted down a motion to fire the
veteran general manager of the AMS.
In a vote held after a closed council meeting—the content of
which will never be known to the students council representatives—the
AMS bureaucrats defeated the motion by law representative Dell Valair
with a 14-3-4 count.
The move to fire Pearson, the behind-the-scenes professional who
administers AMS business, was not a spur-of-the-moment decision.
Students, SUB employees and AMS
administrative staff started the campaign during the
summer in an effort to raise questions concerning the
legitimacy of both Pearson's professional actions and
his personality.
Those people charged that the grey eminence of
13 years behind the AMS operation exerted
illegitimate control over councillors, committee
decisions and the operation of SUB.
They also charged that Pearson is personally
arrogant and objectionable and that'he tends to
throw temper tantrums, break pool cues and toss
balls around in the SUB games room.
This presumably is what was discussed in the council meeting.
AMS president Fraser Hodge said before the meeting that it
would move in camera because personalities would be discussed.
"There will be a lot of blood and guts pulled apart in the
meeting," he said.
But what actually transpired during the three-hour in-camera
session will never be known.
Although he is a legitimate member of council, Ubyssey editor
Michael Finlay was ejected from the meeting under threat of being fired
from his editorial position.
Finlay was asked to assure Hodge that he would not report what
took place if he remained in the council chamber.
There is nothing legally binding on Finlay to do so and he refused
to give the assurance rather than compromise his ethics and principles
as a newsman.
Said Hodge: "You'll either leave or be fired."
Although Hodge would give no legal grounds for either the
ejection from the chamber or for his threat of firing, Finlay left for fear
that council would disregard legality and fire him without grounds.
Finlay's distrust of council arose partly from an earlier action
concerning honoraria payment for the staff of Tuum Est.
Editor of The Ubyssey—of which Tuum Est was a special
edition—and acting editor of Tuum Est, Finlay was assured months ago
by AMS treasurer Chuck Campbell that honoraria for Tuum Est staff
would be no less than $300.
But council awarded only $200 on the recommendation of the
finance committee—headed by Campbell.
(Continued overleaf-see Idiocy)
Housing situation
really serious'
UBC students were sleeping outside the housing office
last week.
They were hoping to get a bed for the rest of the year in
one of UBC's residences—but many were unsuccessful.
Despite the fact that students were informed of where
they stood on the waiting lists, about 60 waited outside the
offices—in the administration building—each morning. Many had
slept there all night.
They came in the hope of getting rooms after
cancellations had been received. But cancellations were few.
The problem is not new—with little or no increase in
facilities and a massive influx of students—but is espacially bad
this year.
According to Les Rohringer, director of UBC residences,
the waiting list for residence accommmodation hasn't been this
long since Totem Park was built five years ago.
(Continued overleaf-see Gage) Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9,  1969
MORE IDIOCY
(from page 1)
Campbell denied he had made the statement about the $300.
Fraser Hodge said that it made no difference, that Campbell had no
right to make the statement anyway.
Both Finlay and Tuum Est editor Peter Ladner were present
when Campbell agreed to the figure, saying, "That ($300) can be
arranged without problem."
Finlay and Ladner assert that Campbell's denial ofthe statement
is baseless and utterly illegitimate. Despite the denial, the statement was
made, said the editors.
After the in-camera meeting—which was punctuated be great
outbursts of laughter and friendly joking—council voted to put Pearson
on four weeks' holiday and to hire a management consultant firm to
review the AMS's structure and procedure.
What really happened will never be known. Pearson was
unavailable for comment. But he's still here, somewhere.
What's left on campus?
Dig CLAM
A Phoenix has arisen from the embers of the UBC Left.
It's CLAM, the Campus Left Action Movement, which is
now working on campus to expand its membership.
Aim of the group is to build a voluntary union as an
alternative to the Alma Mater Society, which it feels is not
representative of students and does not pursue their best interests in
dealing with the faculty, administration and B.C. community.
The group has published a 24-page newspaper, the Barnacle,
which is being sold across the campus.
It is also sponsoring a program of events designed to give
students some idea of what they aren't told in classes.
Today at noon in the SUB auditorium the national film
board documentary Bethune! will be shown. It tells the story of a
famous Canadian doctor who served humanity in Communist China adn
the Spanish civil war but is virtually unheard of in Canadian schools.
Thursday at noon in Bu. 106 SFU prof Louis Feldhammer
discusses human nature and will refute the scientific faults of
anthropologists who say man is innately aggressive.
CLAM aims to provide a more forceful and directed radical
approach than past UBC Left groups such as SDU have done.
It is organized around the principle of anti-imperialism and
recognized the U.S. as the most expansionist world power today.
CLAM's basis of unity supports the right to self-determination of all
peoples including Canada's Indians, women and residents of Quebec.
"Particularly in Canada, the pressure of foreign imperialism
continuously represses the economic, political and cultural
development of our country," the group's basis of unity says.
"Thus we oppose in Canada foreign domination of our economic,
political and cultural lives.
"We recognize that American imperialism is active in Canada and
as well that the Canadian government is an accomplice of this
imperialism, both at home and abroad.
"We recognize the need for an independent Canada, given the
immense foreign control of our economic and cultural institutions.
"We see that formation of a political movement dedicated to
Canadian national liberation is crucial, and is part of the world-wide
struggle against American expansionism.
A meeting for prospective members and other interested
persons will be held in the SUB club's lounge Friday at 8 p.m. The role
of progressive students in the university will be discussed.
i5rci*V.
roon photo
IT'S A CRYING SHAME the
state the university is in,
although the tears shed here
aren't exactly the normal type.
Still, one can be moved to such
frustration by the UBC factory
processing department.
Gage petitions federal govt,
for $9 million residence loan
(from page 1)
Students who had spent three years in
residence found it virtually impossible to get
accommodation.
The housing administration works on the basis
that younger students should have priority .since it
is likely that this is one of their first years living
away from home.
To ease the situation, the university has a new
1,200-bed residence ready for construction—except
for the money.
The Wireless—a cluster of three 17 story
high-rises—to be built on the ngitheast corner of the
campus near SUB (will cost more than $9 million.
But the Central Mortgage and Housing
Corporation has advised UBC that its 1969 budget
will not allow the necessary loan.
Administration president Walter Gage—on the
instructions    of   the    Board    of    Governors—has
petitioned B.C.'s federal MP's to pressure CHMC for
the money.
In the meantime enrolment grows—along with
the housing shortage.
"I don't know if the provincial government will
be willing to put in the money to help qui the
federal corporation," Rohringer said. But at least for
the next two years the situation will be really
serious."
A lack of funds has also halted much needed
additions to accommodation for married students.
Off campus housing is handled by the AMS
through its housing listing service.
Landlords pay a $1 fee to be included in a list
of available accommodation printed every Friday.
The lists are available at the AMS business
office or the SUB information desk.
DUTHIE BOOKS
UNIVERSITY BRANCH
4560 W. 10th Ave. - 224-7012
OTHER STORES
919 ROBSON 684-4496
PAPERBACK CELLAR 861-8713
670 SEYMOUR 685-3627
1032 W. HASTINGS 688-7434
■   ■   ■   ■
CINEMA 16
PRESENTS
Series 1: INTERNATIONAL FILMS
September 15
Dutchman by Anthony Harvey. A vivid rendition of
Le Roy Jones' controversial and electric play; Shirley
Knight toys with a young Negro in New York's dramatic
subway . . . sexual and social games.
September 30
Frankenstein with Boris Karloff as Prank, and Dracula
with Bela Lugosi ae Fang.
Other films include:
Renoir's La Marseillaise, Bergman's Sawdust And Tinsel,
Kobayashi's Rebellion and four others . . .
Series 2: GODARD RETROSPECTIVE
The experiments, growth, style, paradoxes and contradictions of one of the most contemporary and controversial film-makers . . . and the evolution of 'la tendresse',
'la violence', and 'la politique'. Our series opens September 22 with Vivre Sa Vie, and includes Masculin/
Feminin, Pierrot Le Fou, La Chinoise, Weekend and
four others . . .
Series 3: SILENT CLASSICS
September 29 brings Son Of The Shiek — fates^worse-
than-death, desert chases, last minute rescues, stunts,
furious fights, and the inimitable lover, Rudolph
Valentino.
Also in this series: Carl Dreyer's Master Of The House,
Josef von Sternberg's Underworld, and Alfred Hitchcock's The Lodger (where the man upstairs is very
possibly Jack the Ripper!).
Series 4: WESTERN DOUBLE-BILLS
Four nights of double-bills, including High Noon, Eldorado, Shane and Rio Grande. A tribute 'auteur' directors, box-office hits, and Wyatt Earp starting January 19.
Admission is by series only, and tickets are available
at the AMS, all Duthies Book Stores,
and at the first showing of each series.
Series
Series
Series
Series
Students & Staff
--    $5.00
     $5.00
~~-    $2.50
---    $3.50
Others
$6.00
$6.00
$3.50
$4.50
Show times:  Series  1   and  2:  6:00 and  8:30  p.r
Series 3: 8:00 p.m.
Series  4: 7:30 p.m.
STUDENT
IN THE
BUILDING
THEATRE
For dates   and   other   information   consult   our   brochure   or
contact Cinema 16 at 228-3697 or come to room 247, SUB.
■     ■■■■■ Tuesday, September 9,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
*■ *•*-*.
SDU HEADQUARTERS?  Nope, it's the lounge in the law building. Perhaps the lawyers think a
revolution's coming. Could be.
roon photo
Food, parking costs up
labor, inflation blamed
By JOHN ANDERSEN
* Pardon me ma'm? You said 13 cents for a
sticky bun? Good grief.
Yeah man, all you Charlie Browns are taking it
in the ear again.
A joint student-faculty committee quietly
raised food and parking prices over the summer
while students were away.
Examples of increases are: a pot of tea—up
from 10 to 15 cents; dinner minimum—up from 60
to 65 cents; fish and chips—up from 50 to 5 5 cents.
A glass of milk will now cost 12 cents instead
of 10 while the campus breakfast, the cinnamon
bun, will cost 13 cents instead of ten.
Director of UBC's ancillary services, John
McLean, said reasons for the price increases (other
than to increase the circulation of pennies) include
increased labor costs and rising food prices.
The price of hamburgers remains unchanged.
Preferred parking rates have also been raised.
Faculty and staff will now pay $22.50 instead of
$15 while the rate in preferred student lots has been
increased from $10 to $15.
