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UBC Publications

Pow Sep 29, 1992

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Array VOL 75, NO. 7
INSIDE:
RCMP lingual support, p.5
Saul Terry interview, p.l 1
Spectacular sports centre
COVER STORY
Freedom:
To Date
BY LILLIAN AU
AND EFFIE POW
PAT Pratibha, 26, refuses to
marry against her choice.
Pratibha has rejected two
•marriages to men in their late thirties
arranged by her family—one a
doctor from Africa selected by word
of mouth.
"I was treated like a chattel up
for the highest bidder," she said.
"They didn't care about my
feelings."
"I have the option to say no,
but I face tremendous disapproval if
I do. My family constantly reminded
me that I missed a good man.
Everyday my father would call me
an old spinster," she said.
Her family, she said, considers
her a "disgrace and an
embarassment."
"Because I'm still not
married...my family has a difficult
time finding suitable candidates for
my younger sisters," she said. "Being
single has cast doubt on my family
name."
Pratibha's first date didn't
come until she was 25, after she left
home against her parents' wishes.
"When I was at home, I wasn't
even allowed to talk to boys," she
said. "My dad would just have a fit
if I spoke to a guy."
Said Pratibha: "I never
understoodwhat'sitlike to be kissed
or to hold hands because I never
experienced those feelings."
She said many Indo-Canadian
women face a bleak future.
Continued on page 12
■p>^^ ILEG1T1MUS NON CARBORUNDUM
POW
UBYSSEY SPECIAL EDITION
Vancouver, British Columbia, September 29,1992
PHOTO BY ROSA TSBSIG
Age. Race. Lifestyle. Income. Sexual orientation. Young people face new pressures in
dating from their peers and families. See COVER STORY.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
"It's like demanding eggs
from chickens without
feeding them."
L-uYaaLi P. 16
JOBS
CANADA'S
ENGINEERS:
executives: 99% male
managers: 98% male
staff: 97% male
profs: 98% male
students: 86% male
UBC: 3 women : 20 men
 BY BIANCA ZEE
MEN still dominate the
world of engineering, a
federal report revealed.
The report showed women form
only 14 per cent of Canada's
engineering students.
More Than Just Numbers,
prompted by the massacre of 14
women at Ecole Polytechnique in
December 1989, revealed the
percentage of women engineers
diminish drastically with each step
up the corporate ladder.
The joint federal and corporate
study by the Canadian Committee on
Women and Engineering reports
women form only three per cent of
Canada's 121,4(54 engineers.
Danan Li of Vancouver is one of
3,875 women engineers in Canada.
In her field, only one per cent of the
executives are women, the report said.
Li, 27, a civil engineer, said she
was given a few hints in Ontario
when she embarked on her
engineering career.
"A male colleague once advised
that you have to swear to survive in
this field," said Li who now works
for a Cloverdale firm.
"I do notknow any other woman
engineers except the ones I studied
with," said Li. "Ftight now all my coworkers are male except myself, the
receptionist and the secretary."
UBC       schooled       2,400
engineering students last year.
Twenty in 23 students were men.
Continued on page 13.
Student mom told "no student discount
55
BY EFFIE POW
A UBC student was denied a flight
home for Christmas because of her
three-month-old child.
UBC Travel CUTS refused Evy
Simpson a student fare to Toronto,
citing "company policy" prohibits
student discounts for students
travelling with babies.
Infants under two years old
usually fly free-of-charge on all
domestic flights.
"I was really upset and didn't
know what to do," said Simpson, 35.
"I couldn't afford to go home if it
wasn't a student ticket."
Simpson would need to pay $200
more for a regular fare.
"Aren't mothers one of the most
impoverished families in Canada,"
Simpson said. "Shouldn't they be the
ones to get a break?"
Another student mother was also
recently rejected for a student
discount, said UBC Travel CUTS
manager Marjorie Wilder.
Wilder said she called the Toronto
head office which advised her to turn
the student down.
Toronto head office spokesperson
Tammy Agueci could not explain the
rejections. She said she thought the
airlines might not be equipped to
handle infants.
"There was confusion about
mothers travelling with infants," she
said.
But no airline policy denies
student mothers student discounts.
An executive for the Canadian
Federation of Students, which owns
Travel CUTS, said, "There was never
a policy on the part of the airlines or
our company.
"The incident that happened
before was a misunderstanding," said
Travel CUTS chair Jamie McEvoy.
"We do everything to accommodate
mothers and their children."
CFS, a student advocacy group,
operates 34 Travel CUTS offices.
Simpson booked a student ticket
at a downtown Travel CUTS office
Thursday without mentioning her
child. She requested a brochure of
rules but none was available. With a
reporter, she later approached the
UBC branch, which offically noted
her child would accopman her.
IRAVELcms
Evy Simpson upset over rejection.
STAFF PHOTO Tuesday, September 29,1992
POW
Vol.75, No.7
CLASSIFIED • 822-3978
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES: AMS cardholders - 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines, 60cents, commercial - 3 lines, $5.00, additional lines,
75 cents. (10% discount on 25 issues or more). Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4pm, 2 days before
publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A7,822-3977.
11 - FOR SALE (Private)
BRAND NEW! 4-40 Macintosh
Classic includes mouse and
keyboard. Asking $1200. Phone
228-9333. Ask for Carl.
RENAULT ALLIANCE, 1983,
good condition, great mileage. Car
of the year in 83. $1,500.
30-JOBS
AMAZING OPPORTUNITY for
students to earn part-time income.
Flexible hours. Call toll free 1-979-
0450.
WORK STUDY VACANCIES,
Macintosh experience preferred but
notnecessary. Mustbe able to work
lOhrs/wk. Good writing and typing
skills. Up to $ 14/hr. Please call Dr.
Tan @ 822-2737 immediately or
leave message at 327-5863.
GREEKS & CLUBS RAISE A
COOL $1,000.00
IN JUST ONE WEEK! PLUS
$1000 FOR THE MEMBER WHO
CALLS! And    a    FREE
HEADPHONE RADIO just for
calling 1-800-932-0528, Ext. 65.
NATIVE ENGLISH speaking
instructors urgently needed for ft/pt
working with children.   Teaching
experience helpful. Proper visa with
B.A.required. Will provide housing
Y300000 per month. Send resume
with photo to American Times/
Cosmo, 4-20 Suehiro-cho Kiryu
Gunma,Phone: 027743-5770. Must
come to Japan by Oct. 20/92.
Japanese not essential. Extra info:
Esther Silva 224-2673.
70 - SERVICES
JOB HUNTING? We have
thousands of job-matched reumes
on file. We're experts in resume
writing, editing, typesetting.
WordPLUS: near campus at 4183
W. 14th Avenue. Phone or fax 228-
8444.
SKIPPING CD PLAYERS fixed,
repairs $20+ over 80% success rate.
Call the Disc Doktor at 251-6463.
YOUR GRADES WILL
SUFFER unless your written English
is of competitive quality. Before
you hand in an important essay or
term paper, bring it to us for expert
editing and correcting (grammar,
coherence, bias, etc.). WordPLUS:
near campus at 4183 W. 14th Ave.
Phone or fax 228-8444.
80 - TUTORING
MATH AND PHYSICS tutoring
by Ph.D., 15 years experience, on-
campus, reasonable rates. Call 254-
7058, anytime.
85 - TYPING
PROFESSIONAL typist, 30years
exp., wdprocess/typing, APA/MLA,
thesis. Student rates. Dorothy, 228-
8346.
— ON CAMPUS—
Don't Panic!
AMS WORD PROCESS-ZING
will do it for you!
Room 60, SUB
(Across from Torts)
Fall Hours:
Mon. - Thurs. 9 - 6
Friday 9 - 5
Drop in or call 822-5640
Student OPINIONS
"What interests you most in
a newspaper?"
PROFESSIONAL WORD
PROCESSING, typing, APA; also
camera-ready typesetting of journal
articles, newsletters, posters; low-
cost colour-overlay photocopying.
WordPLUS: near campus at 4183
W. 14th Avenue. Phone or fax 228-
8444.
TYPING & WP of theses, essays,
letters, manuscripts, resumes,
reports. Bilingual. Clemy 266-
6641.
Norman Wignall
Anthropology 4
"• Obituaries
(just to check
everyone's
still with him)
• Comics--
Wizaidofld
• Book reviews
• Used car ads
in the
classifieds
• Personals
(Just kidding.
Honest.)"
