UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 15, 1968

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126312.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126312.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126312-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126312-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126312-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126312-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126312-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126312-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126312-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126312.ris

Full Text

 Who the
hell is
Vol. XLIX, No. 58
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH  15,  1968
Fast action
follows
book brief
The UBC student library report has prompted strong action by library staff.
Head librarian Basil Stuart-
Stubbs said Thursday the library has been working on the
recommendations of the report
since they first became known
early in 1967.
The report was recently summarized and then published in
The Ubyssey Tuesday.
"We've been working on the
advice of the report for some
time now, and dozens of things
have been improved," Stuart-
Stubbs said.
"Students complained about
the short hours of the library,
so now we're open until midnight and on Sunday mornings."
More signs have been put up
►in the stacks to direct students
after some complained they
became lost.
The report contained several
complaints about first and second year students creating
noise and confusion in the
main stacks. The library instituted a policy at the beginning
of the last winter session prohibiting them from these
-areas, Stuart-Stubbs said.
Complaints of poor heating
and lighting have resulted in
a revamping of the heating
system and proposed replacement of light fixtures in the
main stacks, he said.
"Loan privileges to faculty
members have been cut to
some extent but they kick too
much about proposals for
short term loans."
Efforts are being made to
inform students of the workings of the library, said Stuart-
Stubbs. Next year students can
take an audio-visual instruction course on the library as
well as tours. The course will
feature closed circuit television, slides, and tapes.
Some controversial practices
will have to remain despite
complaints, he said. "Students
will have to continue to show
library cards when entering
the main stacks. If they did
not, it wouldn't be long before
there were all sorts of people
besides UBC students using
the library.
"And it is impossible to allow phone renewals because
we have an automated checking system that depends on
having the library card in order to work."
Levying fines must also continue especially in cases where
there is a hold on the overdue
book.
The lack of seating space,
severely criticized in the report, will continue until more
money is given to the university by the provincial government, Stuart-Stubbs said.
"We're hoping we will get
the money for a new undergraduate library, but we need
capital grants for that."
— georga hollo photo
GEOLOGY STUDENTS who recently complained their building is held together only by ivy have established an  ivy
chart  indicating  the deteriorating  condition  of the  ivy on
the  building.
Hippie  image  of  CYC
outdated  says  Clarke
Widespread criticism of the hippie image of the Company
of Young Canadians is outdated and misinformed, CYC director
Alan Clarke said Wednesday.
"The people should worry about the hippie and school dropout problems rather than whether these problems are within
CYC's jurisdiction," said Clarke.
Only four or five of the 20 CYC volunteers working with
city youths are in hippie projects, he said.
"Canadians should be much more involved with the problems of their young people in the cities."
The legislation under which CYC was set up authorizes
involvement in co-operative education.
People should be less preoccupied with CYC's constitutional
position regarding education. They should be upset about the
frustrations in the conventional education system, he said.
Answering charges that the CYC's involvement in experimental schools is unconstitutional, Clarke said: "If there's anything unconstitutional it is in the legislation, not in CYC."
CYC workers are active at Knowplace in Vancouver and
the Barker free school in Cloverdale.
Clarke said he was disappointed in the federal government's 20 per cent cutback in the CYC budget this year.
The cutback is much more serious than it sounds because
it is on last year's budget, not next year's needs.
CYC and the general youth volunteer phenomenon is growing fast, he said.
The company is getting 1,200 applications a year. One new
request comes in every day from groups or institutions who
want CYC volunteer help.
But the group cannot fill the requests because of the budget
cut.
IN ALBERTAf
~7Z        T^^efEsmsnt*,-
March result-
fee hike review
EDMONTON (CUP) — Shouting, placard-waving University
of Alberta students Tuesday forced their provincial government
to attempt to stave off a tuition fee hike.
The 3,000 students, armed with a 6,500-signature petition,
marched a mile and a half from the UofA campus to the provincial legislature to protest the raise.
Premier E. C. Manning announced after a meeting with
student leaders that his government would review the operating grants it gives to the university.
UofA board of governors recently recommended a $100
increase because they claim the grant is insufficient to maintain
the university's academic standard.
The increase would bring UofA fees to $400 a year — still
among the lowest in Canada. For medical, dental and grad students it will mean fees of $500.
As students stood in the 22 degree weather and 30-mile-an-
hour wind, education minister Raymond Reierson came out to
hear student union president Al Anderson state the students'
case.
"We're here to show many students are concerned about
the fee increase," Anderson told the minister. "The upper and
middle income brackets are already over-represented at this
university.
"A fee hike will accentuate this situation.
"Students' incomes are not keeping up with rising living
costs," he added. "A fee increase could mean many students
would not be able to afford university."
The crowd cheered Anderson but booed when Reierson
told them their fees were not a government responsibility. "Your
board of governors sets fees," he called through a megaphone.
Student leaders later met with Manning and four cabinet
ministers in a council chamber. Tbe government promised after
the meeting to review the university operating grant at its next
executive council meeting and investigate charges of inequalities
in distribution of student financial assistance.
Law students condemn
discriminatory arrests
UBC law students followed their professors' lead in protesting the arrest of 15 persons in front of the courthouse
Saturday.
By Thursday afternoon, 114 of the faculty's 398 students
had signed a petition protesting what they called the abuse of
the legal process in the arrest and dentention of the 15.
The arrests were discriminatory and may have been illegal
because of the allegedly defective warrants, they said.
Stripping and searching the defendants was unreasonable,
and setting bail of $50 for an offence which carried a maximum
$25 fine was oppressive.
The students also condemned the use of an order-in-council
to discriminate against an individual or group on the basis of his
appearance or any other arbitrary criterion.
Copies of the petition, started by first year law students,
go to attorney general Robert Bonner, the federal department of
justice, mayor Tom Campbell, the Vancouver Bar Association
and the admissions committee of the UBC law society.
Exam times up next week
Students must wait until next week to learn dates of
their final exams.
Exam schedules will not be posted until early next
week,   according   to   registrar's   office   spokesman   Andy   £
Wilson. |
Schedules had earlier been expected to appear today.
"We ran into an unexpected group of conflicts," WIl-   :;
son said.
Exams begin April 16 — the day after Easter Monday   ^
— and continue until May 3. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March   15,   1968
— fred cawsey photo
PADDY SHERMAN managed a grin during Gabor Mate's attack.
'Papers must change to meet times
By NORMAN GIDNEY
The information explosion, electronic media
and the need for more background explanation
are radically changing newspapers, Vancouver
Province editor Paddy Sherman said Thursday.
In a debate with UBC senator Gabor Mate
on the role of a newspaper in society, Sherman
told a noon hour audience in Brock the newspaper ten years ago had a staple news diet of
accidents and routine crime.
Today, he said, more than 60 per cent of the
news in his paper is about events outside B.C.
Mate disagreed with a claim by Sherman that
ideology is  dead  on  the  editorial   pages.
"When Sherman says ideology is dead he's
ignoring the facts," Mate said.
"The dominant ideology in North America is
corporate liberalism. Fred Wood represents corporate liberalism at its best," he said. Mate
quoted a recent issue of Vancouver Life that
Wood was connected with both downtown dailies
and many prominent Canadian corporations.
Mate said there was no conspiracy between
people like Wood and newspaper editors — they
just think alike.
He also said American news coverage of many
important world developments — Vietnam,
China, the Greek military coup d'etat — are
either biased and unfactual or incomplete.
Mate charged the war in Laos in 1959 was
fought in the headlines of  the American press.
"The function of the press," Sherman answered "is to supply a kind of minefield through
which government walks."
It should also be a mirror of society and try
to interpret to the vast middle ground of the
population the actions of the progressives and
reactionaries, he said. This, said Sherman, is
the most rewarding role for a newspaper.
Sherman said television is unable to present
the interrelation of abstract ideas because of
space and time limitations.
A&B SOUND
RECORD SALE
WIDE SELECTION AT LOWEST PRICES IN B.C.
LUNCHEON STEAKS  $1.19
Luncheon    Steak    Dinner,    anytime—5    oz.    Sirloin
Baked   Potato,   Tossed   Salad   and   Garlic   Bread*
NOW
NEAR   CAMPUS
4489 West 10th Ave.
100%
HUMAN HAIR
WIGS
21.95, 31.95, 41.95 & 61.95
WIGLETS
$9.95
BEAUTIFUL  FALLS
$29.95
SALES
10%
Discount  to
U.B.C.   Students
& Personnel
SERVICE
"GONE WITH THE WIG"
49 W. HASTINGS ST.
Between Woodward's and A. & N.
TELEPHONE
688-1201
MONO  &  STEREO
Featuring:
JOHN WESTLEY HARDING
AS I  WENT OUT ONE
MORNING
DEAR LANDLORD
$3.58
Reg. $4.98
Featuring:
SUZANNE
MASTER SONG
WINTER LADY
A*B SOUND
MU 2-4846
Open Friday Until 9 p.m.
571 GRANVILLE (at Dunsmuir)
MU 2-1919 Friday, March   15,   1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
— george hollo photo
MORE THAN 600 education students marched from the
cairn to the ed building Thursday before stringing up this
mouse in annual toilet training rite.
Program to aid housing
planned at conference
ANN ARBOR, Mich. (CUP) — A conference on low-cost
^student housing at the University of Michigan March 1-3 produced plans for a United States organization to seek tax relief
and direct financial aid for student housing co-ops.
Two hundred students from 41 universities in the U.S. and
Canada attended. It was the first such large-scale conference of
campus co-operatives in several  years.
Howard Adelman, a professor at York University in Toronto,
said the Canadian government has loaned more than $14 million
to student co-operatives on 11 campuses in the past five years.
He said the government is now financing construction of a $5.7
million, 10-story building for Rochdale College in Toronto, a coop college-in-residence democratically run by its 800 members.
Trevor Thomas, director of the college housing program of
the U.S. department of housing and urban development, pointed
out low-interest loans available for student housing. But these
loans are only available through universities, he said, and only
•one non-university-sponsored co-op has ever been granted funds.
The conference was hosted by the student corporation at
the Michigan campus which operates eleven houses. A second
meeting in Chicago later in March will lay the groundwork for
the new national organization.
Classroom squeeze on,
education grants short
TORONTO (CUP) — More Ontario students
will get money from the government next year,
but they'll also be crammed into larger classes.
Observers say these are the main results of
the Ontario government's universities budget
handed down Tuesday.
Government spokesmen said the increase
would allow the universities to improve the
quality of education.
But presidents of Ontario universities claim
the opposite. They predict larger classes and a
widening student-professor ratio. They also complain many special programs have been ignored
by the budget.
MORE THAN LAST YEAR
The government has allocated $209.3 million
to operate the province's 140 provincially-
assisted universities in 1968-69. This is 40 million more than last year's 169 million.
The grants will support an expected 82,000
students, up from current enrolment of 73,000.
Of an additional $32 million earmarked for
student assistance plans, $26 million will go to
the province of Ontario student awards program
(POSAP), almost double the $13.7 million set
aside for POSAP last year.
The increases in operating grants are in the
form of a bigger per-student grant to universities.
Last year, universities got $1,320 for each full-
time student. The budget increased this basic
unit to $1,450.
The government two years ago adopted a
system of formula financing to determine university grants. The grant is figured out by multiplying the number of students at the university by
the basic per-student grant of $1,450. The system
also makes adjustments for differences in costs
among faculties.
HIGHEST IN CANADA
The grants were announced Tuesday by Dr.
Douglas Wright, chairman of the university
affairs committee, an advisory body to the government.
Students to vote
on ed ombudsm
Education students can elect their own
ombudsman next week.
The position was created by the new
education council and will come before a
general meeting of education students for
ratification Thursday.
Education president-elect Gerry Olund
said Monday the ombudsman will be chairman of the student-faculty liaison committee  which airs  student  complaints.
"He will hear complaints from students
and present them to the committee," Olund
said.
Nominations for the post close today at
1:30 p.m. and the election will be Wednesday.
Olund also said applications for several
education committee positions are now
being accepted.
Applicants are sought for seminar rep,
returning officer, special events rep, grad
rep, night school rep, Ubyssey rep and
intramurals rep—both men's and women's.
"The per-student grants are the highest in
Canada," he said. Quebec's per-student grant
unit is $1,400. Ontario's is $1,450.
Wright said the increases would improve the
quality of education.
"While the increase in the per-student unit
is 10 per cent, rising costs of living are only four
to five per cent," he said. "Anything above the
five per cent can be used for improvement."
But the committee of presidents of universities of Ontario Wednesday issued a press release
disagreeing with this conclusion.