There will be no increase in the $5 rate for
parking in the regular student lots.
McLean explained the parking rates were raised
to meet an estimated $75,000 deficit in the
operating costs of parking services.
Re.ommendations for the increases were made
to the board of governors by the student-faculty
committees.
Bottomore
as trustee
SFU  hoax
By ROBIN BURGESS
The appointment of professor T. B. Bottomore to Simon Fraser
University's PSA trusteeship committee is a hoax and a farce, a SFU
prof said Monday.
"Bottomore allowed his name to be used to legitimize an
obviously illegitimate committee," said Louis Feldhammer, of SFU's
political science, sociology and anthropology department.
The appointment of the world-renowned scholar and former dean
of arts to the trusteeship committee was announced in July while
Bottomore was teaching at the University of Sussex, England.
According to dean of arts Dale Sullivan, the former dean will arrive
and assume his duties at SFU sometime this term although not in the
next month.
"But this information just isn't correct," said Feldhammer. "He's
not going to come. He told me so himself," he said.
Bottomore has sent two letters from England strongly criticizing
the PSA department and expressing his views on the department
policies and administration.
The most recent development in the controversial upheaval in the
SFU department involved the dismissal of 11 PSA faculty members last
week.
"No one has been fired," commented Sullivan, "But some people
have been recommended for non-tenure."
"A lot of people seem to think the department is being purged,
but it's just not true," Sullivan said.
Dr. Kathleen Aberle, one of the professors recommended for
non-tenure, said:
"I think that rash judgments were made on 11 people in the PSA
department. The committee that made the judgments was not
academically competent and didn't follow correct procedure."
The judgment committee was not the elected PSA committee but
an appointed one with no PSA representatives among its members,
according to Mrs. Ablerle.
The professors were all strong supporters of equal student
participation of "student parity" in the administration of the
department, she said.
Mrs. Aberle was one of a number of PSA faculty members who
insisted on maintaining student committees in the face of
administration objection.
Her case is being appealed, Sullivan said.
Election campaign
costs AMS $6,500
By JAN DUINKER
The Alma Mater Society spent $6,500 in the recent provincial
election.
AMS treasurer Chuck Campbell said $3,000 of the $6,500 was
spent on the campaign of Dell Valair, who ran as an independent
candidate in Rossland-Trail, opposing education minister Donald
Brothers.
The AMS also spent another $5,000 for pro-education publicity
in the Vancouver area.
The other $500 was spent in sending AMS executives on a
speaking itour of other B.C. ridings.
Campbell said all the funds came from the "promotion of higher
education fund" set aside two years ago by the AMS.
Valair, law 2, was pleased with his campaign.
His propaganda promoted more financial help for education.
Although Brothers was re-elected, and Valair received only 288
.votes, Valair feels he convinced the electorate of the need of more
money for education.
He said local newspapers and people at election meetings gave
him an enthusiastic response.
He attributes to his campaign the 2,000-vote decrease in Brothers'
' winning margin.
AMS president Fraser Hodge also was content with results of the
•-campaign.
"The idea of educating the public by the vehicle of an
independent condidate in a provincial election was a good one," Hodge
said.
Hodge, who went on a speaking tour of Prince Rupert and Prince
George, said that the free publicity given to the student point of view
was well worth the cost.
He said the purpose of the Valair campaign was not to get votes,
fefut to publicize the problems of higher education.
"I could not agree with the educational policies of any of the
existing political parties," Hodge said.
Valair said that by the end of the campaign, he was not
encouraging people to vote for him, but just asking them to keep his
ideas on education in mind.
He said he was not disappointed by the vote he received.
BOWED DOWN   by  crueler facts  of campus life, unidentified student grudgingly parts with
hard-earned cash for the glory of education. Life is hard and so is the concrete.
Too many students-registrar
UBC has registered 2,000 students too
many, registrar Jack Parnall said Monday.
Some 22,000 students are expected to
register this year, but the university is equipped
to handle only 20,000.
"Limited enrolment is the only solution,"
Parnall said.
He said a recommendation dealing with
that  subject  is  being  brought up before the
senate in the near future. "A quota system
could provide a possible solution" said Parnall.
He said another solution would be for the
faculties to decide upon the number of students
they could handle.
This number would then be discussed with
the administration and a final decision agreed
upon. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9,   1969
TMUBYSSSY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the
Alma Mater Socieity of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university
administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
subcribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which it is a
founding member. Ubyssey News Service supports one foreign
correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305; editor,
228-2301; Page Friday, 118-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
SEPTEMBER 9, 1969
Welcome?
Welcome frosh, to the big machine.
Here you are, all 3,500 of you, quivering in trepidation,
huddling in your small, partisan groups as you set your feet lightly on
the great UBC campus.
We wish you wouldn't.
The fact of the matter is, there's no room for you here. Go
away, why don't you, until there's someplace that can hold you all.
Disappear for a while. Vanish. You're crowding us.
Oh,, it's not that we have anything against you. You have the
desire, the intelligence, the academic record and, yes, the right to
come to UBC. Education is a wonderful thing.
But education isn't what they dole out here. It's impossible
because there are too many people. This isn't a university, it's a
factory. And the assembly lines area little full right now.
So go away. If you've nothing better to do, why don't you hop
the ferry to Victoria and talk to the smiling Santa Claus who gives the
gifts to the good little students.
Everybody should be laughed at at least once in his life.
Disintegration
Well, they did it again.
In what has to go down as one ofthe most incredibly fouled up
and disgraceful moves of any student council, the AMS governing
body Monday night decided not to dismiss AMS general manager Ron
Pearson.
Now most students have never heard of Ron Pearson. We aren't
saying here whether or not he should be fired—although we strongly
suspect he should.
Despite the fact that last year's executive attempted to fire
Pearson and failed and despite the fact that observers for the last
several years have questioned the legitimacy of the 13-year
manipulator of the student government's business operations, council
has seen fit at this point to knuckle under again.
Knuckle under, collapse, disintegrate. They all apply because at
one point three days ago, the executive was determined that Pearson
would go.
In a private discussion AMS external affairs officer Mike Doyle
said that an executive meeting Friday had not even discussed whether
or not Pearson should be dismissed but had confined its deliberations
to the procedure under which the general manager should be fired.
And then sometime in the rash of executive meetings over the
weekend, as the confused and frightened councillors gathered to
decide on some way of wriggling out of their predicament without
losing face, the decision was reversed.
The Ubyssey knew Monday afternoon that Pearson was destined
to stay. We even knew of the planned four-week holiday being offered
as payoff to the determined and concerned students who had
questioned the continuance of Pearson's employ.
Somehow, incredible as it may seem, the executive changed its
mind. What happened in the council meeting will never be known. All
that is known is that a frightened, panic-stricken group of weak
amateur policians shattered and caved in.
Those people are what we euphemistically call our government.
Editor: Michael Finlay
News Paul Knox
City Nate Smith
Wire Irene Wasilewski
Sports   Jim Maddin
Associate Peter Ladner
Senior John Twigg
Ass't City John Gibbs
Page Friday
 Fred Cawsey, Norbert Ruebsaat
A new day has dawned, a new year
has begun, the challenge of university
is at hand and all the rest of that first
day of the year crap.
Once again, The Ubyssey rolls off
the presses into the hands of the
cheering  masses  and,  once  again, an
eager Horde of new recruits marches in
to help perform the world's greatest
labor of love.
For a welcome change, feminine
beauty was plentiful in the forms of
Sandy Kass, Leslie Plommer, Robin
Burgess, Christine Krawczyk, Elso
Gladwin and Kathy Zahar.
Their presence brightened the lives
of Murray Kennedy, Jan Duinker, Ken
Mann, Kelvin Beckett, BrianMcWatters,
Ken Van Camp and Jim Davies.
Then there was old standby Maurice
Bridge (That's all he did—stand by and
watch). Also left over from last year
were Ulf Ottho, John Andersen, Peter
Kennedy, Michael Qufgley, Nader
Mirhady adn Elaine Tarzwell.
Tony Gallagher helped out in the
wide world of sports, while the
darkroom crew consisted of Fred
Cawsey, Fred Cawsey, Fred Cawsey
and assorted Photosoc types.
Welcome to UBC
VALAIR CAMPAIGN
Dumb, dumb, dumb
How much does one useless vote cost?
It's an interesting question in the light of the
ridiculous AMS-backed campaigning of UBC law
student and AMS councillor Dell Valair in the
recent provincial election. In case you don't know,
Valair ran as an independent in education minister
Donald Brothers' home riding of Rossland-Trail.
His -higher education promtion campaign was
financed largely by the AMS, using the higher
education promotion funds allocated by last year's
council.
He didn't win. In fact, he got exactly 288 votes.
Brothers got 5,897. The NDP candidate pulled in
4,785. Even the Liberal got 1,768.
And how much did those 288 votes cost. Well,
AMS treasurer Chuck Campbell estimates about
$3,000 was funnelled directly into the campaign.
That works out to about $10 a vote.
But ads were also taken out in the Sun and
Province to support Valair and his campaign.
Half-page ads. Campbell estimates these ads cost
about $3,500 but he doesn't think they should be
counted as part of the election campaign, despite
the fact that they featured pictures of Valair,
biographical notes, and a little advice to vote Dell
Velair in Rossland Trail.
Now add this money on and you get a total of
some $6,500 of student money was used to support
a candidate in the election. That comes to about
$22.57 a vote.
And what for? Sweet nothing.
Ignoring the possibly unethical aspects of
forcing students to pay for the campaign of a
candidate whose politics they quite possibly do not
support, the very goal the AMS aimed for was
doomed from the start.
The fact is, there was-never a prayer that the
idea of higher education promotion would receive
the least bit of exposure or publicity. Sure, Valair
did a lot of door knocking and speaking in..
Rossland-Trail. Lots of people heard him. Hundreds,
probably. But to make an impression you have to
hit thousands and hundreds of thousands.
And the only way to do that is to get the
newspapers, radio stations and television stations to
spread the word. But they can't do it if the guy is
way off in Rossland-Trail. (Quick, who knows
where Rossland is?).
The AMS should not have run a candidate at
all. If they had to run one, he should have been in'
the Lower Mainland. The media jump at anything
unusual about a campaign. Papers love to do stories
on someone fighting for motherhood, freedom or
education. Radio and television stations swoon at **
the chance to interview the clean-cut, hard-working
student fighting for a better chance.
