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The Ubyssey Sep 27, 1968

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Array Vol. L, No. 9
VANCOUVER,  B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27,  1968
224-3916
— dick button photo
THEY ARE STILL offering those agrestic brockburgers at ridiculous prices, but at least the new
SUB cafeteria opened on time.
SUB pub-in draws good crowd
despite bureaucrat opposition
. TThe opening of SUB and
the annual clubs day attracted
a crowd of 400 to hear Mother
Tucker's Yellow Duck perform
atythe south entrance of SUB,
but all 400 weren't there just
to hear the band.
■The other attraction at SUB
Thursday was the pub-in, supported by the students and
some Alma Mater Society executives but officially unsanctioned by the SUB management
committee.
The committee placed an ad
in Thursday's Ubyssey which
stated: "the consumption of
alcohol in the Student Union
Building without a permit is
illegal."
But the committee's action
failed to hamper attendance
at the pub-in though at least
200 students brought beer.
Large groups were not conspicuous, but the number of empties left in SUB indicated the
success of the  event.
See in the crowd were eight
bookstor employees, bottles in
hand, carrying a sign that read,
"Labor supports students at
pub-in."
Tlhtrtee students wearing
sweatshirts which read "Anglican Theological College drinking   team"   drank   what   they
SUB not officially open,
big bash in January
SUB is not yet officially open.
The committee for the official opening of SUB said the ceremony will not take place until late January. No specific dates
have been announced but it is expected to be a week-long cele*-
bration.
Tentative activities include an all night dance, a student-
alumni banquet, and other festivities to involve the whole campus.
The event, expected to cost several thousand dollars, will
be financed partly by the Alma Mater Society. The budget has
not yet been ratified.
Meeting at noon today in SUB meeting room for those
interested in serving on the committee.
&"~***i„
>*• *<<..-
'Sw
Drop over and drip
for Red Cross drive
At least 25,000 pints of blood is the goal of the Red
Cross blood donors clinic to be held at UBC next week.
The clinic will be held in SUB meeting rooms from
Sept. 30 to Oct. 4, from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
On Monday at 10:30 a.m. Alma Mater president David
Zirnhelt and faculty association president William Webber
will give blood in the meeting rooms.
To see the Zirnhelt-Webber show, you will have to get
in line and give your pint
claim was sacramental wine.
Provincial Liquor Control
Board head Col. Donald McGuigan, said only '1 have no
comment  to  make."
Acting president Walter
Gage said the administration
would take no stand until the
AMS made its position clear.
"The AMS has a by-law prohibiting the consumption of
alcohol on its premises," said
Gage.
Panthers
arm blacks,
tight cops
The Black Panters party is
a revolutionary organization
fighting for the liberation of
black Americans from colonial domination, a Seattle Panther told 200 UBC students
Thursday.
Aaron Dixon said the party
supports struggles for national
liberation by all oppressed
people, such as the fight by
the Vietnamese against American   imperialism.
He said the party encourages
the Iblack community to take
up arms to protect itself against
inturding  white  police.
The party's 10-point program
includes demands for freedom
of all black prisoners, exemption of blacks from military
service, trials of blacks by their
'peers, and full employment,
and decent housing and education for all citizens.
Dixon said the Panthers
were organized in 1966.
"Mao Tse-tung said that if
a revolution lasts longer than
three years it is a victory,"
he said.
Dixon said the Panthers
have chapters in 29 major
American cities.
Flu bug hits.
Hare absent
UBC president Kenneth Hare, suffering for two weeks from
an influenza attack, has taken leave of absence from UBC.
A statement released Thursday by UBC's information department says Hare's recovery has been slow because of "overwork and fatigue".
"Hare's medical advisers have instructed him to reduce substantially his commitments for the remainder of the fall term
and to take a short leave from the university and the city at this
time," the statement says.
It adds that inter-faculty and student affairs dean Walter
H. Gage has been appointed acting president in
Hare's absence. This is usual procedure.
An information department spokesman
said it was impossible to elaborate on the duration of Hare's absence from UBC.
Hare missed last week's senate-student
meeting in International House because of his
illness.
Gage was acting president during the past
academic year until Hare took over his duties
as president June 1.
He is one of three UBC deputy presidents.
The other two are engineering dean Bill Armstrong and bursar William White.
The spokesman said Gage will assume full presidential responsibilities and be authorized to make any statement or take
any action which would normally be done by Hare.
Alma Mater Society president Dave Zirnhelt said late
Thursday Hare's departure will make little difference to student
strategy in pressing for academic reform.
"In any case, we are going to have to deal with the senate
committee which is investigating the AMS academic reform
brief," Zirnhelt said.
"I think Hare has made his position clear. The situation is
really past the presidential level at this stage anyway."
STUDENTS SLEEP IN
A late check at press time (2 a.m. this morning) showed that
about 15 students had so far successfully defied an AMS rule that
the new Student Union Building is to close nightly at 1 a.m.
The group, which included females, planned to sleep overnight to establish a precedent for round-the-clock use of the
building by students.
"The group feels that there will be many occasions when
students would like to use the building after 1 a.m., and the AMS
has no right to impose such arbitrary restrictions," said John
Mate, arts 4.
He said the security guard in the building had so far made
no attempt to have the students removed.
HARE
PENSIVE BLACK PANTHERS await question from Hebb audience on the nature of their revolutionary group. Panthers
said they are part of a world-wide struggle against
colonial   domination. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  September 27,   1968
— fred caw-ny photo
WHAT'S THAT creeping over the top of the administration building? Have the Martians finally
landed? Actually its the egregious bell tower back to haunt us again. The tuning fork outside
the Caf actually look good beside it.
Mexicans  in  revolt,
gun  battles  kill  7
MEXICO CITY (CUPI) — Three more people were killed in
gun battles here Monday bringing total casualties in the last
week to seven.
Police attacked the Santo Tomas vocational school with more
than a thousands rounds of ammunition in response to sniper
fire in the battle, most violent so far in the two-month-old
Mexico rebellion.
More than 400 cars of troops were sent into the area after
the skirmish had lasted over five hours. More than 1,000 arrests
were reported.
Nearby hospitals reported 52 wounded, but many injured
students were taken back into the school.
Another group of 5,000 youths marched on a prison demanding release of two labor leaders who have been held since 1959
on charges of subversion. They dispersed when student leaders
told them to return with a plan of action.
Students claim over 30 deaths have taken place since the
revolt started in July. The army, they say, has been burning the
bodies. Both the army and government deny any deaths before
the past week.
The revtolt started with a strike by 88,000 Mexican students
in July protesting government suppression of a student demonstration in favor of Fidel Castro's Cuban regime.
VOLKSWAGEN
SPECIALISTS
Large Stock of Parts on Hand
CERTIFIED MECHANICS
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th 224-0828
Varsity
224-3730   V
4375 W. 10th
7:30
9:30
The Hour Of Tin: Wolf
is the hour between
niyht and dawn.
It is the hour when most
people die, when sleep
is deepest, when
nightmares are most real.
It is the hour when the
sleepless are haunted
by their deepest tear,
when ghosts and demons
are most powerful.
The Hour of The Wolf is
also the hour when most
children are born.
INGMAR BERGMAN'S
HOUR OF THE WOLF
COLUMBIA
— powell h.rgrave photo
CARL HORST of General Sound puts the final  touches on
SUB's $45,000 total mind control sound system.
Special Price $3.29
A&B SOUND
571 GRANVILLE at Dunsmuir • Open Friday 'til 9 p.m. • MU 2-1919, MU 2-4846 Friday, September 27,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
— dick button photo
BOOKSTORE EMPLOYEES march] through SUB supporting the pub-in. The  combined  clubs  day-pub-in  attracted  about   1200
students despite most of the rooms being locked. The official opening of SUB will be sometime in January.
McGill BoG
approves
revisions
MONTREAL (CU1P)— Eight
McGill University students
will be sitting as elected representatives in open senate
meetings   this  year.
Monday, the board of governors unanimously approved
the recommendation, only one
of many dealing with university government changes at
McGill.
In other moves, the board:
Opened its own meetings
More   than   tripled   faculty
representation on senate (from
9  to 32)
Changed its own composition by making provision for
five members elected by and
from the senate—with student
senators eligible—and added
24 members to be reprsenta-
tive of the community served
by the university "such as
agencies of government, research, the profession, business, labor and the arts."
Since the number of governors will remain static at 36,
recomposition will greatly
change the corporation director
image of the board.
j;      Law faculty to
'   restrict enrolment
The law faculty will restrict enrolment to  250 first
H  year students in 1969..
d On the agenda for the UBC senate's Oct. 2 meeting is
^   a proposal from the faculty of law that the number  of
students in first year be limited to 250 and the total in
X   the faculty, including graduate students, to 700.
'; A law faculty spokesman would not discuss the pro-
*s  posal and refused to give any reasons for the proposed
.   restrictions.
Law Dean  George  Curtis  could  not be  reached  for
;-   comment.
Also on the agenda is business arising from the student
council-senate discussion of Sept.   17,  a  report from the
.    committee on the role and organization of senate, and a
report  of the  curriculum  committee.
White highschoolers boycott
over black students pot shots
TRENTON, N.J. (CUPI) — Some 250 white high school
students boycotted classed at Trenton High School Thursday
and will not return until black students stop "taking potshots"
.at them.
Many of the students wore "Wallace for President" buttons
and carried "White Power" signs.
The white demonstrators are protesting alleged incidents
at the high school Wedntsday in which several whites were
roughed up by black students.
The beatings were reported to have occurred just before
some 50 blacks walked out of classes protesting alleged police
brutality against two black students detained in a downtown
store.
MORAL MAN HAS REMTED A &.OODH0UKD
TO WB-P H/N FWlHOMfc, THC NOTORIOUS   RABS'T....
Rules screw Persky again,
bar him from senate race
Persky's screwed again!
