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Pow Mar 9, 1993

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Array Vbl. 75, No. 41
INSIDE
SKY Lee
exclusive
interview, p. 3
Undercover
Pit sting
intercepts
drug sale
BY CHARLES NHO ~
A FUMBLING drug
dealer tried to peddle
marijuana in the Pit to the wrong
patron.
The patron watched big
screen hockey but also carried a
badge.
Jeffrey William Moore, 36,
caught in an undercover RCMP
sting was charged with
trafficking narcotics.
Cons. Alfredo Bangloy
agreed to buy some dope and
the two men went into the Pit
washroom.
Bangloy made sure Moore
entered a stall first and then
sealed off the only exit Moore
became suspicious and then
panicky when his continual
pleas for the money were met
by excuses from Bangloy.
At one point, Moore
threatened to flush the drugs
down the toilet
"I could have arrested him
right then, but for safety.I waited
for my partner," said Bangloy.
Cons. Greg Bishop, who is
usually involved in most of
UBC's narcotics arrests,
charged into the washroom and
helped Bangloy handcuff the
suspect without incident, and
seized almost a pound of
marijuana.
This undercover operation
is a part of an on-going RCMP
drive against occasional drug
trafficking on campus and at
Wreck Beach.
Bomb's
away
First the World Trade
Centre. Next the Pit.
UBC RCMP evacuated the
Student Union Building
Saturday at 10 pm after
receiving a anonymous call
which warned of a bomb in the
Pit pub.
Equipped with an
explosives sniffing dog, UBC
RCMP searched the SUB
building which was cleared of
barroom rowdies, theatregoers,
Pow reporters and dancers from
the Pharmacy ballroom party.
Police searched several
hours but found no bomb.
V^^    HAVE POW WILL TRAVEL
Pow
UBYSSEY SPECIAL
Vancouver, British Columbia, March 9,1993
PHOTO BY ROSA TSENG
Women with a vision: celebrating International Women's Day
UBCS WOMEN TODAY	
Leading women
BY CATHY LU, BRENDA
WONG, GORSHARN TOOR
AND KAREN YOUNG
KIM Campbell's bare
shoulders, Judy Tyabji's
pyjama parties and Faye Leung's
hats are images which overshadow
the abilities of women leaders.
But at UBC, women are
foreshadowing a future where they
soon will play out extraordinary
roles as they emerge from a student
society often seen as a city
microcosm.
During International Women's
Day on March 8, Pow spoke to
dozens of women leaders headed
for various walks of life from
agriculture to commerce to
recreation to social and community
leadership. Here's a slice of what
we found.
Nadine Arraji, Arab Students
Society president, can frequently be
seen by the Student Union Building
talking to passersby. She feels her
club has added a positive
contribution to bridge understanding
between Arabs and Canadians.
Araji wants to dismantle
stereotypes about the Arab world
such as the veil and women'srights.
An articulate and educated
woman, Araji issurprisedby student
questions about Arab women's
conditions prompted by a flawed
Vancouver Sun series calledWomen
of the Veil. The popular media
perception confuses religion and
fundamentalist law, she says.
"I thought we were evidence
that women were not the
stereotypical image," she says.
A second-year chemical
engineering student, Araji has
always been encouraged to pursue a
career—even her grandfather is
supportive.
Quinnie Pak of the Chinese
See page 7
QUOTE OF THE DAY
a
My brain won out
eventually, although not
before some short, pudgy
guy pounded by me.
page 6
Manager
fired for
harassment
BY STAN PAUL
THE manager of the UBC
aquatic centre has been fired
over   allegations   of   sexual
harassment.
Jim Bremner, also an auxiliary
RCMP officer, was "terminated"
following a two month investigation,
said former AMS president Martin
Ertl.
Ertl said that "there were
allegations of sexual harrassment
against the manager, filed just before
Christmas."
The management committee
that employs and runs the aquatic
centre on behalf of the AMS and
UBC conducted the investigation
after receiving four formal
complaints by centre employees to
the campus se xual harassment office.
"We found out that Bremner
could not effectively manage the
centre...the complaints were found
to be credible," said Ertl, who was
on the committee until February.
"The complainants that came
forward reported incidents that dated
back some time," Ertl said. "Some
of the incidents occurred over the
one or two years that they were
employed."
Bremner has managed the
aquatic centre for the last 14 years
since its opening.
Sexual assault
by Main Library
reported
A 19-year old woman was
reportedly sexually assaulted
between the bus loop and the Main
Library.
A witness said she found the
woman "beaten up" after 9 pm
March 1 and walked her to the
University Hospital.
But UBC RCMP were unable
to locate the woman after she left a
name and phone number. The name
was not listed with the UBC
Registrar arid the woman was not
found at the recorded address or
phone number.
Police cannot verify whether
the woman was attacked at another
location but doubt the attack occured
■ at the time and place reported. The
suspect is described as stocky, 6
foot, 4 inches, wearing a black tatoo
of a Playboy bunny on his right
, bicep, and a. scar on his right side of
his face. He has brown eyes and hair
and was using a Spanish accent Tuesday, March 9,1993
POW
Vol. 75 No. 41
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RATES: AMS caidholders - 3 Nnes $3.15, -Kldi-onal lines 63 cents. Commercial - 3 Hnes $5.25, additional lines 80 cents. (10%
discount on 25 issues or more.) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 3:30 pm, 2 days before pubfcation. Room 266, SUB,
UBC, Vancouver. B.C. V6T 2A7. 822-3977.