They claim the grants were not sufficient to
maintain the already unsatisfactory student-
faculty ratio. Faced with an anticipated 12 per
cent enrolment increase, the committee says, the
universities can't afford to hire additional professors.
This will mean larger classes for students and
a resultant loss of contact between students and
profs.
COMMITTEE COMPLAINED
The committee complained development of
special programs will have to be curtailed.
Dr. H. G. Thode, president of McMaster University, said in a statement Wednesday it will
be hard to maintain quality.
"It will be impossible to launch several new
programs we had contemplated, let alone nourish other programs that have been started over
the last two years," he said.
He said planned expansion of library holdings will have to be slowed down along with
planned improvements in some doctoral programs.
University of Western Ontario president
Carleton Williams also said there would be some
academic cutbacks as a result of insufficient
government grants.
Ham, frog at trial
MONCTON <CUP) — The trial of the pig's
head may be the first case in New Brunswick
ever to be heard in French.
Two Universite de Moncton students, Jacques
Bilise, 21, and Jacques Moreau, 22, both of Quebec province, face a charge of public mischief
after they allegedly placed a box containing a
10-pound pig's head on the front porch of Moncton mayor Leonard Jones Feb.  15.
Their lawyer presfent<*(d precedent which
which would allow the case to be heard in
French.
The same day New Brunswick's speech from
the throne contained a promise from Louis
Robichaud's Liberals to make both English and
French the official languages of the province,
following up a promise made at the constitutional conference.
New Brunswick's population is 40 per cent
Acadian French.
Courting session set
There will be a gathering this Saturday in
front of the courthouse.
An anonymous caller notified The Ubyssey
Thursday of the planned gathering.
He asked those interested to bring bag
lunches and to refrain from shouting, littering
the area or carrying placards. THfWSSM
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). The
Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which
it is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo.
Page  Friday,   loc.  24;   sports,  loc.   23;  advertising,  loc.   26.  Telex  04-5224.
Final winner Southam Trophy, awarded by Canadian
University Press for general excellence. Co-winner Bracken
Trophy for editorial writing.
"I do not mind lying, but I hate inaccuracy."
— Samuel Butler
MARCH 15, 1968
Oiled students
Horror stories in university-oriented publications
are not frequent. But one appearing in this month's
Canadian University magazine, and reprinted in Thursday's Ubyssey, has definite overtones of Alfred Hitchcock.
In it, a York University staffer in effect calls for the
introduction of a computer system to produce students.
He compares the three industrial production areas of
manufacturing, marketing and market (customers), to
a university production involving faculty, administration,
and students.
Programming courses, says the sonorous - toned
author, would utilize the necessary role of students as
consumers of knowledge.
Our reaction to this example of a warped mentality
is extreme revulsion tinged with uttter disgust. The
article, which at first one cannot believe is serious, is
just one eruption on a national administration complexion increasingly blotched with too much oil. The
oil, in this case, is squeezed by white-collar mechanics
in the university hierarchy whose blinding concern is
that the cogs of necessary bureaucracy mesh as smoothly
as possible.
What makes their potentially helpful concern blinding is that it ignores the essence of a university —
people — and concentrates on statistics.
As a result, the stench of student alienation at most
large universities is already overwhelming. By thwarting initiative with a myriad of rules, categorizing thinkers into stifling nooks, and urging spirit to become
profit, the bureaucrats whose minds are ruled in columns are raping campus after campus with sharpened
pencils. They forget that blood flows in the arteries of a
university, not ink.
Students at campuses such as UBC are shaking off
the oil, joining to evaporate the tendency to mechanize.
But more should be airing their discontent, boiling over
the resentment that builds up each year. And we urge
sympathetic faculty members and administrators, to
merge forces in the fight against creeping computerism.
—S.E.G.
Sole brothers
Surprisingly, the cost of shoelaces has not increased
yet. While price tags expand on such essentials as houses,
yachts, cars, and apple pies, shoelaces take the same
revered place in society as chocolate bars. As expectancy
increases that some manufacturing heel will lace into
shoe repairmen for not boosting the price of shoe laces,
the harder the latter put their feet down. Likewise,
chocolate makers are barred from upping candy costs
by a retailers' sweetness that is never foiled.
There is little doubt that shoelaces and chocolate
bars are the real hinges on which our economy should
swing. Unfortunately, if it happened, even the most confirmed munchers would be fit to be tied. It's time
capitalists saw eyelet to eyelet. — S.KG.
EDITOR:   Danny  Stoffman
City       Stuart  Gray
News          Susan  Gransby
Managing       Murray  McMillan
Photo     Kurt Hilger
Senior    Pat Hrushowy
Sports       Mike  Jessen
Wire          Norman Gidney
Page Friday     Judy Bing
Ass't. City      Boni Lee
Each clutching a loaf and a fish, the
anticipant subjects waited and waited.
Some were feeling cross, but Ann
Arky hit the nail on the head when she
suggested that the omnipotent one
might be hammered. Later, to a burst
of trumpets, He divined to come. Paul
Knox danced a jig in a jigger, until
he didn't have an ounce of energy
left, while Mike Finlay stood on his
noggin until he felt his scalp pull
from resting on a scalpel.
Irving Fetish, meanwhile, let out a
mean wail as he cavorted with assorted ostriches, who couldn't get into a
flap. John Davies trundled in a wheel-
*^**J«S»vM%Jf^*J*<'^*^v*^ *"■, , '
barrow laden with port, so as not to
start bored, and ended up looking real
sallow. "Him pale," mumbled the pornographic Dick Tracy, impaled on a
toothpick. As his teeth fell out, by
gum, if Steve Roper didn't pick a
tooth up because he was filling gnaw-
ty. Archie Tecture tried to frame his
words, but drew the line at a stiff
sentence.
Steve Jackson clenched a polka-dot
tie, before stepping into a puce spotlight with his spots light. From there
he superbly played the part of city
orge, mostly since he was organized.
Leaping about, Fred Cawsey had a
bout with a pseudo-polaroid while
snapping polar boids. Also in the dank
darkroom, Lawrence Woodd and Bob
Brown walked in the wrong entrance
entranced and fell 187 feet into a date
Pit.
John Twigg's dynamism was severely sapped in the jock shop, but he saw
the   blight   and   won.
An editorial blorg meeting for all
will be held today at 8:30 a.m. followed
by another at noon at which godot
will have been waiting four hours. In
the  cracker  jacket.
Nowadays, Jones, feeding information into computers is strictly passe.
** **
Student  impact  rises
By CAREY LINDE
The success of Senator Eugene McCarthy, a
peace candidate, in the New Hampshire primary last Tuesday, has naturally caused a great
political stir in North America and Europe.
The most significant result is the credit being given to the youth and students who did
the campaign work for McCarthy. This is a new
event in North American politics. Jack Kennedy appealed to the young, but it was not the
young who won him his primaries.
Europe, Latin and South America, Japan
and Africa have had long histories of strong
student participation in the vital affairs of the
day. It may be premature, but it is to be hoped
the youth are about to stand up and take their
place in the political arena in North America,
an event long overdue.
The Peace and Freedom Party in California
is youthful, but it is merely the outward manifestation of a segment of youth that has always
been involved. McCarthy's followers are more
from the ranks of regular university and high
school students. It is this group that has the
power to effect society — if it would only exert
that power.
On this campus, students will have an op
portunity to participate in civic elections in
Vancouver next fall. The present city council,
largely made up of bible-packing grandfathers,
is headed by a mayor with little imagination.
We must support those candidates who favor
lifting the restrictions on housing that hinder
students. We must support the mayoralty candidate who, as head of the police commission,
will declare an end to the war on the youth of
this city, and who will seriously try to react to
problems as they really are, not as his paranoiac
pensioner's mind thinks they are. As citizens
first (students second), we are obliged to involve
ourselves directly in the democratic process.
If Bennett's baloneypackers continue to line
their purses at the expense of the education of
our brothers, sisters, and children, we must set
our sights on removing that philistine gang
from office. And we can do it, as outrageous
and contemptuous as it may seem to the students on this campus who have been taught to
accept things as they are.
I hope this summer that we will all appraise
our role in society and the world, and return
next fall with a conviction to begin acting,
rather than continuing to stay in our role of
being acted upon.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Root for grass . . .
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Do you smoke grass?
If you do or want to, consider the following: In B.C. today, the minimum sentence for
possession is six months and
the maximum is seven years.
Many students who smoke
grass do not realize the consequences of a conviction.
With a criminal record, you
may be prevented from entering a profession; you may also
be rejected for citizenship by
a foreign government.
Some of the unfortunate students arrested for possession
have the idea that they can
stand up in court and say:
"Your Honor, do you realize
that a great many people find
marajuana much more enjoyable and in other ways better
than alcohol?" They can expect the reply: "The court informs the accused that he is
guilty under section 4 (2) of
the Narcotic Control Act. Sentence is six months definite."
If students do not like this
law, it is up to them to pressure Ottawa to change the law.
At any rate, they should at
least be aware of the legal and
economic consequences of it.
SAMUEL SCHICK,
law 2
And  dig  spuds
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Just a brief note to remind
all true Irishmen and sons
thereof, that there will be a
recruitment and training meeting of the Vancouver Regiment of the Irish Republican
Army (I.R.A.) in the fields behind Brock on Sunday, St.
Patrick's Day at noon. Please
bring shovels for spud digging.
ANDY McCONKEY
law 3
Reactionary
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It is indeed gratifying to
hear a reactionary politician
calling for students to examine
our so-called democratic society, especially on such a vital
topic as the British monarchy
(which reigns because it is the
will of British subjects, including Canadians.) I had hoped
that   Mr.   Kierans  would   dis
cuss such democratic institutions as the free enterprise
system which permits Americans, Britons, and an almost
non-existent percentage of Canadians to control 98 per cent
of our nations capital. However
I personally believe that the influence of this minority could
successfully disuade Mr. Kierans from encouraging students
to examine this aspect of the
Canadian society. A democracy
in the classical sense refers to
rule by the majority, with
rights to the minority — not
the election of professional
politicians by apolitical citizens. Redistribution of wealth
into the hands of the majority
is important, and more desirable than creating more wealth
to fall into the hands of the
minority.
To again mention the monarchy, the British Communist
Party has always considered
retaining of the Queen completely desirable. There are
more important problems to
deal with than eliminating a
power les-* class.
B.  McLELLAN
arts 2 ww yiwk pf    2WO
1984 is only sixteen years away
By ARNOLD SABA
Our society contains a great untapped potential for totalitarianism. We
have passed so many laws in the pursuit of freedom that almost everything
is against the law if you look into it.
In theory, a free society is one in
which people are free to pursue their
own interests, and in which laws are
designed to enlarge and protect freedom, not restrict it.
But many of our laws are restrictive of liberty to the point of erasing
some of man's basic human rights. It is
against the law in Canada to wander
without a home, like a gypsy, illegal
not to work in order to pursue some
ideal, or to take drugs if one chooses.
A common phrase calls these things
crimes without victims.
Our society is sure that it knows all
the answers: that life is to work, propoxate, and die, all within a framework
of respectable behaviour and a certain
etiquette.
Two weeks ago, the B.C. Legislature
passed a law making it possible for a
police officer to decide that a person is
mentally disturbed, and to lock him up
for seventy-two hours without charge.
The law was designed to deal with
genuine cases, but the possibility of its
wider interpretation is obvious.
RUMOUR
Possibly a great many very sane
people are locked up in mental hospitals at this moment. They have related
not to our society as the ultimate reality, but to the larger, timeless reality,
of life and society in the abstract. It is
the same reality seen by early Christians, eastern mystics, the Romantic
poets, and the hippies. Our society's
thinking is limited.
Police states are aptly named. Worse
than the oppression of the minority by
the majority is an armed, powerful,
vicious minority. Some of the more
infamous and obvious examples are Hitler's Germany, Stalin's Russia, and
Franco's Spaid; Greece, South Vietnam,
and Haiti are also police states.
Several weeks ago, there was a
rumour that the United States government had declared it treason to criticise
the administration. While the rumour
was false, its credibility stemmed from
the fact that it is not much closer to
dictatorship than the U.S. has already
gone.
In North America as a whole, police
action against ordinary citizens is becoming more frequent, flagrant, and
violent. In Vancouver's recent "drug
swoop", a communal house with eleven
Pf
MARCH 15, 1968
on the cover:
Lois Hornby's tradition of
cheerful, lighthearted
covers is further promulgated with this nonolithic
lithograph of the Police
State.