Minh Chau Nguyen
Applied Sciences 4
"• European
Community
issues
•NASAorESA
current events
in space
program
• Op/Ed in
Vancouver Sun
• Food section"
Meg Ross
Arts 2
• Positive
human
interest stories
• Garfield
comics
• Film and play
reviews
• Horoscopes
• Dear Abby"
Compiled By %psa Tseng
BETWEEN CLASSES
Tuesday
Christian Science Organization.
Testimonial mtg. Noon, BUCH B234.
UBC Library. Learn UBCLIB Drop-
in session. Noon, Arts Computer Rm,
Sedge Lower Fir.
Chinese Christian Fellowship
(Cantonese). "Root" - conference,
speaker: Dr. In-Shing Leung. Noon-
1:30, Biol 2000.
Wednesday
AMS. Clubs Days. 11:30 - 3:30,
SUB Concourse & SUB 2nd Floor.
Arab Student Society. Arabic Movie
-subtitled. Noon- 1:30pm, Angus421.
Women Students' Office. Mature
women students drop-in group. Noon -
1:30, Brock 261.
StudentChristianMovement. Supper
& bible study. 5:30 pm, Lutheran
Campus Centre.
Jewish Students Assn. StudentBoard
meeting. 1:30, Hillel House.
Hillel/Jewish Students Assn. Genesis:
Literal or Allegorical? Noon, Hillel
House.
Gays & Lesbians of UBC. General
mtg. Noon, SUB 215.
Thursday
Live Drawing Club. Every Thursday.
Noon - 2:20 pm, Lasserre 204. $4.50
International Socialists' Meeting:
"Education under Capitalism and
Socialism." 7:30 pm, SUB 211.
Hillel/Jewish Students Assn.
Registration for beginners Hebrew.
11:30-1, Hillel House.
Friday
Alma Mater Society. Clubs Days.
11:30 - 3:30, SUB Main Concourse &
SUB 2nd Floor.
Gays & Lesbians of UBC.   Social.
WIN A TRIP TO
KHATMANDU, NEPAL
representing the Relyukal Cultural Centre of Canada at the
Reiyukai International Speech Festival
First Prize: expense paid trip to Khatmandu, Nepal
Second Prize: $500 Scholarship
Third - Fifth Prizes: $100 - $200 Scholarships
Contest is open to all Canadian citizens or landed immigrants 16-25 years old.
Entry Deadline:       November 8,1992
For more information and an official entry form, contact us by mail or fax at:
RCC International Canadian Office
1076 West 49th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Phone 263-1919    Fax 266-3406
•T-SHIRTS
•JACKETS
[INTRAMURAL]
UNIFORMS
•COFFEE
MUGS
SILKSCREENING
(QUICK TURNAROUND)
•EMBROIDERY
•CRESTS & CHENNILLE
•CUSTOM-MADE JACKETS
call the OYE SPORTSWEAR
HOTLINE: 875-1245
■■rKOMTTVELlVEKyOT QOOVS"
OPEN EVENINGS & WEEKENDS
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY.
$230 F^ Speck* also!
ElClDGf
I PIZZA CO. 1/ Vfol. 75, No. 7
POW
Tuesday, September 29,1992
NEWS
DEMOLITION
Movable class built with screwdriver
plagued by leaks and strange noises
BY CHARLES NHO
STRANGE noises
resembling moans
descend from a voice
class upstairs as tennis hacks rally
below duringarainstorm. Players
must leap over buckets and
towels catching raindrops from
a leaking roof while returning
serves.
Checker-framed windows
broken long ago by vandals or
errant balls let in even more rain
and wind. One quarter of the
low-hanging lights are burned
out while others flicker near
extinction. The smell of mildew
escapes sweat-doused change
rooms. Buzzing wasps have
nested almost a year upstairs
beneath the building's tattered
lumber frame. And sand from a
long jump pit finds its way to the
far ends of four tennis courts.
The $2.5 million Armories
built in 1941 have seen better
days.
The doors of the former two-
floor Canadian forces
headquarters will be locked on
New Year's Day with impending
demolition. A budgeted $13-
million Creative Arts Centre that
includes dance studios will be
built on the grounds.
"It's kind of sad to see it
go," said caretaker Rick Jessop.
"You can't expect much
more out of this place...it's old,
that's why you're not seeing them
putanymore money in thisplace."
Since students stopped
writing winter exams in their
parkas two years ago, the building
has rapidly deteriorated. The
wooden building—four walls
held together by screws—has had
dozens of uses.
Physical education students
play field hockey on its tennis
courts and hold track practices.
On one court, they installed a
temporary weight room. Near to
arts and science buildings, the
Armouries haive attracted dances
and concerts in the past decade.
Even jnartial arts classes and
memorial services were held
there. Until 1983," students
stormed the building which
housed the UBC bookstore's
September sales.
In 1988, UBC planners said it
should be demolished.
"It's the worst condition I've
seen it in," said UBC Tennis Club
president Sean Godel, who has
used its courts for five years. "It's
losing the club atmosphere."
"They used to spiff it up just
before Christmas exams," he said.
"The future looks pretty bleak
now."
\
i«*v. t;'-*M
; ** d '?.*■ "*
rf&U Of. ;
POLICE
UBC Tennis Club president Sean Godel spies leaking
Armouries roof photo by ma chia-nien
ASYLUM
Journalist and computer whiz
narrowly escape deportation
 BY HAO LI	
FOR journalist Liu YiJun and
computer whiz Lin Lin, jailed
nine months in Hong Kong,
new hope in Canada came as a last-
minute surprise.
The two women, arrested in
Hong Kong last Dec. 17 as illegal
immigrants, were facing deportation
Sept. 16 back to Chinadespiteclaims
of possible persecution.
"We were taken out by Hong
Kong police at 6 a.m...and thought
we would be sent back to China,"
said Liu, 29, in Vancouver. "Only
when I found out I was on the way to
the airport did I have some hope."
Lin, 24, and Liu were granted
political asylum Sept. 16 in Canada,
after a last-minute call by Canadian
immigration officials to Hong Kong.
"The Hong Kong immigration
officers still call this action a
deportion, but to Canada instead of
China," Liu said.
Liu said she still stays at arm's
length from Chinese-speaking
individuals in Canada.
"I was told there were all kinds
of Chinese groups here and I am not
sure whether you are working for
Chinese government," she said.
Liu and Lin slipped illegally
into Hong Kong last December and
were caught by local police. They
applied forpolitical asylum in Hong
Kong after being sent to an
immigration detention centre, but
were rejected.
"They showed a very surprised
attitude towards us because we are
women. There were all kinds of
suspicions about why we were
there," said Liu.
The first forcible deportation
order came in mid-Febuary,
followed by six others but these
were halted by protesting human
rights and pro-democracy activists.
The protest prompted a judicial
review.
continued on page 7
PHOTO BY MA CHIA-NIEN
Lin Lin (left) and Liu YiJun find refuge in Canada
Profs
steal
books
BY CHARLES NHO
UBC Bookstore thefts rarely
succeed.
Even professors have been
caught redhanded.
"Students, visitors, even
professors are shoplifting," said
bookstore director Debbie Harvie.
Two UBC full-time
professors were charged last year
for taking books and supplies, she
said. One pleaded guilty and the
other charge was dismissed in
court as a first-time offense.
Two weeks ago UBC RCMP
arrested five robbery suspects at
UBC Bookstore.
"There's probably a greater
chance of being caught in there
than almost any other store in
Vancouver," UBC RCMP Staff
Sgt. Bern Jansen said. "It has a
very effective surveillance
system."
The store has a plain clothes
security guard and invisible
magnetic fields that detect
magnetic strips placed in
textbooks.
About $200,000 in goods
were heisted from UBC bookstore
last year.
Impoverished shoplifters
were a minority, Harvie said.
Several suspects had hundreds of
dollars in their wallets when police
arrested them, she said.
"Fifty percentof those caught
are for $20 or less, many for less
than $5,"Harvie said. "They think
no one will notice...that it won't
be missed."
The bookstore without
exception will press charges on
anyone caught stealing, she said.
Suspects are only charged if
they're caught concealing an item
and stepping outside the store
without paying.
One student caught
shoplifting, she said, panicked so
much that he tried to ram through
a large ground-level window to
escape prosecution.
"It's quite a dramatic
experience for the student",
Harvie said, "We don't want to be
a fortress but we have to stop
shrinkage."
Harvie said popular scams
include the following scenarios:
• Two people enter the
bookstore. One steals an item, the
other purchases the same item.
When confronted outside by
security guards, they produce the
item and receipt. The guards do
not investigate further.
• A student buys a textbook.
