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The Ubyssey Mar 10, 2009

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March 10,2009 \ www.ubyssey.ca
enjoying torture and bondage since 1918 | volume xc, number 43
UBC's official student newspaper is published Tuesdays and Fridays
w
FACULTY-SPECIFIC
RESEARCH AND
TEACHING
$570 M
STUDENT
FINANCIAL AID*
$259 M
$6,434,000 2    EVENTS
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
MARCH 10, 2009
Events
If you have an event, e-mail us at events@ubyssey.ca
ThhIUbyssey
Ongoing
Summer International Volunteer
Opportunity in Rwanda * Developing World Connections coordinates
groups that travel to the developing
world to do volunteer work and
this year will be running a trip out
of UBC. This summer's project is 5
weeks with an additional week to
explore Rwanda. There are still a
few spots remaining for this summer's students groups, but time is
running out so apply soon. • For
more info please visit www.develop-
ingworldconnections.org or contact
the student team leader Steve Peat
at peat_88@hotmail.com. •
Action—Camera: Beijing Performance Photography 'Examines
the trajectory from the underground
performing arts community
centered in Beijing's "East Village"
in the early 1990s, to a current
nternationally recognized practice.
• January 16, 2009 lOam-Monday,
April 20, 2009 11am. For further
information please contact Naomi
Sawada at naomi.sawada@ubc.ca,
tel: (604) 822-3640, or fax: (604)
822-6689, or take a look at belkin-
artgallery. com/_email/_main_belkin/
Action Camera. •
March 10
Fix - The Story of An Addicted
City • Presented by the Canadian
Students for Sensible Drug Policy
(CSSDP) Club. This documentary
deals with Vancouver's drug issues.
All are welcome and light refreshments will be provided. • March
10, 2009, 4:30pm, Woodward
Lecture Hall5 • lnquiries?Contact
cssdp@club.ams.ubc.ca. •
AMS Job Fair • Meet your future
employers! The AMS Job Fair introduces UBC students to prospective
employers for part-time, summer,
full-time, work abroad and post
graduate career opportunities are
being featured over 22 exhibitors
and recruiters. Bring your resume.
• Tues March 10 - Wed March 11,
Warn to 4pm, Location: SUB Main
Concourse. •
March 11
A NUMBER by Caryl Churchill •
What makes you who you are?
Your genes or. . .? What if you
found out you were one of a
number of clones? Science fact—or
science fiction? These are some of
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Dr. Ho
Dr. Lam
2IS2 West Broadway,
Vancouver, BC.VBK2C8
Tel: BD4.733.343I Fax: BD4.733.3432
the provocative questions posed
by this startling play about a son
who confronts his father with
the fact that he has genetically
identical counterparts and is merely
one of "a number." This critically
acclaimed professional production
of Caryl Churchill's award winning
play is something that you will
want to discuss and debate long
after you have left the theatre. •
March 11-14, 2009, Dorothy
Somerset Studio Theatre, 7:30pm
To: 8:30pm and 1 Matinee, Cost:
$5 to book call: 604.822.2678 or
Email: theatre@in terchange. ubc.
ca, for more info www.theatre.ubc.
The Reader • 1 5 year old Michael
Berg has a passionate and secretive
affair with Hanna Schmitz, a woman twice his age. After mysteriously
disappearing, she shows up again
in his life, this time on trial for her
nvolvement in the holocaust as an
SS guard. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her powerful performance
as Hanna Schmitz. • Wed. March
1 - Sun March 15, 7pm-9pm,
Location: Norm Theatre, Cost: $4
general admission, $2 members. •
Gran Torino • Clint Eastwood
returns to directing and acting,
playing Walt Kowalski, a tough
miserable war veteran living in
a neighbourhood dominated by
gangs. When Kowalski sets out to
reform his neighbour, a Hmong
teenager who tried to steal his
prized car, he becomes drawn into
the boys life and works to protect
his family from the gangs that
infest their neighbourhood • Wed
March 11-Sun March 15, 9:30pm-
11:00pm, Location: Norm Theatre,
Cost: $4 general admission, $2
members. •
March 12
Silent No More Awareness Campaign • Presented by AMS club
Lifeline. There will be testimonies
from women and men about their
experience with abortion and how
they have healed from the pain
There will be time for questions
afterwards. Everyone is encouraged
DESIGN YOUR PORTFOLIO
Go from classroom to career with the
School of Business at BCIT.	
Launch or advance your career with BCIT's School of Business specialized part- and
full-time programs. Learn from industry experts, make valuable connections, and gain
an unparalleled experience.
Get the skills you need to make a difference from day one. Now that's an impressive
portfolio.
Visit bcit.ca/business
TECHNOLOGY
CHANGES
EVERYTHING
BROADCAST > DESIGN > DIGITAL ARTS > GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS > MEDIA > AND MORE .
We always need volunteers...delicious, delicious volunteers. Come to SUB 24 today.
to attend, particularly those who
are interested in the after effects of
abortion or who has experienced
one. • March 12, 2009, 5-7pm,
Macmillian Building Room 160. For
more information visit http://www.
ams. ubc. ca/clubs/lifeline/ •
UBC REC Golf Championships •
Particpants will have the opportunity to show off their golf skills.
Format is Scramble play (each pair
will tee off, pick the best ball of the
two and play from that spot. This
will be done until ball is holed out.).