But no one wants to travel to Rossland-Trail to
do it. As it turned out, Valair got exactly no space
in the Vancouver Sun, the largest communication
medium in B.C. Not one lousy, stinking word. Not a
peep. Nothing.
It was sheer, absolute, unbelievable stupidity.
The AMS took it upon itself to throw away $6,500/
of student money on a hopelessy ill-conceived and
mismanaged scheme doomed to oblivion from the
first moment.
They'd do better to put their obviously
inadequate minds together to devise some new
college prank. Something like gold fish-swallowing,
only stupider. Tuesday, September 9,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Buffys bomb: promoters fault?
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
The Vancouver Province
yesterday quoted local promoter,
Neil J. Godin, as saying that the
eight hundred paid attendance at
'fast Saturday's Buffy St.
Marie—Dick Gregory concert was
due to the "negative attitude"
developed by Vancouver concert
•goers in the wake of a series of
local rock festival disasters.
Province pop columnist Brian
McLeod remarked "it is to our
disgrace as an intelligent
community that only eight
hundred paid admissions were to
"be found scattered in the
enormity that is the Pacific
(Joliseum."
There may have been a certain
amount of truth in what Godin
said. As well, his failure with the
concert cannot be entirely blamed
on him since the sponsors of the
concert, the NDP, reneged in their
promotional duties. However, in
spite of the failure of any such
NDP commitments, it seems
peculiar that Godin was not better
prepared for the concert in terms
of advance publicity.
With a mimimal amount of
newspaper and radio advertising,
Godin expected that crowds of
both young and old would come
flocking to the Coliseum doors.
He might have realized from the
"local rock festival disasters" that
any such last-minute advertising
attempts would most likely be
unsuccessful. For example, the
Squamish-Vancouver Pop Festival
did not begin advertising locally
until just over a week before it
was to take place, with the result
being a pathetically small crowd, a
great loss of money to the
promoters, and irreparable
damage to the Vancouver and
Canadian pop scenes.
As well, there was little
advance publicity material on the
Coliseum    concert    sent    out,
material which might have made
for a mention of some length in
the local media. Godin's
promotional amateurism was here
as apparent as that of the
cancelled Thunderbird Peace
Festival, which also failed to get
in touch with most local media.
Local impressarios should get
out of their roles of "under
assistant west coast promo men"
and realize that the easiest way to
a customer's pocketbook is
through effective advance
promotion of their concerts. And
berating the public after the
concert (as Godin did in an
emotion -charged "press
conference") for not responding
to the "sincerity" of the
unsuccessful show does very little
for the local pop scene which is
already on extremely shaky
ground.
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TUXEDOS,  DARK  SUITS, TAILS
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WANTED
Literary Genius
to Edit
Grad Student Ass'n
r     Newsletter
Interested people please
leave name and phone no.
with secretary at Grad
Student Center.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FREDERIC   WOOD   THEATRE
Theatre Excitement
Theatre Excitement
BOY MEETS GIRL
by Bella and Samuel Spewack (A happy farce about Hollywood)
September 19-27,8.30 p.m.
Directed by Donald Soule. Settings by Richard K. Wilcox. Costumes by  Kurt Wilhelm
STUDENT SEASON'S TICKETS (4 Plays for $3.00)
AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
Sept. 19-27
Nov. 7-15
Jan. 16-24
March 6-14
"Boy Meets Girl"
"The Crucible" by Arthur Miller
"Exit the King" by lonesco
"As You Like It" by Shakespeare
BOX OFFICE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
ROOM 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE -IT IS FOR YOU Tuesday, September 9,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 6
Decision on UBC's future
coming from BoG, senate
By PETER LADNER
Sometime this fall, the UBC senate and board of
governors will be deciding what this place is going to
be like for the next ten years—and it could be
drastically different from the present setup.
For example, they could decide that by 1980
UBC would be an academic city of 40,000 students,
divided into 30 federated colleges.
Each college would be almost automomous in
its academic decisions, and some would be tied in
with a residence, Oxford style.
Or they could do nothing and UBC could grow
into a 34,400-cog knowledge factory in just five
years, given existing enrolment increase rates.
The federated colleges proposal is one of the
recommendations in the 75-page report of the
senate's committee on long-range objectives. The
report, only a second draft, was published last May,
with the final edition due out around the beginning
of October when debate and, hopefully, decisions,
will begin.
Only five out of the lion the committee voted
for the college proposal, but even the mild majority
proposals, should raise a few student eyebrows.
ENROLMENT FREEZE FAVORED
The majority recommends freezing
undergraduate enrolment at 22,000 bodies;
• holding down the graduate enrolment
increase to 15 per cent per year, rising to a ceiling of
5,500 grad students, making a total enrolment limit
of 27,500.
• upping the pass mark for second-year
students to 60 per cent, to go along with a 65 per
cent requirement for first-year entrance;
• setting up an inter-departmental program,
complete with its own department head, budget and
bureaucracy.
In the words of committee chairman Cyril
Belshaw, head of the anthropology and sociology
department, "Do you want the university we have
now, with enrolment under control, or do you want
to create a university city?"
So what are the students' representatives doing
about it? The student representative on the
committee, former student senator, Don Munton,
has gone south to grad school, leaving the
committee studentless.
It is also less other members, so Belshaw
promises the final report will reflect earlier
discussions when all the committee members
including Munton, were around.
The Alma Mater Society received the report
three months ago but has done nothing about it all
summer. "I'm afraid we've been terribly negligent
because of our involvement in the election
campaign," confessed AMS president Fraser Hodge.
Belshaw said he had heard nothing official from
students. "It's pretty well too late now to affect the
fianl report anyway," he said Monday.
This leaves it up to the 12 student senators to
present the student viewpoint to this crucial
debate—provided they are elected by then. (No date
for elections has yet been set).
DECENTRALIZATION THE KEY
Decentralization is the key to the minority's
federated college proposal.
Each of 30 or more colleges would be a fully
independent unit of about 2,500 students. That
makes more than 60,000 UBC students, although
some would be on satellite campuses.
Each college would have its own faculty, and in
some cases be tied in with its own residence.
As well as being on the faculty of a college,
each professor would also be a member of a
department with his academic colleagues. The whole
show would be divided up into three or possibly
four academic divisions, each virtually autonomous
in academic affairs.
This would reduce the senate's grip over
academic minutiae, but the report proposes to make
the senate the academic budget deciders. The senate
would then presumably pass its budget up to the
board of governors for official OK and ratification.
The one big bogeyman in this proposal is the
mish-mash of bureaucratic monsters needed to make
it go. These are disguised as principals (of colleges),
chairmen (of divisions), directors (of institutes),
vice-chancellors, and the ubiquitous department
heads. The cost and complexity of this power
structure was the main gripe of the status quo
advocates.
They also complained about possible excessive
independence that could lead to
"over-specialization."
The committee members' views on admissions
varied with their stand on the 'Colleges or Status
Quo' debate. The college advocates want to hold up
enrolment just long enough to get the college system
worked out. The others want to lock the gate after
27,500 and keep the rest out forever, hopefully
steering them off to junior colleges around the
province.
Before the committee decides on the future of
our plant, it hashed out the whole debate about the
philosophy of the university, where it's going and
why, and who we are.
"IT SKIMS'-PERSKY
But as radical has-been Stan Persky points out,
it skims over student criticisms of the university
with barely a pause in the "dialogue."
"It's one of the first reports to take account of
student criticism, but then in the blandest way
possible it pretended they didn't exist," Persky
commented.
"What's being proposed doesn't really change
things—it just accommodates dissenters and
humanizes things a little. The existing divisions in
the university are perpetuated, with everyone
allowed to do his own thing on the assumption that
everyone has his own answers to society's problems.
The committee set up three goals for the
university: to extend and preserve knowledge, to
develop individual students, and to serve the needs
,of the people in the society.
But after these noble aims and intentions, the
report bucks argument after argument fizzling out
after each one to conclude that the existing way is
best. It does save them a lot of work.
Pondering the criticism that the university only
serves the vested interests in our society, it
concludes: The university serves society best only
when "its members are left free to pursue the
scholarly interests that are vital to them."
Critics say the university, by nature political,
should take a stand on the vital issues of the day,
the report says. It than charges back to conclude
that the university is not in the political sphere and
should stick to the knowledge extension business.
How does the university decide if its courses are
relevant to society? This is up to the individual,
according to the report. "This is a heavy
responsibility and we need to be as aware as possible
of its implications." And then that discussion ends.
Committee members were Cyril Belshaw
(chairman), W. D. Finn (civil engineering prof),
John Buchanan (ex-chancellor), Ken Lysyk (law
prof), J. R. Mcintosh (education prof), M." W.
Steinberg (English), Robert Clark (academic
planner), Donovan Miller (board of
governors—outside agitator), John Norris (history),
R. W. Stewart (oceanography), David Williams
(senator), plus ex officio members Walter Gage
(administration president) and Jack Parnall
(registrar).
rS.P.C.A. SAYf
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Help wanted
It's that time of year again and
The Ubyssey is craving new staff
members. Reporters, typists and
especially photographers are
welcome. Previous experience not
necessary.
If you want money too, we
also need a copy runner (with his
own car) to take the whole mess
to the printer's.
COMMERCE
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1550 Marine
922-4921 Tuesday,  September 9,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Old Acadia Camp hut turns
playpen for students  kids
By JIM DAVIES
An old Acadia Camp hut is turning into a big
playpen.
It's a day-care centre—the first project of a new
campus group called the UBC Co-operative
Association.
The group is converting the old Acadia
recreation hut at 5589 Agronomy Road into the
centre, which is scheduled to open Sept. 15 with
room for 36 children aged 3 to 6.
Purpose of the centre is to supervise married
students' children while they attend classes or work.
"We will have room for 36 children of faculty,
staff and students on a first come—first serve basis,"
said Wanda Tilley, head of the day care centre.
"Fees will be charged according to ability to
pay and with students' incomes being what they are,
most of the fees will be refunded by the provicial
health and welfare board, which has licensed the
centre."
The board will rebate fees according to couples'
incomes according to a scale which has not yet been
worked out, said Mrs. Tilley.
Operating hours for the centre will be from 8
a.m. to 6 p.m.
"We have three licensed teachers for the centre
and a social worker, Emily Campbell, who came to
us through the faculty of education child study
centre to aid in the first few months," said Carol
Howe, a member of the association.