5-COMING EVENTS
CHERISH YOUR FREEDOM to read:
Ls priceless. Sec the banned book display at
the UBC Bookstore, 6200 University Blvd.,
Vancouver, B.C 822-2665.
Um'llNGTHESUMN__RX» you want!
Tuesday March 9 12:30 pm SUB Theatre.
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SUMMER WORK FOR University
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GAYS, LESBIANS & Bisexuals of UBC
infc«i»tiorioffice(SUB237B). 822-4638.
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Interview time?
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Monday - Saturday: 9:30 - 6:00
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Between classes held due to lack of space*
The University of British Columbia
Department of Theatre and Film
(DOMWEy'SIO^D S09£
Adapted by Errol Durbach
Directed by John Wright
Si Victorian SpcctacuCar
March 10 - 20
2 for 1 Preview - Wednesday
March 10
Curtain: 8:00pm
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K I_ S E R V ATIONS
822-2678
Support Your Campus Theatre
Community Sports
###
###
WILSON STAFF DYNAPOWER
Squash Racquets
REG. $119.95      SALE $89.95
YONEX RQ60 Tennis Racquets
REG. $119.95      SALE $79.95
DAVE STIEB Ball Gloves
REG. $59.95       SALE $49.95
RUCANOR 233 Graphite Comp
Squash Racquets
REG. $79.95      SALE $39.95
Barbarian Rugby Jerseys
REG. $59.95      SALE $39.95
SPORTECK PRIMA Soccer Balls
REG. $54.95      SALE $29.95
BLACK KNIGHT Carbon Graphite
Badminton Racquets
REG. $49.95      SALE $29.95
DYNAMO Hockey Sticks (ball hockey)
REG. $17.95       SALE $12.95 \bl. 75, No. 41
POW
Tuesday, March 9,1993
NEWS
Sky without limits: a writer's tale
BY KAREN YOUNG
FRUMPILY swaddled in
heavy winter-wear, Sharon
Kwan Ying Lee describes herself as
a bag-lady.
Sharon Kwan Ying, however,
is also SKY Lee, author of
Disappearing Moon Cafe and
winner of the 1990 City of
Vancouver Book Award.
Besides writing, and perhaps
mumbling to lamp-posts while
pushing a shopping cart, Lee is a
feminist, Chinese community
activist, nurse, and visual artist.
Peeling off the requisite
Vancouver apparel, Lee looks
attractively girlish with her long
hair, short kilt, and a hip pair of
tinted granny glasses perched on
her nose.
Lee, 40, attributes her good
fortune in publishing as the result of
a bizarre cosmos run by chance.
"Life is just a series of random
chemical reactions," she says.
Lee sent a manuscript of her
first book to nine publishers. All of
them rejected it, except New West
Press in Alberta.
"My publisher was rejecting Lives
of Saints at the same time as
accepting mine. There's really no
sense to it at all. None. It's very
random." shrugs Lee, now
publishing with Douglas and
Mclntyre.
When suggested that she looks
closer to 30 than her actual age,
Lee cackles appreciatively.
Lee, a UBC Asian Studies
graduate, is just old enough to
remember the first meeting in the
Chinese-Canadian community
about its identity.
"It was way back in 1970," she
reminisces like an aged old-timer.
"When we hit our 20s, we went
down Chinatown to get politicized
andradicalized,"recallsLee, sipping
1990 Governor General award finalist SKY Lee, a UBC Fine Arts graduate, won the
Vancouver Book Award for her first novel Disappearing Moon Cafe  photo by Chung wong
a cup of herbal tea at La Quena.
Her perspective on cultural
issues, however, have changed a
great deal since then. At 20, Lee
found it easy to blame the white
culture, an attitude which she now
criticizes as "ethnically pious" and a
"waste of resources."
"If you didn't have that concept
of racial inferiority to deal with or
cling to, what would you be doing
with your time and your life?"
Bom in Port Alberni, a place
Lee describes as once "very redneck, racist," Lee spent her
childhood fighting racial prejudice.
"I remember little episodes like
there'd be: a family of four boys that
lived down the street, and my brother
used to get into trouble with
them...We became a family gang
ourselves. We'd be out there with
our sticks and my dad's leather belt,
beating them and chasing them.
They'd be chasing us too. Oh it was
really kind of silly," Lee recounts in
the recent collective book, Jin Guo:
Voices of Chinese Canadian
Women.
Lee is now revising the
manuscript of her new book, a
collection of short stories entitled
Bellydancer. Sounding a bit like
exotic Arthur Murray courses, the
central trilogy of stories is called
Bellydancer Level One, Bellydancer
Level Two, and Bellydancer Level
Three.
The eclectic mix of stories
explores feminism through the
metaphor of the belly-shaking art
form, dives into the ancient ashes of
Pompeii, and even creates a
personality for the stiff-limbed man
found striding across those yellow
crosswalk signs.
Lee's first book, Disappearing
Moon Cafe, traced the lives of
women in four generations of a
Chinese-Canadian family. A
captivating tale of clandestine sins,
passions, and epic tragedy, the book
won Lee critical acclaim.
Lee has also written short stories
for numerous periodicals, and
contributed to books such as
Vancouver Short Stories, Jin Guo,
and Telling Ic Women and Words
Across Cultures. Lee also illustrated
Paul Yee's book Teach Me How to
Fly, Skyfighter.
With the successes of Lee, local
poetEvelyn Lau, and American Amy
Tan, Lin points out that books on the
Asian-North American experience
have become attractive to publishers.
It's been a question of access,
whether the people who are in control
of publishing are going to allow that
culture in. And I guess recently,
they decided they would, for some
odd reason," she says.