• March 12, 10am-4pm, Location: University Golf Club (5185
University Blvd), Cost: UBC Student
Singles $40, UBC Student Doubles
$75, UBC Staff Singles $55, UBC
Staff Doubles $ 100. Must Register
by Wed Feb 25. For more info,
please contact Aaron Miu: amiu@
rec.ubc.ca, 604.822.2506. •
The Three Course Connection Dinner • An annual mentorship mea
that brings together students and
alumni from the Faculty of Arts, the
Faculty of Science, and the Sauder
School of Business. This exciting
event gives third and fourth-year
students the opportunity to network with members of the alumni
community, accompanied by great
food and entertainment. • March
12, 6pm, Location: University Golf
Club (5185 University Blvd). •
March 13
Ivor Wynne 3 on 3 Basketball
Tournament • Join in on some
action-packed late night basketball
Teams of 3 to 4 will show off their
skills in order to become the next
Ivor Wynne Champion in the final
event of the Insomniac Series. This
will be one to remember! • Fri,
March 13, 7pm - Sat, March 14,
3am. Location: Student Recreation
Centre. Cost: $32 for student
teams, $54 for staff teams, Register by Wed March 11. For more
information, please contact Tristan
Brown, Coordinator of League
Sports at: tbrown@rec.ubc.ca or
604-822-9051. •
Classifieds
We Want You!
Are you a UBC distance student
with a learning disability?
Wantto be partofa research study?
Contact PhD candidate Nancy E.
Black to receive an information
package:
ruby77@interchange.ubc.ca
Free Meditation Workshop!
A series of 4 weekly classes beginning Tuesday March 10,7:30pm
Rm. 604 ofthe Asian Centre:
1871 West Mall UBC
To Register Call #604.732.8997
Interested in learning about international health initiatives? Attend
Exploring Global Outreach - a FREE
speakers evening hosted by Global
Outreach Students' Association,
March 16th 5-7:30pm, Room 182 in
the Ike Barber Learning Centre.
Contact ubc.gosa@gmail.com
Self-Discovery and Peace:
A FREE 8-Week Course
Starts: March 15,2-3 pm
Location: Kitsilano Neighbourhood
House ,2305 West 7th Ave
To register:
1-877-GNOSIS-1
vancouver@gnosticmovement.
com
Know yourself and discover profound peace.
Golden Key Fundraiser!!
Gossip nightclub, Friday March 13
at 10pm. Tickets are $10 including
a free shooter and free entry before 11 pm. Open to non-members.
Email fundraising@ubcgoldenkey.
org
March 10"', 2009
volume xc, n"43
Editorial Board
COORDINATING EDITOR
Kellan Higgins: coordinating@uhyssey.ca
NEWS EDITORS
Stephanie Findlay & Justin McElroy :
news@uhyssey.ca
CULTURE EDITOR
Trevor Melanson : culture@uhyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Shun Endo : sports@uhyssey.ca
FEATURES & PERSPECTIVES EDITOR
Joe Rayment: features@uhyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Goh Iromoto :photos@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Paul Bucci:production@uhyssey.ca
COPY EDITOR
Celestian Rince: copy@uhysseyca
VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR
Kalyeena Makortoff: volunteers @uhyssey.ca
WEBMASTER
Adam Leggett: webmaster@uhyssey ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : multimedia@uhyssey.ca
Editorial Office
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604-822-2301
fax: 604-822-9279
web: www.uhyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @uhyssey.ca
Business Office
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604-822-1654
business office: 604-822-6681
fax: 604-822-1658
e-mail: advertising@uhyssey.ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Gerald Deo
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper ofthe University of British Columbia. It is published every Tuesday
and Friday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an
autonomous, democratically run student organization, and
all students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written bythe Ubyssey staff.
They are the expressed opinion of the staff, and do not
necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey Publications
Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial
content appearing in The Ubyssey is the property of The
Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The Ubyssey
Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adherestoCUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words. Please
include your phone number, student number and signature
(not for publication) as well as your year and faculty with
all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are
dropped off atthe editorial officeofThe Ubyssey; otherwise
verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and are run
according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written
by Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to letters
and perspectives over freestyles unless the latter is time
sensitive. Opinion pieces will not be run until the identity of
the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissionsfor length and clarity. All letters must be
received by 12 noon the day before intended publication.
Letters received after this point will be published in the
following issue unless there is an urgent time restriction or
other matter deemed relevant bythe Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified
advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to
publish an advertisement or if an error in the ad occurs the
liability of the UPS will not be greaterthan the price pa id for
the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes
or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or the
impact ofthe ad.
Contributors
Regina Nyamekye and Kalyeena Makortoff decided to go and
watch the handball game ofthe term to cheer the goalie Joe
Rayment on. They called their buddies, Celestian Rince, Belinda Li and Goh Iromoto, to see whether they were up to show
their support, but they were out partying with Shawn Lir Vivien ne Tutlewski at Gossip Night club celebrating Paul Bucci's
legal Canadian birthday. On their way, they bumped into Tara
Martellaro, Alicia Woodside, Maria Cirstea and Kate O'Neil,
all spotting blue and gold t-shirt Ubyssey t-shirts, who were
going to watch two of their History classmates win: Trevor
Record and Trevor Melanson. The referee blew the whistle and
the game started. Within 5 minutes, one player was down on
his knees, covering his eyes. Someone had smashed the ball
into his face. "Come on! Come on!" the whole crowd started
chanting.Theplayerjersey number57finally stood up, itwas
Justin McElroy! The handsome dude on the Ubyssey team. The
ladies went berserk "Aw, Oh my God" erupted from the side
lines, until he finally waved to shut them up. The score was
10:0 with Ubyssey in the lead, so the opponents, the Matrix
Dinosaurs called for time-out. Kenneth Dodge,the MCforthe
night yelled out"Now give it up foryour Ubyssey Dance Team:
Stephanie Findlay, Sarah Eden, Sarah Chung, Kie Shiroma and
FaizaZia Khan" he said "they will be dancing to the hit-mix
Ubyssey Rocks." In about two hours, the game was over and
Ubyssey had won against the Matrix Dinosaurs. We were all
ecstatic, and to end the night, Kyrstin Bain and Kathy Yan Li,
shared the famed Ubyssey kiss of 90 years.