The centre has support from the Alma Mater
Society and university adminstration. The AMS
loaned it $5,000 and deputy administration
president Bill Armstrong helped organizers get the
2,400-square-foot recreation hut.
Current problems include a shortage of money
and volunteer staff.
"We will welcome all donations of dolls and
toys as well as any volunteer workers who wish to
help with the children," said Mrs. Tilley.
Further plans for the UBC Co-operative
Association include a housing complex for 1,000
married students and their families and a wholesale
food store.
Architecture student Roger Hughes designed
the day care, centre and is working on plans for the
housing co-op.
Hughes and grad student John Tilley, head of
the association, are negotiating with B.C. lands and
forests minister Ray Williston in an effort to get
land for the complex.
Students interested in the day care centre and
the housing co-op are asked to phone 224-5481,
224-5195 or 228-9225.
VARSITY SPORTS
CENTRE LTD.
— John Wurflinger —
EXTENDS A WARM WELCOME TO ALL
RETURNING and NEW STUDENTS
and FACULTY and STAF F
We would like to meet you in person, so why not drop in
and get acquainted and incidentally see our wide range
of Sports Equipment and and Sportswear!
4510 W. 10l*h Ave
224-6414
Nanaimo, Prince George
get regional colleges
Two new regional colleges open in B.C. this fall
despite the provincial government's financing
formula.
Nanaimo's Malaspina College opens with about
600 students in an old hospital building and New
Caledonia College has enroled about 250 students
in classes at Prince George Secondary School.
They bring the total in what is supposed to be
province-wide system of colleges to six.
So far the only others are Selkirk College in
Castlegar, Okanagan College in Vernon, Kelowna,
Penticton and Salmon Arm, Capilano College on the
North Shore and Vancouver City College.
All are housed in what are described as
"temporary"     facilities    and    were    hard-won
concessions from municipal taxpayers—who finance
40 per cent ofthe capital and operating costs.
Unlike Quebec and Ontario, the colleges in B.C.
exist under the Public Schools Act—not the
Universities Act—and the responsibility lies entirely
with local school boards.
The school boards often have trouble agreeing
with neighboring boards and then in selling the idea
to the electorate.
Such colleges in Ontario and Quebec are
initiated, planned and financed by the provincial
governments.
At least two more colleges are expected to open
next September in the Fraser Valley and in
Kamloops.
JhSL
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SUNDAY - 10 A.M. to 11:30 P.M.
— We Are Open On All Statutory Holidays —
For your convenience:
•    A TAKE-OUT SERVICE
Hot poop &
SUBculture
The New Christy Minstrels, a
classical guitar concert and a
regular program of films are three
of the events taking place in the
next week.
The Minstrels' concert, part of
frosh orientation, will be in war
memorial gym at 8:00 p.m. Sept.
15. Admission will be $1.25 for
students, $2 for anyone else.
There is no admission charge
for the classical guitar concert by
Robert Westerburg Wednesday
noon in the SUB auditorium. STB
cultural supervisor Fred Flores
said the concert may pave the way
for a classical guitar workshop.
The regular program of films
scheduled to be shown in the SUB
auditorium will begin after
approval from student council.
Admission will be 75 cents.
f»JX-■ _      .  .. _ _ _
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3261 W. Broadway     736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
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TICKETS AT
INFORMATION DESK SUB Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9,   1969
MONEY PROBLEM  WILL SPELL  CUS DEATH
PORT ARTHUR-Financially
crippled and riven internally by
attacks from both radicals and
moderates, the Canadian Union of
Students staggered out of its 33rd
annual congress facing the very
real possibility of dissolution by
Christmas.
And perhaps more
importantly, the congress had not
come to grips with the charges
laid by radical delegates, observers
and members of the former CUS
secretariat that the national
organization faced total
irrelevance if it did not struggle to
alter its nature and that of the
student councils which form its
base.
The right as wll as the left
was unsuccessful in forcing debate
on the stucture of CUS: a motion
put forward by the University of
Calgary, calling for the creation of
a new national organization, the
Canadian Students' Federation,
died for lack of a seconder.
Sponsored by members of the
universities of Toronto, McGill,
Dalhousie and British Columbia,
the resolution included a
constitution which would have
greatly restricted the ability of the
new union to take political stands.
Neither the McGill nor UBC
representatives were registered as
delegates to the congress, and
Toronto and Dalhousie
delegations refused to support the
actions of a minority of their
members.
When the final plenary
session of the congress broke off
at six a.m. September 3, more
than a third of the items on the
order paper still remained to be
debated and passed; but
antagonisms raised as radicals
insisted the structure of CUS
rather than moderate programs
held  the   key  to  rebuilding  the
"A lot of people here are
going to return to campus and not
do   very   much,"   charged   Barry
McPeake, last year's CUS Atlantic
fieldworker and chairman of the
congress until he spoke at the
final plenary.
"People have to make a
choice," he said, "Either they
fulfill the implications of the
content of our motions in action
and words, or they sustain the
structures which have lead to
failure in the past."
"That choice may mean
staying on their student councils,
or getting the hell off. And when
the real crunch comes, they're
going to stay on council."
"The choice lies not in
keeping the structure," McPeake
said. "We have to destroy them or
tear them apart so they will serve
the people."
But McPeake's charges met
bitter denunciation from John
Gallagher, a r.icmber of the
incoming CUS secretariat, who
labelled the redicals
"opportunistic" and supported
the position taken by incoming
CUS president Martin Loney—that
the union must concentrate on
organizing students around issues
such as housing and
unemployment rather than a
radical analysis of society.
"You're not dealing with
these problems in a historical
way," Gallagher said. "You have
failed to come up with an
alternative program."
The previous evening,
delegates from the University of
Waterloo had also tried to force a
discussion of CUS structure,
stunning the congress by
proposing the national union
become    an    affiliate    of    the
International Workers of the
World, a revolutionary syndicalist
organization smashed by police in
the 1920's.
The Waterloo proposal went
down to defeat by a vote of 17 to
3, after the congress refused to
allow Waterloo to withdraw its
motion.
But the hard logic of finances
may prove to be more of a
deciding factor in the direction of
CUS than either radical or
moderate arguments. At the end
of the congress, only eight student
councils had committed
themselves to the union for the
coming year, although several
other delegations committed
themselves to fight for CUS in
referendums.
With only 39,500 students in
the union, CUS finance
commissions predicted the
organization would go "belly-up
by Christmas" if critical
referendums at Carleton
University and the University of
Toronto did not favor CUS.
Students at Carleton will vote
October 13; Toronto students
October 23. As many as 10 other
referendums may be called during
the forthcoming year.
The precarious state of the
union's finances lead to one
change in CUS operations:
selection of a president-elect,
traditionally one of the duties of
the fall congress, was postponed
until Christmas, when the union
will hold another legislative
meeting.
The decision to elect Martin
Loney's successor at mid-year will
also allow CUS members to
evaluate the actions of the
secretariatin view of events during
the next four months.
While many programs were
left undebated in the hands of the
CUS national council, delegates
from 3 3 schools who attended the
conference—with voting rights
regardless of their membership
status in the union—managed to
pass resolutions on some aspects
of education and on the nature of
the students in society.
Delegates stated their
opposition to the Americanization
of Canadian universities, but also
condemned any attempts to
regulate the number of American
professors by means of a quota
system.
CUS hecvjes condemn 'ivory tower'
approach at 33rd Congress
PORT ARTHUR-Canadian universities are
supporting "an irrational and inhuman status
quo," according to the education policy
statement passed Monday by a large majority of
the universities represented at the 33rd CUS
congress.
While recognizing that the university does
criticize the present system to some extent,
delegates said the "ivory tower" approach to
problems "separates criticism from action," and
produces "academic criticism that is often
merely academic, removed from real material
problems."
The policy statement relates society's
inability to solve the problems of poverty and
inequality to the fragmentation of knowledge
which prevents intellectuals from forming the
"total perspectives" these problems require.
The statement also condemns the
subordination of public good to private profit.
Congress delegates also attacked courses
"directly apologist" of present conditions
which encourage students to think the system is
unchangeable. The policy statement condemns
"ecology courses that don't deal with pollution,
politics courses that deal with politics as what
happens in parliament, and economics courses
that teach Samuelson" ( a major apologist of
the present North American economic system.)
The only real opposition to the statement
came from Martin Shapiro, a congress observer
from McGill University.
Shapiro was received with amusement or
disbelief as he said the document was
"intolerant" on non-socialist views, "perhaps
much narrower than the present educational
system," and had "dangerous tendencies
towards a new kind of fascism."
Delegates applauded CUS secretariat
member John Gallagher when he replied that
the statement called for "something more than
a unified university with a unifying ideology."
Most expressed approval at Gallagher's
statement that the present university system
does not allow different points of view to be
expressed and "can only lead to a
reinforcement of the status quo."
For their part, radical delegates criticized
the document as "too moderate," although
they appeared to agree with the principles of
the statement.
Only two schools voted against adoption of
the statement.
"A professor's ability to deal
with the Canadian reality is not
always based on his nationality,"
they noted.
The delegates also called for
an end to authoritarianism in
education, and presented demands
which would lead to the
development     of    a    "critical
demanded that other university
services, such as bookstores,
libraries and food services be
democratized and organized on a
co-operative basis.
The congress also called for
students to struggle against the
development of the Mid-Canada
Corridor,     a     corporate    and
CUS CONGRESS
REPORTS
from Canadian University Press
university"—one which would do
more than act as an apologist for
the status quo.
The present educational
system, delegates said, "prepared
the student to fit uncritically into
the corporate capitalist structure,
without questioning the social and
moral effects of the system."
"The students in the
classroom should be in control in
the classroom and should be
actively participating in the
classroom," one delegate said.
As well as classroom
democracy, student parity on
academic decision-making bodies,
hiring, firing and promotion
committees,    the    congress    also
government plan to create an
urbanized, industrial strip of land
just south of the Arctic Regions.
The congress noted the plan
would, in effect, be another
tenacle of American control of
Canada, and added that "any
nation which values its
independence and sovereignty
must have control of the
development of its natural
resources.
PANGO PANGO-Great
screaming hordes of
partially-chartreuse ■ acne-ridden
blorgs led a huge rampage of
construction through this island
capital today, claiming the
government was too weak and
scared   to   absobcreate   properly.
UBC STUDENT REP.-JOHN KEATING-Res. YU 8-5144
Get an early start in
the fall fashion parade.