That was the general reaction to assistant registrar
Ken Young's announcement
that Stan Persky, arts 4, is ineligible to run for the position
of student senator.
To be eligible, a student must
have completed a full academic
year the year before the election, and Persky only completed
12 units last year.
"It's the whole legalistic
crap all over again," said
Persky. "You can't make a
progressive move without
stumbling over rules."
Persky said he hopes to complete the fifth course in time
to get his nomination form in.
Last year's Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan
agreed with AMS vice-president Carey Linde when he said
he didn't really think the senate is where it's at.
"How can you get anything
done with only four students
out of 81 senators?" he asked.
"I'm not really interested in
the senate election, because
the real action is at the departmental level." r
Peter Braund is rumored to
be running for the position,
jbut he was unavailable for
confirmation Thursday.
So far, only two nominations
have been  accepted.
These are those of Stuart
Rush and W. A. Ferguson, both
in law 2.
Nominations close Oct. 3.
AMS
law s representative
Queens senate closed
despite council plea
KINGSTON (CUP) — Queen's four student senators attended
their first senate meeting today behind closed doors despite a
formal student request that it be opened.
Graduate student Craig Atkins, one of the four, refused to
make any comment about the proceedings except that openness
was not discussed and that the students said nothing about it.
Tuesday night the council executive voted to demand open
senate meetings. They also were unhappy about token representation and asked for parity on two key senate committees,
those of student affairs and academic development.
The council said it would not send anyone to the committees (where students are non-voting members) unless parity was
was granted.
Members of the Queen's Journal were refused access to
both the senate and board of trustees meetings held today.
News editor Mark Elliott asked for copies of minutes and
agendas but was not given either even though Atkins told him
the minutes would be available to the student executive.
Queen's now seats four student senators, two of whom, at
least, are hesistant to endorse open meetings. John Gray opposes
open meetings because he says he would not have the "courage
to say things at an open meeting that (he) would have at a
closed one."
^ Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  September 27,   1968
THS UBYSSEY       ZAP*   general ireverence
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242 editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, local 24; sports, local
23; advertising,  local 26. Telex 04-5843.
SEPTEMBER 27, 1968
Senate-in
Forces are coming into play on campus which may
possibly turn the upcoming election of student senators
into a significant event.
There, are several tactical approaches being offered,
but the common aim of the groups involved is to mobilize student support in a bid to create a democratic
senate structured to honestly serve the wishes of the
students and faculty.
One approach, the substance of which was offered
in a column on this page Thursday, is for students to
elect upwards of eighty students to the senate, giving
them a small majority on that body and the power with
which to implement the changes in academic structure
many would like to see.
Another proposal that has been brought forward is
for students to elect members to a parallel student senate which, with the possible participation of interested
faculty members, could create groups on a departmental
and faculty level to prepare restructuring proposals and
actively organize to bring about their implementation.
Both proposals have many good features and perhaps in some way could be combined, creating a unified and broad front of students with which to move
against the present senate.
To this end we propose that a meeting be held Monday at noon in the SUB general lounge where various
student groups can get together to formulate some organized approach to the elections.
The first approach seems the best method to force
the senate to declare their position on whether students
will ever be recognized as having the legitimate democratic right of decision-making over the areas in which
they operate daily in the classroom — course content,
grading, size of classes, appointment of professors, decisions on tenure, etc. v
If senate says yes, then there will be a reasonably
fair number of student representatives on the senate
ready and willing to assume those responsibilities.
If senate says no, then students will learn (again)
that senate has no intention of allowing democracy in
the university. If they do, then why not now?
In either event the students must be prepared to
come up with proposals which will begin to solve the
curren crisis in the classrooms, and to do this they must
have the contact with the base level by which students
can articulate and formulate the restructuring they
wish to see.
This phase calls for a formal incorporation of the
work currently being carried out by the ad hoc groups
currently organizing on the departmental level, and this
leads into some features of the second proposal.
If in the unlikely event the present senate allows
the 80-odd senators to join that body, then students are
in a position to assume an equal role with equal voice
and power to implement their proposals.
The senate in itself is in theory a necessary and
functional co-ordinating body — the issue involved is
the total lack of proportional representation on it, and
of course the fact that the board of governors is another
bodv which must be simultaneously democratized to
enable the senate proposals to be carried out.
When/if the student bid is denied, a parallel student senate with its departmental groupings is necessary
to formulate proposals for change to discredit the present senate's inaction and continue the educational process among the student mass.
Whether or not this whole concept succeeds, it is
a highly-educational device to reach the student body
while at the same time preoaring the students actively
involved to be able to run the university properly, which
sometime in the future they inevitably will.
How the whole election process is to be organized
remains another problem; The AMS has indicated clear-
lv that, it intends only to play the game of electing the
four student senators under the rules laid down by
the senate.
The best proposal seems to be to completely bypass
the AMS in this affair and create a new ballot for the
elec+ion of the 80-odd student senators, on which any
student, regardless of academic standing, should be
able to run.
These, then, are some proposals which hopefully
the meeting on Monday can use as a base for the upcoming campaign.
Latest entry in the law dean
race is Dr. Charles Bourne,
author of the infamous Bourne
Report on student non-representation in university government.
• •      •
The Black Panther speaker
yesterday had a hard time getting across the border from his
Seattle base. Seems the cop
saw his Panther membership
card and said, "You' ain't going
nowhere." "I then called him
a racist," explained the Panther to the UBC audience. Guffaws.
I'll bet he called him a racist. The audience smiled at the
first use of the phrase "racist
dog pig" for policeman, but
were squirming by the 400th.
• *      •
The CBC producer making
"A Little Learning" on this
campus and other places in
Vancouver is sincerely trying
to turn out an unbiased, repre-
SUBTERFUGE
sentative account of the present
university situation. But he
could hardly keep from laughing when he watched Malcolm
McGregor perform for the
camera the other day. He'd
been hoping to find some antiquated, ridiculous or imbecilic
interpretations, and he got just
what he wanted.
• •      *
The story goes that two science profs, not known for their
stuffy attitudes, were booted
out of restaurant in Gibsons
the other day for being hippies.
In retaliation, the two plan to
send flowers to the swank joint,
signing their names and all six
of their degrees.
• •      •
An arts prof used the All-
Right Word of the Month in
his class the other day, asking
students in rather graphic
terms if they agreed at that moment with Jill Cameron's fuck-
ing-in-the-classrooms   call   to
arms.
Nobody walked out, which'
means times have changed since
trailblazer Werner Cohn used
to shock his Sociology 200-
classes with his annual discussion of obscenity.
• *      •
Progress marches on at UBC.
Genetics workers have dis- *
covered a new mutation of the
fruit fly. They call it Droso-
phila melanogaster priapus. or
"Hung" for short. Guess how
its different.
• • •
Anthropology prof Bill Willmott is a fire hazard. One of
his classes meets in a hut called G-14, which has only two
doors, both at the same end
of the hall.
So popular is Willmott's
course, that no-one cuts and
there are never enough seats.-
What with students sitting in
the aisles, the room is a solid
mass of flesh.
By  Jill  Cameron
Put students into SUB
SUB is no more a student building than any
other building on  campus.
True, it is being paid for with student
money, but the building has been designed by
and for a handful of Brock bureaucrats. As a
result, less than half the building can be used
by an independent student (i.e. one who is not
a "joiner" — about 90 per cent of all students).
The atmosphere is like that of a downtown office building, not a student hang-out.
This year's council, like every other, appointed an eleven-man committee to "manage"
the building. Their job was to prepare a SUB
policy, which, in fact, is a fat book of rules.
These rules dictate where you can sit, where
you can eat, who can use various rooms, what
you can do and where. These rules will promote the bureaucratic atmosphere, and do not
take into account the needs of most students.
They are designed for the comfort of the student elite.
For example, there are sixteen meeting
rooms in the building. These are used for meetings only at lunch hour, with a few exceptions.
These meeting rooms represent a large amount
of space that we might like to use for informal
group discussions, eating lunches or studying.
But the committee has made a rule that these
rooms will be locked up when they have not
been booked. And that means that if you, a
student who has helped to pay for the building,
ever want to see the inside of a meeting room,
you'll have to join some organization recognized by the AMS. And did you know that you
can't eat or drink.in the main lounge? After
all you might spill on the carpet. Naughty children must be disciplined. There are rules concerning how you spend your time in the segregated quiet rooms. In chairman Peter Braund's
words, there will be no "hanky-panky".
Don't you think that you're old enough to
decide those things yourself? And what about
an AMS that is struggling with the administration for student participation in university affairs, and won't let those same studentss participate in the control of their own building.
Selft-determination  should  start at home.
Because I do not attach any validity to rules
which have  been  made  without  your   know
ledge, let alone your support, I have started a
petition to ask for a referendum on one of
the rules that council has passed. I urge all
students who are interested in having a say in
controlling their own affairs to sign this petition. To sign it will signify only that you want
a referendum to be held, not that you will vote*
yes.
The rule in question is "The hours for the
building shall be 7:45 a.m. to 1 a.m." Since any
building hours are rather arbitrarily set, we .
can question why these were picked. But a
better question might be, why were any hours
set? Why can't the building be open at all
times, at least until we see when students want"
to use it?
There should be one place on campus where
students can go at any hour. A place where we
can talk, relax, eat, study, or anything else we
want to do. Students are not restricted to nine-
to-five  days;  many  have  mornings  or  whole
days off, so they don't have to be in bed at one.
And since the advent of electricity, many hu
mans   have   found   night-life   appealing.   The
argument that there are no students on campus after one o'clock is both untrue and misleading. Most students are not on campus after
one because there is no place that is open. And-
we'll never know how many people would us£
SUB late at night unless we open it and find^
out.