Judy Bing and Stephen
Scobie were arrested loitering without intent in the
Page Friday office. Kurt
Hilger photographed and
fingerprinted them. Bert
Hill organized mass demonstrations in Lillooet,
Cloverdale, and Prince
George. Eventually, Andrew Horvat bailed them
out, but not before they
had accused Arnold Saba
of police brutality. Reilly
Burke has jumped parole
again.
sleeping occupants was invaded by the
police, who beat up several people and
destroyed furniture and valuables in
search of drugs. They found none.
Also in Vancouver, police arrested
sixteen "hippies" who were sitting
around the courthouse fountain, on a
charge of loitering, while about two
hundred conventionally dressed people
in the same area were ignored. The
police later admitted it was part of a
campaign to stamp out hippies.
RITUAL
In San Francisco, the police staged
an unprovoked raid on the Haight-Ash-
bury area, in which they chased pedestrians with cars, beat up women,
clubbed bystanders, and sprayed tear
gas on a whole theatre full of innocent
people. Two of these events never made
it into the mass press. The image of our
society is flawed somewhere.
According to The Realist, the government of the United States is repairing the detention camps it used for
Japanese citizens in World War II, and
the FBI has a plan ready to be implemented "overnight", which would yield
an arrest of twelve thousand people,
with an additional four hundred thousand to be gathered later.
Police states exist for their own
sake, and arise when a society is divided and confused .The citizens' beliefs
are malleable, because they want something definite to believe in — a definite
enemy.
The purge is a community ritual
when "undesirables" are eliminated to
keep the order clean, to keep the machine of society running. This is how
Hitler rose to power, in the chaos which
followed the first world war. Stalin
was a dictator just after a tremendous
social revolution in Russia.
PURSUIT
Today our whole western society is
tremendously confused. Besides the current problems of race riots, pollution,
and slums, the whole basis of society
is in question. The United States has
risen to be the wealthiest nation in the
world, making great technological
strides and creating an unparalled
standard of living, and Canada has been
dragged along. Yet most people are
not "satisfied". They do not communicate with their fellows, join in solving
on common problems, but rather stay
shut up in their spheres of work and
survival in a hostile society.
What really freaks them out is that
their children do not work in the right
way either. The generation gap is
wider today than ever before. The
standards with which the parents grew
up are obsolete in this advanced age,
and their children have naturally absorbed different life styles. The parents
cannot change; it is too late for psychological adjustment. But the children, in
rejecting obsolete standards, are returning to more relevant matters, which
are, in an age of affluence, the pursuit
of truth, perfection, and the appreciation of life.
DECADENCE
What many people see as decadence, the blooming of complete artistic
expression and strange styles among
the younger people, may be just the
opposite. There are numerous examples
of great societies which have had
periods similar to ours just before the
final clap of doom. Therefore, says
the analogy, we are headed for a fall.
How so?
Is it that this way of life leads to
a fall? Or is it that as soon as any
society can afford the luxury to do
these things, certain factions in it
previously able to vent their hostile
energies only through work and war,
now must turn this agression toward
their own society? It certainly is not
the nonconformists, the "decadent"
people leading us to doom. They don't
have the power or the bombs.
The dropouts are becoming a majority. Yet the governments do not
represent them, nor does the popular
press. The press represents the established business interests, and as liberal
as it tries to be, it cannot escape its
origins. The people of North America
can't believe their press anymore, nor
their government. Every day one can
see events in the underground press
that never appear in the mass press.
RESPECTABLE DISSENT
Even though the factions in the
country are beginning to polarize into
two hostile groups, America is still
basically a reasonable country. Large
numbers of people are committed to
pulling out of Vietnam and settling
the home situation, and many of these
people are "respectable" men in high
positions. But we must not believe
that this common ground between all
war dissenters extends to all other
issues as well. For although some war
dissenters may come to see the basic
phoniness of their society, through
their current association with dissident
DROPPING OUT
Society is not working for the
people today, and perhaps what Marshal McLuhan predicted is beginning to
occur. He foresaw many top men leaving their positions — in effect, dropping out. McNamara, Pearson have already done so.
This creates a dangerous situation.
With many people leaving their positions in society, or alienated from
it, the fanatic few are left with the
power to mold those who are confused
and malleable.
Now is the time of mass paranoia, as
the right, the left and the unaffiliated,
suspect plots and dangers from various
creeping menaces. And it is becoming
hard to pursue one's own interests, if
they are outside the sphere of the
workings of our society, with the fear
that at any moment that society is
going to do harm to you. This is why
so many people are involved in social
protest, instead of "inner revolution."
Even the least involved are
planning their own activities. There is
elements, most of them are still establishment-minded. And hippies will not
rejoin The Great Society when the war
is over, either.
In both our countries, the problem
still remains. There are several attitudes held by people committed to
social revolution. One is violent revolution, with bombs, front lines, and
the works. Unfortunately this course
of action would likely precipitate a
reign of terror, or an even worse police
state. In a sense, it would be just a
change of the party in power, and just
as ineffectual in creating genuine social
change.
It would be based on serving the
system, and would be completely rational and hard-working, which is unnecessary today. Any type of rational
system will get our society nowhere,
because now we have time to be irrational, free, and individualistic.
Another possible method of changing society is more evolutionary. It is
through "confrontation", which means
setting up situations which demand
solutions, in the hopes of setting new
precedents. This has evolved from the
third type of change, mostly because
of its notable lack of success in dealing with the older generation. It is
internal revolution; the conversion of
people to peaceful, contented individuals through example, love and, philosophy.
THE     U BYSSEY
supposed to be a giant congress of
Yippies (?) in Chicago this summer, at
the time of the giant Democratic convention. They are for the most part
going to play music, dance, be freaks,
etc., but their aim is to provoke confrontation, toward the purpose of god
knows what.
The worst spectre seem to be mind
control, the 1984 syndrome, the ultimate police state, when the "officials"
control not only every movement, but
every thought as well.
Perhaps a little comfort is the
thought that every invention, social
change, movement and change of fashion for the last million years has
brought cries of doom for the human
race, predicting the end of man's noble
spirit of independence.
The primary reasons for the police
state are the will to power in some
people, and the desire to align with
power among others, to reap certain
physical or psychological rewards. Even
if, by some unlikely apocolypse, America should become a land of Yippies,
we would still have to consider the
powers in other nations. So, deeming
it slightly unlikely that the whole world
should be converted (people have tried
that), the most we can hope for is to
keep our own countries in order, without expecting perfection.
Those who want perfection of any
sort will always have to seek it within.
Friday, March   15,   1968 lp£   shvee
Streetcar to
critics' playpen
By KEITH FRASER
When the Playhouse theatre established Stage 2 earlier this
year as a workhouse for pretty well unknown plays, it did so
out of deference to the critics. While this courteous manoeuvre
offered a kind of off Broadway in capsule dose, it served two
purposes: 1) enabled local critics to retain their jobs by supplying drama which they could proudly predict would either sink
or swim, thereby earning the esteem of the editors; 2) enabled
the Playhouse to float along with established plays upon which
the critics could comfortably impose superficial opinions without editorial backlash. I am glad to report that the new order
had provided splendid opportunities for cursory appraisal, at
least for this critic: I disliked The Beaux' Stratagem because
it wasn't funny enough, and I admired Philadelphia Here I
Come! because it was.
For Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire however, I thought a more penetrating criticism would be suitable;
something fresh about this classic which ran 855 performances
on Broadway twenty years ago. So I scrounged out the notebook (since published) of the director preparing for that first
production, and found that Elia Kazan had said it all. In an
auora of expectancy he had penetrated the character of Blanche
DuBois in exciting fashion, and had acquired a virtual stranglehold upon the styling and symbolism of this drama set into the
humidity of New Orleans.
Understandably I was disappointed. I mean what could a
bloody student critic say that would top Elia Kazan? I though
about taking a week off to come up with something original —-
maybe find a copy of the play and count the number of lies
Blanche tells; or how many times Stanley Kowalski feels like
swatting his wife.
Essentially this drama revolves about the aging Blanche
who visits her married sister and comes into contact with Stanley, the Polish husband who represents everything that is repugnant to her. Her sensitivities are those of tfie deep south,
anachronistic in modern society, especially in the tenement life
of New Orleans. In the local production Frances Hyland gives
a moving performance of this victim of a perverted marriage.
She and director Joy Coghill appear to work well together:
there is a butterfly fragility about Miss Hyland that enables the
audience to warm progressively to her predicament.
In contrast, August Schellenberg displays a bestial level
— schiffer photo
Frances Hyland and August Schellenberg.
which is both fascinating and repulsive. His interpretation is
strong, possibly too strong for one who presumably possessed
some manners as a former military officer. His wife Stella receives quite adequate treatment from Patricia Gage. Dan MacDonald who plays Mitch — Blanche's suitor before he discovers
her nympholeptic past — also renders a steady and at times
delightful portrait.
Although audience appreciation on opening night was rather
tepid, Streetcar will probably generate more excitement during
its run. While the critics will have had their chances to derail
it if they dare, I suspect that the scissors won't really be wielded
with any authority until the next opening of Stage 2, the critics'
playpen.
SUZUKI
MOTORCYCLE
CENTRE
SERVICE  -  PARTS  -
3627 W. Broadway
ACCESSORIES
731-7510
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Repaired
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
UNRULY HAIR?
Best Men's Hairstyling Service
at the
Upper Tenth  Barber
4574 W. 10th Ave.
T block from gate*
BOOKS
* Hardcover   books
* Textbooks
* Paperbacks
* Review    Notes
* Study   Guides
If   you   are   looking   for   a   required
text  or   for   casual   reacting   try:
Village Book Shop
5732  UNIVERSITY   BLVD.
228-8410
Open 10 a.m.  to 9 p.m.
| THE VILLAGE CAFE |
Where Friends Meet & Dine ■
DISCOUNT ON      ■
PIZZA TO GO
I
I
I
I
V4 Block East
of Memorial Gym
at 5778 University Blvd.
Phone 224-0640
I
I
I
A telepathic interview with
the greatest Ma of them all
By PETER LINCOLN
That did it. The imposter that The
Ubyssey interviewed this week so upset my soul that I immediately had
a telepathic interview with the greatest mom of them all (outside Hickory
Holler and Madonna Barker), the real
ma, the late Ma Rainey, often called
by many the queen of the blues (some
pull for Liberace but that's another
column).
pf: I think I'll start right off with
a question and then we'll just let it
carry us the rest of the way. With
all the turmoil in your country over
the war in Vietnam; the dissenters
like Fulbright; the accusations against
President Johnson and so on; with all
this controversy, you must surely have
some feelings about the war. If so,
what are they?
Ma Rainey: Well, sonny, I don't
really know too much about this war,
but you're right. I'm interested in
war. War is part of my business. It's
the blues. It's also General Motors'
business but their bag is the greens.
Like I said I don't know too much
about the war except that speaking
as a coloured person — as you can
see I'm a very dark white — if I had
to pick between Lyndon Johnson's
Khe Sanh or William Fulbright's Arkansas I'd be out getting a fitting for
a green beret right now.
pf: You mentioned the blues and it
reminds me that you are first of all
an   entertainer.   Now lately  there's
been a trend for entertainers to enter
politics and there's been much criticism of this. How would you justify,
for instance, an entertainer, specifically a blues singer having any right
to speak out on politics compared to,
say, a small town newspaper editor?
I mean do you think a blues singer
deserves to take over an alleged
music column and state her views on
politics?
Ma Rainey: The news in the blues.
pf: Well, what then do you mean
by the blues?
Ma Rainey: The blues is different
things to different people, like Arkansas and Vietnam. It's hell everywhere to someone. One man's meat
is too often another man's. The blues
can be sad like George Wallace watching Dr. H. Rap Brown operating on
his wife or it can be happy like
Stokely Carmichael watching Dr. H.
Rap Brown operating on Wallace's
wife.
pf: Then you think the blues is a
philosophy akin to the intrinsic existentialism of the human individual as
espoused by Camus, Sartre, and Baldwin, the paradoxes of joy and sorrow
in what at best could be termed a
quasinebulous existence?
Ma Rainey: You took the words
right out of my mouth. I think you're
getting to the nitty-gritty of the whole
thing.
pf: Thanks, Ma. Another thing that
people often associate with the blues
is sex. Now somebody once said sex
isn't good for young people. They
also went on to say that there's plenty
of time for it in life and that the
young people who engage in it become
useless in other fields. Do you have
any comment on that?