Boutique Pia is ready
with swinging young
clothes for the girl on
the go. Loads of colors,
suede, wool . . . lots of
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3621 W. Broadway
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1412 Marine, W. Van.
922-3610 Tuesday, September 9,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
CUS types kill
bid for new union
PORT ARTHUR (CUP)-An attempt to replace the
Canadian Union of Students had met a quick death.
Members of four universities' delegations attending the
33rd CUS congress drafted a resolution which would have
disbanded the union and created a new national organization
called the Canadian Students' Federation.
Put before the annual general meeting of the union by the
University of Calgary, it died for lack of a seconder.
Sponsored by members of the universities of Toronto,
McGill, Dalhousie and British Columbia, the resolution included
a constitution which would have greatly restricted the ability of
CUS to take political stands.
The Calgary delegation, while it did put the motion befor
the congress, did not argue in favor of it.
Neither McGill nor British Columbia were registered as
delegates of observers to the congress. And neith the Toronto
nor Dalhousie delegations would support the motion drafted by
a minority of their members.
Course unions
queried by CUS
PORT ARTHUR (CUP)-The 33rd CUS Congress called for a
more democratized approach to classroom organizing.
An unopposed resolution criticized existing course unions for
■being divorced from most students in their course, being monopolized
by a minority of "students with career ambitions in their discipline",
and for limiting their action to administrative matters.
Delegates called for a new policy whereby unions would only be
formed after small groups of students in a class had initiated critiques
of the class content and structure, and after "the mass of students
within the discipline have articulated some concrete demands."
Instead of working so closely with faculty, the new kind of
course union would write critiques of both the course and its
textbooks, confront the professor openly in the classroom, and
organize counter-courses, as these appeared necessary to the members.
Observer Ron Thompson raised the only debate on the new
concept when he proposed an amendment which would start a program
of organized cheating at the class level to challenge the whole system of
marks and grades and the way class content is determined.
Thompson's "cheating" rejects methods like getting someone else
to write one's exam of sleeping with the professor. In his
.non-competitive system, as soon as an exam was handed around the
students would gather together to discuss it, divide up the work to be
done, perhaps bring relevant books and notes into the room to
.broaden the scope of their answers."
Thompson asked the delegates to adopt the first step in the
system by starting to "cheat by co-operation in the classroom".
The amendment was defeated by a narrow margin, with many
delegates abstaining.
Congress supports Canada,
cool to quota on U. S. profs
SLASHING EXPENSES CUT...
Budget reduction rests
on Oct. CUS referendums
PORT ARTHUR (CUP)-Financially crippled
by referendum defeats in the last school year, the
Canadian Union of Students slashed $85,000 off
last year's expanses and $5 3,000 from projected
expenses this year for a deflated 1969-70 budget of
only $94,500.
And that revenue figure rests on two key
referendums at University of Toronto and Carleton
in October. The union must close out, probably by
Christmas, if CUS loses support at those campuses,
the finance committee concluded at the CUs annual
Congress last week.
Toronto and Carleton would bring in revenues
of almost $35,000, including money from the CUS
Travel Plan. A loss at Toronto especially would
require "such a drastic cut in secretariat staff that
no further operation of the Union is sensible, the
committee said.
Incoming CUS president Martin Loney
proposed expenditures for the 1969-70 year at
$148,600 to maintain programs at their present
level. In making their cuts, the finance committee:
Reduced the budget for the CUS National
Council to $4,000 from a proposed $5,400,
anticipating a reduced number of members;
Cut research money to $8,300 from $11,000;
Slashed a CUS grant to a national student
newspaper to replace issue to $16,000 from a
proposed $20,000.
Management costs were cut almost $14,000,
but much of this cost was redistributed through
project  financing.  Each  CUS project is budgeted
separately to include staff salaries, but the result is
less money for each project itself, although the
absolute amount budgeted remains the same.
CUS president Martin Loney said at the end of
the Congress that the drop in income would make
CUS "a small part of what happens on Canadian
campuses this year.
"But CUS will still be a forum for debate and
provide full-time people with experience to try and
translate that debate into action on the campus."
Beside Toronto and Carleton, 10 schools
representing 5 7,500 members are up for
referendums that might go pro-CUS. Calgary
University, with 6,000 students, was not included as
a possibility for re-opening membership in the
Union.
The committee also included a $38,500 profit
on the Travel Plan, although the plan would be
"crippled if too many campuses reject CUS this year.
If so, the plan might be administered through
the Ontario Union of Students and other provincial
unions which have kept more members than the
national union.
But the Congress seemed to agree that without
Toronto, no Union was possible. The feeling was
reflected in an alternate budget—the "belly-up by
Christmas" budget-which set out what the Union
would need to meet its financial obligations if it
folds in December.
The belly-up budget assumes half costs for
variable items such as field workers, and full costs
for fixed items such as rent and insurance.
CUS craps on classes
PORT ARTHUR (CUP)-Students must
"reverse the power relationships between the
instructor and the students," according to a
resolution on "authoritarian structure in the
classroom" passed Tuesday (September 2) by the
33rd CUS congress.
The resolution attacked verbatum note-taking,
memorization for examinations and long reading
lists for leaving little time for critical thinking.
The resolution further attacked this situation
because it "prepares the student to fit uncritically
into the corporate capitalist structure," without
questioning the social and moral effects of the
system.
Memorial    University   delegate    John   Harris
Called this section "an attempt to relate the
ecomomic factors in our society right to the
classroom, since the role of the professor is that of
the boss."
The students in the classrooms should be in
control in the classroom and should actively
participating in the classroom," he said.
The only opposition to the resolution was led
by Calgary delegate Bob Ferrier, who stated that
"the problem is more with the student than with
the system," and that "the student should open up"
and participate more often.
Ferrier was supported by Ken Sunquist of
Regina who said the picture of an authoritarian
classroom "just doesn't fit into what I know."
PORT ARTHUR (CUP)-The Canadian Union
of Students Congress voted almost unanimously to
oppose    the    Americanization    of    Canadian
'CUS not for us'
UBC will probably never re-join the Canadian
Union of Students as it exists today, Alma Mater
Society external affairs officer Mike Doyle, said
Monday.
UBC students rejected CUS in a referendum last
year.
"CUS alienates all those schools outside of
Ontario, both east and west," said Doyle. "UBC was
- so alienated from CUS it was impossible for us to
remain in. They (CUS) failed to comprehend the
cultural and value differences in the various regions
of Canada."
Last year UBC paid $15,000, or approximately
75 cents per student, for CUS services.
■ When asked what the AMS would do with the
$15,000, Doyle said he is concerned with
reorganizing student government involving "a
comprehensive managment analysis."
v The B.C. union of students will be much more
'applicable to UBC than was CUS. UBC isn't
interested in revolutionary rhetoric,   said Doyle.
Doyle said that the future of BCUS and CUS
hinges on the AMS conference Oct. 4-5 when the
structure of the student government will be
discussed.
universities, but rejected a quota system that would
directly restrict the number of U.S. professors
teaching in Canada.
The delegates noted in a resolution at the 33rd
CUS Congress that "a professor's ability to deal
with Canadian reality is not always based on his
nationality."
An amendment to set up departments of
Canadian Studies in our universities was soundly
defeated.
"The whole university should discuss Canadian
content, not just one blasted department," said
Brandon delegate Harko Bhaget.
Toronto delegate Chris Szalwinski pointed out
a separate institute would not solve the problem of
Americanization of other courses.
"Some American professors have the concepts
and experience to understand that reality, and
conversely, some Canadian professors—often trained
in U.S. graduate schools—present an American
discipline that has no relation to our Canadian
reality."
The Congress resolved that all academic
openings in universities must be advertised in
Canada*, that Canadian graduate schools
emphasizing the Canadian perspective be established
to orient faculty toward Canadian problems; and
that students participate in hiring, promotion and
tenure of professors, and in curriculum committees.
''' <^&«ii*ll8*
'•* *
\>   *~
Interested in SELLING?
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ADVERTISING
SALES REP
for the
UBYSSEY
This is an excellent opportunity to gain
sales experience and to earn worthwhile
commissions for part-time work.
The Publications Office needs two
second or third-year business-minded
students who will work hard for 10-12
hours a week.
If interested apply to the
Publications Office
Room 241, Student Union Building Page   10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9,   1969
BOOZE WILL   FLOW, BUT
Pit still in ballroom
A "minor" political hassle over control of the
Pit has slowed the creation of a permanent site for
the student beer garden.
Working plans for a permanent Pit were drawn
up last spring, but Alma Mater Society co-ordinator
Dave Grahame said the earliest possible opening date
is the end of January.
"The internal problems have been worked out
now, so I'd rather not say anything," Grahame said.
Although Grahame refused to elaborate, the
"internal problems" are generally believed to be
jurisdictional hassles between the pit management
committee and the AMS council.
Present plans call for a permanent Pit to be
located behind the Thunderbird Shop in the
basement of SUB. A temporary pit will be set up in
the SUB ballroom.
Grahame said pit passes will be available Sept.
22 and the Pit should be open by Sept. 30. Planned
hours are Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, 4:30
p.m. to 11:30 p.m.
Application for the position of student
supervisor in charge of day-to-day Pit operation will
be open until Friday.
The Pit committee consisting of two SUB
management committee members and three other
students will make recommendations to council on
Pit policy.
New, mind-expanding
Science I program arrives,
brother to Arts I course
By KEN RUDOLPH
Science I, a comprehensive program for
freshmen, arrives this year. "We do not want to
chop freshmen into so many parts, we want an
integrated program," says philosophy prof Ed Levy,
organizer of the new Science I course.
"Science I will help give science students a social
conscience," says student activist Stan Persky.
Along with Levy and Persky, Steve Straker, Ed
Hundert and Eric Leed are the instuctors for a new
mind-expanding six unit course designed to help
students understand the 20th Century, not just their
test-tubes.
The subject matter will range from Galileo to
Santayana.
The two-hour seminars of 12 students each will
feature directed reading but no compulsory reading,
papers discussed on an individual basis and no
comprehensive exam at the end of the session.
Germinated during last year's Teach-in, a
follow-up of the Faculty Club invasion, Science I is
structured similarly to Arts I, being offered at UBC
for the third year.