If you're sure that you wouldn't use  the
building yourself, is that any reason why others
shouldn't be allowed to? Money is a very small
problem as the university pays for all main-'*"'
tenance and security. If you're worried about
people  sleeping  there,  a   rule   against it  can
easily be made. Problems that arise should be^
dealt with when they arise, and in the meantime, all our efforts should be directed towards
changing SUB from a bureaucratic palace into
a campus centre where everyone feels at home.
I think that extending the hours to a full dajr'"
will help to do that. And if the problems become  too   great,   we  can  always   change  the
hours.
Whether  you  agree with  the  twenty-four-
hour policy or not, I hope you will support the
petition. Every student has the right to express
his opinion by voting.
EDITOR: Al Birnie
City Desk   Paul  Knox, Mike Finlay
News   John Twigg
Managing    Mike Jessen
Photo .... Fred Cawsey, Powell Hargrave
Wire   Peter Ladner
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
Split asunder, the editorial board
nearly retched in anticipation of the
dreary months ahead. Irving Fetish toss-
187 great balls of fire into the cavernous maw of Godfrey Glower, but
Alexandra Volkoff just curled up into
a little ball of fire and began to make
the first of many marks on James Con-
chie. Bonnie Trott and Leo Tolstoy co-
habitated   a   haunted   editorial   office,
and Mary Warner drifted in and out.
Elaine  Tarzwell  threw   an  ice   cream
roll   at   city   desk   who   laughed.   JohiS*
Gibbs and Dale Wik were around; Bret
Smiley   and   Dorrance   Woodward   prepared themselves.
Rik Nyland and Frank Scherubl gave
a sporting gesture, and Dick Button
clicked  shutters. -;    "*^f "'-■»;'"-*-, "* w' r*-r  -. ^"^^
* M**, ^**- "***     -i      * * M ">:^fe>,*t-v
! -.** i  >   **%    v r •jKw-y-aft- ^--r
-^Mife'##*
*, ,.i*-t*;'^lli»r.*'«*-i*««!t,*.a"Mi;-iiSW By BERNARD ST. JACQUES
INTRODUCTION
I arrived in Paris, May 26. Strikes, demonstrations and student meetings were at their peak.
Universities had closed. I decided to stay in Paris.
As a former student of the University of Paris,
I was invited to take part in the various meetings
of students and professors for the reform of the
university; those meetings were held twenty-four
hours a day.
I was in Paris until the end of June. I lived
during that time at walking distance from the
Quartier Latin. I was once caught In the Sorbonne
during a night barricade. The noise and smell
of tear gas bombs were something familiar.
I had several talks with students and faculty
members. Here are some of my Impressions of
what has been called "Les evenements de mai"
in relation to student unrest in Canada, and more
particularly in B.C.
First, it must be made clear that the conditions of Canadian universities and French universities are not all the same. A French student
or faculty member will find that the situation in
B.C. compared with that in France is something
marvellous, for instance, the student to professor
ratio, the budgets of the various universities per
student, the physical facilities (buildings and so
on), the high ratio of students who receive B.A.'s
(in France, there are years of 50% or 60% failure), the possibility for students of meeting and
talking to faculty members (in France, many professors do not have any office space or stand aloof
from the students. Many never see their students
outside the classrooms) etc. . . .
Nevertheless, I believe that several of the
basic reasons for the French student unrest can
be found in Canadian student unrests. The important thing to remember is that they are not
always parallel or equal in the scale of gravity,
or to use students' jargon in the scale of "sickness". I would like to point out also that several
social and political features are markedly different. I do not agree, therefore, with the editorial of
Confrontations   Vol   2,   No.   1   (New   Democratic
pE Zwo
Spring -
time in
Paris
Youth/For an independent Socialist Canada),
August/Sept., 1961, "The Road from Paris is
Straight".
From these impressions, I would like to sketch
a few ideas that took shape in my mind during
that month in Paris and after I came back to
UBC. These ideas are presented here as my own
and are not intended to represent anyone else's
views.
1)    VIOLENCE
For one who was in Paris at that time, the
first fact on which one had to take a stand was
violence. There was ugly, useless and destructive
violence in Paris. Many innocent people were
injured and many people from the hard-working
class suffered severe losses of property in the form
of small shops burned or damaged, cars completely destroyed, etc. . . .
It is rather easy to see how this eruption of
violence started. In fact, it was planned and it was
part of the student leaders' strategy. I am not the
first one to point it out. The same process occurred in several American universities. It is a well-
known fact that Cohn-Bendit had less than one
hundred real followers at Nanterre (section of
the University of Paris, on the suburbs of Paris.).
Cohn-Bendit's strategy was to force the University Administration into a situation in which it
■would be likely to take drastic measures such as
calling the police to the Sorbonne campus. It
worked very -well. In a few days Cohn-Bendit had
thousands of students around him. Students of any
country — the French included — hate the sight
of riot police on their campus. And they battled
with them. In fact, this lasted until the destructive night of the rue "Gay-Lussac". From that
day on, most students had abandoned the barricades because they realized that this violence and
destruction was no longer relevant to their justified complaints about the university.
Let us say first that it is rather contradictory
that student leaders who usually clamor against
"American Imperialism in Vietnam" and now
"Russian Imperialism in Czechoslovakia", or
against police brutality, and declare themselves
pacifists would willingly consider violence in all
its forms to obtain what they want. The editorial
of The Ubyssey, September 17, 1968, "Burn Baby
Burn" is either sheer romanticism or an appeal
to violence. And violence should not be accepted
or condoned under any circumstances or for any
reason in the student movement because it is unjustified and it is, moreover, harmful to the students themselves. This is one of my deepest convictions after my experience in Paris.
One of the basic objectives of university reform in France is a greater freedom of expression
for all members of the university, students and
faculty. "The respect, therefore (Maurice Duver-
ger, Le Monde — Selection Hebdomadaire, 12 -18
Sept.), by each student and by each professor of
the freedom of thought and action of the others
will necessarily be the fundamental rule of the
new university. Any appeal to violence will either
destroy the university or lead towards a more
authoritarian type of university."
A student from the Sorbonne told me that in
his opinion the barricades were a mistake. Besides being the symbolic refusal of the students
to dialogue — which they are asking for — the
barricades turned public opinion against them,
namely, the many who strongly favored a drastic
reform of the university. It is a well known fact
that any more violence in the French universities
will delay for many years a reform which is now
on the point of taking place.
The new French Minister of Education, Edgar
Faure, has said very well (July '68) that "the
expression 'student power' which is meaningless
if it implies a kind of student dictatorship for
faculty members or society at large but is in fact
very meaningful if it expresses the return of a
power which must belong to every human being:
that of defining one's own destiny. The student
does not want to be a simple number in a lecture
hall."
Violence is indicative of authoritarian regimes,
domination and suppression of freedom. One cannot blame these Canadian faculty members who
otherwise are very open to dialogue with students
and to drastic university reform, if they are reticent when they are confronted with threats of
violence from student leaders. Indeed, Canadian
professors who have gained "academic freedom"
after many years of struggle are not ready to
abandon it to the hands of a far more authoritarian power — "student power".
Students want a university built on demoeatic
principles. Violence has no place in it. It must
be obtained through democratic principles. If
violence is used, it is either the end of the university or the return to the authoritarian type of
university. Violence, moreover, is easily disguised
under the forms of sit-ins, occupations of buildings and similar actions. It is nevertheless genuine
violence. It is the use of physical force to impede
the freedom of others. Physical force calls for
physical force and a vicious circle of coercion,
repression  and  police  intervention.
I must not be accused of "fear" in witnessing
violence in Paris. In 1960 I was teaching in Tokyo
and I witnessed the rioting of the Japanese students trying to stop the renewal of the American-
Japanese peace treaty. Cars and buildings were
burned, several people were injured, a girl was
crushed to death in the rioting, and the treaty
was renewed. Indeed very little positive progress
is achieved by violence. There are many instances
of this in our century.
2)    POLITICS  IN  THE  UNIVERSITY
A French journalist wrote: (Le Monde, Selection Hebdomadaire, 14 Aug. - 21 Aug., p. 6.) "It is
unbelievable that a French university graduate in
1968 are completely ignorant (or almost) of not
only economics but also of the main political systems, ideologies, political parties, syndicates,
means of communication to the masses, etc. . . .
It is even less believable that unless he joins the
law faculty, he remains ignorant even after his
B.A. or Master's or Doctorate degree. Mr. Faure,
the new Minister of Education, has suggested that
political training in the university be given in all
factulties as it is already given in the Faculty of
Law."
To my mind the situation is not much better
in Canada. Courses on economics and political
sociology should be multiplied and made accessible to all students of all faculties. In these
courses, students should have the opportunity to
confront each other's views, to be able to study
the various political systems, and to form their
own political opinions. Professional lecturing and
guidance, opportunity for reading and reflection
in this field will never be sufficient. Students must
develop their political awareness and judgment.
This, however, is a far cry from making a university a place where the main political occupation of students is to protest — although they are
right — for instance against "U.S. imperialism in
Vietnam",   or   "Russian   imperialism  in   Czecho-
On the cover this week is a revolutionary
method of kissing, ifs French, but it may
be catching on in other countries . . .
Page Vendredi, which is this wek's euphemism for the egregious ad-sheet, wishes to
express its gratitude to Bernard St. Jacquies
a student and teach of many people and
many languages, for his detailed account of
Paris while it burned.
Yes, yes, we admit it, we did it, and here
it is:
arnold saba, kurt hilger  -    -    -    -    -    art
peter lincoln, riley burke -    -    -    features
Stephen scobie, andrew horvat - men friday
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, September 27,  1968 Continued from pf 2wo
Slovakia". Anybody can do that and the complex
set-up of a university is not needed for that. We
expect more from people who have time to think
and to study than to shout in a negative way
about the problems in question.