Ma Rainey: Well, the first part
about the blues being full of sex is
wrong. It's just other things that
don't have any that makes the blues
look sexy. If I remember right it was
one of your great bluesmen Little
Austrian Sig Freud who said sex was
everywhere. As for being a bad thing
for young people I'll tell you I'd
rather receive a bill from the hospital
for my daughter than a receipt from
Washington for my son. The only
thing I can say to young people in
this matter is to make love not babies.
pf: Thanks, Ma. I think we can end
it on that note. All I have to say
now is go see O.C. at the Marco Polo
sometime between now and Pat Paulsen and take a listen to a few fairly
new records — John Coltrane's last
Expression and Mel Brown's Chicken
Fat both on Impulse and Lou Donaldson's Alligator Boogaloo on Blue Note.
Also start tuning in to CKLG-PM
starting Saturday promising everything from the Fugs to Albert Ayler.
By the way do you think there's any
truth to the rumor that Wilson Pickett
is putting out a record in tribute to
the discoverer of the polio vaccine
called "Salk it to me baby"?
CAR INSURANCE
DUE?
Save with
State Farm's
low insurance
rates for
careful drivers.
See me.
8455 GRANVILLE ST.,
VANCOUVER  14, B.C.
261-4255
STATI  MIM
STATE FARM
MUTUAL
CANADIAN HEAD OFFICE
TORONTO, ONT.
GOOD STUDENT? 25% DISCOUNT
Friday, Mar. 15th, at 8 p.m.
CONCERT
To Support The Vietnamese
National Liberation Front
York Theatre
639   Commercial   Dr.
ADMISSION FREE
MC — Mr. Tom Clarke
Folksingers   —    Tommy   Hawkins
Joe   Irving   —   Vera   Johnson
also Dan George & Company
Friday, March  15,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY NEW SCHOOL DANCE
FRIDAY, MARCH 15, 9 P.M.
PERITZ HALL
6184 Ash (behind Ookridge)
Admission   $1.50   per   person   &   refreshments
FEATURING
My Indole Ring Yellow Brick Road
La Troupe Seeds of Time
Grotesque
[
Local-Long Distance
Agents
Atlas Van Lines
Canada, U.S.A.
Individual Vault
Storage — Clean
Low Insurance Rates
Agents in Over 100
Countries
Ship "Door to Door"
■Through -
Internatioal
Sea Van, Inc.
MOORE'S TRANSFER LTD.
1018 BURNABY ST.
VANCOUVER 5, B.C.
224-3111
681-5474
Born to be worn in the sun
Beached for Summer '68 — a bright, upbeat
collection of playabouts, for soaking up sun or
lounging after a plunge. . ___ .    .,_
5-15 in Junior Sportswear at L_l/\ I V-/ IN O
pf   4ouv i
On welfare imperialism
Two weeks ago. John Gerassi spoke to the
Cultural Oppression Conference at UBC on
American imperialism in Latin America and
Vietnam. This article prepared in co-operation
with Stanford graduate student Steve Weissman appeared originally in The Minority of
One and is an amplification of Gerassi's speech.
Gerassi until recently was professor of International Relations at San Francisco State College.
Of course, few Liberals support outright
interventions. Most refuse to see themselves as
supporters of imperialism. Some, who call themselves the sophisticated ones, accept the inevitability of a global "sphere of influence" dichotomy between the great powers. They refer to
this inevitability as "the responsibility of power."
But even they are well-intentioned and, like all well-intentioned Americans, claim that
some good can come out of
the evil of imperialism. If only
power is used wisely argue
these Liberals and Social Democrats, the poor can still profit
from our richness. Thus, they
wage campaigns against the
shipment of arms to under-
GERASSI developed lands, insist that the
U.S. instead send social aid. Their cry is for
economic development, not free enterprise. They
want to export the New Deal, the welfare state.
They are welfare imperialists.
But it is precisely these liberal commitments,
precisely this welfare imperialism which creates
the setting, sets up the conditions, and generates
the attitudes for old style military and economic
imperialism. The best example is Vietnam,
where, after the collapse of the French, the
U.S. moved in not as a policeman but as a social
worker. As John IMoDermott explained in The
Nation (July 25, 1966):
The Americans had influenced the choice of
Diem in the first place. They gave technical
and dollar support to a revamping of the entire
Vietnamese educational system from elementary
schools through the university and- technical
institute level. This included both teacher training and the rewriting of textbooks. They gave
technical assistance in revising the banking and
currency system and in framing general economic and monetary policy. The United States
Operations Mission (USOM—the AID Mission)
undertook planning and dollar support for the
reconstruction and development of the entire
Vietnamese transportation and communications
network—railroads, canals, highways, civil aviation, coastal transport, radio and television, and
the telephone system. They assisted in planning
and executing the various agricultural programs,
including crop diversffteation, land reclamation,
land reform, agricultural extension aad mass
peasant regroupment, (the Refugee Resettlement,
Land Development, AgrovWle and later Strategic
Hamlet Programs). Finally, they exerted extremely strong influence over the nation's two
largest economic activities (exclusive of farming)
—military operations and the import business.
Half a million U.S. soldiers have caused -us
to forget this earlier, escalation. But military
intervention was a natural follow-up. The U.S.
aid apparatus had overwhelmed the Vietnamese
government and destroyed its independence.
American welfare imperialism had disrupted the
Vietnamese economy, politics and culture. And
the success — not the failure — of the VS.
development program set off such changes In
Vietnamese society and institutions that the resulting social and political disorder overcame
American efforts to establish stability. There
was just no way for the peasantry to fit into
the new U.S.-made society in Saigon. Hence
from 1954 to 1961, while U.S. aid to Vietnam
amounted to $1,544,000, only $42,000,000 (less
than 3 per cent) went into rural projects (and
at that, the figures include education and health
from which the peasants did not really benefit).
The Vietnamese peasants, unable to partake
in the high-consumption urban economy, became
more and more isolated, more and more prone
to reject the American way of life, hence more
and more repressed. Thus, U.S. social democracy
created an enemy out of a people who were
generally unpolitical, uncommitted, and unsophisticated. What's more, the process was inevitable
THE      UBYSSEY
for even if America had wanted to help the
peasantry, the mechanism for doing so simply
didn't exist.
This is even truer in Latin America, where
AID officials must work with and through an
established U.S. presence — American corporations, totally and naturally geared to meet the
demands of urban consumers. Under such conditions, U.S. Aid programs can only increase the
gap between the urban consumer (including the
so-called rising "middle sectors") and the poor,
unintegrated campesinos, who generally make up
the majority.
As that gap continues to widen, both American investors and U.S. AID expectantly focus
more, for both profits and political showmanship, on visible returns. What has happened to
public utilities is indicative. In Latin America,
three North American firms — International
Telephone and Telegraph, American and Foreign
Power, and Brazilian Light, Power, and Traction
companies — have long exercised a virtual monopoly over all public utilities. In recent years,
however, profits have dwindled while political
costs have risen. Highly visible, dependent upon
politically determined rates, and in direct daily
contact with ordinary people, the public utilities
became a natural target for nationalists. As a
result, the companies felt reluctant to invest
money in new equipment and instead began
to withdraw.
With the Alliance for Progress, this withdrawal was speeded up. The three companies
ended up with over $1 billion of Alliance funds
investing much of it into higher paying sectors
of the economy. In Argentina ,for example,
AMFORP poured its sell-out wealth into consumer industry, in housing (with the Rockefeller-
owned IBEC), and in money-lending (at 18 per
cent on 90 to 180 day notes). Meanwhile, their
poorly equipped, overpriced, costly - to - operate
-facilities became the property of the local governments, turning them into symbols of the
inefficiency of government involvement in the
economy. Whereas, one of the industrial investments, the PASA Petroleum complex, which
was made possible only through an Alliance for
Progress "extended risk guarantee" loan by the
Agency for International Development, became
"the largest privately financed project in a
developing country. It is important to the
future of private enterprise in Argentina, and
to the United States, that it not fail." (Hearings
on Foreign Assistance, 1964).
It certainly is important to the U.S. — and
to private enterprise in Argentina. But it is
not important, on the contrary it is another
form of subjugation, to the poor of Argentina.
That project will increase the poverty of the
population of such provinces as Salta and Tucu-
man. There, where tiie poor don't have cars
or oil heaters or factories to work in, petroleum
products are meaningless. The project itself will
augment their isolation. Like the peasants of
Vietnam, the disenfranchised sugar growers of
Salta will leam to view the city, the bureaucrats,
and eventually the Americans as their enemy.
They will follow Che   Guevara in revolution.
They will do so anyway because no social
democratic or liberal government, no local oligarchy or local entrepreneur class can cope with
the problems of the poor. Their profit-oriented
or pay-as-you-go type of structure, no matter how
well-meaning, does not embody the mechanism
capable of dealing with lower classes. Rebellion
therefore becomes natural. With the U.S. involved on the side of modernization, i.e., the
establishment, the poor's fight necessarily becomes long and costly. Yet it all started with
well-meaning liberals who wanted to help, who
looked upon Food for Peace as altruistic, upon
foundation help as generous, upon church group
volunteers as dedicated, upon civic action programs as forward-looking, upon academic "objective" research programs as constructive.
In Vietnam it is now too late. If the U.S.
agression there is to end, it will be only because the Vietnamese people will have forced
the U.S. to gt out. Well-motivated Americans
now oppose that agression. But it started in
1954. Such Americans should have opposed U.S.
aid then. Instead, they tried to turn Diem into
a nationalist. They campaigned for social measures. They argued for elections. They still argue
for free elections. Such is the stuff from which
empires are born.
Friday, March   15,   1968 I pf   Sive
Escalation on the
courthouse front
By BERT HILL
Page Friday War Correspondent
As the Vancouver War went into its second
year, new offensives and counteroffensives were
mounted. The action of the government side
were at first unclear but informed observers
could see the emerging pattern. "The Hippies
are beginning a new infiltration following the
winter months. Vancouver must prepare for the
new offensive for this is a war for the hearts
and minds of the people. We will hold the line."
Spokesmen for the Hippies, who reject this
label as prejorative said, "The Free People have
been harassed by middle class minds and social
strictures for a year now. The lower middle
classes may grumble but it is obvious that the
heavy fire power of the establishment is now
coming,"
Spokesman for Free People's City Government (FPCG) point to the latest crackdown by
RCMP drug squad as the opening offensive by
the other side.
"Some places in the States the cops have
stopped pushing their drug laws. In Vancouver
they lay off university students. Obviously the
pot laws are used as discriminatory penalties."
The next stage of the offensive in the opinion
of the FPCG was signaled by the statement by
the head of the Tourist Bureau. "Merilees isn't
just worried about beautiful clean (anti-hippy)
cities for the tourists. He is the running dog of
the Vancouver power structure and has been
for years. It isn't surprising the Bay cracked
down following his statements."
The Hudson Bay store has lately got in the
practice of continually washing its windows
which discourages FPCG guerrillas from camping on the streets around the store.
"We have been waiting for a signal from the
other side but all we get is a barrage of hippies.
We are reviewing our program from A to Z but
all we get is herds of these guerrillas harrassing
our people and depriving them of their $1.49
freedoms."
FPCG officials do not see it this way at all.
"When the pacification program of the Bay
broke down over the latest offensive we dispatched our prime minister Stan Persky to
negotiate."
This meeting at top levels resulted in a
satisfactory  settlement for the FPCG  and  the
Bay. The FPCG moved their base to the public
fountain of the court house and the Bay permitted the FPCG elements to enter the store.
"Obviously there was conflict in the government's ruling circles," says an FPCG spokesman.
"How else can you explain the sudden offensive
Saturday when 16 of our members were detained by the troops of the government?"
Government officials see it differently. "The
FPCG was only buying time and waiting for
the next infiltration from outside Vancouver.
We will not negotiate with the FPCG as they
are not the legitimate government of the Hippies."
Government officials say they are waiting
for word or peace signals from the ruler of the
FPCG who they claim lives in San Francisco.
They refused to disclose who the person was
except that they had defined his identity through
analysis of dispatches of the secret organ of
the FPCG — The Underground and Liberation
News Services.
"Our leader in the field, the police chief,
states the war is being won and that the corner
will soon be turned."
No one appears to know how heavy a Hippy
offensive is expected. While the FPCG has begun to organize facilities to handle the new
arrivals, most observers discredit the credibility
of the columnist of the establishment newspaper on his prediction of a heavy invasion.
"Obviously this air cover over estimated the
over-kill ratio," said the FPCG spokesman.
Government officials are privately concerned about the new focus of the war. One high
placed official expressed shock and amazement
at the lightning shift of the FPCG from the outlying areas of Fourth Avenue to the very heart
of city commercial and government activity.