The unstructured class idea was pioneered by Joe
Tussman at the University of California at Berkeley
about six years ago.
ftpjfoes wth
ideas
548 Granville, Vancouver 2
MU. 2-1022
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BUY NOW AND SAVE Tuesday, September 9,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
The muckraker's manual.
by John Twigg
Personnel feud has SUB agog;
McGregor fears tower protest
iXC.
PIZZA
The Student Union Building
has indigestion—there's scandal
brewing in its intestines.
Alma Mater Society
treasurer Chuck Campbell fired
games area manager Dermot Boyd
without consulting council. Also,
one of Campbell's blue blazer
cronies, Graham Vance was hired
as interim SUB building manager.
Boyd and Vance both
expressed interest in the job, and
now it looks like Campbell is
worrying about his own job.
And to make it old home
week, Roger (Big Train) McAfee
was seen wandering around SUB's
passages with a tape recorder
recording his impressions of the
building.
Big Rog was AMS president
in '64-'65, the year UBC students
voted to make SUB a reality.
Roger hasn't been able to forget
his baby since, even though he is
now a prosecutor in juvenile
court.
Peter Braund, AMS
president in '66-'67, now has a job
with National Student Marketing
Corporation, an American
company that owns the
Thunderbird Shop.
Braund was an outspoken
council member when the vote to
give NSMC the SUB franchise was
taken.
Treasurer Campbell, who
has been on campus as long as
anyone can remember, will
probable be worrying about his
short and curlies for a long time,
regardless of what the building
manager fiasco outcome is.
The reason? Treasurers for
the past few years have lacked the
courage to call for much-needed
increases in grants to some
organizations, and the AMS fee
has not been increased since SUB
was voted in.
Thus the incoming treasurer
has been left holding a bigger and
bigger bag each year, but this year
may be the year the treasurer will
be forced to call an increase in the
$29 AMS fee.
*   *   *
More increases which you
have little power over are in
parking fees and SUB cafeteria
prices.
Food prices were hiked
about 10 per cent and the amount
of food in each serving has been
reduced. A glaring example is the
size of the french fries tray, which
is a mere rowboat of its former
bathtub size.
The parking fee has been
upped to $22.50 from $15 for
faculty and staff; preferred student
parking from $10 to $15; regular-
student parking is still $5.
UBC PReports has ancillary
services head John F. McLean
saying the increases are to meet a
$7 5,000 deficit in parking
services.
He also says the food price
increases were the result of
increased food and labor costs.
But then UBC PReports
says, "UBC ancillary services,
which include traffic and parking,
food services, bookstore and
residences, are operated by the
university on a non-profit basis."
Oh really? When was the
last time the bookstore profits
were released to the public? If
you don't believe it is making a
killing, take the labels of some of
the books and see how much
markup you are paying.
The article goes on to say:
"The costs of operation and
capital for expansion are provided
through the sale of services to
faculty, staff, students and
visitors." That means you and I,
fellow student niggers.
Until ancillary services
proves it is losing money, any
price increases should be looked
on with extreme skepticism. Seen
any good cases lately? If so, tell
us.
And while we're on the
administration's PR sheet, biology
prof Marian Jakeway wrote an
interesting article in the latest
edition (erudition?).
She said The Ubyssey is an
example of student apathy
because  students do not protest
its narrow-minded views. "As a
result," she says, "the paper
remains the way it is—biased,
inaccurate and unrepresentative of
the broad range of student views."
Would you like to have such*
a narrow-minded prof? I suppose
The Sun is a good paper because it
represents the broad majority.
(Continued overleaf)
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IMPORTANT NOTICE
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The Bookstore and
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Monday Through Thursday - Sept. 8-11
HAVEN'T YA HEARD
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4393 WEST 10TH AVENUE — 224-4144
VANCOUVER 8, B. C. Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  September 9,  1969
More mild muckraking
From Page 11
Take this, Marian Jakeway:
Murray Kennedy was a member of
the Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity
last year and is the same Kennedy
who ran for fraternity king with a
campaign slogan of "Wanted: a
Kennedy who isn't shot down all
the time." Largely because of
publicity in The Ubyssey, he was
withdrawn from the competition.
Guess who walked into The
Ubyssey office Monday with
shoulder-length hair and an eager
"give me a job" smile? None other
than the same Murray Kennedy.
The wheel turns.
Still on UBC PReports,
(edited by Jim Banham and
presided over by information
officer Arnie Myers) gather in this
quote from Myers on who
controls the information
department:
"We report directly to the
president (who reports to the
board of governors). We are an
administrative and not ancillary
(self-supporting) department.
"Our budget is administered
by the board of governors."
And who is on the BoG?
Chairman is lumber magnate
Walter Koerner, assisted by
lumber exec Richard Bibbs;
fishing exec Donovan Miller; John
Liersch; lawyer Art Fouks. A
sixth member will be chosen later
this year by Lieutenant-Governor
Jack Nicholson.
Sun publisher Stuart Keate
resigned from the BoG this year,
reportedly because it was taking
up too much of his time.
The bell tower is alive and
hunching regularly on the half
hour.
Ceremonies head Dr.
Malcolm F. McGregor said a small,
private dinner was held at
chairman   Koerner's  recently,  at
The BOOKFINDER
Textbooks - Study Guides
Technical Books - Manuals
General  Interest &  Fiction
We also sell books
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4444 W 10th
2 blks from gate - 228-8933
which Leon Ladner, who donated
the $200,000 edifice, was
honored by Nicholson unveiling a
plaque.
But McGregor was uncertain
if an outdoor dedication
ceremony for students would be
held. "We will test the atmosphere
in the next few weeks and see if
they want one," he said.
McGregor explained the
"atmosphere" concerned student
demonstrations. "We don't want
to hold a ceremany and then have
a demonstration," he said, "it
would be an embarrassment to
Mr. Ladner.
"Some students like the bell
tower, you know. And besides,
Mr. Ladner gave us a $200,000
tower, not $200,000."
What say you, students?
Ever notice there's a record
price war on in town? At some
places albums cost $3.29, others
$3.98.
The war started when A and
B Sound established itself as a
discount store at Granville and
Dunsmuir. The establishment
stores treated it as a mosquito bite
and hoped it would go away. It
didn't.
Then they tried repellent, in
the form of a rival discount store
known as Stereo-Mart a few doors
north of A and B.
Stereo-Mart is owned and
operated by Kelly's Records, the
oldest record store chain in B.C.,
with the express purpose of
competing with A and B.
That explains why the
manager ofthe now-closed Kelly's
store at Georgia and Seymour was
seen only two blocks away in the
Stereo-Mart store chatting with*
the cashier.
And our spies (how's that
for a gossip column cliche?)
inform us the Thunderbird Shop
in the SUB basement is selling
albums at discount prices.
An interesting letter from
the Commission of Inquiry into
the   Non-medical   Use   of  Drugs
(formed by the federal
government in May) arrived in
The Ubyssey's mail Monday.
It said the commission
invites written briefs from all
interested persons and will hold
public hearings as well. It says the
commission has been given
authority to protect the
anonymity of those who wish to
give evidence.
Submissions should be made
by Nov. 1 to the commission at
the Vanier Building, 222 Nepean
Street, Ottawa. But get this, they
want eight copies. Ho hum . . .
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OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Committee Positions Vacant
All students who are interested in applying for positions on the following committees please submit a letter
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Student Union Buildingr
1. Men's Athletic Committee — one position
2. Winter Sports Centre Committee — two positions
3* Traffic Committee — four positions
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WHITHER BCUS?
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
Useless union queried
The short life of the B.C.
Union of Students is in danger.
"A lot of soul searching will
have to be done in order for the
BCUS   to   survive," Alma Mater
Society   president   Fraser   Hodge
said Monday.
He said the union—in existence
less than a year—will hold a
conference Sept. 20 and 21.
50 Arts 1 applicants
refused for space lack
As many as 50 people who applied for the Arts I program will be
left out in the cold.
"The program will hold 360 people in three sections of 120 each
but we are over enrolled by almost fifty students," Dr. D. M. Beach,
co-chairman ofthe program said Monday.
He said there are no plans for enlargement of the program this
year because it is the third and last of the three-year trial period.
The Arts II program, the second year continuation of Arts I, is
not offered this year. The class, which last year had one faculty
member and 20 students, was to have been enlarged to at least 80
students and four faculty but preparations were not started in time to
offer it this year.
Proposals to present an enlarged Arts II for 1970-71 are being
dfafted for presentation to the senate. Ian Ross said he was fairly
confident that the proposals will succeed.
Hodge charged that the union
has done nothing but "pull its
head in" since it was formed last
January.
BCUS is a federation of
student councils with
representatives from UBC, Simon
Fraser University, University of
Victoria, Notre Dame University,
B.C. Institute of Technology,
Capilano College, Selkirk Junior
College and Vancouver City
College.
"I'm fed up with the people in
BCUS," Hodge said. "Erwin Epp,
the representative from
-Vancouver City College (who is
now at UBC) is the only one who
has a head on his shoulders."
The committee representing
UBC at the conference has jjQt
been decided but will definitely
be led by Hodge. AMS external
affairs officer Mike Doyle and
vice-president Tony Hodge could
also appear on the committee.
Committee
wants you
to tour B.C.
The Community Information
Committee is looking for students
interested in touring the B.C.
boonies to speak to the natives.
The committee, a revised
edition of the high school
visitation committee, will be
financed by the Alma Mater
Society, committee chairman
Susan Shaw, ed. 4, said Monday.
Students will be sent to towns
trhoughout B.C. where they will
visit high schools and service
clubs.
Miss Shaw said the object of
the visits will be to acquaint the
taxpayers with the problems of
higher education in B.C. and to
answer questions from a student's
point of view.
The students will tour in
groups of five for a week at a
time. Miss Shaw said the AMS will
provide rented cars for the
students.
An organizational meeting will
be held Wednesday noon in Sub
211. The first tour begins Oct. 6.
PANGO PANGO-Blorg
overseas diplomat Gray Glance
today returned from his
enliggtening trip to the
psychedelic confines of
Hottawatta with the news that the
revolution is alive and gasping.
Frosh frolics
If you are a poor
misguided first-year student
who got a notice from the
frosh orientation committee
telling you to go to a certain
room at a certain noon-hour
this week, it's in SUB.
You are one of 1,500
freshmen invited to this
experimental advisory
program by the poor
misguided orientation
committee.
If you're interested,
show up at the concrete
monument at the appointed
time and see what happens.
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New and Used Typewriters and Adding Machines
Portables with case. Reg.