Aaron, in his book Reflexions sur la revolution
de mai, (Fayard, 1968) writes: "Between the 15-
year-old boy who makes a dissertation about love
in Racine and the university student who interprets 'Das Capital' without having read Ricardo
and without knowing modern economics, there Is
not much difference, with the exception of rhetorical talent."
The "sick" society expects more from students
and faculty members than the power to protest.
It expects study, reflection, knowledge about the
things they protest. The society expects more than
negative protests from students and faculty members, it expects guidance and solutions, and these
are not achieved in shouting, rioting, demonstrations, but in calm study, discussion and reflection.
3)    "A FREE UNIVERSITY IN A FREE SOCIETY"
This has been the slogan of many student
leaders. It is a noble one. However, one who has
the habit of "realistic ideals" — maybe wrongly
— will be tempted to say that although one must
look for more freedom, it is unrealistic to search
for a university or a society without any constraint or limitation of freedom. Any member of
a social group has to impose — or has to have
imposed — on himself some limitation in the
exercise of his freedom. This is denied by many
student leaders through the philosophy of Marcuse, as for instance, in Eros and Civilization. This
philosophy is based on Freud's conception of the
human personality. At the bottom of the human
being there is the id or libido, that is, the instinctive impulses which know neither rule nor law.
At the top there is the ego, that is the consciousness that the individual has of, himself. Onto the
ego, is grafted the super-ego, that is the social constraints which, right from the beginning of his
existence, are imposed on the individual and become part of himself.
The ego is then torn apart between the id or
libido and the super-ego, that is between the
unruly instinct and the repression exerted on it
by the super-ego in the name of the society,
morality and reason.
On all this, Marcuse agrees with Freud but
not on ihe definitive character of this situation.
For Freud, a civilisation is possible only if it imposes constraints on the unruly instincts. There
will always be, therefore, difficult stuggles between the two, that is between the unruly instincts
and reason and/or the rules of the social group.
For Marcuse, on the other hand, these struggles
exist today but should disappear in a more advanced society. The actual "repressive civilization"
must be replaced, in the future, by a new civilization where instincts will not be repressed by
outside rules, but would spontaneously develop
themselves in order and harmony in this renovated
society. In this civilization of the future, there will
be no more conflict between the quest for pleasure and the social order, between instinct and
reason, between the individual and the society.
It seems that student leaders who invoke
Marcuse have stopped reading him at this convenient place, or might never have read him at
all. Indeed, Marcuse recognizes that several justifiable constraints must remain in his new renovated society. After condemning the "repressive
civilization," at the end he distinguishes between
"repression" and "over-repression". It is only the
latter, that Is, tyranny and unjustifiable repression,
but not all rules and constraints, that must be
abolished. "Civilization," he writes, "depends to a
large extent on a rational authority, based on
knowledge and necessity, and aiming at the
conversation and preservation of life." Marcuse,
at the end of his book, leaving the sphere of
philosophical generalities, gives a few concrete
examples of those justifiable repressions, for
instance, the one exerted on the child who -would
like to cross the street at any time and cannot,
the one exerted by the traffic policeman on the
driver. He considers as legitimate the authority
of the pilot of a plane who may have to take
decisions contrary to those of the passengers, or
again the authority of the engineer, over the
work of his laborers.
To these examples of Marcuse's many others
could be added. And this would lead us to admit
that many rules and some form of authority are
necessary in family life, in economic and political
life, as well as in international relations. The
justification for these rules and authority is naturally the good itself of those concerned.
■"^^^^™" p£ 3hree ■^■■■^^
In admitting that some constraints are justified
in his "renovated society", Marcuse agrees with
reality, but at the time destroys his theory. In
this new society Marcuse wanted to suppress
conflicts between a repressive morality and human
instincts. However, it is evident that it is not only
the unjustified constraints that come in conflict
with instincts, but the most justified constraints.
Every day, newspapers are full of these conflicts:
thefts, holdups, rapes, car accidents, etc . . .
Rene Daude wrote (Le Monde, August  15-21)
about the events of May: "When the dream of a
society where instincts would no more meet any
obstacles has pervaded a youth ready to explode,
it  makes the  actual  society  look  essentially
oppressive and arouce against it a violent spirit
of revolt. This dream has certainly played a role
in the recent events in France". I think also that
it does play a role among Canadian  students.  I
hope they will be able to make their "autocritique"
as we say in Ftench and maybe have more realist; -  ideals   about   the  Canadian   university   and
ian society. But at the same time, I wish that
n justified constraints" be removed and most
llarly from  our universities.
and anxieties, creating a climate of confidence far
more proper to learning and personal research. It
would moreover favor dialogue between faculty
members and students, not only about matters
related to courses, but also about educational
issues. Students are often inhibited and afraid to
express their views or disagree with the teachers
because of the exam.
There is no doubt that this exam system is
not conducive to personal thinking and learning.
It fosters the memorization and automatic repetition of "ready-made" ideas, without any personal
discussion. After a few years — maybe a few
months — nothing is left of these tremendous
efforts of memory, but some vague notions.
M. Faure, the French Minister of Education,
has remarked very well that a change in our
system of evaluating the knowledge and aptitudes
of our students supposes a pedagogical transformation and even a change in the conception itself of
teaching. (This partly explains the opposition of
some faculty members and even of some students.
The old system is far more "comfortable".)
Indeed, in a system where the main preoccupation of the student is not to write down and to
4)    EXAMINATIONS
F. Gaussen, a French journalist, has made a
very severe criticism of the examinations system
in French Higher Education: "In the actual state
of degradation of the French Higher Education,
the 'exam' is the keystone of a staggering system:
For the professor, it is the symbol of his power;
for the student, it is the concrete outcome of an
uneasy year through which he went gropingly.
Examinations monopolize an essential part of the
activity of the faculty. They take several weeks
of a school year which is already short. Teaching
is made in relation to examinations. 'Exams' are
the only guide-marks—and indeed experienced as
terrible ones—in the aponymtms activity of the
French student. One understands therefore that
the temptation to change this system by mocking
it is very strong ... By bringing books and notes
at the examination, by writing exams in groups,
the students have showed very well the absurdity
of a system which rests on memory and the
mechanic reproduction of models and ideas
'provided' by textbooks or professors' lectures."
It is my sincere belief that this criticism is
justified for many of our Canadian universities.
And I also think that this type of examination is
a real obstacle to learning and to education, and
should therefore be eliminated. I fully agree with
students who give the "exam issue" top priority.
Indeed, the elimination of the memory based
examinations would remove unnecessary tensions
memorize what the teacher says or what is in the
textbook, and where he main activity of the
teacher is not to control this "output" of the
student, real education can start. On the one hand,
there is the possibility and the time for the student
to do personal work and thinking, and on the
other, for the professor to guide him. (This role
is evidently impossible for the professor who has
hundreds of students in a classroom, but in this
case I believe education is also impossible.) It will
often lead to student-professor research projects.
It will be a creative, a personal activity; the opportunity for the student to form his judgement, to
confront it, to learn to think, in a word, it will be
education.
The classical objection: how will you grade
the student? First, I do not think that the memory
type examination is indicative of the value of a
student. It shows only one thing: his memory. In
the modern world, computers do this job better
and we should expect something else from the
students. Secondly, there are all kinds of ways
of grading the.students: essays, termpapers, class-
participation, lectures, seminars etc . . . Any work
which encourages the student to do personal work,
personal research, personal thinking, should be
used. I believe that this is true even in the
sciences. It would be wrong, to my mind, to think
that a student in medicine will be a competent
doctor because he has  100%   on a memory-type
Continued on pf 9ine
Friday, September 27,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY pfi 4our
By K. TOUGAS
The film medium creates a world; Federico
Fellini's films describe a personal universe.
While the combination of gaiety and tragedy
fuse in near-fantasy, Fellini's apparent objective is a more authentic description of life* — a
deliberate refusal of traditional inauthentic
patterns to rediscover the rhythm, emotion and
method in his (our) character. Within a free
association of action and image he emphasizes
an inner reality; the atmosphere of "normal"
realism filtered and selected, forms the basis
of a liberating world of creative imagination.
His universe concerns people and places in
relationship — the result is often critical, but
indulgent. Unashamed sentimentality ... a
world of exploitation without love where one
small individual struggles to offer (or find)
himself. Yet another facet reveals a mordant
and ironic view, often anti-clerical, and without
inhibition.
The retrospective soon beginning at the Vancouver Art Gallery takes the "Fellinian universe" from its 1951 cradle: Variety Lights. In
his first feature Fellini feels out a process soon
to be established in his style.
More pointed in his later work, Fellini
first describes here a very plain situation,
progessing by means of a complexity of action
which engulfs the main characters and slowly
releasing them, alone, at the apogee of their
distress . . . forced, unsettled, into a bleak
despairing day. The touring theatrical troupe
of the film find themselves evicted into the
joyless morning, ending their momentary Eden.
The White Sheikh recounts of a young bourgeois bride caught in the romantic adventure
of a photo-romance. Her dreams become a reality after deserting her husband and discovering
the white sheik by the sea. Although slightly
drawn-out, the film subsists on a flowing atmosphere where Fellini satirizes, but at the same
time presents haunting fragments within our
own consciousness.
However even greater validity is found in
the middle-class men/boys of a small town. I
Vile-lloni proposes the drifters, bored, aimless,
with their dreams of grandeur, wealth, and
women, treated by the script with both criticism and warm acceptance — the director, too,
was once one of these drifters.
La Strada however was the major step away
from the Italian neo-realist movement. The
moods, the romanticism pervade the work as
three symbolic characters (soul, mind, and body)
enact "the fantastic history of a sad honeymoon
with a posthumous declaration of love". Here
the visual associations begin, emphasizing despair, loneliness and human eccentricity.