"Perhaps they were tired of the
same old British-general-in-India
novels," she adds, doing a goofy
impression of the stiff upper-lipped
military officers.
Despite her establishment as a
writer, Lee still depends on her
nursing career. She earned her
nursing diploma from Douglas
College.
"Trying to be an artist or a writer
in this setting is difficult. Nursing is
fine for me and it's hard to convince
me to give up a well-paying job for
a mediocre-paying position as a
writer. That's how writers are treated
in our bureaucratic culture. Very
shabbily," she grumbles good-
naturedly.
Lee points out that Margaret
Atwood once said you can write
anything you want in Canada
because no one is reading it.
Now thatNorth American brains
are in the death-grip of Super
Nintendo and America's Funniest
Home Videos, the likelihood of
anyone reading anything beyond the
pages of this week's TV guide is
quickly diminishing.
"We're in our dying throes," Lee
comments on the state of literature.
But, looking far healthier than
someone who is supposedly in their
death-bed convulsions, Lee
continues to make an impact in the
many roles in her life.
Donning her bicycle helmet and
preparing to pick up her son from
school, SKY Lee becomes Mom
and the future of her personal life
seems to outshine the often cloudy
future of literature. "Often a child
symbolizes; the future, something to
motivate you to work towards," Lee
says optimistically.
COLUMN
Imagining a literary map
BY KARLYN KOH
IN investigating literature
by Asian Canadian women
at UBC, I am sometimes my own
field guide.
I am faced with the question
of where to start when trying to
chart this literature. Most people
seem to only come up with the
names of Joy Kogawa, Evelyn
Lau and SKY Lee, and then, even
award-winning Lee is an obscure
name in the mainstream
Vancouver context.
A lot of leg work has to be
done on my own because there are
no formal courses nor ha ve I found
avenues through which to make
connections with other interested
students and scholars. The
professors I have consulted have
received such research very
positively and encouragingly, but
they acknowledge unfamiliarity in
this area.
I am trying to seek out people
who have similar interests or studies
to maintain an informal network to
share resources and experiences. As
the field is a relatively new and
unmapped one, the community of
Asian women in Vancouver, both
readers and writers, are the primary
guides for support and direction.
Much of the published writings
of Asian Canadian women are often
marginalized in anthologies and
magazines. This poses some
problems for identifying a body of
work that is also acceptable to an
institutional curricula. Of course in
the study of marginalized literature,
there is the need to confront the
question of why the old standards of
acceptable literature are maintained
in a university context
Vancouver writer and UBC
grad, Ann Jew, related the
experience of reading a
manuscript of Asian Canadian
women' s literature by Rita Wong
in Calgary: Jew felt like crying
when she saw, for the first time,
her work and other women's
writing analyzed as a
comprehensive body.
Jew is one of several Chinese
women writers working in
Vancouver. Some other writers
include Larissa Lai, ILaiwan, C.
Allyson Lee and Lydia Kwa.
Much work is being generated by
this community, but there is
relatively little critical response
andanalysis. The challenge facing
a student of such literature is to
search these writers and works
out, so as to continue the
pioneering work of former and
present critics in this field.
LAW
Legal babblers and scribblers
BY GRACE KE
AND KAREN YOUNG
All lawyers are not created
equally. The "babblers"
or courtroom litigators occupy one
floor, and the "scribblers" or
solicitors on another at the corner of
Burrard and Georgia.
Lawyers are witnessing the "old
boys club" being penetrated by
increasing numbers of women who
areattracted to the financial rewards,
challenging work, and demanding
social justice.
This new wave of female
lawyers characterize themselves as
progressive thinkers with self-
assured attitudes.
However, they also they know
their obstacles. Although a
progressive change is occurring,
some larger downtown firms
maintain the old boys network and
glass ceilings.
Mindy Jong, a Dalhousie graduate
and seven-year veteran of corporate
commercial law, provides her own
twist on the adage: "It's a man's
world, but a smart woman takes the
advantages of it"
Perhaps an even greater challenge
is when some women balance their
careers and families. While some
sacrifice their professions to start a
family, others go home after a 12-
hour working day.
In atypical day Jong works on 10
cases, so she also emphasizes the
importance of organization.
She is also an executive member of
the federal Liberal Party and the BC
Women's Commission for the
federal Liberal Party (both Port
Moody-Coquitlam riding).
Jong, however, enjoys the role as
a "trapper," a lawyer who lures in
the new clients, more than a
"skinner," one who does the work.
Ming Song, a lawyer and UBC
SEE PAGE 6 Tuesday, March 9,1993
POW
\fol. 75 No. 41
University
Athletic
Council
Positions
The AMS is now accepting applications for students at large
to sit on the University Athletic Council (UAC). The UAC is
the overall governing body for athletic activities on campus
(Intercollegiate Athletics, Intramurals, Recreation UBC and
Community Sports) and advises the UBC Board of Governors on policy and direction.
The UAC meets approximately once every two months.
Appointees will also sit on a subcommittee which meets
frequently.
The term of appointment is for one year from April 1,1993
to March 31,1994.
Applications are available is SUB Room 238 and must be
handed in by 4:30 pm on Friday March 12,1993. For more
information, please contact Bill Dobie (SUB Room 256, Tel.
822-3972).
KITTO
JAPANESE HOUSE
A Homestyle Japanese
Restaurant Featuring:
Teriyaki Set from 6.95
Ramen/Udon from 4.95
Donburi (Rice&Topping)
 from 4.95
Introducing
HAPPY HOUR with ROBATA
Bring Your Friends
After 10pm Monday - Sunday
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833 Granville St. • 687-6622
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to go
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^Writing ^ resurtet
• Mepiaringfor \an iMeryleW?