70.00 value. While they
last    49.50
Brand new 15" Standard
Typewriters. Reg. over
$300. Discount Price 249.50
Brand New Electric Portables. From 159.50
I.B.M. Selectrics ___ 395.50
Brand New Electric Adding
Machines. While they last.
Each 89.50
Filing Cabinets, from 39.50
Lovely "Decorator" Office
Chairs, all colors 19.50
New Steno Chairs 29.50
Near New Standard Typewriters, fully reconditioned.
New machine gtee. Reg.
165.00. Our Discount Price,
Each 95.00
Older Guaranteed Standards, from 29.50
Full Size Electric Typewriters,
all makes. 79.50 to 450.00
Brand New Electronic Calculators. Reg. $1500-$2000.
Hurry for these 695.00
Desks, from 24.50
Carbon  Paper Vi Price
Remember Poison Typewriters have the greatest selection
and the Lowest Prices in Canada.
TOP PRICE FOR TRADE-INS!
30-Day Exchange Privilege on Every Machine Sold
With No Depreciation Penalty.
POLSON TYPEWRITERS Ltd.
458 W Broadway - 879-0631
OPEN DAILY INCL. SAT., 9-6. FRI., 9-9
OBJECTIVE: CAREER
The Regular Officer Training Plan is not for dreamers. It's
for the clear-thinking, bright young man with a determination to
embark on a meaningful and self-satisfying career.
The ROTP has one purpose: to make you work hard and
train hard so that you come out a complete man as an officer
in the Canadian Armed Forces.
You attend one of the Canadian Military Colleges where you
may earn a Bachelor's degree in arts, sciences, or engineering.
And you'll study for this degree in both of our official
languages.
This program provides uniforms, board and a modest wage.
Since vacancies at the Military Colleges are limited you may
be sponsored at a Canadian university.
To us,this career plan is one ofthe most meaningful available
to any young man growing up in Canada today. But it's not for
dreamers. It's for the young man who has a strong eye to a
responsible military career.
For further information write to the
Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre,
545 Seymour St., Vancouver, B.C.
THE REGULAR OFFICER TRAINING PLAN-NOT FOR DREAMERS Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  September 9,   1969
New national newspaper?
Maybe by mid-October
PORT ARTHUR (CUP)-Students across
Canada may be reading a new national magazine by
mid-October.
To be distributed by participating student
newspapers with their regular issues, the magazine
will carry articles considered to be of national
interest, rather then exclusively student concerns.
Almost half of the funds needed to produce the
publication were allocated for it at the 33rd
congress of the Canadian Union of Students. The
rest of the financing will come from sales to
subscribers, mostly student newspapers.
The magazine is an independent project being
run with co-operation between CUS and Canadian
University Press, the national student newspaper
co-op.
Content will be decided by a six-man editorial
board composed of two members from each of the
national organizations and two independent
members.
The proposed editor of the publication is Don
Kossick, former editor of the Carillon, student
newspaper at the Regina campus of the University
of Saskatchewan, and a fromer CUS field-worker.
"We  hope  to   be  able to  bring to national
attention some of the crucial problems existing in
our country that are usually ignored by the regular
press," Kossick said.
"The regular news media either ignore the
reasons behind the headlines or cover them in a very
insufficient way. We hope to make analysis part of
every story.
Boot buffs buff
Shinerama, the mass shoe-shining project for
first-year students will become a reality Friday.
Those taking part should be at the SUB
information desk by 9:30 to register and pick up a
list of directions for the day. Group leaders will see
that the bootlickers get back to the campus at the
end of the day.
Passes for the Saturday night dance will be
given to those taking part.
Proceeds for Shinerama go to the" Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation.
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
.2609 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
Hosiery, Handbags, Boots —
both Men's & Women's
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a* visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10% discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE BETWEEN 10th & 11th - 738-9833
CLARKE
SIMPKINS
USED CARS
'68   TRIUMPH   TR-4AIRS   -    19,000
miles,   Excellent   Shape $0599
'66 FIAT  850  COUPE  -  A  fun  car
with   great   economy $1299
'66   SUNBEAM   TIGER   -   260 CID
V-8    $2199
'65   ISUZU  BELLETT-Two  to   choose
from    $999
'65   VOLVO   1225   —   2   Dr.   Good
Condition     $1599
'62   VAUXHALL   VICTOR   4   Dr.   -
Only 31,000 original  miles $635
'60 ENVOY 4 Dr. Sedan $385
CLARKE SIMPKINS
IMPORTS
7th Ave. & Burrard
"Nearly   Everyone  Likes
Clarke   Simpkins   Service"
RE-6-4282
WELCOME STUDENTS -
From Your UBC Bookstore
You can get all your Books and Supplies with ease and
at a saving at the UNIVERSITY - OPERATED BOOKSTORE
Buy All Text Books except -
Medicine Social Work   Dentistry
Rehab. Medicine   Law Librarianship
Pharmacy Architecture    Planning
at THE ARMORIES
Monday - Friday - During September
HOURS: This Week to Thursday - Open to 9 p.m.
Friday and Subsequent 8:45 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
STATIONERY - ART MATERIALS - PAPERBACKS
Engineering and Gym Supplies, etc.
At the Regular Store on the Main Mall
REBATE POLICY
University of British Columbia students get a 5% rebate on all 'terns purchased at the Bookstore. All registered students, including GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE students in regular attendance at the winter and summer sessions, will be eligible
for the rebate.
To obtain the rebate, students should save their cash register receipt slips — which are not transferable — and present them
within 12 months of the purchase date. Rebates will be given from April 1st to the 31st of May for Winter Session Students.
Summer Session Students will present their receipts at the close of the Summer Session.
Students presenting their Alma Mater Society card or Summer Session Association card with their accumulated CASH REGISTER RECEIPT SLIPS will receive their 5% rebate in cash.
STUDENTS are reminded that POSITIVELY NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES
will be made without presenting the cash register receipt slips. Tuesday, September 9,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
Thunderbird Soccer
is minus some wings
END JIM BLAIR goes for a gain behind the blocking of fellow
end, basketball star Dave Rice (82). Although the Birds lost 11-0,
the coaches are unusually optimistic.
Football team
has problems
The UBC Thunderbird varsity football team opens
its 1969 schedule this Saturday evening in Tacoma,
Washington, with a new quarterback, shuffled line-up,
and a grand total of 40 bodies on the roster.
The new quarterback is Al Larson, a 5' 10" 160 pound first
year jock from Kelowna who throws the ball extremely well. He
will relieve incumbent Roger Gregory who will better be able to
utilize his speed at his new position, left halfback.
Paul Danylin and Ron Fowler will likely round out the starting
backfield with veteran fullback Dave Corcoran moving to middle
linebacker.
Another noteable addition to the lineup will be ex-basketball
forward Dave Rice who will be seeing a good deal of action at
offensive end.
The presence of Rice will be of some consolation to head
coach Frank Gnup as his first string stalwart Rod Smith had the
misfortune of breaking his arm in an 11-0 loss to the Seattle
Cavaliers in a controlled scrimage on Saturday.
The opposition for the Birds on Saturday in Tacoma will be
Pacific Lutheran University, who will doubtlessly prove an
adequate opening test. PLU have 25 returning lettermen from last
year's club which downed 40-0 in their only meeting.
Lutheran will be led by their two strong running backs, Dave
Holstad and Gary Hammer, the team's leading scorers last year.
The first home game for the Birds this year will be on
Saturday Sept. 20 against College of Idaho.
Anyone wishing to pay for either the varsity or the Jayvees is
welcome to call Frank Gnup at any time or location or drop in to
the Athletic Office at War Memorial Gym.
dick button photo
The UBC Thunderbird soccer
team is in need of a multitude of
players this year says head coach
Joe Johnson.
According to Johnson most
of this year's team will be made
up of new faces as few players
from last year have returned. To
date quite a few players have
turned out for the Jayvee
Tomahawks, but there still is a
shortage for the Birds.
The team had an excellent
season last year, narrowly
missing the league title at the
very end of the season. Johnson
feels that in spite of the
rebuilding necessary this year,
there is no reason for the team
not to  do just as  well if not
better this year.
Anyone interested can
contact Johnson at War
Memorial gym.
SWIM LESSONS
Every morning of the week
for the next two months UBC
students can get swimming
lessons at Empire pool.
Register for the classes which
are divided into Tuesday,
Wednesday, Friday and Monday,
Thursday sets. The classes for all
levels of Red Cross and Royal
Life Saving awards are about an
hour long.
VOLLEYBALL
Volleyball practices for both
varsity and junior varsity teams
will be Tuesday and Wednesday,
Memorial Gym at 4:30 p.m.
Players and a manager are
needed.
The team's first practices will
be Wednesday, 4:30 p.m. and
Thursday, 12:30 on the New
Spencer fields, which are behind
the Winter Sports Centre.
FIELD HOCKEY
Head blorg Crazy Tenneb led
his establishment blorgs to an
overwhelming 39-11 victory over
the challenging Pee-end Packers in
Wednesday's tri-annual field
hickey match.
Tenneb, foaming at the mouth
and drooling at the ears, reaped a.
personal benefit in the fourth half
when he announced his team "had
Godard on its side."
Observers say the threat of
enforced literature on the masses
made them kick the Pee-end's
♦balls out of bounds.
Paricipants will get
a glimpse of beautiful B.C. during
a ferry trip to Victoria and a
moonlight cruise along
Vancouver's shoreline. The
Alcoholism Foundation of B.C.
will hold a reception Sept. 14.
tf&i&A
mm
EAT IN .TAKE OUT • DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
Complete Auto
Service
To All Mokes
• Electronic Tune-Up
• Brake Service
Disc and Standard
• Wheel Balancing
• Exhaust Repairs
■*%■
10 YEARS IN THIS
LOCATION
UNIVERSITY  SHELL
SERVICE
Peter Lissack
4314 W 10th Ave.
224-0828
ATTENTION.
UBC, SFU, VCC Students
GASH
FOR DISCONTINUED
BOOKS
Sell them at the Armoury
September 8-12
Monday to Friday
Both Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trade marks which identify only the product of Coca-Cola Ltd.
Who's
got the
ball?
Who cares! Who's got the Coke? Coca-Cola has the
refreshing taste you never get tired of. That's why things go
better with Coke, after Coke, after Coke.
Authorized bottler of Coca-Cola under contract with Coca-Cola ltd.