V      Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
Canadian    printed on^100%
University     'recycledpaper
Press \Z_\Q MARCH 10, 2009
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
UBC's anthropology museum reopens
18 month, $55.5 million renovation to be fully finished for opening ceremonies
by Sarah Eden
News Writer
After a six-month closure, the
Museum of Anthropology reopened this Sunday with a new
exhibition and an emphasis on
the collaborative focus of the
expanded and renovated space.
Hundreds gathered in the refurbished Great Hall to listen to
Dr Anthony Shelton, the director of MOA, describe the progress ofthe renovation and what
patrons should expect when
the full project is completed in
time for the 2010 Olympics on
January 23, 2010. Shelton pronounced the new MOA as one
that will "take its place again
to be one of the major powerhouses of Vancouver."
The ceremony marked the
completion of Phase I of MOA's
$55.5 million "Partnership of
Peoples" Renewal Project. By
nearly doubling its size, the museum will be able to house major
visiting exhibitions that would
have otherwise skipped Vancouver on their tour. This increase
in size will also include various
amenities for museum guests including a cafe, a not yet opened
theatre, a Cultural Research
Suite and the now partially open
Centre for Cultural Research. The
Cultural Research Suite, with its
oral history language lab, lounge
and archives research room, will
be a particularly useful tool for
students studying First Nations.
Another aspect of the Renewal Project that has officials at the
museum pleased is the Reciprocal Research Network (RRN).
The RRN will facilitate research
by providing unprecedented
access to collections from
North America and Europe in
one single network. MOA has
nearly finished digitalizing its
35,000-piece collection. Part of
the process of this archiving has
been working with First Nations
community members to accurately label and describe the
museum's collection. With this
collaboration Shelton hopes that
the museum displays "the material as the people who made the
material want it to be shown."
After Shelton's address to
the crowd, the Pacific Islanders
Hugagesea Club sang and dance
to welcome the museum's new
exhibition: TATATJ: Samoan Tattooing and Global Culture. The
exhibit features photographs
taken by New Zealand's Mark
Adams during his 30 years of
documenting tattooed Samoans
and tattooists.
The museum also revealed a
panel installation for its opening by Coast Salish artist John
Marston. The panel is entitled
"'ehhwe'p syuth" or "To Share
History" and is joined by video
segments from the movie Killer
Whale and Crocodile which documents Marston's trip to Papua
New Guinea and subsequent inspiration to carve his panel. *2I
The UBC Museum of Anthropology is open Tuesday, Warn
to 9pm and Wednesday through
Sunday, 1 Oam—5pm. Admission
is free for UBC students, staff
and faculty with UBC ID. Areas
still under renovation include
the Bill Reid Rotunda, and Michael M. Ames Theatre, and the
temporary exhibition gallery.
Dr Anthony Shelton addresses guests at the MOA opening last Sunday, goh iromoto photos/the ubyssey
Invention lands students in CBC's Dragon's Den
Engineering and business students finish second place in national contest, win $10,000
by Sarah Chung
News Staff
A team of engineering and business students from UBC won
$10,000 for placing second at
the Enterprize National Business
Contest last month.
Their project is a magnetic
adapter that safely disconnects
from electrical plugs and sockets upon impact, designed to
prevent tripping hazards and
damaging of the appliance. "We
came up with the idea based
on the experience of a friend...
he had his laptop and someone
tripped on his cord and smashed
it," Shane Miller-Tait said. "We
spent three months just sitting
in a room, brainstorming, going to the Gallery having a beer,
brainstorming."
"EasyPlug was a simple but an
elegant idea...which is very hard
to do," said Frank Pho, a finalist
judge and vice-president of the
Business Development Bank of
Canada. "The most appealing
part of EasyPlug was bringing
down [the technology] to the size
that is no bigger than the size of
the plug itself."
Students from the EasyPlug
came from the innovative undergraduate class New Venture
Design (APSC 486/COMM 486),
which aims to create young entrepreneurs with new business
ideas. Team members are UBC
engineers Jay Jagpal, Shane
Miller-Tait and Greg Wong, and
left Greg Wong, Max Miller, Ryan Fetterly, Crystal Hung, Jay Jagpal, and Shane Miller-Tait display their prize, right The plug in action, courtesy of ubc engineers
Sauder students Ryan Fetterly,
Crystal Hung and Max Miller.
"It's the best course I've ever
taken," said Miller-Tait, a fourth
year engineer and the spokesman of EasyPlug. "This course
gives you what else you have to
do if you want to do your own
business."
According to Pho, judging criteria for the competition had three
main perspectives. First, that the
technology is a unique, novel idea
that has a broad application. Second, the feasibility of the product
and finally,     whether  students
put forward "reasonable assumptions" to execute the plan.
"It's like a three-legged stool.
The three [criteria] must be met
to be stabilized," Pho said.
The New Venture Design
teams this year were supervised
by UBC engineering professors
Peter Lawrence and Philippe
Kruchten and Sauder marketing
instructor Paul Cubbon.
The year-long course creates
four teams, each with three engineers and three commerce students, who are then given $3000
to pursue their business ideas pro
vided by funding from Cancer Research Cruise. Students have travelled to Singapore, Hong Kong and
Nebraska to enter competitions.
The course's main purpose is
to "combine cultural differences
that is needed to start the company," Lawrence said. "As opposed
to work initially in more conventional jobs, this course gives
a chance for students to start a
company on their own."
"It's very different in a sense
that we don't tell them what to do,
we facilitate," Kruchten said. "It
has to be their idea, their project."
Thanks to their second place
finish, the EasyPlug team has
been given a chance to showcase
their invention at an audition
for CBC's Dragon's Den, a show
where industry experts give
grants to business entrepreneurs for projects they see with
potential. Miller-Tait and his
group are optimistic of the product's future.