•. being the one Who gets hired?
<■'*** *-*     * „*
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ARTS [
Drop/by the Outreach Desk in SUB Mam Concourse
Monday-Frfday
ll:30am-12:30pm    ,
18 Wheels halts with rhyme
BY WANDA CHOW
%/V/ HEN Canadian musical theatre maestro John
T T   Gray worked for The Journal as a guest
commentator, his methods were unorthodox. He sang.
The UBC theatre grad, originally from Nova Scotia,
would force a musical rhyme, often painfully so, until
his time was up. Hey, people watched it
Later the award-winning musical playwright put
Canada on the world's theatre map with Billy Bishop
Goes to War in the late 80s.
The latest re-launch of Gray's 18 Wheels, playing
at Arts Club Revue until late March, gives us a taste of
Canadian life on the road.
As one character chants, "If you want to know
your country get your ass out on the road."
An Alberta truck stop and the cab of a semi are
among backdrops for a cosy combination of country
music, trucker's folklore and offbeat characters.
18 Wheels, Gray's first play, written before his
successful musicals Billy Bishop Goes to War and
Rock and Roll, was first performed in 1976. It has since
had more than 50 productions across Canada.
The current Arts Club Revue production, directed
by Michael McLaughlin, is being touted as a new and
improved version.
Any visual doubts about 18 Wheels are erased upon
entering the theatre. TedRoberts has designed a trucker's
heaven complete with neon signs, pin-up posters of
semis, and on stage, the skeletal yet familiar cab of an
18-wheeler.
For the most part, the improvements, such as a
rewritten second act, work. A separate band no longer
performs as the cast plays their own music on stage,
giving the show a greater intimacy.
However, the rhyming couplet format in the
storytelling delivers great witticisms but trivializes more
serious moments such as the Highway 401 car crash.
The story's sombre tone blends badly with the
somewhat forced rhymes and causes an expectation of
a punchline that never materializes.
The strength of the show is in its music, loosely
written around the stories of big city aspirations, love
won and lost and everyday road woes. The humour is
subtle, almost homely. Take the tune Haulin' Chicken
Guts: "You gets paid double to haul the parts that ain't
so finger lickin' good."
See page 6
/«m.
by stars
JACKY   CHEUNG
BY MICHELLE WONG
What you do get when you mix
five notorious singers, one movie
star, a record producer and a former
beauty pageant winner?
Not a partridge.
Together the star-studded line
up skied with donors at Blackcomb
Mountain, sung live and auctioned
off personal belongings on Cathay
TV in Vancouver and raised $1.63
million in a few days for a local
hospital.
Hongkongpop singer and actor
Jackie (True Love) Cheung,
considered one of Asia's "four great
giants" had sold the most albums
last year in Hongkong. His
autographed belt was auctioned off
for $3,000. He threw in a CD for
good measure.
Singer Sally Yeh, a Victoria
resident, had been the top female
vocalist for three years in Hongkong.
Her nightshirt was sold for $2000.
With Hongkong pop singer
See page 6
CMAs
won't
survive
the '90s.
They'll
MANAGE
the'90s.
The graduates who become the managers of the '90s
and beyond will have the flexibility to manage any change.
Even a change of industry or two.
That's why the CMA program places so much stress on
broad management skills. In fact, it's the only
professional program devoted exclusively to hands-on
training in management accounting.
The CMA designation starts with a thorough grounding
in finance - then goes on to provide an overview of all
aspects of business, and how each contributes to the
bottom line. That overview is constantly updated, too,
because the CMA designation carries with it a mandatory
requirement for continuing professional development.
As a CMA, you'll do more than just manage financial
information. You'll use financial information to manage.
And that includes managing your own career.
For more information on your future as a CMA, mail
this coupon now or telephone (604) 687-5891 or
1-800-663-9646 in  B.C.
I 1
Please send me a copy of the Professional Program Guide 1992 - 93.
NAME
CMA
ADDRESS
CITY
PROVINCE..
POSTAL CODE
The Society of Management
Accountants of British Columbia
P.O. Box 11548
1575 - 650 West Georgia Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6B 4W7
The "M" stands for Management       I I Vfcl. 75, No. 41
POW
Tuesday, March 9,1993
i " , *X' *'"', * <   -*M '
ARTS
UUUU*WM^M^^^^^UM^^^*MMMiM«*««-^*^Mt^M^MtM***MM*M4
MCAT
Tea time makes a comeback
PHOTO BY CHERYl NIAMATH
High tea at three in Gastown
BY RAUL PESCHIERA
AND CHERYL NIAMATH
"There are few hours in life more
agreeable than the hour dedicated
to the ceremony known as afternoon
tea''— Henry James,
Portrait of a Lady.
ALTHOUGH evoking
images of tight-lipped
aristocrats pinching bone china tea
cups, taking the odd dry sip or
nibbling the corners of cucumber
sandwiches as they chat wistfully of
turn-of-the-century empire matters,
tea time is a relatively new tradition.
As the story goes, in 1840, the
Duchess of Bedford whimsically at
mid-day called for sandwiches and
cakes with a cup of tea to be sent to
a chamber. So pleasant was this
recess that the duchess regularly
invited her friends and soon high
time became a favourite of the day' s
affairs.
Today high tea is taken in cities
world-wide including Beijing,
Singapore, Tokyo, London and
Vancouver.