"We interpret this as a defeat for the Hippies
since they have had to give up their former
power bases and concentrate their resources on
the new front. They have obviously been rejected by the inhabitants of the Fourth Avenue
area who have chosen their freedom that we
have guaranteed to protect."
FPCG sources discredit this analysis.
"We in the FPCG say the government is
lying when it says they want to protect and
guarantee the freedom of the people. This is
their colonial war and they want the young for
their corporations and their consumer society."
Rough lessons at graduate school
By K. TOUGAS
No question about it, Mike
Nichols' The Graduate is the
most hilarious film to come
around in a long time — not
mild chuckles but side-splitting belly-laughs that send
you crawling in the aisles
wishing amongst howls of
laughter that you hadn't had
that dinner just before . . .
The problems begin with
the return of a reserved and
confused young man (Dustin
Hoffman), graduate from an
eastern status college, who is
slightly nervous about the
upper middle class milieu
that he is thrust back into.
Nichols sees and develops
the inherent comedy in basically ugly situations. His innocent and almost awkward
hero with irritated super-
polite brush-offs plows
through his parents' typical
gay parties, where everyone
falsely offers "heartfelt congratulations  and advice".
Benjamin is then bluntly
seduced by the wife of his
father's business partner
(Anne Bancroft) — reacting
first   in   hilarious    reserved
Friday, March   15,   1968
panic, he later comes back in
nervous curiosity which becomes bumbling discovery.
When the daughter of this
woman (Katherine Ross) becomes a rival to her raging
jealous mother the result is
violent upheaval. As the
young man moves from first
sex with the mother to first
love with the daughter his
passion becomes an obsession: he plaintively follows
Elaine in what becomes a
lyrical search through Berkeley. His marriage proposal is
thwarted by her violent parents who set up a "suitable
marriage". Discovering this,
the graduate, in a rapid
tempo race-against-time, tries
to stop the wedding . . . The
final long shot revealing both
humour and a realization that
behind the romantic furor
his unfortunate reality is
ever-present.
The "message" is ever-present, for Nichols prods this
pattern of life amongst its
shallow puppets, wallowing
in false family relations, infidelity, violence, meaningless marriages: this framework that shaped a boyish 21
atttmmm
year old who makes some
attempt at reflection but is
swallowed, and acts blindly
and immaturely. As depicted
in the church scene, Benjamin is not some valiant
hero, nor a Christ-image, but
in fact a fairly intelligent
guy living like his fish behind a guard - all - invisible -
shield. He may actively react
to his synthetic surroundings
but chances are he will end
up like his father.
A few minor reservations
(shaky mood changes, an obvious fitting of the visuals to
the lengths of the songs, the
over - repetition of "Scarborough Fair" — the 6th time is
just . . . . ) are entirely compensated for by the vivacious
and imaginative editing and
by the uproarious humour
that lies in Dustin Hoffman's
perfect dead-pan delivery, in
his movement and timing,
and most important, in the
believability he gives this
riotous role . . .
If you manage to pick
yourself up from the floor,
stumble to the street and go
tell your friends about the
film!
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices
•BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
■KERRISDALE   41s.t at YEW
Enjoy a candlelight dinner
■* at the
BAVARIAN
ROOM
Delightful food —
Excellent service
in  an
Intimate Atmosphere
«^      phone for reservation
MODERN   CAFE
Bavarian Room    —    3005 W. Broadway    —    RE 6-9012
BUKHARA
One of the most interesting and
least changed cities in Central
Asia. Parts of the Ark or Citadel,
still standing, are 2000 years
old, Cyrus, Darius, Turks, Arabs,
Mongols, Persians and Russians
have all had their turn here.
Bukhara—another of the interesting cities on our tour to
the U.S.S.R., led by Mr. Ohan-
janian, Aug.  24-Sept. 14.
Hagen's  Travel  Service  Ltd.
7 OFFICES
2996   W.   Broaway
736-5651
982  Denman  St.
682-7254
925   W.   Georgia
684-2448
4841    Victoria    Drlv«
879-4575
4685   Kingsway,   Bby.
431-6674
|407   Columbia,   N.W.
526-7873
1425 Marine Dr., W.V.
926-4304
HAGEN'S
Open 9-5  p.m.  Incl.  Saturday
THE      UBYSSEY
WINNER
7 ACADEMY
AWARD
NOMINATIONS!
JOSEPH E. LEVINE
MK5CNIS
MIKE NICHOLS
LAWRENCE TURMAN
PROOUCtlQN
Including:
BEST PICTURE
BEST ACTRESS
BEST ACTOR
BEST DIRECTOR
"Benjamin-do you find me undesirable?" "Oh, no Mrs. Robinson.
I think you're the most attractive of all my parents' friends."
THE GRADUATE Q
ADMITTANCE
ilH-UM
TO HMONS
)• r[AR$ Of AGE
OtOVE*
ANNE BANCROFT  DUSTIN HOFFMAN KATHARINE ROSS
SCREEhPlAV 6V SCCS Br
CALDER WILUNGHAM*. BUCK HENRY F'AUL SIMON
PtR'OBMtO Bv fflODuCIO B*
SIMON^GARFUNKEL LAWRENCE TURMAN
DiHiCTID Bv
MIKE NICHOLS technicolor* panavision*
AN EMBASSY PICTURES RIUAS**
Granville ft Smith*
MU 1-1511 ipS   6ixi
»■&■«
t'^.>. ;-;>:■-,-    ■
■£?**$
-•§*
wages guerilla artfare
By REILLY BURKE
The chalky scrawl on a tar-paper wall across
from the Ponderosa reads, "Graffiti is good". It's
just a casual observation on the worth of a very
much alive campus art form, but it reflects the almost universal delight evoked by these guerilla
graphics.
The opportunity to write on a vacant piece of
wall or pavement provides a platform for the little
man to ventilate his frustrations or to publicly
communicate what he thinks may be a vital message.
There is, of course, the familiar W.C. variety
of wall writing which is usually short-lived due to
the long reach of the Physical Plant scrubbing arm.
This type of graffiti possesses a degree of vitality
and resilience matched only by the Viet Cong, and
continually regenerates itself much to the benefit
of chaste little boys and girls, and the overcrowded
facilities at Riverview.
The more aggressive artists take to the outdoors
with a modicum of stealth and quantities of paint,
spray-bombs, brushes,  and even rollers.
Jock-minded pencil pushers from that other
bush institution arrive nooturnally in their wheezing customised Vauxhalls to stencil "SFU" on our
lovely architect designed sidewalks. A safe statement, mind you, and one that causes very little
consternation.
The red paint graphics of the "Fort Boys" are
equally feeble. It's like a very famous person said
to me one miserable rainy day — "So what?"
A little muck is moved, however, when the
character assassins arrive and draw public attention
to the peculiar bedroom antics and anatomical
preferences of certain faculties as in the "Engineers
Eat" type of expression.
There is no doubt that some of the engineers
do, but whether they do or not is of no great concern to most people. As a result, this kind of statement is similar to the W.C. variety In its negligible
impact.
Socially motivated activists provide us with a
more cerebral brand of mural literature, and the
opportunity to vicariously enjoy some establishment
tail-pulling.
Unfortunately the best examples of revolutionary graffiti have been flushed down the toilet of
history.
Two years ago the hoardings surrounding the
emerging medical complex sprouted eight foot high
** „'
i^^ry^rfX-
■ tf'&'Jf,*"".'. *~'X$;
XMyx¥f{
~»dX'\
An organic folk art
... a political indicator
letters demanding "LEGALIZE POT", which caused
such strong repercussions that cracks appeared in
the walls of the Seagram distilleries.
During construction of the education facility a
number of aesthetically desperate individuals
mounted ladders and wrote "UGLY UGLY UGLY"
in enormous letters across the side of the building.
It was a witty and incisive billboard editorial on
the sad creations of the campus monument builders.
Perhaps if we had a disposable cardboard university instead of our super-rigid concrete Versailles
we might see more of this ever changing but persistently lively art form. The kaleidoscopic potential of such a transient environment absolutely
boggles my mind.
ARE YOU CONCERNED?
The AMS Needs People
Committee Chairmen
Canadian University Students Overseas
Frosh Orientation
Highschool Conference
Intramurals
Performing Arts
Speakers
Symposia
World University Service
Committee Members
Academic Symposia Committee
Brock Art Committee
Student Union Building Management
Winter Sports Centre Management
I
GET IN VOL VED!
APPLICATIONS OR FURTHER INFORMATION-A.M.S. SECRETARY, BOX 54, BROCK HALL.
DEADLINE 12:00 NOON, MARCH 19
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March   15,  1968 pf  7even m
  BEND WIRE INTO USEFUL THINGS
CONoocrfo   ijy    UltCU     (jOBDIf,   MHCLE   ^RH/r£   jjfi
■ws 5 x "■'     Be Ready for Second Coming
f ®&WM  of Jesus, In October, 1975
Crunch coming
MOSCOW (UPI) — An un*
identified e Iderly man
haranguing a small crowd near
JLenin's Tomb in Red Square
began shouting at passersby
about the situation in the
Middle East.
All that could be understood
from his largely unintelligible
words was that he opposed the
ceasefire.
Suddenly he exploded.
SOLICITOR LOSES
Cou-sii-J AL
Tortured 9 Years by
2C0RNSandaWART
Constipation
Horribly
unfair
pp p
Dead
man had
parsnip
in bed . . . ■
A 22-year-old gardener was
. probably    under    the
influence of the hallucination
drug LSD when he' jumped
naked through a window at
his home and plunged 30 feet
to his death, a coroner said
today.
And when police searched his
room they found a book on
witchcraft, a case full of toads
and a large parsnip in his bed,
the St. Paneras inquest was told.
The arardener, Clive Amor, of
North Hill Avenue, Haringey,
died as a result of a fractured
skull.
His father, Mr. William Amor,
told the coroner, Mr. Ian Milne,
that Clive had been acting
" very peculiarly."
He said he knew his son had:
been taking drugs, but did not
know what type.
Adjourned
At about 5.30 a.m. on June 2
he took Clive a cup of tea. Then
a few minutes later he heard
a crash of glass. His son, he
added, had seemed quite all
right when he took him the tea.
Told by the coroner that a
case of toads had been found
on a table by the bed, Mr. Amor
said his son had had them for
a long time.
Mr. Aliine a'.so mentioned that
a book on witchcraft had been
found in the room. Mr. Amor
said he knew his son had the
book, but didn't think he was
really interested  in  witchcraft.
Station Sergeant Eric Whelan
told the inquest that in addition
to the toads and the witchcraft
oooik, he found " what I can only
describe as a ivery large parsnip,"'
in the b;d.
Pathologist Mr, N. Patel said
he could find no evidence of
barbiturate drugs or alcohol in
the dead man's body. He said
Anior had died from a contused
brain due to the fractured skull.
The coroner adjourned the
case until July 5 for Mr. Patel
to "try and rccovt.* ;he end
products  of  this L-SiD drug/'
Armless Man Flies
HIS APPEAL
At Parksville tne occasion
was marked for some people,
among them an RCMP officer, by a tremor which
Comox armed services
spokesman said could not
possibly have been caused by
their errant Voodoo and
which seismologists said could
not possibly have been caused
by their earthquake.
Saanich seismologist Br. W.
G. Milne was left shaking his
head   in   puzzlement
Editorial
Artistic anarchy as
an alternative to
Hungarian musicians.
Which do you prefer?
Send answers now.
Of course, this is horribly unfair. We know that the West
won't launch a total war of all-
out massacre if it  can  possibly
s'3
*o
v. 5
/WicK
uJ .
co £
tc -
**
enseen
Si
iwemess
~    showers/
r*  bright y
?±%   ,NTER»e
%^JvaS\
INTERVALS ' 4j,
Dumfries
(SHOWERS %*-#
TO-DAY'S  WEATHER
Roger Countill is a pseudonym.
.3
S_<
o _
■K 3
o >
a c
*•*- *\.
-X,
Attests
Gordon For You?
PARIS (UPI) - Felix
Laurent decided Wednesday 'he
could no longer stand the
quality of programs on
■France's national television
network so he took his set to the
top of the Eiffel Tower and
hurled it to the ground.
CHERBOURG    (Reuters)    —
France   laid   the   keel   of   her
second   nuclear  submarine,
Terrible,   at  a   brief  ceremony r-jj
here Saturday.