The confidence trickster of II Bidone is
perhaps one of the "vitelloni" who drifted in
the wrong direction. Commencing with somewhat surrealistic imagery and developing on a
dramatic Une not unlike Gogol's Dead Souls, the
film is crowned by its remarkable final sequence representing the hero's paralysis, search,
and death in the gravel of a roadside
Dramatically weaker, Nights of Cabiria
presents episodes in the life of Cabiria, prostitute in Rome. Her airs of experience are insufficient to counter her basic gullibility, which
is in fact her faith in life and happiness: her
humanity.
La Dolce Vita was the film that gave Fellini
international fame and success — its tone is
of ambiguity, heralded by an enormous Christ
dangling from a helicopter over Rome. It is the
story of Marcello, society/scandal columnist
in his personal and private jungle of money,
sex and darkness. This is the nightmare of
modern life — not the documentation of reality
—but the imaginative reality of a living death.
8i/_ in my mind is Fellini's masterwork . . .
His vision here is personal, and the most
intense; a synthesis of his previous themes and
moods. Guido as a director is a creator without
a film. Amongst the plague of non-creative
monsters crawling about him, his is the task
of discovering a film, which in fact, is discovering himself. 8V_ is Guido, part real, part unreal, part present, part past. Vital time moments
— Joyce's epiphanies — set the course of his
hellish search through fantasy, nightmare and
reflection, framed within two brilliant scenes:
opening with a car snared in an immense traffic
jam with the driver, himself, attempting to
batter his way out of his self-imposed steamy
cage, and finally closing with an amazing
launching pad set punctuated by the mad flurry
of frenzied humanity. Guido steps outside of
the living debris (as into the lonely, heavy
morning) still with his unsolved doubts, but
observing the living exhibit of material exploding around him.
Finally, the overrated Juliet of the Spirits.
Here Fellini was less able to penetrate into the
woman's actual being as he did with Guido. The
film is this time a picture of the mental relationship between Juliet's childhood and religious upbringing, her imagination, her unfailing love for a failing husband, spiritualism and
a rur-real entourage. Juliet remains part of the
"fellinian universe", and truly perhaps it is
not the perception that is kicking, but its transmission . . .
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  September 27,   1968 THE AFRICAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION PRESENTS: A SYMPOSIUM
AFRICA
Conflict and Prospect
The purpose of the symposium is to extend to a wide range of people in Canada, students and non-students alike, a
knowledge of the problems faced by the African countries, and an awareness of the responsibilities of other countries,
particularly Canada, towards them in a rapidly changing world community.
PROGRAMME
Wednesday, October 2, 1968
Opening       — 12:30 P.M. — Dr. Kenneth Hare.
Speaker        — Hon. Simon Kapwepwe, Vice-President,
Republic of Zambia.
Topic •— The Southern Panhandle of Africa.
Place — Student Union Building.
EVENING    — 7:30 P.M.
Speakers      — Hon. Simon Kapwepwe
Professor W. E. Abraham
Professor Peter Lloyd
Mr. Abi Jones
Topic — Panel discusses theme of the symposium
—Africa, Conflict and Prospect.
Place — Student Union Building.
Moderator    — Professor Robert Wyllie, Simon Fraser
University.
Thursday, October 3, 1968
12:30 P.M.
Speaker
Topic
Place
Moderator
7:30 P.M.
Speaker
Professor Rene  Dumont,  University  of
Paris.
A comparative look at pre and post independence efforts at economic development in Africa.
Student Union Building.
Professor Gerard Tougas, University of
British Columbia.
Roosevelt
— Professor   St.   Clair   Drake,
University, Chicago, Illinois.
Topic — Black Power in Africa and the Americas.
Place — Student Union Building.
Moderator    — Professor Fred Stockholder, University
of British Columbia.
Discussants — Professor Robert Wyllie, Simon Fraser
University.
Professor Harry Cannon, University of
British Columbia.
Professor Robert Pokrant, University of
British Columbia.
friday, October 4, 1968
12:30 PM.
Speaker
Topic
Place
Moderator
7:30 P.M.
Speaker
Hon. L. A. M. Brewah, Minister of External Affairs, Sierra Leone.
The future role of the Military in African
Political Development.
Student Union Building.
Professor Robert Pokrant, University of
British Columbia.
— Hon. Paul Martin, Leader of the Senate,
Ottawa, and former Canadian External
Affairs Minister.
Topic — Foreign aid to underdeveloped countries
with special reference to Africa.
Speaker        — Professor Peter Gutkind, McGill University.
Topic — Unemployment, Urbanization, and Mod
ernization  in  Africa:   A  Socio-Political
Analysis.
Place — Hebb Theatre
Moderators  — Dr.   Peter   Oberlander,   University   of
British Columbia.
Dr.   Edward   Margetts,   University   of
British Columbia.
Discussants — Dr. Hugh Keenleyside, President of B.C.
Hydro.
Dr. John Conway. University of British
Columbia.
Dr. Harry Cannon, University of British
Columbia.
Dr. Peter Kup, Simon Fraser University.
Dr. Cyril Belshaw.
Friday, September 27,  1968
You Are Invited
Under the kind patronage of Dr. Kenneth Hare,
the African Students Association is organizing a
Symposium — "Africa—Conflict and Prospect" —
from 2nd to 5th October, 1968.
The African Continent presents a kaleidoscopic
scene wrought with many and varied problems: to
mention a few, Apartheid in South Africa. Unlawful Seizure of Independence (in Rhodesia), Portuguese colonial enclaves, civil and guerrilla warfare
(in Nigeria), neo-colonialism, and incessant coup
d'-etats are some of the divisive conflicts that
exist while independent African nations aspire to
rebuild a viable and honourable identity.
In the light of the aforementioned problems,
distinguished guest statesmen and scholars (see
programme) from Africa, Canada, France, United
Kingdom, and the United States of America have
been invited to participate in this most historic
and ambitious highlight of Africa Week. It is our
sincere conviction that the Symposium will not
only provide scholarly analyses of the multifarious
economic, social, political and educational difficulties, but will also suggest lines of action which
may lead to improved master-plans and conditions
on the African Continent.
On behalf of the African Students Association
I invite the Staff, the Students and the community
at large to utilize this unique opportunity to question, criticise and clarify misconceptions and at the
same time further international goodwill and understanding.
David P. M. Hadote,
President, African Student Association
Saturday, October 5, 1968 — Workshop
MORNING SESSION
10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. —
Topic —
11:00 a.m.-11:15 anv —
11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. —
Topic ■—
12:15 p.m.-l :30 p.m. —
AFTERNOON SESSION
1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m. —
Topic —
2:30 p.m.-2:45 p.m. —
2:45 p.m.-3:45 p.m. —
Topic —
4:00 p.m. —
Professor   W.    E.   Abraham,
Head, Department of Philosophy, University of Ghana.
African Political Philosophies.
Coffee Break.
Professor Rene Dumont, University of Paris.
Difficulties of African Socialism.
Lunch.
Professor   St.    Clair    Drake,
Roosevelt University, Chicago.
Pan - Africanism,    Myth    and
Reality.
Coffee Break.
Professor Peter Lloyd, Department of African and Asian
Studies, University of Sussex,
England.
The Politics of Ethnicity: The
Nigerian example.
Summary.
GENERAL  INFORMATION
REGISTRATION
Open to all members of the general public. Admission may have to be limited and it would be advisable
to pre-register by mail.
FEE   $10.00
$ 2,50
$ 1.50
.50
.50
.25
$ 5.00
$ 1.50
Full Programme (excluding banquet)
Student Rate
Evening Lectures
Student Rate
Noonday Lectures
Student   Rate
Saturday Workshop including lunch
Student Rate
MEALS
Noonday and evening meals will be available in the
campus cafeterias at a modest cost.
PARKING
Campus parking restrictions will be in effect and
hence parking will be available in 'Visitors' lots only.
The 'Fraser River Lot' and the 'Frederic Wood Theatre
Lot' are also equally convenient to all of the lecture
halls.
BANQUET
A banquet will be held at the Faculty Club on
campus at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, October 5. Reservations
($5.00) for the banquet should be made on the advance
registration, and accompanied by payment. Only a limited number of tickets are available.
DANCE
October 5th at International House. Bands: "Caribbean Natives" and "Organization". Fee: $1.50 flat rate.
Drinks.
For further information, contact:
The African Students' Association,
Office of the Alma Mater Society,
University of British Columbia.
PHONE 224-3242.
RETURN TO:
African Students' Association
University of British Columbia
Vancouver 8, B.C.
PHONE 224-3242
I enclose a cheque/money order for $-.
"Symposium on Africa".
FULL  REGISTRATION  FEE
$10.00 (includes coffee)
Student Rate
$2.50
as  registration   fee  for
(Please make cheques payable to the Alma  Mater Society, University  of British Columbia.)
NAME	
ADDRESS
I intend to attend banquet
I intend to attend Workshop only
YES    □
YES    □
TELEPHONE: HOME
OFFICE
NO    □
NO    □
THE     UBYSSEY
Advertisement pS 6ix
Ragas and
Muffins
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
DUBBING
An evil practice is again abroad. I refer to that artistic
atrocity, the dubbing of foreign language films into English.
At the present time, there are no fewer than three
dubbed films playing at commercial theatres in Vancouver.
Eric Soya's 17 is even advertised as being "all in English".
Truffaut's The Bride Wore Black is being shown dubbed,
despite a full house for the subtitled version during the
summer Varsity festival.
It is to the Varsity's credit that it always plays only
subtitled versions: we can rejoice that the Czech prizewinner, Closely Watched Trains, which was to have played
at the Studio in a dubbed version, will not be shown at the
Varsity.)
Worst of all, the magnificent Elvira Madigan. a film
in which every shade of colour and every tone of sound is
exquisitely calculated, is being shown in a dubbed version,
in which the voices of the main characters are almost
ludicrously inappropriate.
In any decent film, the sound of the voices is as important as what is being said. Can you imagine how much
a Bergman film, say, would lose if deprived of the cold
northern sounds of the Swedish language? Or what could
be more ludicrous than a Japanese samurai film dubbed in
English?