"In a month or so, we're planning to incorporate, continue to
prototype, refine the business
the plan and hopefully take it
into the market." vi 4 | NEWS
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
MARCH 10, 2009
Agenda for March 11, 2009
1. Women's supplement
2. Colours supplement
3. Ratify staff restructure vote
4. Elections stuff/coordinator/position paper
5. Kate's FUNdraiser
6. Explanation of last week's failed joke
7. Ubyssey Board election update
8. Bonfire
9. Spoof Issue
10. NASH update
11. Other business
-
walk in with your taxes, walk out with your money
and you could win $5,000 towards a road trip, visit refundroadtrip.ca
come in today or call
1-800-HRBLOCK (472-5625)
H&R BLOCK
VIVIENNE TUTLEWSKI PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
The emotional risks
of cosmetic surgery
BY KlE SHIROMA
To qualify for student pricing, student must present either (i) a T2202a documenting 4 or more months of full-time attendance at a college or university
during 2008 or (ii) a valid high school identification card. Expires July 31,2009. Must also qualify for Instant Cash Back and Cash Back products. See office for
details. Valid only at participating H&R Block locations in Canada. SPC Card offers valid from 08/01/08 to 07/31/09 at participating locations in Canada only.
For Cardholder only. Offers may vary, restrictions may apply. Usage may be restricted when used in conjunction with any other offer or retailer loyalty card
discounts. Cannot be used towards the purchase of gift cards or certificates.
News Writer
Two UBC researchers have released a study questioning the
portrayal of cosmetic surgery as
a positive option for enhancing
physical appearance and emotional health.
Andrea Polonijo and Richard
Carpiano's study on how women's magazines fail to discuss
emotional risks that women
encounter after undergoing cosmetic surgery has picked up attention as the first investigationg
into how cosmetic surgery is
presented to Canadians.
Their study calls for a better
weighted analysis and portrayal
by media of how cosmetic surgery may affect not only one's
physical health, but also one's
mental and emotional well-
being. This is so that women can
make more informed decisions
about whether or not to go under
the knife.
"There are numerous studies
that have looked at emotional
health and cosmetic surgery,
however there is no popular
consensus on the percentage of
women who experience emotional health problems versus
those who do not," said Polonijo.
Polonijo said she took interest in the subject when she saw
statistics in 2005 which showed
that "cosmetic surgery was on
the rise for Canadians and that
women made up 85 per cent
of patients." Polonijo's study
reveals how magazines tend to
"medicalize" the female body—
the whole process of undergoing plastic surgery becomes
scientific. It is about physical
risks rather than addressing the
emotional aspects related to why
someone might undergo plastic
surgery.
Polonijo and Carpiano's study
notes that women's magazines
tend to consult males for their
general opinions on beauty,
which could be problematic as
it sexualizes and objectifies the
female body.
Caryn Duncan, head of the
Vancouver Women's Health Collective, thinks that the issue is
more broadly based. "Women
put a lot of pressure on themselves to measure up and they
look to really unrealistic images
of women and say 'Why don't I
look like her?' Of course we don't
look like supermodels. Most
women wear a size 12 and they
weigh 145 or 150 pounds and
that's not the image that we see
of women." However, Duncan
agreed that much of the beauty
industry is supported and driven
by men, so both women and men
are guilty of promoting these unattainable standards.
Shari Graydon, an Ottawa
journalist and media critic who
founded a spoof website advertising a 'breast investment'
credit card (www.pantyraiders.
org/plasticassets) asserted that,
"research suggests that women
are enormously influenced by
the images in fashion media and
advertising that promote unattainable ideals of beauty.
"The more women are exposed to these images and
ideals, the more likely they are
to feel critical about their own
bodies. In addition, fashion
media are supported by advertisers who claim their products
are capable of transforming
women's bodies and faces to
look like the airbrushed images they present." Magazines
reinforce an unattainable vision of beauty and also have
vested interests because cosmetic surgeons' offices pay for
advertisements in magazines.
Graydon said that there
needs to be more analysis of
the emotional risks that come
with cosmetic surgery as opposed to just the physical
risks. "Human beings are complicated creatures and health
professionals, psychologists
and brain scientists alike are
developing an appreciation of
the impact of our emotional
state on the state of our overall
health." ty c
CuJ
tui
Editor: Trevor Melanson \ E-mail: culture@ubyssey.ca
March 10,20091 Page S
Hurricanes blow away Thurgan Hammer
Namewise, Hammer blows away both bands
by Trevor Record
Culture Staff
Band Wars, a "battle of the
bands" style competition, got off
to its start last Thursday at the
Pit. The preliminary match will
be followed by two more every
Thursday, until the finals are
held on March 26. Although
only sparsely attended, the
three bands that played put forward a good fight.
The first band up was Megan
Heise and the Hurricanes. Heise
has written for The Ubyssey culture section before, so there is
a small chance she'll actually
read this. I guess that means
I better watch my ass or she'll
see that I thought her voice
was kind of whiny and that her
music was boring. Nah, just
kidding; Megan and the Hurricanes were pretty good, except
for their exceedingly terrible
name. Megan is a decent singer
and their drummer is really
damn good. The lead guitarist
was competent, as was die bassist—even though he looked so
young I would place him about
Ave pimples away from a McDonald's trainee badge.
The second band had a way
better name: Thurgan Hammer.
Sadly, they did not play a very
good set. That is, unless you
like yarns about orcish riders
related through the timeless
medium of heavy metal. Even
if that is the case I'm not sure
if you would like Thurgan Hammer all that much. But they
were dressed up in a fantasy
theme and that was great; one
had a fur-trimmed cape and
their violinist had pixie wings. If
Band Wars listened to my ideas
and made the competing bands
engage in actual warfare, the
five-piece batde-ready Thurgan
Hammer guys and gals would
be a shoo-in for the finals.