T
m
■*■*
CIS
be
CO
c
CO
-*■«
S
ce
• I-*
■M
«*H
J. A. B. HAMILTON
British Railway
Accidents
Tells the whole story of twenty-
seven ofthe great accidents ofthe
present century.     Illustrated 30s.
THIS UFEBUOV
TOILET SOAP HAS
A GOUGEOUS SMEU-\
AND IT «£A£Xy GETS
INTO THE POUES.
MAW WAS M&HT.
NOW I KNOWHOW
TO SNO B.G.
x.\ 1*
.... ........ W,
!&. A    f~int>    Tfanmr   Jfrrhrrna   f?irt%r*>11a    J?ri*s**hf*rTV    PrA/fv.  *f?f__"/v.   Rron/n-eiV. $£
yu
•*•
A list of cows' names appeared in the advertisement of a set
of dairy stock in Shropshire, 1809.
Earnest, Curlpate, Jezebel, Judith, Bee, Gayless, Early, Secunda,
A. One, Fancy, Firbrina, Firbrella, Roseberry, Pretty, Curly, Browney,
Yorkshire, Daisy, Rose Rosalina, Second, Standfast, K. Wouski,
Broad Cap, Rosely, Helen, Fillbowl, Sexta, M. Broadface, Fillpan,
Rosebud, Wisky, Doctress, Lovely Lass, Urah, Third, Rworea, Cot
Lass, Rosamond, Rosella, Miss Key, Tertia, Furba.
HtS
Hts
its
Hts
Hts
Hts
its
HtS
Hts
HtS
HtS
qxt
HtS
its
its
HtS
HtS
HtS
HtS
HtS
HtS
HtS
306
Ifs best to live in a hedge
HtS
«U
HtS
HtS
HtS
HtS
HtS
HtS
HtS
HtS
HtS
TOILETS
orturous
European oAoe *Store
EXCLUSIVE DEALER FOR
MANZ, THE CHOICE OF THE
GERAAAN OLYMPIC TEAM, 1968
IMPORTED  FROM
FRANCE,   GERMANY,   ITALY   ANO   SPAIN
979 Granville St. at Nelson
Phone: 683-2819
Near the Downtown Theatre
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
PlescUbtion Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
E. EUROPE
We've specialized in this area
for a number of years and are
official agents for all the Government Tourist Offices in Eastern Europe and the U.S.S.R.
Information on tourist facilities
conferences and congresses
available through our branches.
7 OFFICES
2996  W.   Broaway
736-5651
982  Denman   St.
682-7254
925   W.   Georgia
684-2448
4841   Victoria   Drive
879-4575
468!i   Kingsway,   Bby.
43T-6674
|407   Columbia,   N.W.
526-7873
1425  Marine  Dr., W.V.
926-4304
Hagen's Travel Service Ltd.
HAGEN'S
Open 9-5  p.m.  Incl.  Saturday
WE'VE RENOVATED OUR SHOP!
Come in and inspect our newly-
renovated shop—We now have more
new equipment as well as a larger
staff so we can continue, to be the
most efficient as well as the most
economical V.W. repair shop in town,
(inquire about this week's front-end  special)
AUT0-HENNEKEN SERVICE
8914 OAK STREET (at Marine)
Phone Hans 263-8121
If
0
I
1
0
o
a
i
o
a
o
a
o
i
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
m
From Province Files
30  vears  aso
March 12, 1918
Vancouver Millionaires and Seattle,
present Stanley Cup holders, battle to
2-all tie before record crowd at the
Vancouver Arena. Mickey McKay scored
both Vancouver goals.
. . . and on the above date O. B.
Allan jewellers had already been
serving British Columbia for 14
years.
Today, as then, their experience
& integrity are your assurance of
satisfaction when buying a diamond.
,<■*•""",
Registered
Jeweller
A.UKRH'AX
('KM   SOOIKTV
"Gainsborough"
$300
Convenient   Budget  Terms
Balance in  12 months
Xit.d
l.l.UITKI)
('raiivill--    at    Pender
Since   IH04
1
0
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
0
J
Friday, March  15,  1968
THE     U BYSSEY Editor, Page Friday:
A Russian film version of
Hamlet which was presented
three weeks ago at the Varsity
ended, as I imagine do most
versions of this play, in a funeral procession, the solemnity
of which I am sure failed to
leave none but the hard-hearted unmoved. Upon leaving the
theatre short minutes later, I
chanced to hear (as one does)
a comment about "someone
tripping in the funeral procession", a statement whose incredible triteness I leave the reader to affirm. Evidently this impotent witticism had issued
from the lips of a particularly
boorish Philistine. I turned
around, fully expecting to see
a tousle-haired, gum-snapping,
freckled and besneakered
twelve-year-old grinning at his
comrade who, convulsed with
hilarity, expressed their primordial satisfaction at the lad's
insipid humor. Imagine then,
if you will, my incredulity
that the damning words had
been uttered by none other
than celebrated art nouveau
critic — one Stephen Scobie!
Well. If these words were
created as an attempt at what
some people might describe as
"camp", then allow me to say
only that the depths in which
Ubyssey "culture" wallows is
further below my helping
reach than I had imagined. If
however, they were spoken in
a sincere effort to vocalize the
majesty, and subtle eloquence
of one of Shakespeare's greatest masterpieces, then . . . one
can feel only pathos.
Please do not misunderstand
me. I am not demanding Mr.
Scobie's resignation or even
suggesting such an action (although at this point a proclamation of complete dissociation
from The Ubyssey would of
course, be the only right and
honorable thing to do). I am
simply expressing my astonishment, indignation and perhaps — yes — a trace of
bitterness.
A disillusionment of this
sort is always painful. I must
urge all those who share these
troubled times with me to remember that, even with the
world about our knees, we
must try, somehow, to continue.
DANNY SONNENSCHEIN
arts 1
Ed. note: Our critic grovels
in unrepentance.
*
be
*m    pr
r
Cello channels
schmaltzy Strauss
By ANDREW HORVAT
The passion and vigour of twenty-two year old Jacqueline du Pre, British cellist, and the intensity of the
Vancouver Symphony under Meredith Davies were out of
place at the Queen Liz Sunday, March 3rd.
By that I do not mean to say that the predominantly
elderly, grey haired, ladies at the concert were unable to
appreciate the predominantly nineteenth century programe.
The absence of younger people, obviously for financial
reasons, proved that at least in this instance, youth was not
wasted on the young.
Miss du Pre was sensual; she commanded the Schum-
mann concerto, and she stole the limelight in the Don
Quixote. She was nervous, but when she played, all her
energies were channelled into her cello, and her instrument became the voice of a melodramatic Schumann, and
a schmaltzy Richard Strauss.
The orchestra was no less energetic in Daphnis and
Chloe, certainly more moving than any recording could
have been.
But why must the Vancouver Symphony constantly
play the classics? Surely some symphonic music must have
been written after the Great War! Why must Miss du Pre
be a medium for the nineteenth century? Surely she is
capable of rendering the music of her own times as well
as, if not better than that of her great grandfather.
And even if it is the sound of the peerless masters
that reverberates in that labyrinth-roofed Queen Liz, why
must it terminate at the ear drums of tired business-men
whose wives dragged them to the only Sunday afternoon
social event in Vancouver?
Now that Vancouver has a Symphony Orchestra that
can play the prerequisites, why not have it play three unit
thesis courses?
But three to five dollars is too much to pay for a
single performance of Jacqueline du Pre. Especially when
the same outlay will buy a record of comparable value at
a certain downtown discount record shop. The problem here
is that a recording and a live performance just do not
compare. A recording heard twice is simply a mechanical
regurgitation, no matter how high the quality of that
recording may be. A repeat performance by a live orchestra
is never the same no matter how second rate that orchestra
may be.
The matter concerning the price is one for Special
Events to decide, and while Special Events (or the Faculty
of Music for that matter) is at it, they could arrange some
contemporary music, from Carl Orff onwards, to be played
on campus. Another solution to the money question might
be reduced rates, or free passes for next year's youthful
programs. ._
 ci
rrioku pizza TYiokiA
Dine In — Take Out — Delivery
Across the street from the
Fraser   Arms
1381   S.W.  Marine  Drive 263-4440
RENTAL & SALES
* 2,500   GARMENTS   TO
CHOOSE FROM
* Full Dress (Tails)
* Morning Coats
* Directors' Coats
* White and Coloured Coats
* Shirts and  Accessories
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
(Downstairs)
623 Howe 688-2481
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION
PAPERBACKS
Specializing in
Review Notes
and Study Guides
224-4144
4393 W. 10th Ave.
FACTS You Should Know
About Your New Student Union Building
SUB! SUB!   SUB!
Your new SUB will provide the following recreation facilities:
—10  billiard  tables.
—Table  tennis.
—8  bowling  lanes.
—Mens' and  women's quiet rooms, plus  showers  and
lockers.
—Vending.
For further information, watch for future ads, or
contact the SUB office, 2nd floor, Brock South.
V
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
se
fr
Waiting Jcr fyfa
>>
by SAMUEL BECKETT
with
Robert Clothier Gregory Reid
Lee Taylor
Directed by Stanley Weese. Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox.
MARCH 22-30, 1968
Student Tickets $1.00
(available for all  performances)
— Special Student Performances -
Monday, March 25th    7:30    p.m.
Thursday,  March 28th  12:30 p.m.
k
Tickets: Fredric Wood Theatre Room 207 or 228-26
Support Your Campus Theatre
—^—FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE-——
A
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March  15,  1968 Friday, March   15,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  13
The odds and ends page
Govt dissolves building restrictions
TORONTO (CUP) — The
Ontario government will soon
drop the distinction between
academic  and  non - academic
Campus cop
shoots man
COLLEGE PARK, MO.
(CUP-CPS) — A campus policeman has been suspended after
shooting a University of Maryland student in the leg for playing a prank.
Campus policeman Lenwood
Holden, who shot Michael Fo-
der, 19, while Foder was pulling down a bedsheet-banner
from the first floor of a women's dorm, has been charged
with assault to commit murder.
Lt. Henry Nebel of the campus force told the Maryland
Diamondback, the campus paper, that Foder had fallen and
broken his leg. But a bullet
was later removed from Fod-
er's leg at the school's infirmary.
Some witnesses to the incident said Holden yelled, "Stop
or I'll shoot" before firing.
Foder said he was so scared he
just ran.
university buildings when
doling out capital grants.
This could mean student
union buildings, theatres, athletic complexes, etc., will get
a higher share of the costs of
construction paid through government grants.
"There is every indication of
a new policy being announced
within a month or so," said
James Bancroft, new director
of the finance branch of the
department of university affairs.
"And the distinction between
class A and class B buildings
will go by the board."
At present class A, academic
buildings, receive government
grants for 85 per cent of their
cost. Class B, non - academic
buildings, receive only 50 per
cents grants.
"The former policy just
wasn't providing, that well, the
support that was necessary,"
Bancroft said.
Conservatives headed
Brian Prittie, arts 4, has
been elected president of the
UBC Conservative club, by
acclamation.
Former campus socred president Ian Strachan, ed. 4, becomes first vice-president, and
George Gibault, arts 1, is the
new  second  vice-president.
FORMAL
AND
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sales
Tuxedos, tails, white dinner iackets, morning
coats . . . complete size
rang*.
We   also   make   made-to-
measure suits.
10%   U.B.C.   Discount.
MCCUISH    POMF-AT^WBA*
Mon.-Sat. 9:00 to 5:30
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
ROACH DELICATESSEN
UMBERTO MENGHI - ANTHONY ANTISIN
INVITE YOU TO TRY
THEIR ITALIAN FOOD
LASAGNE & CANNELLONI
Please phone in advance for take-out orders
In our Delicatessen  Dept.:  Cold  meats,  cheeses  and
all  kinds of imported foods.
4471 WEST 10th AVE. 224-6722
L\mvE.R&N  5WIC6-S- 10.00 f UllS"
THE DAY YOU BUY A DIAMOND
You  are  buying  for  the future
as   well   as   the   present   .   .   .
•
SEE   US   FOR   YOUR   DIAMOND   TODAY
10%   Discount to Students
Varsity Jewellers
4517   West  10th
224-4432
Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE
Applications   will   be   received   up   to   March    16   for
'      positions  on the A.M.S.  Discipline  Committee  .Submit
applications to:
Box No. 65 President,
A.M.S. Brock Hall Law Students Association
Committee Members
Applications are now being received for Committee
members for the following Joint AMS-Administration
Committees:
Academic Symposium Committee
Brock Art Committee
Student Union Building Management Committee
Winter Sports Centre Management Committee
Applications for the above positions must include a letter
outlinng qualfications, reasons for applying, and, where
applicable, a proposed program. Eligibility forms are
available from the AMS Office, and must be completed
by the Registrar's Office before making application.