And so on: the arguments against dubbing are well-
known, and overwhelming, except by one standard: the
commercial. It seems that the mass audience is still willing
to accept the shoddy fakes of dubbed films, because they
are unwilling to go to the minimal effort of learning to read
subtitles.
There is no perfect way of translating a film: I know
that subtitles are often incomplete and imperfect. But at
least they still give you the original voices, the original
intentions of the director and the actors. Subtitling is imperfect, but it is still the only acceptable way we   have.
The only way this can ever change is if we get it
through the thick heads of film distributors and exhibitors
that a sizable portion of the intelligent public rejects dubbed films entirely. That means, simply, protesting, loudly,
to the managers of any theatre in town which plays dubbed
prints.
• * *
PEATING
I wish to expound to your astonished eyes the dubious
etymology of the word "peat".
(1) Meaning. This word, hitherto unknown in the English language as a Verb, may be defined as "to do anything
for the first time".
Hence the form "re-peat", to do anything for the second
or subsequent time.
(2) Source. The word is believed to originate in the
Highlands of Scotland, where "peat" (noun) is a common
fuel. In a quaint old wedding custom, the young bride is
daubed in peat by her attendants before the marriage is
consummated. This was called "peating"; and the verb was
hence formed to signify anything done for the first time.
The actual process was supervised by an old man in
the clan, who was called Peter (or peater); but since this
seemed to allude to Roman Catholicism, the Presbyterian
church put\an end to the practice. (See Proceedings of the
General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, Vol. XXXIII,
1727, pages 846-934.)
(3) Usage. The only recorded use of the term in literature is in a 16th century lyric poem, found in a crypt of a
church in Fenswickley-by-the Bog, Staffordshire. The poem
is believed to be the work of a Scottish exile named Calum
Maclllduit (if you won't). It is the harrowing tale of a
young maiden who was raped behind her hayloft. The opposite stanza (Stanza XXVII) runs as follows:
"He peated me! He peated meV
The doleful maiden cried.
She rolled her legs three times about,
And fell on her backside.
"A-down  a-down  a-down-o!
A-down a-down!" he cried.
"A-down a-down a-downo!"
And "Up yours!" she replied.
• • •
COMING
Coming to the Olympia Theatre, Hastings and Nanaimo,
this Sunday night only, show-time 7 p.m.: Kon Ichikawa's
An Actor's Revenge, one of the greatest samurai films ever
made. The audience will be 90 per cent Japanese, but be
reassured, the film will be subtitled. (Not dubbed!)
On the bus downtown the other day, as we were passing the Studio theatre, the man behind me remarked: "I
wonder what kind of movie that is "The Graduate? Is it
about horse-racing?"
Well, hardly. Coming in this column next week, an
examination of the remarkable phenomenon of The Graduate, the most successful movie of the year, and all the things
it's supposed to stand for, but doesn't.
She.  rolled, her legs fflree Jiznes aboix*
Albee Pinter pair of
polyandrous plays
By KEITH FRASER
For as long as it remains the only recognized kinship group in Western societies,
the family will continue to intrigue playwrights for the kind of relationship which
welds it together, and for the sort of instinct that guards it against intrusion. It is
two families in Britain and America, for
instance, that provide the shenanigans calculated to deal with the "disease" that Intrudes upon each of them in Harold Pinter's
The Homecoming and Edward Albee's A
Delicate Balance, both presently under local
production. What happens within these families located in their respective living rooms
is contorted yet engrossing, absurd but still
credible, despite the inverted orders that
emerge.
Pinter's play is the stranger of the two,
its psychology less explicit, and its symmetry more original. Max is a widower and the
unlistened-to father of Lenny and Joey who
still live with him and his brother Sam in
an old North London house. When his eldest
son Teddy, a doctor of philosophy, returns
with his wife for a visit, this woman proves
such a family requisite, both as mother and
sexual partner for Max and his two sons,
that Teddy is forced to return to America
and his own family without her — leaving
Lenny to set up Ruth as a part-time, bread-
winning whore. In typical Pinter fashion
none of the character motivation is made
clear, only set down in dialogue and pauses
that compound its ambiguity. The ending
sees Ruth replacing Max's dead wife, but
there is an extension of a peculiar nature
here: while the family has become essentially a matriarchy (where Albee's play begins
and ends), Ruth's new marriage commitment, to be anthropolgically correct, is polyandry, a rare bird indeed in Western society.
No stranger to directing Pinter's plays is
John Brockington; a year ago he handled
two of them with convincing style at the
Arts Club, and has staged The Homecoming
on campus where freshmen have the opportunity to supplement their required reading
with a fine, stylized production. His staging
often emphasized a sort of stiff Restoration
balance that lent ritual to characters in
physical conflict, or in simple living. The
beginning of Act Two, for example, where
the script merely required a lighting of
cigars and the serving of coffee, Mr. Brockington,   with  artistic   correctness,  had  the
characters move in harmony as they lit up,
and freeze in silence as they received their
coffee. He dichotomized quite neatly between the nimble-footed, calculating Lenny
and the bumble-mouthed, faltering Joey.
A Delicate Balance at the Arts Club received less notable but still sensitive direction from Marion Poggemiller. Albee's family includes Agnes, the garrulous, domineering wife; Tobias, her acquiescent husband;
and Claire, her alcoholic sister who provides
the comic relief. Into this unit intrude Harry
and Edna, their closest friends, fleeing from
an unknown terror and seeking refuge
which is acorded them until Julia, the four-
time married daughter returns from her
latest husband hysterically demanding her
old bedroom from these trespassers. Tobias
manages to take charge from Agnes and attempts to weld family and friendship into
a workable reality, but he breaks down in
his effort and the intruders exit, leaving
Agnes again the not unwilling family fulcrum. In this society of presqueezed orange
juice and instant coffee, friendship is a
disease, and the family members remain
unknowable both to each other and to themselves.
Theatrically the play was less effective
than the Pinter; the first act was vapid and
didn't move until the terror from which
Harry and Edna were fleeing entered with
them. Yet the kind of tacit musical chairs
with which Miss Poggemiller enriched the
scanty script directions showed she understood the play well. She provided each character with an appropriate chair, couch, or
stool which often became the post for
another character when a temporary shifting of roles occurred. Occasionally this touch
became haphazard, but for the most part it
came off well and revealed this director
whose work I had not previously seen, as a
talent to approach with sharp interest. The
veteran Antony E. Holland rendered the
finest performance of this cast in the role
of  Harry.   While   Peter   Brockington   acted
with  characteristic  depth  his  makeup was
unable to convey a sixty year old man.
Albee's family welcomes intruders until
Oct. 5, while Pinter's has pulled in the mat
— unless a holdover allows it to extend
more tickets for those interested in kinship
laundry.
**,
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, September 27,   1968 pfi 7even
About Milgrig, who loved her parents
Once upon a time there was a little girl named Milgrig,
believe it or not.
Milgrig had kind, wonderful parents who raised her to
believe in vttrtue, honesty, altruism, hard work, and self
sufficiency.
Because they also valued education, they sent little Milgrig to college and sent her a fat monthly allowance and paid
her fees and pressed money into her hands whenever she
came home, which was wenever they sent her enough money
for an airplane ticket.
One day when Little Milgrig had been at college for two
or three years and read "Indignant Taxpayers" 10,000th letter
to the newspaper, she underwent a spiritual conversion.
She realized that she could no longer accept all the
goodies of a college education as long as other people were
working to pay for them.
She wrote to her dear parents saying they should not
send her any more money because she was a big girl now and
wanted to be self-sufficient and not beg from anybody.
During the next week Milgreg used up her bank balance
and applied for 4,157 jobs. But since she was too well educated
to clean fish and not well enough educated to do much else,
she didn't get any of them.
Since she had been foolish enough to take a college-
entrance course in high school instead of secretarial stuff,
she couldn't type; and she couldn't clip poodles, and she was
too skinny to be a go-go girl, and she didn't want to peddle
magazines door to door.
At last she got a job as a waitress at $55 per week. This
meant she had to work till late at night with plenty of overtime and let drunks make remarks at her and pinch her, but
she made enough to live on. And by living in a small, damp
basement and not wasting any money on unnecessary food or
Sunday bus passes, by tremendous effort she saved $400.
She knew this wouldn't even pay her fees, let alone enable her to live during the year.
Fortunately, her grades had been good, and the provincial government told her they would give her some money to
pay some of her fees. With this, plus a part-time job, Milgrig
scraped through another year, though of course she couldn't
afford to travel home and missed her mother very much.
But she learned to type. So when summer role rolled
around again, Milgrig got a good job as a file clerk.
Unfortunately, even a good job as file clerk pays only a
little bit of money. It is jobs like working in a sawmill or a
coal mine or a fish boat that pay well, and only boys can get
good jobs like that.
So when autumn came, Milgrig was still broke. And because of her part time job the winter before, her grades had
gone down and she couldn't get another bursary.
Still she was determined not to borrow money from her
parents. They had lots of money and were willing to give it
to her, but she felt she couldn't maintain her exhilarating,
adult-type responsibility that way.
So she went down to the bank and asked for a loan.
"Certainly we will be glad to give you a loan," said the
friendly local bank manager. "Sign here."
"But this is an ordinary bank loan," she said. "It says I
must pay nine per cent interest, and I must pay it back quite
soon, and other harsh things."
"Listen, kid," said the friendly local bank manager,
"most banks would not lend you this money, since you have
no skills, no job or prospect of getting one for some time,
and legally are too young to qualify. We know you and like
you well enough to help you out, but we don't have to, and
technically we shouldn't."
"But can't I get a special student loan?" asked little
Milgrig.
"O.K.," said the friendly local bank manager. "Here is
the form. Get your parents to sign this, saying they have no
money of their own."