The final contestants, The
Bards, were solid enough, even
though their name is somehow
less creative than the Hurricanes'. They were a formidable
three-piece band that put out
some pretty solid rock music. By
the time they played a few more
people had arrived, and a dancing crowd formed. At the end
of the night, Megan Heise and
the Hurricanes were declared
the winners. They'll be playing
again at the finals on the 26th
against the winners from the
next two preliminaries.
"This was amazing," Heise
said soon after her win. "Come
watch us at the finals. We're going to rock that shit." *2I
Thurgan Hammer would have won had Band Wars been a battle of might...and magic, goh iromoto photo/the ubyssey
Christian metal straight from depths of hell
by Kenneth John Dodge
Culture Staff
"There Shall Be Weeping and
Gnashing of Teeth." That's what
Jesus had to say about hell, but
the same could be said for a
night of metalcore with Underoath. These guys are a Christian
screamo band and they want
you to know that accepting Jesus
Christ as your personal saviour
can be almost as uplifting as listening to their music. This is
probably not a great endorsement, since Underoath's sound
is a better soundtrack for moments of spiritual despair and
physical torment than for your
local church's youth night.
It might sound like I'm ripping into Underoath but their
presence has been a standout on
the Warped Tour and their headlining stop in Vancouver really
gave the band a chance to shine
artistically. Behind the band, for
the entirety of the performance,
played a pretentious attempt at
an eerie art film (a la The Blair
Witch Project) that synched images of wheelchairs, crosses and
corpses with mellow synthesizers between songs. At times this
simple set-piece came off as conceited showboating, but overall
it added some cool ambience
to the show. I wish more bands
made use of theatrics like this,
honesdy.
Underoath was able to show
off its range early on with the
haunting drone at the tail end
of "It's a Dangerous Business
Walking Out Your Front Door..."
that had a very aggressive
crowd lurching violendy as lead
screamer Spencer Chamberlain
chanted "drowning in my sleep...
I'm drowning in my sleep."
Fisticuffs were thrown down at
least once in the mosh pit and,
yes, angst was secreted violendy
like  pus  from  an  Underoath
fan's pimple-ridden face. What
this had to do with salvation is
suspect to say the least.
Highlights from the band's
very good latest album, Lost
in the Sound of Separation, included clap-happy "Too Bright
To See, Too Loud To Hear" and
the exploding-heart-on-sleeve
"The Only Survivor Was Miraculously Unharmed," featuring
the band's signature screaming unpredictable crescendos
and satisfying comedowns. The
pompously worded, yet infectious, synth-infused single "Writing on the Wall" ended the show
favourably.
The show had been highly
entertaining, and by the middle
of their set I was beginning to
suspect that Underoath wouldn't
try to evangelize me—as I had
participated in their punk
preaching at Warped Tour some
years back. But, lucky us, we got
a mini-thesis on redemption
and Jesus from Chamberlain
prior to the encore. Their music
speaks, hauntingly at times, to
moments of sorrow and abandonment. Underoath should let
their sound and wild live show
provide catharsis for their fans,
rather than painting a road map
to salvation. *2I
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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7
Erica Li found out about the
team during clubs day, when
they had a booth set up on the
second floor of the SUB. The
first-year Commerce student
was always passionate about
it. "I was always interested in
dancing and swimming, and it
was good to combine the two."
She was touched by beautiful
routines shown at the Beijing
Olympics last year and is planning to stay on with the team.
Her secret to juggling her busy
school schedule and her twice-
weekly swim practices is good
time management.
Two interesting facts I found
out about synchronized swimming was that firstly, they have
an underwater speaker, so that
the swimmers can hear the
music while underwater. I was
always baffled by the incredible rhythm the swimmers had
while underwater, wondering
how in the world they managed
to hear the music. Well, that
mystery's solved. Secondly, the
make-up they usually adorn
for competitions and performances is just the normal kind
A few of the synchro team members practices their routine with
close attention to uniformity.
SHUN ENDO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
you get from the store. I had
a preconceived notion that it
was some kind of special waterproof makeup, where after
the performance one had to use
baby oil to scrub it off. The only
thing waterproof about their
makeup is their mascara.
So it isn't hard to be a synchronized swimmer. As coach Bittner
said with a twinkle in her eye, "All
you have to do is declare 'I want
to be a synchronized swimmer'
and you show up and as long as
you're not going to drown, that's
okay. There's always been a team
for a new kid." vi
Triathlon at UBC
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The UBC Triathlon was held
this past Sunday on a sunny
morning at the UBC campus. The annual event holds
different endurance competitions such as the duath-
lon, short triathlon and
kids aquathlon. As one of
the biggest triathlon event
in North America, UBC
students as well as trained
athletes all endured the race
and aimed for the goal line
just outside ofthe SUB.
Facundo Chernikoff won
the Olympic Triathlon
(1.5km swim, 40km cycle
and 10km run) the most
compeitive bracket in this
event. He won the race with
a time of 2:03:50.
SHAWN LI PHOTOS/THE UBYSSEY lnion
If you 'd like to submit a letter, please contact feedback@ubyssey.ca
March 10,20091 Page 9
Start a university club
Its challenging, but there's no better experience
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by Kate O'Neill
Journalists for Human Rights UBC,
founding president
If I may offer a thought on my
journey through four years at
UBC, it is that by being involved
in a club you can enrich your
university experience in ways
you can't even imagine. Even
better is starting a club, an experience in and of itself.
There are over 400 clubs at
UBC, 15 of which are self-categorized as "political/social action" clubs, 26 as "community
service," and eight as "media/
arts/performance." It might
have been safe to assume that
there already existed a club
or combination of clubs that
would have satisfied my incipient curiosity for human rights
and journalism. So why start
Journalists for Human Rights
(JHR) at UBC? I am neither a
journalist, nor a human rights
expert.