Letters of application and eligibility forms must be
submitted to the secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall, by Noon,
March  19.
All applicants are asked to attend the AMS Council
Meeting March 19, 6:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers,
Brock Hall.
Committee Chairmen
Applications will be received up to Noon, March 19 for
the positions of Chairman of the following AMS Standing Committees:
Canadian University Service  Overseas
Frosh Orientation
High School Conference Committee
Intramurals  Committee
Performing Arts Committee
Speakers Committee
Symposia Committee
World University Service
Applications for the above positions must include a
letter outlining qualifications, reasons for applying, and
a proposed program. Eligibility forms are available from
the AMS Office and must be completed by the Registrar's
Office before making application.
Letters of applications and eligibility forms must be
submitted to the secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall, by Noon,
March 19.
All applicants are asked to attend the AMS Council
Meeting March 19, 6:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers,
Brock Hall.
Finance Committee
Interviews will be held during the week of March 18 to
March 21 for appointment of members-at-large of Finance
Committee.
Letters of application will be received by the Secretary
of the A.M.S., Brock Hall, until noon, Tuesday, March 19,
1968.
Letters should include qualifications, campus interests,
and eligibility forms.
Officers In The Canadian Forces Enjoy Challenging Jobs
With The Excitement Of Travel and Responsibility, and
There May Be A Place For You Among Them
UNDER GRADS
May Qualify For Subsidized
University Training — Including:
• Tuition Fully Paid
9   Book Allowance
• $187 M. Salary
12  Mo.   Yr.   While   Attending   University
• Month  Paid  Holiday Annually
• Medical & Dental Care
• An Assured Future
UNIVERSITY GRADS
May Qualify For :
• Immediate Commissions
• Excellent Pay
#)   An Assured Future in a Unique and
Interesting Profession
• Early Pension Benifits At Top Rates
Phone or Visit The
Canadian    Forces
Recruiting Center
547 Seymour St.
Vancouver
684 - 7341 Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March   15,   1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Laos crisis analyzed
SOUTH EAST ASIA
PROJECT
Dr. Mandel of the economics department on Laos?-
economic and political crisis
today noon in Ang. 104.
EDUCATION US
Dean's forum, with guest
speaker Bob Young, principal
of Campbell River Secondary
School, today, noon, ed. 100.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
General meeting for elections, today, noon, IH. Bring
membership cards.
HELLENIC SOC
Greek Independence Day —
Prof. J. Gaitanakis, school of
architecture, speaks on The
Celebration of an Idea, Monday, 7:30 p.m., IH. Refreshments and dancing afterwards.
CANADIANS  FOR  NLF
Concert today, 8 p.m., York
Theatre, 639 Commercial. Admission free.
DANCE CLUB
Free party and competitions
Campus-wide contest
for aspiring photogs
Picture yourself in a photography contest.
Photosoc Is sponsoring a
sponsoring a campus-wide contest for staff and students.
Deadline for entries is March
15. More information is at the
Photosoc office in Brock ext.
166 or Lass. 201.
at the lounge today, 8 p.m. All
welcome.
GUEST LECTURER
Prof. R. Morton Smith, dept.
of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto speaks at noon
today in Bu. 102 on Caste in
India — Its Historical Origins
and Development.
NEWMAN CLUB
Last mixer today, 9 p.m. —
1 a.m., St. Mark's lounge.
Members, 50 cents, non-members, 75 cents.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Monday  noon—all  welcome
to   hear    an   overseas    social
worker, in Bu. 203. This is the
last meeting.
COLLEGE LIFE
CAT-GIF — meet tonight at
9 a.m. at 6242 Yukon.
FINE ARTS GALLERY
Noon  today — Prof.  Abraham Rogatnick,   school  of architecture, will conduct a tour
of chairs exhibition.
UBCSCC
Garden path rally for members, Sunday, starting 9 a.m.
from Queen Elizabeth park.
Novices welcome.
GERMAN CLUB
Kommen  sie  und  sehen  sie
einen  wunderbaren   Farb-film
Afrika  auf  English.  Dienstag,
IH 402.
CHORAL SOCIETY
Return all music to clubroom, Brock ext. 360, anytime.
LSM
Christianity in the year 2000.
Panel discussion Sunday with
dinner at 6 p.m., Lutheran student center. Pre-fab man in
the year 2000, Monday, noon
in Bu. 104 with medical genetics prof. Dr. M. Carey.
PHRATERES
Important all - Phi meeting
today noon Bu. 106. All members please attend.
COMPUTER CLUB
All members who wish to go
on SFU field trip Thursday
noon (March 21) please sign
notice in computer hut.
Yawn!
POINT GREY, (Staff) —
More than 200 fire-breathing
copy boys went threw up here
early Thursday to protest the
weird sleeping habits of the
great white number one garbage-producer to be.
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE  DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS,   DARK   SUITS,   TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
MASQUERADE   COSTUMES
SPECIAL STUDENT  RATES
224-0034      4397 W. 10th
WORLD WIDE TRAVEL
are the agents for
Alma Mater
Charter Flights
TO LONDON
DEPARTS JUNE 3 AND JUNE 7
Some Seats Still Available On Group Departure June 3rd
SEE THE WORLD WIDE OFFICE
ON CAMPUS FOR ADVICE AND
ALL YOUR LAND ARRANGEMENTS
Owl S&wuxa CoAi V0**- ^thinq.
WORLD-WIDE
American Express
Representative
5700 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
224-4391
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75c. 3 days $2.00.
Commercal—3 lines, 1 day $1.00. 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in  advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
THE GRASS HARP LIGHT SHOW
and dance, Sat., Mar. 16, 9:00 to
1:00, Brock, Girls $1.00, Guys $1.25,
Couples   $2.00.	
LAST NEWMAN MIXER! FRIDAY,
March 15th at St. Mark's Lounge,
9-1.
LAST DANCE OF THE YEAR? —
Hear and see the Grass Harp in
action Sat., Mar. 16, 9:00 to 1:00—
Brock—Girls, $1.00—Guys, $1.25 —
Couples,   $2.00.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
IS
THE PUBLICATIONS OFFICE HAS
three watches found on campus
plus several glasses and 2 wedding
rings. Owners should identify and
claim.
LOST: BLACK DIAMOND STONE
from Man's Ring. Finder please call
224-1545.
LOST: MATH TEXT (THOMAS) BE-
tween Hennings and Grad Centre,
after 7, 224-9711, Tom, Rm. 130,
reward.
LOST: BLUE KIT BAG LAST FRI-
day, hitchiking to 16th Burrard,
phone 685-2578 or leave at Athletic
Office,   W.M.   Gym.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
UBC BEAUTY SALON. EXPERT
styling and cutting. No appointment necessary. 5736 University
Blvd.
•DON'T PROCRASTINATE . . . SEE
ad in this paper for the Foreign
Student   Reception   Programme."
FATHER BAUER SPEAKS ON "THE
Place of God in Society." Mon.,
March 18 in St. Marks Lounge at
8 p.m.
OPEN   DOOR   DROP-IN   CENTRE   —
(Coffee house  in  Church  cellar.)
Every   Friday   night,   9-12   midnight,
corner of 11th and  Fir.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOW-
ship execution, on skull hill, Hubert
Butcher, BU 100, March 18, 20 &
21   at   12:30.
EXPERIENCE THE MAGIC OF THE
Grass Harp—Light Show and Dance
Sat.—Brock—9:00  to  1:00.
ATTENTION COEDS — BE SAFE
and confident in all situations.
Parties, strange cars, automatic
elevators, blind dates, dark streets.
New pamphlet shows how to use
shoes, purse, umbrella or plain psychology to handle jostlers or attackers. The best of judo, karate and
aiki-do plus a new chart of over
40 nerve centres and pressure
points. Easy to read, easy to learn.
Pamphlet plus chart only $1.25. No
C.O.D. Available now through Box
128,   Station G,   Montreal  18,  P.Q.
Travel  Opportunities
16
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Best prices, Busy "B" Books, 146
West   Hastings,   681-4931.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
ai
'54   PONTIAC,   EXCELLENT   MECH.
cond,  must sell.  AM 1-3690.
•55    PONTIAC    RELIABLE    TRANS.
Call   261-9501   after   6   p.m.,   Dick.
Automobiles Wanted
21
61-64 6 - CYLINDER AUTOMATIC
station wagon prefered, not necessary, for cash, phone 299-9032 Sunday   12-4.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
UBC BARBER SHOP, IN THE VILL-
age,  open  6  days a week.
YOU DON'T HAVE TO DRIVE A
Firebird to be with the "incrowd".
Just have the experts at Corky's
style your hair. Corky's 4th Avenue
Barber Shop, 4th and Alma Road,
ph.   731-4717   for   your   appointment.
Scandals
37
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
Ave. 228-8933.
BEEP BEEP — ROAD RUNNER
cartoons, Wed., Mar. 20 noon, Aud.
50c.
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB — CHEESE
tasting party (and all that that
entails) Friday night, Cecil Green
Park. After eight. (T.G. I.F. as
usual   3:30-6:00.)
DANCE TO THE SCANDALOUS
sounds of the Grass Harp — Light
Show incl.—Sat.—Brock—9:00 to 1:00
—Girls, $1.00—Guys, $1.25—Couples,
$2.00.	
DOUG AND TERESA: CONGRATS
on 2 times 9 months: and only 18.
Good  God!    The  Group.
Typing
40
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis  typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
TYPING  —   ELEC.   MACHINE
Phone   738-7881
ACCURATE COPY TYPING 30c/
page, phone 274-1075 anytime except
weekends. 	
EXPERT   TYPIST   —   ELECTRIC
224-6129  —   228-8384.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call  277-5640.
SHORT NOTICE TYPING DURING
the day: 25c page; phone Ruth,
RE   8-4410.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
SI
Help Wanted—Male
91
LIFEGUARD & SWIMMING IN-
structor wanted. The Village of
Lillooet requires the services of a
lifeguard & swimming instructor
from. May 15, 1968 to Sept. 1st, 1968.
Salary range to $500 per month,
depending on qualifications. Interested persons please contact the
undersigned before April 15, 1968,
stating qualifications and salary expected. G. A. Wiley, Village Clerk,
Box   610,   Lillooet,   B.C.
Help W'ted—Male or Female    53
INSTRUCTION
Instruction  Wanted
61
WANTED NATIVE FRENCH
speaker for conversation, 1 or 2
hrs. per week: W. Cohn (Sociology)
228-3830  or  263-6372.
Tutoring
64
FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS AND
sciences other undergraduate subjects to fourth year. Canadian Tutorial    Centre,    736-6923.
ENGLISH 100 & 200 STUDENTS:
Experienced tutor available, $4.00/
hour (single or group). Carol Clarke
224-5460.
EXPERIENCED TUTORING IN 1ST
& 2nd year English, History, Math,
Chemistry, French, and other languages. For appointment phone Mr.
Huberman—B.A.-LLB.— Huberman
Educational Inst., 2158 West 12th.
Phone   732-5535   —   263-4808.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
Tl
—   OLD   TOTEMS   FOR  SALE  —
1963,   1965  &  1966  issues  50c.
Campus   Life's   25c.   Publications  Off.,
Brock   Hall
.357 S&W MAGNUM REVOLVER.
New with many extras. Phone Phil
433-7668   after   6:30.	
•NEW LINES AT THE DISCOUNT
House' of tape-players, tape recorders, all sizes in transistor and electric radio's, watches, luggage, binoculars, jewelry and gift items; 1500
latest style ladies bathingsuits to
choose from, wholesale prices on all
merchandise. 3235 West Broadway.
Phone   732-6811.
MALLORCAN SPANISH CLASSICAL
guitar. Tone rated better than $700
Gibson-Goya.   $115.   224-9017.     	
HAGSTROM - HAGSTROM - HAG-
strom and other musical goodies.
Mediterranean Guitar Shop —■ 228-
8412 — 4347 West 10th  Avenue.
SEVERAL HAND KNITTED DRESS-
es from $10.00, size 10-14, make to
order, knitted & crochet dresses Ss
dressmaking — 224-3672, 4689 West
12th  Ave.
GET FIT—HUNDRED POUND BAR-
bell outfit, including sleeves and
collars,   $10,phone   Don   224-6975.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
SUMMER ACCOMMODATION IN
Toronto from May 8 to Sept. 15.