The student returns a day later
with the receipt, grabs the same
text and asis for a refund inside
the store.
• A person switches two price
tags to pay the lower cost. As aBritishCblumbian.
As a Canadian.
Never has it
meant so much
There are times when you've probably
said to yoLirself, "My vote doesn't count
for much." But that's hardly the case
with The Canadian Unity Agreement.
On October 26, with a simple yes
ot no, you'll have an opportunity to
decide the future ot our country. And
since the full Agreement must be
approved by every province, it won't
be decided until your vote is counted.
The intent behind this carefully
balanced package is to ensure the unity
and political stability of Canada.
But as B.C. Premier Mike Harcourt
said, "Most important ol all is what you
believe. To help you make an informed
decision, we'll be sending a summary of
the Unity Agreement to every household in B.C. Please read it over, then
vote in the October 26 referendum.
As a British Columbian, as a Canadian,
never has it meant so much."
For further details, including the final text,
call the Referendum Information Office.
1-800-463-3141
In Victoria 953-3929
THE CANADIAN
*UNITY
AGREEMENT
Province of British Columbia Vol 75, No.7
POW
Tuesday, September 29,1992
NEWS
Ml "ii iiitVi ■ Ji ■•■•■.■*.,■
Turner says: repent!
LUCHO VAN ISSCHOT
Former prime minister and
Ubyssey hack, John Turner, was
awarded the 1992 AMS Great
Trekker award, last Friday evening
in the SUB partyroom.
"The honour I receive tonight
is one that I will treasure above any
other," Turner said.
Turner, who was PM for almost
three months in 1984, recalled his
time spent at UBC as "buoyant" and
"confident" years. However, Turner
said students today have greater
obstacles to overcome.
"I don'twant to be pessimistic,"
he said. "But I think that your
generation will have a tougher time
of it"
While at UBC, he was The
Ubyssey's sports editor, Totem
yearbook editor, and AMS student
council member.
Emcee Derek Miller said,
"There are several Ubyssey staffers
here tonight, and I am sure they
aren' t sure whether to honour Mister
Turner or to pity him as someone
who joined the dark side—the seedy
underworld of the AMS."
Turner said he was proud of
being a student politician and a
student journalist
"We who worked for [The
Ubyssey] have nothing to be
ashamed of—we've done very
well," Turner said.
Turner graduated in 1949 with
a B A degree in political science. He
later studied at Oxford as a Rhodes
scholar and at La Sorbonne in Paris.
He was first elected to
Parliament in 1962 to represent a
Quebec constituency. He was
appointedministerof finance under
the Trudeau administration in 1972,
and he became the Liberal party
leader in 1984. After a brief tenure
as PM, Turner was leader of the
Liberal party until 1990.
The Great Trekker Award is
given out annually to honour famous
UBC alumni.
The award commemorates the
Great Trek—a march by UBC
students in 1922 to demand the
campus be moved from its former
downtown to the current West Point
Grey location.
Past recepients include former
Ubyssey editors Allan Fotheringham
and Pierre Berton, Sun columnist
Stan Persky, and Black feminist
politician Rosemary Brown.
In 1954, Turner's mother,
Phyllis G. Ross, was the first woman
to be honoured with the Great
Trekker Award.
Leung enters Liberal race for Quadra
BY CHUNG WONG
Social worker Sophia Leung is
a woman of many hats.
A Point Grey resident for 30
years, Leung met with John Turner
Thursday to forecast her campaign
to represent the Liberal Party in
Vancouver Quadra.
She is vying with Bill Cowie of
UBC' s medicine faculty, high school
counsellor Craig Hemer and Ed
McWhinney to replace the former
prime minister this fall. Turner has
been Quadra's Member of
Parliament since 1984.
"Keep your idealism, that'smy
belief," said Leung. "I am small
next to Turner, but I have my own
personal heights."
Leung works in many trades—
as a family counsellor, business
consultant and community
volunteer.
Her late husband S. Wah Leung
founded UB C' s dentistry faculty and
set up Vancouver's sister city ties
with Guangzhou. The Leungs
founded Vancouver's Chinese
Cultural Centre.
"Turner told me only two
Chinese (both men) in history have
served as MPs," Leung said. "Others
who have run failed because their
campaign was only 'I'm Chinese,
vote for me.'"
But Leung said her community
"Others who have
run failed because
their campaign was
only Tm Chinese,
vote for me.'"
track record will back her politics.
She has served on the Grace
Hospital trustees board, the Justice
Council, the Vancouver City
Council Committee on the Arts,
Vancouver Chamber Choir board,
Dr. Sun Yat Sen Garden Society and
the Committee en Ethno-cultural and
Race Relations,
"As a child I was brought up
with a deep awareness of social
responsibility," said Leung. "Wealth
and materials were secondary."
She owns Leung Consulting and
works for a Vancouver Board of
Trade foreign investments
committee.
"From my business, I also know
how to be fiscally responsible."
Leung is also a board member
of Science World, the Vancouver
Art Gallery, the Vancouver Opera
Society and the Vancouver Sun's
Multi-cultural advisory board.
"It was a very difficult decision
to run, I am already too busy," Leung
said. "I feel I'm privileged to be an
active Canadian, I love community
work."
Breakdown prompts multi-lingual support
BY CHARLES NHO
A Cantonese-speaking
woman finds her locker
broken, her belongings
gone. She suffers an emotional
breakdown.
An ambulance arrives at the
Aquatic Centre and takes her to
University hospital. For three hours
UBC RCMP Cons. Greg Bishop
tries to console her but he cannot
understand her responses.
"It really hit home," said
Bishop. "Something like thatcould
have been prevented. We found
out later she just lost her wallet but
it was the end of a long chain of
unfortunate events."
Her breakdown prompted
Bishop to create a 24-hour on-call
multilingual support group by this
January.
UBC RCMPperiodicallydeal
with distraught people who don't
speak English.
Future support volunteers
may be called to the scene at any
hour.
"Crime doesn't follow a
schedule. It could be lamor5pm,"
Bishop said.
"They may also assist in death
notification to the next-of-kin,"
he said.
Though volunteers will
mostly deal with theft and break-
and-enter scenes, they will also
assist in serious crimes such as
sexual assaults.
"The more violent crimes
ultimately will involve
professional counselling," Bishop
said. "Butvolunteers may be there
for immediate response."
Bishop so far has recruited 15
possible volunteers on and off
campus who will be checked for
criminal records and be trained by
police ride-alongs, videotapes and
literature.
Interested volunteers should
send a resume to Bishop detailing
life experiences, character
references and reasons for
volunteering. Or call 224-1322.
"It won't survive without the
help of the community," Bishop
said. BOOTH
AHOC/fflONS
(Subject to change without notice)
SEPTEMBER 30 -
OCTOBER 2, 1992
In the STUDENT UNION BUILDING
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CHINESE COLLEGIATE SOCIETY BR34
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CHINESE VARSITY CLUB BR26
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PHRATERES BR6
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POTTERY CLUB MC27
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WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICES OF CANADA MC5 Val. 75, No. 7
POW
Tuesday, September 29,1992
NEWS
RESOURCE LIBRARY INDIVIDUAL ADVOCACY GROUPS WORKSHOPS FEMINIST COUNSELLING
Canada grants asylum
Continued from page 3
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WELCOME BACK!
from the Women Students' Office
Drop in to Brock 203, Monday through Friday
9 am - 4:30 pm.
FALL TERM GROUPS
Come join us for support, discussion and information.
CO
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CD
30
Lin Lin, a computer technician, went on a hunger stirke
during her detention in Hong Kong. Liu Yijun shown below.
Career Choices
Mature Women Students
Worrying About Your Weight
Sexual Abuse Survivors
Navigating UBC
Assertiveness Training
Managing School Related Stress
Self-Esteem
September 28 - October 26
September 30 - December 2
October 1 - December 3
October 7 - November 25
October 22
October 6 - 20
October 14- 28
October 14- 28
=j   Survival Skills for Women Graduate Students
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FEMINIST COUNSELLING GROUPS WORKSHOPS INDIVIDUAL ADVOCACY RESOURCE LIBRARY
"It is fair to say that the Hong
Kong government was harmonious
to the Chinese government," Liu
said. "I feel sorry for them."
Liu edited a magazine on Hainan
Island, south of Hong Kong, during
student protests in Tiananmen
Square.
"I didn't do anything special
during that time, I just lead a group
of journalists try to collect
information from beginning to the
end, and tried to report them
publicly."
Liu also said she wrote some
poetry about Tiananmen Square.