I certainly wasn't looking to
add more stress to my fourth
year, or to extend my final year
by a semester. Nor was I especially keen on learning how to
jump through superfluous bureaucratic and administrative
hoops and having nightmares
about grant applications. My
near-fatal experience with economics courses aside, JHR UBC
has quite possibly caused more
aches, pains, frustration and
fatigue than all of my courses
this year combined.
Through conceptualizing and
constitutionalizing a social-
action club on campus, I have
come to two conclusions. Firstly, we are often preaching to the
choir. Secondly, there seems to
be some weird, pervasive need
to raise as much money as possible in an environment where
the population has very litde
money to give.
I often feel as if I am drowning on a campus awash with
people trying to make their
voices heard. I regularly question if my club's efforts are
actually making an impact on
anything more than our members' day planners and students' wallets. But it's worth it.
To risk sounding trite, working with something from inception to conclusion through
hands-on experimentation is
uniquely satisfying. By starting
a club, you learn by both leading and following. You learn
more about teamwork and
cooperation than any assigned
group project. And by the time
you get your degree, your time-
management skills may shock
you.
If this year at UBC has taught
me anything, it is that while we
may be at university to make
our voices heard, we are also
here to learn how to make our
voices heard. It's an important
distinction. We are here to find
a sense of accomplishment
whether it's through acing a
test or passing a club constitution. We are here to learn not
only how to raise funds efficiently, but how to spend less
funds. We are here to meet new,
incredible and inspirational
people, be they classmates or
club members.
By starting a club, you have
the opportunity to meet the
kind of extraordinary and
dedicated individuals that a
class lecture can never provide.
These are the kinds of individuals who have the power to
change your perspective more
than any econ or English professor. You may graduate still
wondering whether your club
experience has made a mark on
anyone at all. However, even if
your passion touched just one
person, it was all worth it. \a
I regularly
question if my
club's efforts are
actually making
an impact
on anything
more than our
members' day
planners and
students' wallets.
IN RESPONSE TO "NAUGHTY
LIBRARY PRINTERS" EDITORIAL FROM FEBRUARY 27,
2009
At UBC Library we're actively
working to improve the study
environment for students in a
number of ways.
In February the library replaced its entire public photocopier and printer fleet to
achieve three goals: to add new
features such as double-sided
copying, to improve energy efficiency and to make printing
more affordable by lowering
prices from 12 cents to 7 cents
per copy.
Any changeover of this sort
was bound to encounter some
technical bumps. As a result, we
introduced the new machines
during the midterm break when
fewer students would be impacted. We certainly regret that some
printers weren't working during
the change. But we now have
more environmentally friendly—
and cheaper—printing services,
which will be a big benefit to
students and to all users. Also,
watch for self-serve scanning
equipment in the near future.
Our library IT department
has just made a mass purchase
of new computers which will be
installed throughout the libraries this spring. We also are in
the process of ordering more
study seats for the Irving K.
Barber Learning Centre.
And coming in mid-April, in
response to students' requests
for longer opening hours, parts
of the Learning Centre will be
open 24/7 for late-night study
during the entire exam period.
At the library we have an active program for listening to
students, which includes holding regular focus groups, student representation on library
committees, and running the
recent LibQual survey, which
helps us find out how we can
serve you better.
We want to hear from you, so
keep the feedback coming and
please bear with us as we make
improvements.
We're working hard to
change any naughty library experiences into nice ones.
—Leonora Crema
Associate University
Librarian
UBC Library
IN RESPONSE TO "RULES ARE
MEANT TO BE QUESTIONED"
EDITORIAL IN MARCH 3,
2009.
While you make a good point
about rules you are neglecting
to consider a few points. Following your own logic:
There is a rule that says that
in order to change or remove a
rule the proper channels must
be  followed.  This  one  exists
because we've decided that
letting anybody decide which
rules they do and don't want to
follow would result in chaos.
In the case of jaywalking, one
might argue that leaving it up to
the discretion ofthe walker would
complicate the issue (from a legal/
liability standpoint) and be unsafe,
and that it is better to just have it
not be allowed all the time.
—Sam Mason
Engineering 4
Do you have something to say? Is something in the world pissing you
off? Read something in the paper, and want to sound off about it? If
you answered "yes" to any of these questions, then write us a letter,
and submit it to feedback@ubyssey.ca. Letters must be 350 words or
less, and we must confirm your identity in person at SUB 24.
sprouts
Apply for next year's Executive Board.
Sprouts is a student-run organization that aims
to promote food security at UBC. We run a
popular cafe in the SUB and support numerous other student initiatives with aims similar
to ours. Over the past year and a half, Sprouts
has grown beyond our expectations, and has
climbed successfully out of a $40,000 debt
to the AMS. Next year, Sprouts will enter an
exciting new era. We have the opportunity
and resources to make a major impact on food
security and sustainability at UBC.
It has been the vision of Sprouts for the past
two years that the executive positions be
filled on a strictly volunteer basis. This choice
reflects our desire that the organization be
led by only the most motivated, dedicated,
and idealistic individuals. The benefits for the
Sprouts executive include discounted produce
and groceries, free lunches, and an invaluable
experience. These opportunities for leadership
provide a chance to work with a team on an
exciting and progressive student enterprise.
To be considered for these positions, applicants should care deeply about the mission
and values of Sprouts, and possess a desire to
innovate the way we regard food systems at
UBC. The roles of the executives are rigour-
ous and demanding, but highly rewarding. We
encourage ambitious, creative and disciplined
students from all faculties and year levels to
apply; greater diversity is better, we say!