Single, double, and triple rooms as
low as $65.00 per month (meals included). For information and applications, write to Campus Co-op,
395 Huron Street, Toronto 5, tel.
921-3168.
WALKING DISTANCE TO CAMPUS,
near Village and meal services.
224-9662. $40.00. 2250 Wesbrook Cresc.
Room & Board
6t
ROOM AND BOARD FOR FEMALE
student, $70.00 per month. Phone
266-0978  after  6:30  p.m.
Furn. Houses 8t Apts.
83
1 BDRM. APT., FURN., KERRIS. TO
sublet May 1-Aug. 31, $120 mo. Ph.
261-4487   after  6:30  p.m.	
ROOMMATE SHARE FURN. WEST
End apt. Reas. 21-over Eng. or Fr.
speaking  girl.   MU  3-8858.
TWO WORKING GIRLS NEED FUR-
nished one-bedrm. apartment, May
to   Sept.,    733-3827,    Sandi,   after   6. Friday, March  15,  1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
THP   Clfl   Ril AA      Wrestlers try out
I   I  I E *m l\k I EP \M mm\ Six  UBC  wrestlers  will  be
By BJORN SIMONSEN
As you are probably well aware of, this has been one of
the poorest ski seasons we have had in years. This has been reflected both in the total number of people using facilities on
local mountains and in the ski shop business.
Ski shop operators report a considerable drop in business
this year as compared to last and many shops
have been left holding the bag with a backroom full of stock.
This could be beneficial to the skier since
this merchandise must be put on sale. Thus
you may be able to pick up a pair of $150
skis for as little as $100.
The biggest factor in determining whether
or not it will be a good or bad year for skiing
is of course the weather.  Last year's record
snowfall   was   caused   by   high   precipitation
coupled with a continual high freezing point
SIMONSEN       elevation.
This year it has rained about as much as it always does but
the freezing point has stayed around 5,000 to 6,000 feet, resulting in a very small snowfall.
Late spring skiing may be very poor this year because of
this chronic lack of snow. This condition was somewhat changed
this week with Whistler receiving over 40 inches of new snow
while the North Shore mountains got considerably less but
enough to make them skiable again.
Manning Park continues to offer good skiing as does Mt.
Baker, if you are lucky enough to pick a sunny day. Whistler
will no doubt be the best and probably the only area that can
still offer good skiing after exams.
Six UBC wrestlers will be
trying for places on Canada's
national team in the Canadian
championships to be held in
Edmonton this weekend.
The wrestlers, part of the 22-
man B.C. team, are Peter Rom-
bough and Denny Boulton, 138
lbs.; Dave Gray, 154; Les
Burguner and Bob Ormond,
171; and Chris Nemeth, 213.
The first three finishers in
each division will be invited
to the national training camp
which will eventually decide
Canada's team.
Field hockey finals
UBC's field hockey teams
will be playing their final
league games of the season this
Saturday.
The Birds play Pitt Meadows
at 1:30 p.m. on Spencer Field.
At the same time, same place
the Scalps play Hawks "C"
and at 3 p.m. the Scalps play
North Shore "B".
The Tomahawks have two
games at Pitt Meadows, the
first at 1:30 p.m. against Pitt
Meadows "C"; the second at
3 p.m. against Wasps.
f/fanAty ef tying a Qiamend?
Illillcr*
At Millers you are assured
of excellent value, superlative stylins* and fine craftsmanship combined with
courteous   service.
o
Convenient Credit Terms arranged with Courtesy Discount
to U.B.C. Students & Personnel
AT   3    CONVENIENT    LOCATIONS
<B 655   Granville   St.,   Vancouver
% 47   W.   Hastings   St.,  Vancouver
* 622 Columbia St., New Westminster
Lady Rose   $175.00
milled
ANNOUNCEMENT
ALL U.B.C. STUDENTS
Are Invited To Take  Part
in a
RECEPTION PROGRAMME
FOR   400   NEW   FOREIGN   STUDENTS
Contact International   House  For More   Information
DRIVING IN U.K
OR EUROPE?
RENTALS
LEASINGS
PURCHASE
ANTCOUNTRY
This Coupon Or Phone For
FREE  BOOKLET
EUROPEAN CARS SERVICE
82 RICHMOND STREET, W.
WTE1002, TORONT01, ONT., CANADA
PHONE 366-2413
SAVE
-———j
NOW IN |
THE UBC J
AREA
TAKE-OUT and    j
HOME DELIVERY !
* Chicken * Shrimp *  Ribs    j
f
Fish
Pizza
736-9788
i-
CHICKEN
DELIGHT®!
3605 W.  Fourth Ave.       '
The   Canadian   Armed   Forces
IlllllllII! OFFICER HI IIU (mp)
TERMS
(a)  Free tuition plus pay while obtaining a degree either
at a Service or Civilian University.
(b) Your obligation is to  serve  in  the Canadian Armed
Forces for at least 4 years after obtaining a degree.
ELIGIBILITY
(a) Junior Matric and  age  16-19  or, Senior Matric and
age 16-20 (add one year to age limit for each year
of university (completed)  beyond Senior Matric).
(b) Canadian Citizen, single and  medically fit.
PROMOTION
On obtaining a degree you would be promoted to the
rank of Lieutenant. In general, promotion opportunities
in the Armed Forces are good but, as in civilian life,
depend on the individual. The minimum rank expectation of a career officer with a university degree should
be that of "MAJOR" for which rank the normal retirement age is 47 years.
SERVICE BENEFITS
(a) Medical and Dental Care.
(b) 30 days leave each year.
(c) Travel.
(d) Retirement with a good pension at a relatively young
age. For example, a Major retiring at age 47, and
with 25 years of service, would receive a pension of
approximately $6400 per year.
COMMENTS
"CommiMioned from the rank)
MONTHLY PAY RATE TABLE
(OFFICERS)
RANK (Equivalent)
INCENTIVE PAV CATEGORY
OFFICERS
Bask
1
year
2
yean
3
A
5
6
years
7
years
8
10
12
yean
14
years
16
Officer-Cadet (ROTP)
187
192
2nd Lieutenant
369
U«utanant
563
603
618
Lieutenant (CFfi)-*
672
692
712
732
752
Com*,
727
752
777
802
827
852
877
Major
931
961
991
1021
1051
1061
Lieutenant-Colonel
1130
1165
1200
1235
1270
Colonel
1404
1449
1494
PILOTS
Lieutenant
7,6|                    1                     I       "'I                    I                   l       796|                     I                   I *                 j          ■■■[">             jM
Lieutenant |CFR] •
842
867
902
937
972
Captain
892
922
962
1002
1042
1082
1122
1142
1162
M-*,-
1117
1147
1177
1207
1237
1267
■
Lieutenant-Colonel
1286
1321
1356
1391
1426
;
Colonel
1482
1527
1572
AIR NAVIGATORS
Lieutenant
694
759
774
Lieutenant |CFR)*
77,
804
839
874
909
Captain
833
863
903
943
983
1023
1063
1083
1103
Major
1009
1039
1069
1099
1129
1159
L ieutenant- Colonel
1208
1243
1278
1313
1348
Colonel
1482
1527
1572
MEDICAL OFFICERS
Captain
920      960    1020    1085    1133     1181     1229    127o             1     ..   j           j            j    ::
Major
1232
1280
1328
1376
1424
1473
Li e u le na nt-Col one!
1428
1476
1524
1572
''$$£'§.
Colonel
1564
1605
1647
DENTAL OFFICERS
Captain
920
954
988
1026
1064
1121
1169
HI?
Major
1077
1125
1173
1221
1269
1316
VM
iin
Lieutenant-Colonel
1329
1377
1425
1474
■ixM
fll
Colonel
1419
1467
1515
1563
LEGAL OFFICERS
Lieutenant
607
;M£-:
Captain
727
•739
752
764
777
805
XxX
ill
Major
931
946
961
983
1021
1081
1120
1175
Lieutena nt-Co lo n el
1198
1246
1294
1342
1422
1471
Colonel
1562
1657
1752
The pay scale to the right is self-explanatory. While attending university you would be paid as an officer cadet,
that is, $187-$192 per month. In addition to free tuition
plus, pay, you are provided with a uniform and with a
book allowance of $125 per year. Summer months are
spent in Service training.
Applications for the forthcoming academic year should be made not later than  1   July to
THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
547 Seymour St., Vancouver (phone 684-7341) or, 1002 Wharf St. in Victoria or, 2908—32 St. in Vernon
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, VISIT, WRITE OR PHONE Page 16
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March   15,   1968
_ i
.    .   EOTTOfU MHCE JESSE*    -
Birds battle Columbus
in crucial league game
UBC soccer Thunderbirds are putting all their money into
their game against Columbus Sunday at 2 p.m. in Callister Park.
The big game will probably determine who will win the
Pacific Coast soccer league championship because there are
few clashes left in the 18-game schedule and the leaders are
closely bunched.
It is the Birds' last league game while Victoria and Columbus have games in hand, but coach Joe Johnson doesn't appear worried.
"If Columbus loses to us, which I expect
them to, then they will be two games behind
with three to play and that is a difficult deficit to erase," said Johnson. "The team is
eager to win, we want to prove that we are
not up there by error."
UBC has a good chance of winning the
game as it has played well lately.
Earlier in  the season,  UBC  played  to  a        JOHNSON
2-2 tie and a 1-0 loss to Columbus, but that was when the squad
had scoring troubles.
The Birds have other advantages going for them as well.
They have the best goals average in the league, a talent which
will be helpful as a tie-breaker.
There has been no decision yet on a protested game against
Victoria Oaks, and this is good. In that game, the Birds were on
the wrong end of several bad calls and the referee was purportedly not too consistent.
Johnson might come up with a few surprises in Sunday's
game, just to confuse Columbus.
Fourth year defenceman Jim Berry could be moved up to
forward to add scoring punch. He scored two goals last weekend
and led the team to a seven goal second half against South Hill
Luckies.
Rugger men hoping to get
a Boot out of SFU squad
By  JOHN  TWIGG
The UBC rugby Thunderbirds will get a big boot out
of Saturday's game against
Simon   Fraser  University.
The game, which starts at
2:30 p.m. in Thunderbird Stadium,  is for the Boot.
The Boot is the new trophy
donated by last year's Thunderbird rugby team as a memento to now-retired coach
Brian Whightman.
Apparently, near the end of
the last season the players
swiped Wightman's boots, and,
knowing that he was going to
retire, had them gilded and
mounted. One boot was presented to Whightman and the
other was set up as the trophy
for the annual SFU-UBC
match.
UBC should win the game
as the second division team,
the Braves, have already
beaten SFU, but it was early
in the season. The Clan has recently beaten UVic, while the
Birds only tied UVic.
It is the Clan's big game of
the year and they are going all
out to win. There is widespread support on the SFU
campus and there's a rumor
that their pep band will attend
the game.
UBC coach Donn Spence is
planning to use an open style
of rugby because this style has
been   more   effective   for   the
\Z79 SEYMOUR ST-
es
//
iW-fabulous
OttVSTCRS
also -fearturT-ng
EAm COtUMS Mhe MOJO
^^^«^*<-**» ^^_»icr <
1    MUKCH II* *» Ti
ri
Birds than a ball-control style.
The open style also leads to
more  spectator  enjoyment.
The game will be played under international rules which
means there are 40 minute
halves and no substitutions.
The rules may not help UBC
because they have several injuries. Four first-stringers will
not play and their positions
will be taken by former
Braves.
Center Dave Austin is expected to lead UBC as he has
played well in recent games.
He is one of the surest tacklers
on the team and has started to
add some tries to the Birds'
attack.
Spence is looking for a win,
especially after the disap-
pointing
southern
tour. "We're
going to
break tradition and not
choke against
SFU," said
Spence, as he
AUSTIN smiled   at
coach Peter M u 11 i n s who
was in the vicinity of the interview. "It will be one of
UBC's last chances to prove
our supremacy over SFU this
year." It is also the Birds' last
home game of the season.
QhDOML (L (DicwwncL
With* Qon$L<lbmaL
Special 10% Discount to all UBC Students
Convenient Terms Available
on Diamond Engagement Rings
FIRBANK'S JEWELLERS
Downtown
Seymour at
Dunsmuir
Brentwood
Shopping
Centre
Park
Royal
TO ALL
STUDENTS AND FACULTY
The
Bookstore
will be closed
ALL DAY
THURSDAY, MARCH 28TH
AND FRIDAY, MARCH 29TH
FOR
Annual   Stocktaking
THE STORE WILL REOPEN
MONDAY, APRIL 1ST

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126312/manifest

Comment

Related Items