"I don't consider myself a
democracy fighter," Liu said.
Liu was under investigation by
China's government though she was
not at square during the protests.
She fled to Shenzhen, a special
economic zone neighbouring to
Hong Kong, with the help of friends
in 1990. There she befriended Lin,
who attended Xian Electrical
Science University in 1989.
Said Lin: "Like the other students
I joined the movement and couldn't
find job after I graduated."
University graduates in China are
usually guaranteed government
jobs.
"With the help of my parents I
was able to find work in Shenzhen."
The two women remained friends
even though Liu told Lin the
government was investigating her.
They both decided to flee for Hong
Kong.
They crossed the border a day
before 30 police stormed Liu's
place, said Liu.
In Hong Kong, they were
immediately arrested as illegal
immigrants and sent to an
immigration detention centre.
"We were like prisoners,
sometimes even worse," said Liu.
"I felt lucky that we arrived in Hong
Kong still alive. I was kind of numb
no matter how they treat me."
Liu lost 10 kgs during her nine-
month detention.
Faced with possible deportation
to China and a lack of family news,
Lin attempted suicide last March.
"My father had cancer at that time
and I have't heard from them for
quite long time," said Lin.
The women were allowed to apply
for asylum in Hong Kong even
though most illegal immigrants
from China are deported
immediately after arrest without any
appeal.
The women say China's
government has "strongly
protested" their asylum in Canada.
"We only have a little knowledge
about Canada from a book," said
Liu. "We think Canada's
government understands the
principle of democracy...! felt free
when I stepped down in Canadian
soil.
'This feeling can not be described
by words especially after we went
through so much suffering."
The women are living in a free
shelter provided by Immigration
Canada.
STUDENT ELECTIONS
FACULTY OF ARTS
Voting for student representatives to serve on the Faculty of Arts will be held on Wednesday, October 7, 1992
between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 4 p.m. Three elections will be held as follows::
History
Candidates are:    Sheila Flynn
(One to be eicted) Ross Penner
Vote in the Department of History,
Buchanan Tower 1297
Political Science
Candidates are:    Willem Mass
(One to be elected)
Jas Sekhon
Vote in the Department of
Political Science, Buchanan C472
First Year (includingb.a., b.mus.)
Candiates are:      Ben Ellison
(Two to be elected)        Derek Mah
Andrea Russell
Vote in Buchanan C156
The following constituencies have been filled by acclamation:
French:
Geography:
Ornela Tolfo
Tim Kneeshaw
Library, Archival &
Information Studies:
Dawn Ibey
Religious Studies:  Christine Norquist
Social Work: Heather Peters
Second Year: Bruce Rusk and Marc Schaper
Sherrill Grace
Associate Dean
Faculty of Arts
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OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
M-TH8-9 FRI 8-6
SAT/SUN 11-6 8 Tuesday, September 29,1992
POW
\fol.75,No.7
■-'m"^,m,»,twmi*ww^^^W"mw"mTfT,,,¥,m¥WW".,*-^^wi|-'WFW
SPORTS
^^mrrrrn^*mmrmnn^mrrmr*m*nvmtrvr*
Off to a flying start:
Driscoll finds endzone twice
BY HENRY HSU
A
2. Jl S the storm clouds receded
from the sky, and rays of sunlight
cut through the darkness, a rainbow
arose from the mist and fell upon
Thunderbird Stadium. First-year
T-Birds quarterback Adrian
Rainbow, led the UBC Thunderbirds
to victory over the Saskatchewan
Huskies 37-17 in last Saturday
afternoon's Homecoming Game.
Rainbow replaced an
ineffective Vince Danielsen early
in the second quarter after the
Thunderbirds got off to a slow
start—collecting only two first
downs in the entire first quarter.
In Danielsen's defence, he was
battling against gusts in excess of
40 km/h. The Huskies built up a
quick 10-0 lead, on kicker David
Strathdee's 32-yard field goal and
QB Shane Reider's impressive 49-
yard TD drive, when UBC coach
Frank Smith pulled Danielsen in
favour of Rainbow.
Immediately, the T-Birds
defence responded with an
interception by safety Jim Murphy.
Rainbow then commanded the
offence down the field, leading to a
Mark Nowotny field goal.
Reider, still reeling from his
last mistake, was picked-off again,
this time into the hands of DB Leigh
King. The T-Birds offence took
swift advantage with a 6-play, 38-
yard drive finishing with a 5-yard
TD pass to receiver Sean Graham.
The teams went into the locker
rooms at halftime with UBC leading
12-10.
With the wind at their backs,
the T-Birds exploded in the third
quarter. Two big passes, a 34-yarder
to WR Peter Poka and a 36-yarder to
WRJeff Sharpened toall-yardTD
run by RB Brad Driscoll.
On the ensuing kick-off, coach
Smith pulled an unexpected trick
from his bag. His kick-off team lined
up in standard formation and then
shifted to the right side of the field
just before the kick. The on-side
kick caught Saskatchewan off guard
and UBC recovered the ball.
Rainbow then marched the
offence downfield with the drive
ending in Nowotny's second field
goal. Later into the quarter, the
offence rumbled 85-yards into the
endzone. Driscoll's 11-yard catch
made the score 30-10 for UBC.
UBC and Saskatchewan
exchanged touchdowns in the fourth
quarter. Ranjit Bawa, cousin to
Vancouver Canucks prospectRobin
Bawa, finished off the game for the
T-Birds at quarterback. His 3-yard
TD pass to WR Mark Hirsche, with
just seconds left in the game, added
salt to Saskatchewan's wounds.
UBC's defence played
exceptionally well, limiting the
Huskies to only 21 yards on the
ground and 187 yards in total.
Individual mentions include: UBC
RB Brad Yamaoka (23 carries, 100
yards)andWRPeterPoka(6catches,
99 yards); and for Saskatchewan,
Duane Dymtryshyn (5 catches, 60
yards, 1 TD).
Stressing that UBC's success is
a team effort, Rainbow sees no
reason that the T-Birds will not go
all the way to the Vanier Cup, "If
everyone plays the way that they
can, we'll win it all."
RECEIVING THREAT: RB Brad Driscoll acrobatic in the air
PHOTO BY MA CHIA-NIB
Bird Bits
Soccer—A Canada West men's
soccer era came to an end Saturday
when the University of Vicotria
Vikings stopped the UBC
Thunderbirds unbeaten streak in
CIAU play at 47 games with a 2-0
win.
In women'splay, second ranked
UBC beat Victoria4-0. Goal scorers
were Megan Blair, Heidi Slaymaker,
Kristine Vaughon and Jocelyn
Cameron. The team is 3-0 in Canada
West play.
Hockey—Forward Tim Inkster
had a goal and an assist to pace UBC
to a 5-2 exhibition hockey win
Sunday in Alberta against Red Deer
College.
SHAKE N* BAKE SHOW 'EM THE FOOT THEN TAKE IT AWAY.
PHOTO BY SIOBHAN ROANTREE Vfol. 75, No. 7
POW
Tuesday, September 29,1992
SPORTS
wins   - 0 losses
Rainbow off bench fires up team
Brad Yamaoka sweeps around Huskie defender
PHOTO BY MA CHIA-NIEN
University of Manitoba athletics scandal
BY MICHELLE MARUK
It's the little things that'll get
ya!
The recent discovery that the
Bison football team has been using
ineligible players during games has
not only brought a cloud of shame
over the Bison athletic programs,
but a semi-cone of silence as well.
In the name of damage control,
the Athletic Department has done a
little house cleaning. The Athletic
Director Mike Moore and the Bison
football coach ScottSpurgeon.both
find themselves sitting on the
sidelines, suspended with pay.
After some investigating, it
appears to be the system of checking
player eligibility that is flawed. It
just so happens that both Spurgeon
and Moore found their necks in a
tightening noose. But it could have
been anyone.
The system for checking player
eligibility is apparently a dual
responsibility between the Athletic
Director and the coach. The only
problem with this is who is left
ultimately responsible. In dual
structures such as this one, it is easy
to miss a case or assume that the
other person has done their
homework. This may or may not
necessarily be the situation in this
case, but the fact remains that the
litde thing of eligibility was missed,
not once but twice.
The real losers in this whole
mess are the players. The ones who
were eligible worked hard for two
wins, and then had their points
snatched away because two of their
esteemed colleagues failed to
complete the mandatory 18 credit
hours, but tried to sneak through the
cracks anyway.
In this dual type of checking
system, supposedly like the double
check system at a certain fast food
chain, failed miserably.