In Vancouver, you once could
take high tea at almost any hotel in
the city. Before World War II tea
dances were held at the Hudson's
Bay downtown and 35 cents could
buy an afternoon tea on tables set
with white damask table cloths and
fine china on the CPR boat to
Victoria.
"Before the war, housewives
would have afternoon tea from 3 pm
until 5 pm," said a longtime
Vancouver resident "That was a
time when they would get together
and talk. But it was quite the thing,
with fancy sandwiches and cloth
napkins."
"But one of the reasons that all
stopped, apart from more women
getting jobs outside their homes,
was that the increase in traffic meant
they couldn't easily get home to
prepare dinner for their families."
Today, tea time in Vancouver
means braving the tourist hordes in
Gastown for high tea at Ye Old
See page ii
Classes
Starting this week
Maximize your performance on the MCAT.
Learn from the company that trains over 50%
of all MCAT students.
734-8378
KAPLAN
The answer lo the test question.
The Senate ol the University
of British Columbia
has requested
the Alma Mater Society
fill a vacancy on the
Bill of an at-laige student representative*
This Message Could Save You
A Year In Your Move To
Management
June, 1993: Entrance Exam for the CMA Professional Program
Two-thirds of the career opportunities in
the accounting profession are now in the
field of management accounting. Onfyone
professional program is devoted entirely to
specific training In management
accounting. The CMA Program.
The entrance examination for this
program, which leads to the CMA
designation, can be written only once
each year, in June. Candidates are
reminded that all prerequisite courses must
be completed before writing the exam.
If you meet the prerequisites, you qualify
to write the June exam - and could be
ready in the Fall to start the CMA Program
that can take you to the top.
For further information, call 687-5891.
Now.
CMA
The "M" stands for Management
Certified Management Accountants of British Columbia
1575-650 West Georgta.Nfancouver, British Columbia, V63 4W7
Phone 687-58*? 1 or 1-600-663-9646   Fax 687-6688
Full time students are eligible for the position. The Senate is the senior academic
body of the University, responsible for
determining University policy along with
the Board of Governors. It has jurisdiction
in all matters of an academic nature.
Resumes detailing academic and extracurricular background will be accepted by
Terri Folsom, AMS Adminis-   |71I11S
trative Assistant, in SUB 238
until 4:30 p.m. on Friday,
March 12,1993.
m
LATE NIGHT BITES.
Subways got the best tasting subs under the stars. All your favorite
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Want a late night bite? Make it Subway tonight.
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.J Wont     Cheryl Mam-tlt       Rom Tteng UltlanAa
Editor        Photo Editor        Photo Editor      Newt Editor
Stan Paid
Manca Zoo      Wanda Chow      Charles Nho
Ntwi Columnist Sport* Editor
Raid PescMcra
Newt Editor
HaoU
__■_ .(•       M_i -Chf«t^il-*sn
n"8B*na" Photo
Gorshani Toor      ON-niWong        Steve Chow Cathy Lu
Cotumnitt -cJtor Columnist Newt Editor
Mark NBeU.     Siobhan Roantree    Ktm Cheng
Sports
Photo
FhotQ
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News Editor
Michelle Wong
•kl —
racwi
Phyllis Kwan      *"g*r|» ltm*
Pow police beat Morgan Maenling
Advertising: Lyanne Evans, 822-3978
Newspaper Design: S.J. Ahn 822-6681
Arts Editor Yukie Kurahashi
POW
A Ubyney Sped*! Edition, publlitw. awry Mcon-J
Itetday, during the whiter Kalan.
Teh 822-2301
Fie 122-9279
$1.6 M FROM PACE 4
Hacken Lee, movie star Veronica (Miss Asia) Yip, current
pop sensation Shirley Kwan, singer FongLui, actress Elizabeth
Lee and Capitol Artists producer Philip Chan, they secured
thousands of donations ranging $ 10 to $10,000 from telethon
viewers in Lower Mainland.
As part of the Starsof the Pacific Variety Show sponsored
by the Hongkong television broadcaster TVB, the stars raised
funds for Mount Saint Joseph Hospital last week in Vancouver.
The audience cast included local developer Geoffrey
Lau, his wife Sandra Lau, hospital co-chair Dr. Francis Ho,
former UBC BoG member and local real estate magnate
Robert Lee, Concord Pacific Developments quarterback
Stanley Kwok and former Socred MLA Grace McCarthy.
'Tonight's success is everybody's success," said Dr. Ho.
"I want to thank the UBC volunteers and others as well.
"Charity knows no boundaries."
Show tickets ranged from $50 to $500 for VIP seats.
Audience members also paid $50 a lottery ticket with a
Whistler condo as first prize valued at $200,000 and a Honda
Civic as second prize.
18 WHEELS FROM PACE 4 	
The cast more than ably demonstrates their musical
prowess on their respective instruments. Ross Douglas
(keyboard, guitar and musical direction), Laurie Murdoch
(fiddle) and David McLeod (bass) shower us with their
musical charm but the spotlight belonged to Marlee Walchuk
and Craig Wood.
Her voice, his banjo-playing and truck sound effects
produced, among other fun moments, the evening's most
endearing characters, Molly and Lloyd.
Their love lost, won and lost story may be thin, but their
characters lend a certain comfortable snugness to the show,
just as the plastic Jesus does to the set, perched in the cab of
the truck.
SPORTS
TRENDY POW RUN   (JUST LIKE THE SUN RUN)
To try the mini-tri
BY MARK NIELSEN
LET'S SEE.
A 400m swim. An
11km cycle. A four km run.