"But my parents have plenty of money," said Milgrig.
"I am taking out the loan because I do not want their handouts. In fact, I do not even want my parents to know about
it. I want to make it on my own."
"Well, it is against the law to give a loan to someone
under 21 without the parent's signature," said the friendly
bank manager.
"But I need the money, and I cannot afford to pay your
interest," said little Milgrig.
"Well, what is so wrong with asking your parents to sign
for you? Or why not borrow the money from them?" asked
the friendly local bank manager.
"Because they would lovingly subvert my freedom,"
answered little Milgrig. "They would refuse to sign a loan
form, for they are too proud to want credit in any form. And
if I took money from them they would refuse to let me repay it.
"You see, they have plenty of money, and they would
know I must work very hard and do without in order to give
them money they don't need and don't want. They have repeatedly told me they want to pay for my education, and
strangely enough, I am the one who resent their charity.
"Supporting myself is the only way I can refute the idiocies
of all the world's Indignant Taxpayers, and if I give in now
and beg, all my struggle has been for nothing."
And that, dear Indignant Taxpayer, is why I am a lazy
hippie commie student radical who believes education should
be free, and a rich bookseller is an abomination in the sight
of God.
-aiae Hiua.16 he&ts th-s- bank- hma66Z
A day out of the life
By PETER LINCOLN
Some mother picks up a pen . . . who cares
about other people's private perverted sex
lives . . . filling our papers with trash . . . our
daughters . . . finishes, goes back to reading
Valley of the Dolls and True Confessions —
the thin vapour line makes it on time to the
Deathfucker (alias t.c.) slapping son on back
mantoman . . . chip off the old block . . .
knocking them up right and left . . . warns
daughter those kikes, nothing they like better than a good Christian cherry ... in black
and chrome sex to country club where friend
comes on didja hear the one about the travelling brassiere salesman and the nigger farmer's hunchbacked daughter . . . damn near
gets a hard on just thinking about it, does
the next day in city council approving new
apartment zoning by-law — public service is
so exciting — like G.P. (Government Police)
on beat body frisking goodlooking suspects,
the uncooperative ones usually fall down
stairs from interrogation several times on
accident — jumpdownspinaround to judges
handing out six reluctant months or making
examples (no cruel or unusual punishments)—
you long haired fuckin bastards are gonna be
in for a long time and slammed in cells with
sodomists but not wife-beaters — you can'
kick her ass but you better not try to screw
it — George Wallace can say shoot the anarchists but anarchists can't say shoot George
Wallace — the right for the right to speak —
no sex education but military education —
Green Berets Si, Chelsea Girls, No — student
presidents issue 108st serious warning — you
are there — the twenty worst century —
boards of directors kept truth drug under
wraps — freedom of assembly lines — nuclear physics and A-bomb making offered to
Indian reservations lost in cheap wine and
rickety kids protected from obscenity by the
deathfucker or one of his several aliases (the
common man, the man in the street, the little
man, the good citizen, the true-blue Canadian,
Americans everywhere, the Party, the State,
law and order, a higher being than all of us,
it's getting better all the time, the voice of
reason) meanwhile down here on the ground
his backers call themselves htwyers and talk
talk it's wrong to break laws and moral commitment is the thing showing stag movies and
girls jumping out of cakes topless girls get
arrested but ragged girls don't get any attention until they become topless girls jumping
out of lawyers cakes — receive fines from
judges who weren't invited — Christ said
show the other cheek, his followers go one
better and show the other face chanting they
shall undergo (like Lady, you can help yourself but don't take too much) to the thin
bread line chanting we shall overcome and
nobody knows you when you're brown and
out — rush past them on Buy Days — while
millions sit at home hoping that the towel
will fall off the girl taking a shower in their
living rooms — mama come here quick and
bring that licking stick — run for your gun,
annie (Oakland stokely) — the new anti-hero
and heroin — rebels without applause — upsets the Deathfucker so, now hot on the tail
of James Dean — somewhere in nowhere —
reading artistic integrity in retouched female
breasts in centre foldouts with a different
way to cover the cunt each month because
it's the law — she just happens to have a box
of crackerjacks or a guitar in her lap — and
huge black headlines in newsstand tabloids,
COMMUNISM CAUSES CANCER, I CAN'T
GET ENOUGH, NEGRO WOMEN MAKE
BETTER BED PARTNERS — you see, THE
POINT THEY'RE TRYING TO MAKE IS
that somebody's shit somewhere doesn't
smell (queen, pope, president, highway ministers) — people who use four letter words
are taking the Lord, thy God's name in vain
and that these are not graven images, or
likeness of any thing in heaven above —
they're the real thing, baby.
Friday, September 27,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY P§§j|K"'m
.*.*v A^^SECWKf'
/JbiM.^^'*
New Fashions in Clothing and
Hairstyles at Nearbys Salons
Looking for the latest in men's
or women's fashions?
If so, there is no need now
to go far from campus to find
a tasteful and up-to-date selection of clothing.
The He and She shop in the
Village, with its $40,000 stock,
can furnish practically anything
in the clothes line.
For the men there is everything from cuff links, Ernst
ties, and double-breasted jackets
to the moddish Nehru look.
For the women the accent
now is on the leather look in
coats, dresses and other miscellaneous, items.
And there is also a varied
selection of children's and
babies' clothes on display.
Co-managers of the He and
She are a young couple, Len
Bergeron, 20, and Sue Burchill,
19, who are earger to please
their customers.
Their shop is situated on the
ground level of the new University Square shopping arcade
built this summer on Western
Parkway, just off University
Boulevard.
Since opening July 10, the
shop — the pair's first business
venture — has attracted people
of all ages, say the proprietors.
"We're aiming for the university students, but we find we're
getting just about everybody in
the area," they say.
The He and She opens at 9
a.m. Monday through Saturday
and closes at 6 each night except Friday when it is open until
9 p.m.
The shopping arcade also provides students with a handy spot
for hairdos and haircuts.
Leo's Coiffures, on the arcade
upper level, caters to the female
students, while the Unique, on
the ground level, is for the men.
Leo's, owned by Mr. Leo, who
also operates a shop at 2372
West Fourth, opened earlier this
summer.
The hairdressers, Mr. Samir
and Miss Lillie, specialize in
hairshaping, as well as offering
body waves, styling, and hair
coloring.
In addition, they also sell and
service wigs and hairpieces.
The salon, which can handle
16 women at a time, is open
Monday through  Saturday.
For the men, there is the
Unique, operated by Joseph
Donzelli.
He offers a straight haircut
for $2.50 — the union rate, but
also styles hair for $7, gives a
razor cut for $3.50, and tints
hair for $7 and up.
Donzelli, a barber for 20
years, came to Canada 10 years
ago from his native Sicily.
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Advertisement
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, September 27,  1968 p£ 9ine
Paris
(Continued from pf 3)
examination. He will forget very soon anyhow the
details of the huge amount
of material he has memor-
ized. The difference — the
only real difference — will
be made between the student who knows how and
where to find the information he needs and has the
ability to interpret and
value it, and the other who
was content in memorizing
it.
Moreover, it is my belief that grading has nothing to do with education.
It is merely a social requirement. Every student
therefore should have the
freedom to decide if he
wants to be evaluated or
not, if he wants a pass-fail
system or not. This is his
right. The traditional argument that grading 'fosters
a healthy spirit of competition among the students'
is, to my mind, utterly ridiculous. Education and
learning are not competitive. A university is not a
racing track.
5) FLEXIBILITY IN THE
SELECTION OF
COURSES
Our present system of
"compulsory courses",
"prerequisite courses",
"required courses" etc. . . .
is awfully complicated.
About this question, I fully endorse the
suggestion of Frank D.
Frketich, president of the
Alma Mater Society of the
University of Victoria
(University of Victoria,
Student Brief): "Professors
and advisors must be given
unlimited authority in . . .
designing a course outline
for individual students. To
what extent professors
want to use this authority
should be up to their discretion, however, the power should be available.
Within this power, it is essential that a student has
the right to ake any course
in any area he desires."
6) PARTICIPATION
It is natural and normal
that students should be on
the various committees
where decisions concerning them are taken. After
all, this is their education.
This aspect of the problem
is clear and needs no discussion. Many Canadian
universities have already
welcomed their students to
take part with faculty
members in decision making about educational matters. However, the concrete forms of this participation might not be readily agreed on. It is evident
that for reasons of time
and competence, the participation of students might
differ according to the nature of the committees and
the problems they deal
with. Students must recognize the fact that they
come and go. To be a university student is not a
life occupation (fortunately!). To be a university professor is one. There is
nothing anti-democratic or
humiliating for the student
(Continued on pf 11)
There is no war
By ARNOLD SABA
You may not actually agree with the above
headline. Tim Buckley, singer and songwriter,
however, does. He sings:
"Is the war across the sea?
Is the war behind the sky?
Have you each and all gone blind:
Is the war inside your mind?"
Men's minds are governed by fears and
insecurity. They fear life; they do not trust
God to keep the world turning under them.
This basic insecurity causes them to try to
control their environment. They imagine
enemies, an attempt to specify the threat
which they feel.
Their fears, then, are manifested into real
conflicts. The war is in their minds, but physical actions are the outlet for the pressure of
mistrust of destiny. This is the basis of world
unrest and ideological struggles.
Men are ground down and defeated by
themselves if they try to fight when there
is no enemy. For they are balancing the entire
universe above them, like the supreme hot
potato, and it is too big to stay up in the air
for long.
Allen Ginsberg, in a somewhat futile
attempt to end the war in Vietnam, wrote to
the then U.S. Secretary of Defense, Robert
McNamara. He started his letter by the reassurance: "First of all, be calm. There is no
threat to your ultimate safety or anybody
else's."
It is unlikely that McNamara understood
what Ginsberg was talking about, much less
finished reading the letter. For most people,
this type of thinking is "reality".