Unfortunately, the University was
not dealing with "Are my fries
there?", but a much more serious
matter — one that involved honor
and trust.
This little slip up, not only slaps
the honest players in the face, but
conjures up images of those nasty
programs to the south that offer a
multitude of benefits to players who
can catch and throw, but have
difficulty with the academic pursuit
of the students. You know the
"basket weaving 101" programs.
(Apologies to anyone who might
actually be taking this course.)
With the added knowledge that
anytime one deals with
Administration, where there is
always a multitude of paperwork
and red tape to fight through only
makes this more confusing. Where
was the bureaucratic shuffle this
time?
To avoid this disgrace would
have been simple. The marks in
questions could have been checked
on the computer system by a
knowledgeable, authorized person
before the season started. If the marks
were not found, would it have hurt
the team to have the questionable
players sit out? Would it have killed
them? It's doubtful, but then again
the system might assume too much.
In the future, athletic teams
should have their rosters checked by
an impartial, separate party with
nothing to win or lose. A body that
will look after all the small details,
making sure that all the i' s are dotted,
and t's crossed.
After all, people always check
the big things, but it's the easily
checked, relatively minute details
that are often assumed that come
back to haunt you.
For the sake of the Bison sports
reputation, let's hope there won't
be a next time.
L
Adrian Rainbow leads T-birds   photo by siobhan roantree 10       Tuesday, September 29,1992
POW
Val. 75, No.7
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ARTS
Beijing Film Studios
Continued from back page  	
This small 300-person studio,
which was remote from central
government, allowed these young
film pioneers solidarity for the first
time.
They shaved their heads for
the first movie they made, One and
Eight.
The result was astonishing.
"It was like an earthquake in
China's movie society. Every scene
would have been killed at beginning
if it was shotintheotherbig studios,"
Li said.
After this controversial movie,
everyone one recognized that the
fifth generation had been born.
Now working in another small
film studio, XianFilm Studio.Zhang
Yi Mo made himself known to the
world as a leading director. Zhang's
Red Sorghum won the 1988 Golden
Bear award at the Berlin film festival.
Ju Dou and Raise the Red Lantern
were Oscar-nominated in two
consecutive years, the first time for
China. His newest film The Story of
Qiu Jiu is in Vancouver's
International Film Festival.
"Zhang Yi Mo made a big
breakthrough in Chinese movie
history. He represents one of the
directions of Chinese movie
development" Li said, "It is not
easy for the fifth generation to build
their own style and be recognized by
the world. A new style can only be
created when you are suffering and
ready to rebel."
Though the fifth generation
have a place in the world film
industry, but the old generation's
stronghold is usually unprofitable.
"Most of the movies we made
lost money, especially those political
ones. Even for the commercial
movies, everyone wants to make
quick bucks and the quality is
unimaginable," Li said.
Beijing Film Studio usually
makes 12films and sells6to Western
film studios that want joint ventures.
The Chinese side provides labourers
and bills the Western studios. When
The Last Emperor was shot, Beijing
Film Studio made $10 million US,
enough to pay the accumulated debt.
"Everytime when they have a
joint venture, it is like they were
injected with amphetamine," Li said.
Generation 5
Five generations of filmmakers mark China's film history: first and
second before 1949 communist takeover; third in 1950s-60s; fourth in
1970s-80s; fifth in 1980s.
After 1949 there are four periods of film history:
• Many popular films and some propaganda films available 1950s to
mid-60s (before the Cultural Revolution).
• Few films made during Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). Early films
are banned. People are given tickets to see eight propaganda films called
"model operas."
• Western films are introduced to China by late 1970s. These ten or 15-
year-old films influence the film techniques briefly.
• Western movies and TV series are more popular, which affect the
present domestic film market Vbl. 75, No.7
POW
Tuesday, September 29,1992        11
UaUiUlMIMUUUWWUUUW
NEWS
BC Indian Chief Saul Terry charges government guilt trip
BYE. GRIFFITH
In a statement released
September 23, Saul Terry explained
that BC chiefs could not support the
current constitutional deal because
of the process involved in the
government's Yes campaign and
because the deal wouldgiveNatives
a vague "third level of government"
instead of the nation-to-nation
negotiating status Native people
have traditionally sought in dealing
with land claims.
Some Native MPs are
campaigning on the Yes side,
saying it's a step in the right
direction toward Native self-
i government. What do you think?
I think they really have not
looked at the whole package and the
implications of, for example, the
territorial integrity (provision),
which I highlight because it is
acknowledging the ownership of the
provinces and the federal
government over many of our
homeland areas that are in dispute,
especially here in British Columbia.
And to acknowledge that the federal
government and the provinces own
all the land in Canada would be
nullifying the land title question that
has not been settled in British
Columbia. The "inherent self-
government" phrase seems to blind
everybody to the other dangers that
are within the package.
Do you think there is any
chance of convincing Native
people in power who are now
campaigning Yes to campaign No
in time to sway the vote?
If they understand the dangers
involved here and come out in full
force I think some of them might
change. But some of those people
have been pretty well co-operating
with the state government for a while
so perhaps their minds are made up
already. Someof them were opposed
to the 1990 actions of the Mohawk
people and they tried to debase or
discredit us from supporting the
Mohawk nation and their self-
defence. I am campaigning to
support the ordinary citizens of our
respective nations—they are the
ones that have to be aware of what is
being offered here. At this point
there are just these PR (public
relations) packages that are prepared
by the government, that are being
utilized to try to convince them to
vote Yes....What they're asking us
to do is to erase the boundaries on
our map and recognize the map of
British Columbia. This is what we
are trying to point out and are
rejecting. This is why we reject the
package.
Prime Minister Mulroney
says we need this constitutional
deal because of Quebec and Native
nations. Is it really what they
want?
He's trying to pull a guilt trip on
a lot of the general public so they'll
say Yes to the aboriginal package,
because the aboriginal peoples have
been seeking recognition for the
inherent right of self-government
for so many years. But the thing is,
even if the Yes comes across with a
resounding landslide, we still don't
have self-government
We will still have to negotiate
with them later. Well, Mulroney's
saying that Quebec is seeking
recognition through this package,
so why would they be voting No
then? It's odd—I think that he's
mounting his campaign on the backs
of thereferendum for next spring, or
next year, for re-election.
Votes will be counted on
reserves separately from the rest
of the country. What would
happen if Native people voted No
but the accord won?
I think that if Native people
voted Noon the reserves, then Ovide
Mercredi (grand chief of the
Assembly of First Nations) would
have to take that into consideration
and ask why is this so?
His mandate was not received
from the people—it was received
from aboriginal chiefs and I think a
lot of those chiefs did not know
what was in the package
either....This whole matter is being
decided prematurely. The royal
proclamation, for example, dictates
how our people must be fully
informed about any type of
constitutional arrangement, treaty
or otherwise, before they give their
consent This package will not have
the full and informed consent of our
people. This is another reason to
reject the package.
If in BC here there are those
who think that viating Yes is simply
for the aboriginal package they
should not feel compelled to vote
Yes because it is not a package that
is acceptable to our people. Although
there may be a handful or two of
leaders who agree with it when you
look at the package closely it is not
good.
I think it takes a lot of courage
to be able to say No in the face of
governments and all the powers that
be that are saying if you say No
you're being a bad Canadian, that
you're going to be responsible for
devastating the economy and so on.
If the individual rights of Canadians
are important then we must make
certain that the country itself listens
to the people.
McLaughlin rhetoric angers women's groups
BY SHARON LINDORES
NDP federal leader Audrey
McLaughlin, who opposed the
Meech Lake Accord, defended the
Charlottetown constitutional
package before 500 UBC students
Friday despite opposition from
Canada's most prominent women's
groups.
"As the first woman elected to
leada federal party, if I believed that
this accord was a step backwards for
women I would not support it," said
McLauglin in a noon-hour speech at
the Henry Angus Building. "And if
I believed in anyway that this accord
would stop us from introducing a
national childcare program I would
not support it"
[National Action
Committee on the
Status of Women]
members say the
constitution's vague
wording will blur the
focus on social aid.
But the National Action
Committee on the Status of Women,
backed by at least 560 women's
groups across Canada, said the final
handshake at Charlottetown
shouldn't have excluded women.
The ten ministers struck a deal
on the Charlottetown constitutional
package in a closed-door meeting.
The ministers, according to
NAC, ignored a request to recognize
the rights of women, children, the
physically challenged, the elderly
and gays and lesbians in the Canada
Clause.
NAC members say the
constitution's vague wording will
blur the focus on social aid.