Anyone can do that. Yeah
right.
Let's just say I "survived"
the UBC short-course
triathlon on Saturday. The
silver medal I won for the
second-best time in my age
group (30-34 years old) only
means I survived better than
some others.
I also quickly learned that
while separately, the distances
of each leg barely equal a
walk in the park, together they
add up to a new experience in
pain.
What'sreally scary is that
the short-course is only half
the length of the regular UBC
triathlon. They won't make
you pee in a bottle at the end
of the mini-tri.
Like its bigger sibling,
the short-course starts with
the swim (less chance of
drowning than if put at the
They won't make you pee in a
bottle at the end of the mini-tri.
end) which was the segment I
focussed most of my training
on.
Unfortunately I spent so
much time stretching before
the race that I had no time to
do a few warm-up laps before
my heat, of about 30 people,
was to start.
We were divided into
three groups of ten, each in a
lane, and started off in two-
second intervals to give us
some space in the pool.
Even so, the atmosphere
was like sharks in a feeding
frenzy. Or like laundry in the
washer. Good thing there was
no spin cycle.
I bumped heads with
oncoming swimmersacouple
of times (sorry) and flutter-
kicked a few faces as well as
being flutter-kicked.
Still, it could have been
worse, I found some open
water near the end of the swim,
albeit because most of the
others were out of the pool.
In a slight panic, I started
running as soon as I got out of
the water. Butafter afew steps
I modified my pace to
compensate for my rubbery
legs. Is this what fall-down
drunk feels like?
What time I lost in the
pool I made up in the cycle. I
had the foresight to leave my
bike in a low gear before
putting it in the rack. Some
others didn' t and could barely
pedal up the slight incline that
starts the cycle.
I also had a good bike,
borrowed from a friend. And
because I ride down
University Boulevard most
days, I knew every gradient
on the road.
I must have passed ten
people by the end ofthe cycle.
But there was still the
run. And I could barely walk.
Consequently, the first
kilometre was a case of mind
ever matter. My legs said
"no." My brain said "yes."
My brain won out eventually,
although not before some
short, pudgy guy pounded by
me.
And not long after I really
found my stride and passed a
few more people, my calf said
"no."Or more like NO! Itwas
cramping up.
Nonetheless, I was able
to kick by one more guy (he
had a bad shin) and finish off
with something resembling a
sprint for the last stretch. That
said, if it was the full-length
triathlon, I would have had to
drop out. My time was 56:18.
Well, okay. It wasn't a
complete descent into hell. In
a certain, indescribable kind
of way, it was even fun. And
the flag-people cheer you on
along the way.
Yes, anyone really can
do it. But it's easier said than
done.
HIGH TEA FROM PAGE 5
English Tea Room. Amidst pastoral prints, calico lamps and
the obligatory bad photograph of Queen Victoria, chef David
Eames will serve you one of 21 types of tea in a big teapot
before a three-tier platter of homemade scones with devonshire
cream and jam, crumpets and finger sandwiches (yes, some
are cucumber with the crust cut off).
Eames said that people are rediscovering the tradition of
taking tea in the afternoon as a break from their busy days.
"Last year at this time, we closed for a month because
business was so slow. But for the past couple of weeks high
LEGAL EAGLES FROM PAGE 3
tea has been selling like crazy."
Vancouverites have also discovered one of the
advantages of afternoon tea: "It's much easier to chat over tea
and scones than over a couple of burgers," Eames said.
Business people are also finding that meetings over tea
in a relaxed setting can be more productive than meetings over
drinks in a crowded bar.
Eames predicted that with more people moving to
Vancouver from countries where high tea is already a traditional
ritual, interest in high tea will increase in the city.
grad, says lawyers establish a   not a partner then you're not
_____w.l,      **_.     —— — ,,*«*;««     K*«» n--.:.!   **   Ort.««* nn',A
community reputation by
joining party politics,
conducting seminars, and
publishing in law journals.
Associates know trapping
enough clients can lead to the
coveted partnership. Song
doesn't like the "boozing and
schmoozing" style of client
relations. Song's priority is
to become the best possible
lawyer without sacrificing too
much to become a partner.
"Because partnership has
this mystical aura about it,
some people believe if you're
special," Song said.
Reflecting upon her student
career, she recommends not
going to law school
immediately after completing
an undergraduate degree.
She recalls her first year
in law school as being much
harder than expected. "It
brings outastudent'snegative
traits and if you've got a
neurosis it is magnified," Song
said.
In class she found herself
intimidated by others who had
insightful remarks.
"I thought 'I'm not going to
open my mouth and I'm not
going to humiliate myself,'"
Song said.
Fourth year pre-law
student, Monica, who prefers
not to use her last name, aims
to enter the law profession for
its social aspects. She believes
there are a lack of civic-
minded lawyers.
With her cultural
background and language
fluency, Monica, 21, believes
she Would be invaluable in
aiding the Chinese
community    with    legal
matters.
"Many can't speak
English, and the Chinese
mentality is very different. I
would help integrate the
culture and the legal issue at
hand into an effective
resolution," Monica said.
Her social consciousness
may extend into politics, a
future she is considering
tentatively.
"There aren't a lot of
female, Chinese-speaking
politicians", she said "I would
think of entering politics."
HUNGER STRIKE FROM BACK PAGE
Feb. 23 to protest their pending deportation. They have since
been joined by six others, three of whom are landed immigrants.
Several strikers say they have already waited two to four
years for a judgement on their refugee claims, leaving them in
a legal limbo—they are denied work permits, access to
English language classes and daycare.