Email applications with a cover letter and
resume by March 15th to:
sprouts.applications@gmail.com
The interview process will be conducted by a
hiring committee before applicants are officially confirmed at Sprouts' Annual Genera
Meeting on April 1st.
Thank you,
The Sprouts Board
Information on the positions can be found on Sprouts' website
www.ams.ubc.ca/clubs/nfc/
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SAUDER
School of Business
Opening Worlds
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Vote in the
UBYSSEY BOARD ELECTIO
next week
March 16- Editorial
If you'd like to submit a letter, please contact feedback@ubyssey.ca
March 10,20091 Page 10
Institutional trans phobia?
On Saturday, the BC minister of healthy living and sport announced
our province will be the first to restrict trans fats in food prepared and
served in restaurants. Good. Now wait, doesn't this mean the Nazi socialists at the government are telling me what to eat? No.
Limiting trans fats usually means limiting use of hydrogenated
cooking oil. For a restaurant, it means switching to a different type of
deep fryer oil. For food manufacturers, it means swapping out hydrogenated oils for something else. There is no food we know of thatyou
wouldn't be able to eat even in a categorical trans fat ban—it's swapping out a chemically altered ingredient that ends up in foods because
it doesn't go bad as quickly as its counterpart.
This is one ofthe most annoying debates simply because it seems
so simple. When the CBC picked up the story, their commenters dove
right in: "I remember in the movie Demolition Man," one wrote, "in the
future the government banned anything deemed potentially harmful
to people, so salt, fats, meat, tobacco, alcohol, swearing sex...were
all out. Are we really that pathetic of a people that we shouldn't be
allowed to make our own choices, and thus demand the government
get involved in all aspects of our lives? Sounds like this is where we are
headed."
As much as we appreciate all references to Demolition Man, it's goes
right to the maxims and oversimplifies the issue either for a few chuckles or because, in this forum, appealing to this evidence (a Sylvester
Stallone movie) is a strong rhetorical tactic. And it seems to be—in a
online CBC forum—strong enough. Or maybe it's not so strong as it is
pervasive. There were dozens of other comments like it—a joke and/or
a jab about becoming a communist state—as if the debate is constantly
being overrun by exactly the same argument, most of which seems
completely uninterested in the sources quoted in the CBC's actual
write-up (And why should they? The CBC is full of communists).
On another front, we have Andre Picard, a reporter at The Globe and
Mail and one of Canada's top health journalists. He penned a column
last Thursday titled "The Internet has changed the nature of scientific
debate." In the past, he'd get letters, more often than not angry letters
since "one thing that has not changed is that people are almost always
moved to put pen to paper or thumbs to keypads when they are angry,
not happy."
But the means of debate itself has changed, he argues. "What is truly
troubling is that the most common 'debating' technique in cyberspace
has become the dismissal of anyone with respect for scientific fact and
reasoned opinion as part of some vast conspiracy."
It's particularly difficult in Picard's field—health reporting is, in a
mainstream publication such as The Globe, translating material to a
public who either doesn't have the means to understand it (doctors are
in school for so long for a reason) or doesn't have the time to research.
Experts are important. Without them, science journalism can't exist.
We have to decide who to trust. Or rather we have to decide who to
suspend judgment about. Questioning the media is important, but so
is the methodology. To shoot down news or a mainstream narrative,
it's important to put at least as much work and research into it as the
initial source, or to rely on someone who did. \a
Shiny empty buildings
If Professor Farnsworfh from Futurama were here, he would say
"Good news everyone. It looks as if UBC has finally completed the
monstrous building projects scattered around campus. Now all we
have to do is tear down the SUB."
It does indeed look like UBC has finally stopped building huge
buildings. If you've been here for the last five years and spent an
hour walking around campus you'll notice that most of the buildings have finished their renovations.
Buchanan, that horrible eyesore turned historical building, is
done two of its five sections of renovations. They are on the way to
getting B block back up to snuff; if you wander over there right now
you can see the guts of it hanging out.
The Life Sciences Building, a monstrosity built out where cars
used to park, is complete. Going inside it feels like you are stepping
into the biggest greenest building ever. After all it prides itself on
being open happy, full of life and light. However there is a dark spot
on the new building, along with all the new buildings on campus:
funding.
UBC has spent hundreds of millions of dollars on new infrastructure. The problem is making sure that things are actually
happening in said infrastructure. Thisyear's budget proposal
has slashed funding to the Health Research, Natural Sciences
and Engineering Research Council, and the Social Sciences and
Humanities Research Council by about 10 per cent collectively. The
Harper government is hoping that by combining agencies together
and collectively reducing their budgets that we will be able to get
the same amount of award winning research as before, just on the
cheap. Funding for buildings has increased though. It's a troubling
development—as Paul Wells ol Macleans said, "it's asinine to open
labs if you will not pay for the work that goes on in labs."
Another plan that the Harper government is pushing forward is
passing down earmarked grants. Instead of letting peer-reviewed
organizations dictate where funding goes, the money will now
be set on specific sights. This may be good for pushing forward
Canada in certain directions, but those directions aren't always the
best use of the funds.
So UBC is in a predicament. We are left with lofty buildings, towering high into the sky. They are a testament to the awesomeness of
building things on campus, but the outputs of those buildings are
predicated on a steady stream of funding allowing for top-quality
research to take place. We can only hope that UBC, along with both
levels of government, starts to care a little less about the skeleton of
our university, and a little more on the guts. *2I
by Katarina Grgic
For Fun
This date in Ubyssey history—1972
COMPUTER TIMETABLES IN
THE WIND
Students could lose the privilege
of choosing their own timetables
under a plan for computerized
scheduling being contemplated
by the registrar's office. The plan
is the office's second attempt at
computerized registration.
In 1970, more than 2000
students pre-registered under a
computerized plan were forced
to register again in mid-September when their timetables were
planned incorrectly.