The "notwithstanding clause"
which empowers a province to sever
ties with federal programs threatens
the social aid, they claim.
But McLaughlin said the
constitution, though "not perfect,"
would not block social policies
proposed in the future.
McLaughlin said a
constitution's power lies with the
governments and the political will of
the people.
But she said: "I would have
liked to have seen greater progress
for women, for the disabled, for the
ethno-cultural community."
McLauglin promised she would
speak to Joe Clark and the premiers
about including the people with
disabilities in the Canada Clause.
People with disabilities included
in drafts leading up to the
Charlottetown package disappeared
during the closed-door meeting
drawing opposition from B.C.
Coalition of People with
Disabilities.
ButMclauglin said Canada can
no longer afford a prolonged debate.
"Leaving the next government
with unresolved constitutional
issues will mean...further turmoil
for the country, less emphasis
on...the economy, jobs and social
programs," she said.
McLaughlin defended the deal
claiming it would:
• push Canada's governments to
heed social and economic needs
• open doors for aboriginal self-
government
• recognize Quebec as a distinct
society
• raise political influence for the
Yukon and the North West
Territories.
Canada would be the first
country to constitutionally recognize
aboriginal rights to self-government,
said McLaughlin whose
constituency is heavily Native-
populated.
"I'm very pleased with what's
happened to the North," she added.
"For the first time the leaders duly
elected by the citizens of the North
will be represented at first ministers
conferences, at constitutional
conferences."
The constitution, she said, also
provides a formula for Canada's
territories to become provinces. 12       Tuesday, September 29,1992
POW
Vtol. 75, No.7
AMY
FOOTLONG
SUBOR
SALAB
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Subway. Get a big, meaty 6" or footlong Subway
sub made fresh, one at a time with the free fixin's
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SUBOR
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ON THE VILLAGE)
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Hours:
Mon/Tue/Thu/Sun:
10 am-Midnite
Wed/Fri/Sat:
10 am-2 am
J
Interviews for
the position of
AMS Ombudsperson
are to be held.
Responsibilities include to: investigate and resolve
complaints from students-recruit, supervise and coordinate
caseworkers;sit on various AMS and UBC committees; and
be available for a minimum of 25 hours per week.
Qualifications include: ability to act as an independent,
neutral and objective officer-ability to deal effectively with
students, faculty and administrators; and knowledge ofthe
structures and services ofthe AMS and UBC.
This position is a volunteer one. The AMS Ombudsoffice is
currently staffed by experienced caseworkers.
Please apply with your resume to Terri Folsom, Administrative Assistant, in SUB 238 by Friday, October 2,1992.
Please direct queries to Carole Forsythe, Vice President, in
SUB 248 at 822-3092.
Vancouver
Art
Gallery
August 19 to
October 18,1992
Montage and Modern Life: 1919-1942
Photographic and cinematic works
from Germany, the USSR, and the
United States.
^jii i   iiuiuiij ii du' nwi
NEWS
■-BSfflBHWW
The Pressure
COVER STORY continued
"They face a constant pressure
to get married. They're all
usually married by age 26. And
when you're married, you become
a servant to your in-laws," she
said.
"I will not date anyone else
unless he's Caucasian," said the
SFU student
Pratibha said she is not
rejecting her culture, but the
servitude and subordination of
some Indo-Canadian marriages.
"You have no control of your
destiny," said Prathiba who
desribes herself as "aggressive
and strong."
"Not all Indo-Canadian men
are like that, but I believe a large
majority of them expect me to
serve them hand and foot like
their mothers did."
Despite a growing '90s
liberalism, social norms still
probe the age, race, income,
lifestyle, and sexual orientation of
a relationship.
Second-year UBC arts student
Manju, 21, said her mother
constantly asks when she'll marry
a "nice Indian boy."
"My mother has been saving
jewellery for my marriage since I
was born," she said.
Manju moved from Ottawa to
escape family pressures.
"I couldn't deal with not being
out as a lesbian with my family
and the Indian community, so I
moved far, far away,"she said.
Feelings of hating herself for
being a lesbian—what she calls
"internalized homophobia"—are
emotional barriers that stifle her
desires to confide in her parents.
"I'm too scared of what their
reaction will be," Manju said. "I
don't want to shame them—
everything I do reflects on my
parents and how they brought me
up."
She hid her sexuality for four
months while at home in the
summer.
She feels free to be open about
her sexuality away from her
family but Manju wants to be
closer to them. "It is difficult to be
this far away. I go through guilty
moments."
She is the only one from her
community who moved far away
to go to university.
"My family can't understand
why I left. They aren't happy that
they can't show me off," she said.
"It's a way of elevating
themselves, which puts
unreasonable expectations on the
children to perform."
Manju said she recently
decided to date only women of
colour.
"It's an affirmation of
myself—being a woman of colour
and loving and respecting myself.
And I don't want to deal with
racist dynamics in a relationship."
UBC fine arts student
Margaret Tom-Wing, 24, receives
leers from passersby in Chinatown
when she goes out with her white
boyfriend.
"I can tell by the look in their
faces that they think I have
abandoned my race," she said. "To
them...we're one-dimensional. An
oriental female and a white guy,
that's all they see. They don't
realise he's really a swell fellow.
"In some families it's a taboo
to date outside your own race,"
she said. "I think it's loosened up
a bit. I see more and more mixed
couples out on the streets."
Tom-Wing said her mother
prefers her to date Chinese men
but has grown accept inter-racial
relationships. Tom-Wing has two
sisters and one brother who all
married non-Chinese partners.
"My mom is more worried
that I won't find someone who
will be able to provide for me,"
she said. "She wants me to be
happy."
•M?
COLLEGE/ UNIVERSITY  RING  WEEK
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Reward yourself
andscoffiJO%
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&JOSTENS
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fefeBOOKSTORF
Sept 30. Oct 1 & 2
10:30 am - 3:30 pm
UBC Bookstore
6200 University Boulevard » 822-2665
I
J*- -■il'*L--V -W.^-YC
ORDER  NOW AND  SAVE DURING THIS
LIMITED ONE-WEEK  OFFER ' Ntol. 75, No. 7
POW
Tuesday, September 29,1992       13
r*- w^f^f^i:f^' $<< %*
NEWS
Engineer mother works
80-hour weeks, at times
with her cnild
Continued from front page
"all my co-workers are male except myself,
the receptionist and the secretary."
Li, a 1989 UBC graduate, said,
a dozen female civil engineering
students were in her class. "It was
actually quite high for that year."
Jackie Miller of the Burnaby-
based Joseph Miller Consultants
works 80-hour weeks even after
recently giving birth to a baby boy.
"My mother usually looks after
him but sometimes I'll take him to
the office," she said.
Miller, 30, a 1985 UBC Bio-
Resources grad, is working long
hours to become a partner in her
father-in-law's firm.
Unlike two-thirds of Canada's
women engineers, Miller holds a
supervisory position, as do 80 per
cent of Canada's male engineers.
Miller said she is not
intimidated by the low numbers of
women executives.
Of Canada's senior
supervisors, senior managers and
executives in engineering, women
form three per cent, two per cent
and one per cent respectively.
"I have not had any difficulties
with clients; so far," Miller said.
"Experience is what counts in this
field."
But she adds, "Joe (father-in-
law) will remain in the
background."
Since the Montreal massacre,
firms are increasingly taking a
stance on gender equality.
After an onslaught of sexist
incidents at Canadian universities
in 1990 wrought by male engineering
students, an Ontario Hydro executive
sent a warning letter to every
engineering faculty, where women
professors form only two per cent.
Sam Horton said Hydro, one of
Canada's largest engineering
employer, would hire only graduates
"prepared to work with people of
both sexes, all races and all levels of
ability."
Ontario Hydro has produced
tangible results. Six percent of its
current workforce are women,
double the national rate.
OPEN THE DOOR
TO YOUR FUTURE
Works Corps is an international organization dedicated
to providing summer opportunities for all students.
Whether you are a first year student or one nearing graduation. Works Corps can help you to gain the invaluable real
world experience that post graduate employers look for.
Back to school with no money again
Working part time to make ends meet
Tired of earning mediocre wages
?
Why not get a head start on your career by securing
yourself employment now?
Listen to what other students have to say:
"My years at Works Corps played a key role in gaining acceptance to Law
School More than the money. I gained confidence, the ability to deal with people
and problems, but most of all I learned how the business world works."
Michael Pratt
International Manager ofthe Year
1st year. Osgoode Hall Law School
My   experience with Works Corps taught me the time management skill:, and
work ethic necessary lo increase my marks and reach my scholastic palatial.