In the meanwhile, they have depended on welfare
assistance. The group say they represent more than 120
refugee claimants facing deportation.
Hunger striker Ali Soltani, denied refugee status after
living in Canada for three years, is to be deported with his wife
and child. Frustration with the immigration process has
caused Ali and his wife, Kobra, to join the hunger strike.
"I did eight months volunteer work in a car repair shop
and then I got a position as a mechanic. However, immigration
refused to renew my work permit and I was told to go on social
assistance. Also, my child was denied daycare," Ali said.
Canadian immigration officials have insisted a return to
Iran poses no jeopardy to the strikers' lives. But Iran's human
rights record does not paint such an optimistic picture.
Since 1981 Iran has been criticized by the United Nations
and Amnesty International for an abhorrent human rights
record which included 301 judicial executions last year, a
United Nations report showed. About 160 cases involved
political dissidents.
Torture toward women included death by stoning,
whipping and forced marriage as common punishment for a
variety of so-called crimes, such as, violation of dress codes
and leaving one's husband.
The International Federation of Iranian Refugee Councils
states that 113,000 women were arrested for minor dress code
violations in 1991.
The hunger strikers have gained the support of MOSAIC,
Organization for Human Rights, Svend Robinson and other
MPs, the faculty of Douglas College, and Iranian Associations
in Canada, US and Europe. But the hunger strikers have yet to
engage in direct talks with Immigration Canada. Vfol. 75, No. 41
POW
Tuesday, March 9,1993
Spring sproings
UBC WOMEN FROM FRONT
PHOTOS BY CHERYL NIAMATH
Do you feel like falling in love?
is your
hayfever
acting UP''
Are VOi,  i
Are you craving Italian food?
irrals - <rttW
The squ
amourous
,"*£ y0U "**"* ***» >n
If you forget the
midterms, the
term papers
and that
overwhelming
feeling of not
having enough
time to get
everything
finished before
classes end,
then how can
you tell that spring
is here?
The days are getting longer
%PUSSl"«"°»s*recomlng
You
can
smell it
in the
air
te°Ple
derate '* sir>S>ng e//&
K's time to
peas
plant your
sweet
Students Association, is only the
second woman president in the
club's 30-year history.
But the third-year history
student's parents were against her
involvement in the club, especially
as president.
Pak came to Canada when she
was two years old, but still copes
with cross-cultural conflictbetween
her parents' traditional Chinese
views of life and her more liberal
education and upbringing.
They warned her that "since
you're a girl, you're going to have a
tough time—it will be hard to get
people to listen to you."
Pak says the older club members
challenge her abilities more so
because of her age rather than her
gender.
As proof that young Chinese
women in Canada are participating
more, Pak points to the female
majority of club's 42 member
council, and the elected president
for next year is again a woman.
Pak's rejections of some of her
parent's values, however, shouldnot
be read as a rejection of everything
Chinese, she says. After all, her club
promotes Chinese culture by
organizing social events, and
offering classes in Chinese painting,
and language instruction.
AttheWomenStudent'sOffice,
the energetic and animated Jin-Sun
Yoon is excited about the bi-cultural
women's discussion group she
initiated at the campus office.
Yoon says that current
terminology for describing the
nature of the women' s experience is
inadequate.
"I realize how narrow this term
bi-cultural is," says Yoon. "Many
women are bi-racial ot even tri-
cultural. For example, [the group
included] an Indian who spent her
teen years in Singapore before
moving to Canada."
Although she faced some
barriers in carrying out her project,
the group began meeting in January.
But it will dissolve in March with
Yoon's departure.
Yoon, 30, is doing her Masters
in counselling psychology and her
practicum at the WSO and
International House.
Her thesis primarily deals with
"ethnic and feminist identity of
Asian Canadian! women." She will
have a report published in the UBC
Reports on counselling women of
colour.
Yoon, who has travelled
extensively before returning to
school, emphasizes people of colour
need to know more about cross-
cultural influences.
"We have to stop looking at
culture as being one big paradigm.
We are affected by many things and
ethnicity isn'tthe biggest one," says
Yoon, also a Multicultural Liason
student committee rep.
Agnes Huang, a 26-year-old
MBAstudentwho has been involved
in community work since moving to
Vancouver from Victoria in 1990
wants to set up a pension plan for the
women of colour who spend their
lives fighting for women's rights.
"Women need to take care of
themselves," Huang says. "Most
women who spend their lives
lobbying or working for feminist
issues don't have a pension plan
after they retire."
She wants to use her
administration and organizational
skills to work with women of colour
in grass-roots organizations.
"I would like to use what I have
learned in my MBA program and
apply it in a non-profit community
organization."
Huang has been a writer and
editorial board member of Kinesis,
the oldest feminist newspaper in
Canada, with interests in legal
issues.
Ann-Marie Huang, 20, is
president of a martial art club that is
three quarters male.
"It has helped me deal with people.
I didn't used to be much a people-
person until this year," says the third-
year marine biology student
Despite a large male
membership, the leadership
responsibilities currently fall on
women in executive positions.
Huang has been a member of the
40-member Shito-Ryu Karate Club
since signing up at Clubs Days in
first year. She took martial arts
classes as achilld but did not practise
again until university.
a
^ -^gj
>
GSS AGM
(& EXECUTIVE ELECTIONS)
MARCH 25TH, 1993 @ 12:30
Graduate Student Centre, Ballroom
SUMMARY OF PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL
CHANGES:
Finding
A Great Job
Demands a
Professional Resume
Vancouver's Resume Experts
BoUFace MeJU 687-5591
Student
Dl&count
202-207 W Hastings (at Camblo)
 .q.        - Four Executive vs. seven
#•      - Executive Honoraria
"       - Expanded duties for Executive
vs. hiring a cood. @ S30.000/yr
- Establish 3 unpaid assistants
Run up-coming Society elections in
January
BRING YOUR STUDENT CARD & FELLOW CR^D
STUDENTS TO VOTE!
rfZGG FtDdb! FPE-E F_>db!