However, the 1970 plan allowed students to choose their
own section but the new plan,
according to a former student
working at UBC, will not. Registrar Jack Parnell refused to say
if the new plan will leave the
choice of sections to students.
Streeters
But he said he feels the university should be making better
use of the computer, "and using
it to program students' courses
would be one possible idea."
Parnall proposes that students
send his office an outline of their
desired courses for the winter
session in June or July. These, he
said, would be fed into the computer and an "appropriate" timetable would be spewed forth.
EUS DOES IT AGAIN
The publication of a second racist newsletter by the engineering undergraduate society has
resulted in the suspension of
classes by a math professor and
a condemnation of the newsletter, by administration president
Walter Gage. The newsletter published Wednesday, contained
a barrage of racist jokes, some
aimed at math prof George Blu-
man who on Feb. 22 withdrew
his application to teach in the
engineering faculty because of
the racist jokes published in the
Feb. 9 newsletter.
...The newsletter began with
an opinion poll of how students
felt about the racism controversy. The poll began with: "To
be truly just and treat everyone
equal we give you the BLEWMAN
ETHNIC POLE"
...Another engineer
ing student, Kim Stephens,
said..."basing his opinions on
such things as the newsletter,
how can an outsider possibly
come to any other conclusion
that a belief that engineers are
depraved, sexist, racist, reactionary perverts." *2I
How much do you rely on scholarships for UBC?
"Most of [my
scholarships]
are from high
school....My
first year was
covered by
scholarships,
just housing
was hard to pay
for, but tuition
was good with
scholarships."
Sean Mehta
Science 2
"I work and I
had scholarships
my first year, but
none my second
year. It would
be nice, but I'm
getting by without them."
Bridget Ehrman-
Solberg, Arts 2
"I'm an American student so
they didn't give
me anything...
So I do all parents' funds and
loans."
Ashley Newel
Arts 3
"Me personally, I haven't
so far aside
from entrance;
so high school
and doing the
bursaries there...
[I've been] just
working over
the summer and
relying on that."
-Coordinated by Tara Martellaro & Katarina Grgic, with photos by Chibwe Mweene MARCH 10, 2009
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
GAMES & COMICS     11
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Golden Age
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28. "No man is an ."
33. First president of Botswana
36. A misspelling on a keyboard
38. Olive genus
39. Someone who holds unorthodox
religious views
Leftover from dinner
End of a sermon
East Indian tree
Coleridge's "Dejection: "
Tidily
Spanish donkey
" for the poor."
Invade in great numbers, as with
pests
57. Determined cost
" la la la."
Flexible twig of a willow tree
La Sagrada Familia architect: abb
Frost's " by Night"
Obelisk
Soft, wet, low-lying land
Hundredth of a buck
41
43
44
46
47
49
51
53
62
63
64
65
66
67
69. " be sorry!"
70. Unknown: abb
71. On the cutting edge
DOWN
1. Vaulted
2. Resin used in strong adhesives
3. Russian founder of the Bolsheviks
and first head ofthe USSR
4. One episode of a series
5. "Excuse me?"
6. Reverberation
7. "This is Houston, you've been
cleared for ."
8. A native of Iraq
9. Most frightening: s t
10. Highest peak
11. Vigorous
12. Bellybutton fuzz
13. "Go ask somebody ."
22. An organization of employees
24. One of a castle's best defences
27. To write on metal or stone
29. Where 26 Across may work
30. The lowest female singing voice
31. Require
32. Cook of Good Luck Chuck
33. Genghis of the Mongol Empire
34. Does _ like _?
35. Place
37. An African antelope
40. A short descriptive poem about
rural or pastoral life
42. Work hard for
45. Refrain, e.g. from alcoho
48. Hardy's slapstick partner
50. Dominated by, e.g. grief-	
52. Molten rock
54. Run down (with dog-)
55. The alcoholic Singapore	
56. Delicious
57. Teapot's blanket
58. "Go as far say."
59. ln_of
60. Portable phone
61. New Spanish coin
LAST ISSUE'S ANSWERS
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am.S I Insider weekly
student society     a weekly look at what's new at your student society
03.10.09
March 10th-11th
10:00 am-4:00 p.m.
Main Concourse, SUB
O ROGERS
a m se ve ntsubc.co
BAND WARS
March 12th
at Pit Pub, UBC
FREE
Plants & Animals
with DRMHLLR
March 18th, Biltmore Cabaret
Tickets: Ticketweb, Zulu,
Scratch, Red Cat
Great Lake
Swimmers
with Kate Maki
March 29th, St James Hall
March 30th, Norm Theatre
Tickets: Ticketweb, Zulu, Outpost
$15.00 advance
UBC
Responsible
Consumption
Week
Vote with Your
Dollar Fair
March 19 & 20,2009
SUB Concourse
9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
MORE
BUSES!
MORE
OFTEN!
V
REDUCE
PASSUPS!
v
ifffftTtftmtfti
We want to hear from you,
tell us your transit story at
www.passups.ca
An initiative from your AMS External Office
Authorized by the AMS,
registered sponsor under the Elections Act, 604 822 2050.
SAVE«££FARM
JOIN     THE    TREK
GREAT FARM TREK09
APRIL 7th
The Trek will depart from the
Student Union Building at 3:30 p.m. and trekkers will
walk to the UBC Farm on south campus.
Please join us at this family-friendly event to support the
farm remaining in its current size and location.
For more information:
www.amsubc.ca and on facebook: Great Farm Trek 2009
THE AMS IS NOW ON FACEBOOK
,ffi"   U UBC Alma Mater Society KARCH 9™ Tl AHUL 3w
/■   ,-•■■'        —p
J
Li
►/^
o >
&*#
.«=*=>
'        MUST DRINK MORE MILK.com    M
BC SCHOOL SPORTS

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