Mandy Barclay
3rd Year International Relations
U.B.C.
For information call Vancouver 244-3924
Western Canada 1-800-655-4992 or send resumes to:
110-12811 Clarke Place, Richmond, B.C. V6V 2H9
INFORMATION SESSION
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1,1992
11am • 1pm • 2pm • 3pm • 4pm
Community Sports
f/
10% off the regular price of
every item in the store for all
UBC students, faculty and staff.
Wide selction of skates, hockey
equipment, balls, racquets,
soccer equipment, etc...
Open seven days a week
3355 W. Broadway 733-1612
The
We s t p o i n t
Room
University Golf Club
5185 University Boulevard, Vancouver
224-7799 14       Tuesday, September 29,1992
POW
\tal.75, No.7
EDITORIAL
Kwtyn Koh Efflc Pow
ArttEdftor Editor
Karen Young       Terri. Chan
Newt Editor       Newt Editor
Brtfi-dai Wong
Newt Editor
Cheryl Niamath
Photo Editor
Rota Tseng
Photo Editor
Lillian An
Newt Editor
Raid PetcWera
Newt Editor
HaoU
Henry H>u
Sportt
Ma Chia-nien
Photo
Gortham Toor
Columnist
Chung W<
Edhor
Wong
Steve Chow      Sharon Undoret
Columnist Newt Editor
Mark Nielsen  Siobhan Roantree      Vh%ce Jhi     Lucho Van btchot
Sports Photo Newt Editor        Newt Editor
Other contributors: Yukie Kurahashi, Raj Sihota,
Michael Gazetas, Daniel PK Mosquin, Elaine
Griffith, Philippe Tierney.
Newspaper Design: S.J. Ahn, 822-6881
Advertising: Omar Diaz, 822-3977
W% j~\M  «  /     A Ubyttey Special Edition, puUMwl every Mcond
rt    m\/\/     Tuesday, durlni the winter Mulon.
I     V^ W  V       Tet 822-2301 Fas «22-927»	
The gap
A local filmmaker phones the newsroom.
"I'm making an eight-minute documentary on the gap between recently-arrived Chinese immigrants and
Caucasians," he says.
The film arrives on the heels of a recent government poll that shows a rising tide of hatred for immigrants
in Canada.
A third of 1,800 adults polled by Ekos Research Associates and Anderson Strategic Research said Canada
should "keep out people who are different from most Canadians."
Half were "really worried that they may become a minority."
Canadian lawmakers used the poll to thrust a proposed immigration law, Bill C-86, which sends a stark
message to Asians obliged to support their parents: If you want to live in Canada, you'll most likely leave your
parents in Asia.
In a coincidental poll, a Toronto civil liberties group, posing as a racist company employer, surveyed ten
temporary employment agencies. The group asked if the agency could lure whites only for the company. Seven
said they would provide the service despite the illegality.
Calling it a "pressing issue," the Vancouver film-maker wants "Chinese people" to explain the social schism
"between the Chinese and Caucasians."
The Chinese, he suggests, are the breeders of social division and economic subversion. He omits
"Caucasians" from blame.
He insists "there are concerns from Caucasians" that wealthy people from Hong Kong and "the Taiwanese,
advantaged people," will control "our society." Do we deduce Caucasians own this "society?" Not once does he
mention Canadians, not once does he embrace the notion that Chinese in Vancouver are Canadians too.
An editor suggests the filmmaker should not loosely use the word Chinese. Most Chinese in Vancouver are
Canadians, not recent immigrants. But he says: "I need to focus on recently arrived immigrants."
A quarter of 22,000 immigrants from Hong Kong last year were investors or entrepreneurs. And one in ten
Vancouverites call Chinese their mother tongue, a census released two weeks ago showed.
In eight minutes, he wants to define the gap, using the "Chinese" to explain. He will focus solely on recently
arrived immigrants from Taiwan, China and Hong Kong, he said. "I need to focus."
An editor tells the filmmaker there are several major Chinese clubs at UBC (he will find they have whites
in their membership). Says the filmmaker: "Doesn't the existence of a Chinese club just aggravate the problems?"
In eight minutes, the director will explain the possibility of Chinese immigrants taking over Vancouver. He
gives two messages: Rich Chinese people, not whites, are a threat to Vancouver. And "the Chinese" dominance
is a result of immigration, not the above-average birthrate of Chinese-Canadians.
This is not fiction, but a documentary.
It slaps the face of Canadians who do not seem to embody his notion of "our society."
He speaks of Chinese dominance in Vancouver when in fact most Asians here are Canadian.
Should these Canadians feel ashamed that members of their race are arriving in Vancouver? Should these
Canadians be worried that members of their own race are rich? Should these Canadians that look Chinese remain
indoors so they are not a visible threat to other Canadians?
Personal aspirations and family
expectations
BY GORSHARN TOOR
Manyparents expect their children
to achieve a university degree. But for
the women interviewed here, an added
expectation is thatthey also get married,
have the 2.3 kids, and the house with
the swimming pool.
For many second-generation
Canadians, achieving the "Canadian
Dream" is the ultimate goal. It is based
on the belief that if you work hard, a
career, a marriage, kids and a house
with all the trimmings should be yours.
Post-secondary education is
thought to be one of the keys to this
dream. For their mothers, high school
was the last formal education they
received before their arranged
marriages. Howe ver,for these women,
their marriages won't be arranged.
"My mom is totally in to education.
But after I get my degree, my mom
does want me to get married and settle
down," said Nancy Kang, a second-
year chemical engineering student.
KathyGhag, a fourth-year honours
economics student, said she wants to
be an architect She plans to pursue a
graduate degree in Community
Economic Planning.
"My parents have always been
very proudand supportive of me," she
said.
However, her parents also want
to see her settle down. She wants to
marry when she is 28, but doesn't
want children.
Jenna, a second-year psychology
major, said her parents really don't
understand what she if studying. She
wants to be a clinical psychologist,
which requires a graduate degree.
"As long as I get a university
degree, my parents don't care what I
study."
Her parents have been here 27
years. Her mother works in a food
processing cannery and her father in
sawmill
Tensions rise between women
and their parents when their schedule
conflicts with their parents. Parents
expect them to marry by 25 or 26, but
these women are putting their careers
before marriage. Vbl. 75, No.7
POW
Tuesday, September 29,1992       15
	
COLUMN
So you think you're Chinese?
BY STEVE CHOW
The third anniversary of the
Chinese government's bloody
crackdown on peaceful protesters in
Tiannamen Square came and went
this year. The world media turned
its selective vision elsewhere.
While thousands of Mainland
Chinese who supported the
movement were still being
persecuted by a legal system that is,
at best, a formality in the face of
capital punishment, the big news
story in early June of this year was
the debate over young or old Elvis
on stamps.
Isn't the Tiannamen Square
massacre something of greater
primacy and import than postage?
Is it not worth remembering with
every breath of freedom?
At the same time, I didn't know
what I was expecting—my family
forgot about the massacre, and we're
Chinese. Sort of.
Last week, I had a lengthy
conversation with my 50-year-old
cousin on the ramifications of the
student protests at Tiannamen. In
his comfortable Capital Hill home,
the conversation slowly shifted to
what it means to be "Chinese" in
Canada.
My cousin had adopted the
North American lifestyle for nearly
twenty years, but his outlook on life
is still rooted stubbornly in the
traditional Chinese way.
When the media brought the
carnage on the streets of Beij ing into
his home, his first thoughts were:
"How will it end? What will happen
to China?" He didn't think of the
many innocents being slaughtered
as he watched the news.
Along with the students in
Beijing, I and the younger generation
of Chinese in Canada saw the
demonstrations as a stand against a
corrupted government and a hope
for change.
From a traditional Chinese
viewpoint, going against the elders
by wishing for freedom and open-
mindedness under the banner of
"pro-democracy" was not apeaceful
protest, but a revolution that would
send China into the next century
plagued by political, economic and
social catastrophe.
My cousin's perspective of the
massacre: it had to be done, a
necessary evil. The government had
no choice but to crush the
demonstrators or else China would
have been splintered into
discontented republics as in the
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REDEFINING CANADIAN FEDERALISM
THE CONSTITUTIONAL
REFERENDUM
On October 26th all Canadians will vote in a
constitutional referendum. With this decisionmaking process upon us, there is a need for
inlormation and analysis ofthe issues and possible
outcomes. This free Saturday forum presents
various points of view on:
• Aboriginal Self-Government
• The Division of Powers
• Parliamentary Reform
• The Position of Quebec
• Yes or No? The Referendum and You
Saturday, Oct 3,8:30 am-4:30pm, Rm 102, Faculty of Law,
George F. Curtis Bldg, UBC. Doors open at 8 am. Seating is
first come, first served. Bring lunch. Coffee provided.