WOMETCO (B.C.) LIMITED
1818 CORNWALL, VANCOUVER Page  16
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9,  1969
Tax expert gets post
UBC has appointed four new department heads
and had created two new institutes on campus.
Milton Moore, a Canadian taxation expert, is the
new head of economics.
Moore's writings include Forestry Tenures in
Canada.
Crawford S. Holling has been named director of
the new institute of animal resource ecology.
Holling also chairs the management committee of
the resourcee sciences centre which is backed by a
$500,000 grant from the Ford Foundation.
Peter Larkin, former head of the institute of
fisheries, has been named head of zoology
department.
Geophysics head R. D. Russell, is the head of the
new institute of astronomy and space science,
formally the institute of earth and planetary
sciences.
The  broadened  institute  will  include graduate
courses leading to masters degrees in areas of
astronomy, moon and planet structure, and the
birth of the solar system.
William D. Finn, head of civil engineering, is the
new dean of applied science and Dr. D. A. Moore is
now head of electrical engineering. Both positions
were formally held by Frank Noakes, who died Aug.
Harger to stay?
The Zoology department is again reviewing
Robin Harger's bid to remain on the faculty.
Harger was informed last year he will be
released at the end of June, 1970. Although he was
popular with his students, the department claimed
Harger did not do sufficient research.
Harger's new bid to remain on the faculty is
now under review by a committee of Zoology profs.
'TWEEN CLASSES
School year: off to a slow start
Tween Classes is the campus
notice board so to find out what's
happening and where, read 'tween
classes.
To place a notice in 'Tween
Classes come to the Ubyssey
office on the second floor of SUB
(north east corner) and fill in the
appropriate form in the correct
manner. Nothing is printed that
contains errors or omissions.
Tween classes deadline occurs at
12:45 p.m. the day before
publication.
This deadline is observed
religiously.
TODAY
KARATE CLUB
Workout  in  SUB  ballroom at 7:00
p.m.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Social Action Week in clubs lounge
all day September 9 to 13.
CLAM
Bethune!     National     Film     Board
documentary, SUB Auditorium, noon.
Wear
TUXEDO RENTALS
10% UBC Discount
JIM   ABERNETHY,   MANAGfcR
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
WEDNESDAY
PHRATERES
B.C. Night at International House
starts 7:30 p.m. Free coffee and
donuts ... all welcome.
AMS EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Organizational meeting of
community information at noon in
SUB meeting room N (211).
THURSDAY
PHOTO SOC
General meeting at noon in SUB
room 245.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Opening meeting at noon and clubs
room.
UBC RADIO
General   meeting   at   noon   in   SUB
rdorp 215. All welcome.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
Open executive meeting at noon in
SUB 211.
CLAM
The Nature of Human Nature with
Louis Feldhammer from SFU, noon,
Bu. 106.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Square   Dance   Club   organizational
meeting at noon in SUB 207 (L).
FRIDAY
UBC ROWING CLUB
Organizational meeting at noon in
SUB 211 (N).
PHRATERES
Meeting at noon in Buch. 104.
9 WEST COAST UNDERGROUND
FILMS
RIMMER . RAZUTIS - RODAN
Vancouver Art Gallery
New Film Workshop
736 Main St.
Sept. 11, 7:30 and 9:00
Sept. 12 & 13, 7:30 & 9:00
Adm. $1.00
GRADUATE
STUDENTS
VOTE
New Constitution
Official Ballot
Self-Addressed Envelope
Campus Mail
By Sept. 19
^^^^.               «^                        ,„„*/ ■*.      --^^^^^^^^J     ■■•*•■   j.       ^j.+^ft/> ,**■*.       ^^^^^M
*•'
■__      \    GREENBERG & L0PTS0N    /   "
.    t.
■■^V        • AUSTIN • MG. • TRIUMPH        *^^H
^^^^~                         .ROVER • LOTUS                   _^M
^^BB                    See them today at                    ^^^H
/  333 NORTH RD., C0Q.       936-4255   \   ,
i.
7                                               hi J->                             tf*■ ■ 11                                              l              '"'•*
^—~" "      ^^±^£           '~~~^ ****^^.
.4-toOO-^                                    -                       ■■■
i
UBC STUDENT REP.-JOHN KEATING-Res. YU 8-5144
CLASSIFIED
Rate:s Students. Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 75* 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines. 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25-t;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
THE GASTOWN REVUE. TUES-
day. Sept. 16 12:30-2:30. SUB Ballroom, free admission, dance sponsored on behalf of the Inter Fraternity Council by Alpha Delta
Phi, Alhpa Tau Omega and Delta
Upsilon.	
MON., SEPT. 15TH, WAR MEM-
orial Gym. The Fab New Christy
Minstrels. 8:00 p.m. Students
$1.25. Others, $2.00. Wow! Wow!
Phi and Delta Upsilon.	
Greetings
12
Information Wanted
13
Lost Sc Found
14
FOUND—TRAINING SHOES, SIZE
6%—on campus.  Call 224-7271.
LOST: LARGE BROWN ENVEL-
ope of student summer placement
reports. Very important. Please
phone   738-2250.       	
Rides & Car Pools
15
RIDE NEEDED FROM NORTH
Vancouver (20th & Chesterfield) to
UBC. Working hours 8.00-4:00
Monday to Friday. Call Sue, 988-
1566.	
DO YOU NEED A RIDE FOR 8:30
classes from Fraser via 25th or
16th  Ave.   Call Walter,   TR 6-7706.
Special Notices
16
U.B.C. BEAUTY SALON (NEAR
campus). Complete hair care. 5736
University  Blvd.   Tel.   228-8942.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP. 4 BAR-
bers to serve you. Open 6 days a
week.   5736   University   Blvd.	
YOUNG PEOPLE: HELP PUT
soul into the community. Take
action in short term projects.
Share your ideas and yourself.
Organizational meeting, Sunday,
Sept. 14, 5:30 p.m. Coffee provided. Bring supper and get Involved. Canadian Memorial, 1811 W.
I6th.  __
SCUBA COURSE AQUA SOC.
NAUI certification. Starts Monday, Sept. 15. Sign up Outdoors
Club lounge before Friday, Sept.
12.	
Travel Opportunities 17
ONE WAY CHARTER TICKET TO
London, England, leaves Sept. 15,
$113.   Tel.   266-9675.	
WANT TO TAKE A TRIP? COME
Monday night for the blastoff
with   New Christy Minstrels.
Wanted-Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
59 JUNE MGBGT AS NEW, IM-
maculate condition, must sell.
731-9663.	
62 ANGLIA. GOOD TRANSPOR-
tation,  $250.  Call 261-1867.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
I AM WILLING TO PAY TOP
prices for good, clean Volkswagen
—any year. Phone Hans, 263-8121.
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Rentals—Miscellaneous
33
PA -SOUND CAR RENTALS
available from UBC Radio (SUB
235). Book in advance for noon
hours.
Scandals
37
IS IT TRUE THAT MILT HAR-
rell is bringing Ann Jacobs to
the  Christy  Minstrel  concert?!
JOIN THE BILLBOARD CLUB
and win $457. Tickets available
from UBC Radio types in SUB
235.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable rates.
321-2102.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Male
52
STUDENT REQUIRED AS MAN-
ager for SUB "Pit". Responsibilities are (1) Manage Pit three
evenings per week, (2) Secure
necessary licences, (3) Other associated duties. Apply in writing,
stating qualifications, to Box 180,
SUB.   Applicant must be over 21.
Applications   close   Sept.   16.	
INTERESTED IN SELLING?
Then why not be an advertising
salesman for The Ubyssey? This Is
an excellent opportunity to gain experience and to earn worthwhile
commissions for part-time work."
Reliable 2nd or 3rd year business-
minded students who will work hard
for 10 or 12 hours weekly are needed. If interested apply to the Pub-
lications Office,  Rm.  241,  SUB.
Male or Female 53
WANTED: SILKSCREENERS AND
handpainters. Apply bringing"
sample of work to Mamooks in
SUB,   Room   249.	
MEN WANTED, WOMEN WANT-
ed! 8:00 p.m. Monday, Sept. 15th
to listen to the wonderful New
Christy Minstrels. War Mem.
Gym. Come one and all with love
and   Gerry.	
Tutoring
64
ADULT ENGLISH LANGUAGE
classes, University Hill School
Board begin Sept. 16, Tues., Friday.   244-4235.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BUY  PRE-SALE TICKETS FOR
BIRDCALLS
Your   Student   Telephone
Directory
NOW-Only 75c and SAVE
After  Publication   Price   Will   Be
$1.00
FOR SALE — SEVERAL SLIDE
rules  with   cases.   Phone   738-8961.
3 BRAND NEW, QUALITY SWISS
watches—men's & ladies'. Very
interesting price. Call evenings,
731-4290.	
BILLBOARD CLUB TICKETS FOR
sale in UBC Radio offices, SUB
235. With membership in this
club, you can have your tuition
paid and get into campus events
at reduced rates. 50 cents.	
HELP. IN DEBT. MUST SELL
4 Afghan vests and coats. Also
size 10 ski boots.  266-4670.	
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM 2% BLOCKS GATES. TWO
children in house. Sleeping $35,
kit. priv. $45. Room and board
$75-$80. Girls: Reduction available for occasional babysitting.
Phone   228-9460.
Room & Board
82
COOP-HOUSE, PRIVATE ROOM,
meals and full priveledges for
open minded girl, Oak and 62nd,
15 min. from UBC. $75.00 per
month.  Call 321-8142.	
ROOM & BOARD IN LOVELY
home. Excellent meals plus laundry, $95. 3258 W. 3*»th. Phone 266-
0162.	
CARPETED DAYLIGHT BASE-
ment B.R. & use of rec. room
with breakfast & dinner & TV
for girl student for lgt. h. -keeping & child care 4:30-7:30 Mon.-
Fri. plus 2 or 3 evenings' babysitting & alternate Sunday afternoons.   263-6068  eve's.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
ONE   GIRL  WANTED   TO   SHARE
large     three-bedroom     on-campus
apt.   with   3   others.   Phone   after,
12:00.  224-9159.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
ONE BEDROOM SUITE FOR RENT
immediately, unfurnished, $130.
No.   105,   1332 Thurlow St.	
AVAILABLE OCT. 1, 3RD & 4TH
year student — female — to share
apt. with 2 others, $70. mo. Ph.
596-8513.

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