I
>_4"-»_V* 8
Tuesday, March 9, 1993
POW
Vol 75 No. 41
*"-"-'-' .^>J^..J^J...>J... J-..-..._   .i ....- ^"fll     [   ■•■['"* mkaW     Wm ^^rnmrn^^ WmM
Hunger strikers gain support
BY PARVIZHOSSIN POUR AND ASHKAN HASHEMI
SINGLE mother Zahra Zarnoosh, is one of the 13 hunger strikers
for Iranian refugee claimants facing deportation.
She escaped an abusive relationship with her husband, a high-
ranking official in Iran, whose influence with Canadian authorities she
says has prevented her refugee status.
"I came here with theexpectation of gaining support from Canadians,
but ironically, I have been branded a criminal because of my husband's
claims to the Canadian embassy in Iran that I had stolen my child," said
Zarnoosh, during International Women's Day in day 12 of her strike.
A Canadian refugee hearing judge had even asked if she had
kidnapped other children.
"I am being forced back to a place where death is the usual punishment
for women who leave their husbands," said Zarnoosh of the hearing's
final judgement
While on the hunger strike she has suffered from kidney problems
and has been taken to the hospital four times.
Seven Iranian refugee claimants, two women and five men, have
continued a hunger strike outside the Vancouver Immigration office since
See page 6
Mother and child hunger strike before Immigration Canada at 800 Helmcken St.
gammer Jobs
jrflfc the «m« Hater Socie5|
PUBLICATIONS
COORDINATOR
At the beginning of each academic year,, the AMS distributes a number of
publications, including the Inside UBC, to first year and returning students. These
publications are intended to provide informational material on the AMS and UBC.
For each publication, the successful
applicant will:
• report to and take direction from
the President;
• request, edit and write material;
• determine their length andformat;
• prepare and monitor a budget;
• obtain quotes from printers; and
• organize their timely distribution.
We are looking for applicants who
have:
• knowledge of both the AMS and
UBC;
•proven   editing   and   writing
abilities;
• constructive criticism of previous
publications; and
•proposals for this year's publications.
Applicants must be available on a part time basis from Monday, March 22. The
wage is $9.73 per hour based on a 37.5 hour work week-fora total of 18 weeks.
Preference will be given to those applicants that are returning for the 1993/94
academic year.
Further information may be obtained from Bill Dobie, President, in SUB 256 at 822-3972.
Applications and resumes will be accepted until 4:30 p.m. on Monday, March 15,
1993. Please deliver them to Terri Folsom, Administrative Assistant, in SUB 238.
FIRST YEAR ORIENTATION
COORDINATOR
In early September, the AMS administers an orientation programme for first year
students. We are looking to improve and to expand it for the upcoming academic year.
The successful applicant will:
• chair and work with a committee of
first year students;
• solicit suggestions from both AMS
and UBCstudentserviceorganizations;
• solicit ideas from other Canadian
universities; and
• with the suggestions of the above,
organize a p rogramme that will ma ke
first year students feel welcome.
We are looking for applicants who are:
• knowledgable about both the AMS
and UBC;
• creative in providing information;
• outgoing, enthusiastic and energetic; and
• able to make anyone feel welcome.
Applicants must be available from Monday, May 31 to Friday, September 10. The wage
is $9.73 per hour based on a 37.5 hour work week. Preference will be given to those
applicants that are returning for the 1993/94 academic year.
For further information call Janice Boyle, Vice President, in SUB 248 at 822-3092.
Applications and resumes will be accepted until 4:30 p.m. on Monday, March 15,1993.
Please deliver them to Terri Folsom, Administrative Assistant, in SUB 238.
GOT A PROPOSAL THAT WILL
BENEFIT STUDENTS? WANT TO
GET PAID TO IMPLEMENT IT?
Please include the following in your proposal: a description; an explanation as to how
it will benefit students; a budget; and a completion date.
The equivalent* of two full time positions are available for the summer. The wage is
$9.73 per hour based on a 37.5 hour work week. Preference will be given to those
applicants that are returning for the 1993/94 academic year.
For further information call Janice Boyle, Vice President, in SUB 248 at 822-3092.
Proposals will be accepted until 4:30 p.m. on Monday, March 15,1993. Please deliver
your proposal to Terri Folsom, Administrative Assistant, in SUB 238.
"That is, we may hire two people for the entire summer or four for two months each or
some combination thereof.
THE GENERAL B.A.
PROGRAM
UBC
This program offers a broad Liberal Arts program as an
alternative to a Major or Honours Program.
Applications are being accepted until May 15, 1993 for
September 1993. Spaces are limited and students are
advised to apply early.
For information and application forms, come to
The General B.A. Office, Buchanan A207,
or call 822-2595
AMPUS
OMPUTERS
386SX IJ25 Notebook
• 4MB RAM • 60MB Hard Drive
• Carrying Case   • MS-DOS 5
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Reservations Recommended
Great Atmosphere
Open from 5:30 p.m.
2_£8080   5&8080    sSStt  II 3307 Dunbar (corner of 17th & Dunbar)      222-4033

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