Inquiries: 222-5272
A Free Saturday Forum at UBC
He claims Fve been over-exposed to Western
values, hypnotized under the glare of
Western media, and I could never know
what it means to be a real Chinese.
former USSR, complete with ethnic
unrest and violence.
China would no longer exist
and would have effectively been
sent back to the age of warring tribes
and dynasties.
Butwhatof freedom and human
rights? I pleaded.
Most ofthe Chinese in China will
never know the freedom that we
take for granted here in Canada.
Indeed, some of them have no clue
as to the significance of the events
of June 4,1989.
My cousin asserts that they are
happy not knowing, that "ignorance
is satisfactory."
He claims I've been overexposed to Western values,
hypnotized under the glare of
western media, and I could never
know what it means to be a real
Chinese.
For myself and the Canadian-
born generation, the authentic
"Chinese spirit" has never come into
being and will probably never be
understood.
We are Chinese in name only,
we who were born here and return to
the "homeland" only as visitors—
we who use the language, learn the
arts, indulge in the cuisine.
Our grasp of the centuries of
Chinese heritage are mere
multicultural song and dance, our
understanding of the complexities
of the Chinese mind helplessly
shallow.
Our vision ofthe "Chinese spirit"
is not of the national unity forged by
Chairman Mao and comrades during
the Long March. We see Beijing as
a government of tyranny and
repression, not the miracle of unity
for provinces of myriad dialects and
ethnicities that for centuries have
warred against each other.
It was bloodshed that brought
China together during the Cultural
Revolution. Ironically, it was
bloodshed that slashed gaping
generational and cultural wounds
between the young and old in
Tiannanmen Square.
The older Chinese brought their
vision of China to Canada when
they started immigrating over one
hundred years ago.
Somewhere along the line,
"Chinese" becase a meaningless
term. How much of our supposed
"Chinese" culture is now centred
around aspirations of expensive cars
and cellular phones, fueled by
parental hopes that offspring will
someday become successful doctors
or chartered accountants?
Perhaps both generations
should close their eyes to the
bloodshed and dream of a greater
"Chinese spirit," a cultural identity
to which all Chinese persons can
relate.
Until then, however, all such
discussion remains mere conjecture.
"What does it mean to be
Chinese?" I asked my older and
more cynical cousin. He answered
with a wry smile, "What does it
mean to be Ginadian?"
**       ** 3 *
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For many students, the first career move is the
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Here's what recent CAs have to say about coming on
board Doane Raymond Pannell:
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j»**t < 16       Tuesday, September 29,1992
POW
Vol. 75, No.7
■ ■ ■
ARTS
FILM FESTIVAL
^wHr-
.•j-'.?"
/"
•* •*.
*V
\ *,%8*-<   > M-
*   - 3£a**l »H*.        dKtf^
Maggie's in town
I felt left out not knowing who the actress was.
She was more popular than the late Marlene Dietrich and Meryl
Streep. Millions of people knew her.
"It's a very old story," said Pow reporter Hao Li. "Everybody knows
who she is."
I had studied the French New Wave, Italian Realism, British Social
Realism...film history for two years at UBC ...even Japanese cinema.
I had seen the 1928 classic Blue Angel. But not once had we ventured
into China.—C.W.
I felt closer to my grandmother, who also died at a young age. She too
was a Shanghainese actress in the 30s.—B.Z.
BY CHUNG WONG AND BIANCA ZEE
Hong Kong superstar Maggie Cheung portrays Ruan Lin Yu, China's most famous actress,
who committed suicide in 1935. Cheung said she sees herself in Ruan.
MEGA-STAR Maggie
Cheung, one of Hong
Kong's most versatile
actresses, investigates the life of
Ruan Lin Yu, a Shanghainese
actress, who committed suicide in
1935, in The Actress.
Her death ended a brilliant
nine-year film career. She made 25
silent films, dying shortly before
sound came to China. She was 25.
There were a lot pressures for
women then and being an actress
was one of the only ways to be
independent.
A year after playing at
Chinatown's Golden Harvest
Theatre, now closed, director
Stanley Kwan's portrayal of Ruan
in The Actress recently drew a media
audience larger than any other
Vancouver film festival feature.
Ironically in 1935, it was the
press who destroyed Ruan. The
media harboured a vendetta against
Ruan who in her last film, The New
Woman (1935), insinuated China's
brass was aligned with Japan.
Caught in a love triangle, Ruan
was hounded by the press who
dubbed her an adulteress after her
impoverished ex-husband filed an
infidelity suit
Cheung is living almost a similar
nightmare with Hong Kong's tabloid
press. She split up with her boyfriend
justbefore making The Actress. But
she says, "I won't commit suicide."
With dignity and passion,
Cheung as Ruan, confesses her
emotions using Method acting
techniques.
"I want to live, I want to
retaliate," Cheung chants in a death
"I want volcanic eruptions,
one bigger than before."
scene for Ruan's New Woman.
"Not good enough," says the
film's director. "I want volcanic
eruptions, one bigger than before.
I'm going to put subtitles on your
face with each word getting bigger."
Like Dietrich, Ruan resisted
social norms of her time. In the
prostitute (1934), she seductively
twirls a cigarette defying a lecherous
mand awaiting a favour.
In The Actress, Kwan boldly
combines documentary footage,
actual B&W Ruan footage, and his
own colour reconstruction of Ruan's
life.
During production, Kwan's all
star cast, including Tony Leung.Shin
Hong, and Carin Lau, debate how
they will recreate Ruan's silent film
footage in colour. They produce
colour silent film which is then
compared with Ruan's actual
footage in black and white. The
secret is to mimic Ruan's malleable
face without allowing the colour to
distract the viewer.
Kwan expertly juxtaposes
footage from Ruan's original films
to that of his cast's imitations. The
result is a magnificent blend in which
the viewer is immersed in Ruan's
world and haunted by her characters
emotional and historical ghosts.
The film is not afraid to layer
Chinese history against emotional
dynamics, thus leaving taboo
Chinese history implicit such as the
Nanjing massacre where at least a
quarter million citizens were
executed, many raped and beheaded.
Bejing cinematographer surviving once again
BY HAO LI
FOR 38-year-old Du Yan Li,
working in Radio Shack's
warehouse   is   only   to
survive...temporarily.
Li was a cinematographer two
years ago in China's Beijing Film
Studio.
He joined the army at 15 to
avoid a countryside re-education
program for highschool graduates.
"I was chosen as a
photographer by the army because
of my city background. This is how
I started my career," Li said.
Li quit the army in 1976 and
became a photo-technician. He
was promoted to a camera crew
"Every time they have a joint venture it is like
they were injected with amphetamines"
position after ten years of hard
work.
A Taiwanese company
invited him to shoot a movie in
Canada and he decided to stay
because of the political situation
back home. Work as a camera
operator is hard to find, he said.
"The three Chinese stations
are all controlled by people from
Hong Kong or Taiwan, they always
tell me they don't have anything
for me," Li said.
Li hasn'tgiven up andis trying
to sell his idea to Roger's cable TV
about Mainland China program
for Canadians.
After 13 years with the
Beijing Film Studio, he is quite
disappointed with China's film
industry. Many films were pre-
ordered government propaganda
tools.
"You don'thaveany choices.
You have to go through a lot of
government and self-censorship,"
Li said.
Major film studios, such as
Beijing.Chang Chun and Shanghai
Film Studios, are particularly
affected.
"The most unfair thing is that
the party still wants us to make
money with these rules and doesn't
provide enough money. It is like
demanding eggs from chickens
without feeding them," Li said.
The old generation of
filmmakers, who endured the 1950s
and 70s political hardships, also
affect China's film industry. They
now control some major film studios
and their conservative ways restrict
the creativity of younger filmmakers.
"They wouldn't allow the
young people to try. And they
always make sure no mistakes
are made, so nobody would get
in trouble," Li said.
For China's young filmmakers, the big studios are not
their haven. Zhang Yi Mo, is
China's most prominent fifth
generation film-maker.
After graduating at the top of
his Beijing College cinematography class in the early 1980s
was offered a job at the Bejing
Fim Studio.
However, heavy censorship
promted Zhang and other young
filmmakers to move to Guang Xi
Continued on page 10

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