Alan Watts, eminent Zen scholar, has
stated that if an idiot is defined as someone
with no functional grasp of reality, then all
of today's leaders and statesmen "are so far
out of touch with the most elementary realities
as to be, quite literally, blithering idiots."
This is not to say that enemies and threats
do not exist. Who could argue ? Undoubtedly
there is subversion, infiltration, unbelievable
webs of deceit at every turn, genuine threats
and real ideological differences.
But why ? Only because they feed on each
other. One threat exists because it has a
counter-threat. A struggle takes place because
both parties struggle.
There is no struggle in the universe. Man
is part of an infinitely large structure, which
exists perfectly despite anybody's attempts
to control it in any direction. Any attempts
by  man to  control the  direction of  destiny
can only end by running man himself around
in circles.
However, in most people's eyes, the universe is not harmonious at all. Man imagines
that always something must be done. Thus
we have the "Russian situation" or the
"Czechoslovakian situation". Life is fraught
with Situations.
It is as if these things appear by spontaneous generation, and then, dammit, man must
solve them ! I mean, after all ,you can't have
a Situation lying around without. someone
solving it!
It is as if all of creation is a massive Situation that must be solved. Life is The Situation, and every day it develops a little farther, with further ramifications, complications,
side issues, events, and other furbiloes. And
every day about a hundred pages of newspaper
must be printed in order to chronicle all these
goings on, so that everybody can be up on
the latest in The Situation.
Fathers tell their sons that they must
march out to Face Life. No wonder they're
a bit scared — they are confronted with the
picture of an entire universe hostile to its
inhabitants !
Even if the war were over, there would
be another problem, and then another. As
long as fear exists, the problems will be manifested. It is like a dog chasing its tail.
It is quite unlikely that this article is going
to blow the world's mind and make everybody
stop playing politics. But that's not the point.
The universe is a perfect sphere, and there
is room inside for the politician, the artist,
the holy man and the thief. But The Situation
does not exist except as one-game, and ideology is not a true grasp of reality.
Of course quite a few people have pointed
this out over the last several thousand years
without much effect. But I just thought I'd
mention it.
Letters
A short response to last
Friday's disgraceful notes on
the Collectors, Fish, etc. written by your rock authority,
Wensley Mole. Little Miss
Mole (sic) displayed a gross
deficiency of knowledge concerning the abilities of said
groups and certainly had no
right advising people in this
•context.
What was said about the
Fish -would perhaps have been
accurate a year ago when
they were easily one of the
top groups on the West Coast.
But anyone who is prepared
to take on the role of music
critic would hopefully keep
somewhat up to date. Knowing that the Fish had broken
up as a result of some mysterious ego adventure on the
part of Joe, having seen Joe
in Vancouver as a single act,
observing the differences between albumns one and two,
and knowing that the group
had got back together to play
the strip in L.A. at $100,000
per month—-these easily accessible facte plus reports
from those who had seen the
group lately would have made
one dubious, to say the least,
in regard to their present
abilities (sic). For those who
knew and appreciated the
Fish of one and two years
ago, Saturday's concert was
just plain sad. For they are
no longer a group—just five
bojreld individuals making
money whereas they previously made music. Their new
bass player is so plastic he
would likely shatter into a
million fragments were more
powerful equipment used—a
great necessity in fact as the
amount of distortion was disturbing. Renditions of such
old songs as Sweet Marie and
the Masked Marauder in their
ne*w "rocking-soul" style
would appear to give many
local groups a fine recording
potential. Thank god they
didn't attempt Section 43.
Enough said about the Fish.
What made Wensley's article
doublely disgusting was the
manner   in   which   she   (sic)
treated The Collectors. Anybody who saw the Tiny Tim
concert and was not already
convinced of the Collectors'
increasingly important position in today's rock scene,
hopefully left feeling differently. One could write a great
deal about them but in the
one word in which is of the
greatest importance to musi-
cans, they are "tight". Despite Wensley's advice that
one need not have arrived at
the concert until the Collectors had finished, it would
have been more appropriate
to suggest that one leave
after they had finished. Anyway, it was good to see that
Wensley did not follow her
(sic) own advice and was
there in her (sick) seat at 8:00
sharp. Anyone with doubts
should catch the Collectors
this weekend at the Circus.
RUBS PRECIOUS
KABLEY ROTHSTEIN
Dear    Messrs.    Precious    &
Rothstein:
Wensley's a male.
A.H.
NEW YORK
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47   W.   Hastings      682-3801
NEW WESTMINSTER
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Friday, September 27,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY pS lOen
By   LISE   DOMINIQUE
Greydon Moore's "poem"
in free verse in just too
much! The Planet Man
speaks  in  heavy  cliches:
"in your escalator of consciousness lies the real
the real world"
and having made this fabulous impression, sustains
it toy using hollow images:
"there    were    glimpses    of
of moving friendly entities
a riot of feelings images
a vast simplicity"
and then, toeing frightened
in this void, he reaches
wildly for security:
"The process is natural"
. . . "very real functions"
Entertainment is provided
by typographical errors
and/or spelling mistakes:
"hulla  hoop"  "pagentry"
GREYDON MOORE
The Planet Man
"The Donkeyodeon" is
especially notable for the
possible plagiarism: "touched our minds" from Leonard Cohen's SUZANNE.
The line, "lsd-horseless
carriage of the twentieth
century" deserves an honorable mention for being
one of the baldest examples
of non-poetic suggestion.
There are also poems by
"richard". Ten to one,
Richard is a nice kid,
twelve years old. He wants
to be in, so he will write
free verse. As richard does
not know how to do this,
Ihe writes sentences and
breaks them up into several lines. His images are
as -worn as they are meaningless:
"Look around an ocean of
nothingnesss
harder longer constantly"
(Leo Jung's "poetry" is
evenly divided between
truisms and cliches, and
he is expert at setting his
emptiness to paper.
"Pat Caldwell" started
a poem with most unlikely
rhyme, but even that pale
effort was too much effort
to make in the second
verse:
"willow willow wept
for he had
no other chance
some men
say
in willows
lies
man's answer to
his  trance"
The spacing was clever,
though, so all was not
lost.
Concrete poem toy Greydon Moore is the masterpiece. In seven paragraphs
with accompanying charts,
he clearly illustrates that
a new "fsc, 13705326"
works out conclusively to
more significant figures
than the standard 'fsc,
1370388". Truly, this is a
poetic wonder!
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The group regrets they were  unable to attend,  but  wish  to
assure their followers they will get "HIGH" again soon.
Thank you for your patience and we'll see you . . .
OCT. 4th at TOTEM PARK
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THE*      UBYSSEY
Friday,  September  27,   1968 Bag  of  matrix
By REILLY BURKE
Of late around the campus I have noticed that many
people are becoming increasingly confused about the true
identities of many of their fellow students.
Not too many years ago it was an easy matter to spot
a fellow and by his appearance alone be able to mentally
assess his particular bag. Like engineers wore red high
school type jackets and crew cuts, and anybody with a
beard was a beatnik. Nothing like the good old days for
simplicity.
However, in recent weeks it has become apparent that
a large number of the various "types" are no longer in the
type bag, and have quite possibly gone into disguise. This
is making it ever more difficult to collectively smear people
who were previously identifiable due to their common
appearance.
In order to cope with this rather awkward dilemma I
have devised what could be called an Interest Matrix, a
suitable method for placing students into one of three convenient bags according to their performance characteristics.
How it works is simple. The three categories are (1)
The radical or true beatnik (RAD), (2) The engineer or
undercover agent (ENG), and <3) the student nigger (NIG).
By relating the person in doubt to the following list, said
person can be instantly bagged and appropriate action can
be taken in the way of name-calling, rumour-mongering,
etc.
READING MATERIAL:
RAD: Journal of Commerce, Aviation Weekly
ENG: Berkeley Barb, Georgia Straight
NIG: Sun, Province, textbooks
PLACE OF RESIDENCE:
RAD: West End
ENG: False Creek, Kitsilano
NIG: Student residences, suburbs
PAINTINGS ON WALL:
RAD: Yves Gaucher
ENG: David Mayrs
NIG: Picasso print, any Black Velvet
RECORDS LISTENED TO:
RAD: Nihilist Spasm Band
ENG: Ravi Shankar
NIG: Johnny Mathis
TRANSPORTATION:
RAD: Lotus, TVR, Marcos
ENG: Vi ton truck
NIG: Mustang, GTO
CLOTHING SHOPS:
RAD: 711 Shop
ENG: Salvation Army
NIG: Murray  Goldman,   Woodward's
TV SHOWS WATCHED:
RAD: Avengers
ENG: Startrek
NIG: Wide World of Sports
MOVIES SEEN:
RAD: Hang 'em High, Wild in the Streets
ENG: 2001 — A Space Odyssey
NIG: Eric Soya's "17"
NIGHT SPOTS:
RAD: Demolition Derby
ENG: Retinal Circus
NIG: Oil Can Harry's
FURNITURE:
RAD: Real Modern
ENG: Second Hand
NIG: Imitation. Modern
BEVERAGES:
RAD: Scotch
ENG: Cheap wine
NIG: Milkshake
RESTAURANT:
RAD: Blue Horizon
ENG: Orange Door
NIG: White Spot
HOLIDAYS:
RAD: Japan, Canary Islands
ENG: Turkey, Cuba
NIG: Harrison Hot Springs, Disneyland
Thus you can see that the classification of students is
now a simple and explicit procedure. There is no doubt
that wide-scale implementation of this Interest Matrix will
greatly streamline local political affairs because of the
elimination of the splinter behaviour groups, and because
of the clarity of identification of the particular student
"type".
Paris
continued from pf 9ine
to admit that on certain
specific problems, some
faculty members will be
more compete nt and
therefore more apt to
make the right decisions.
This is only a matter of
experience and time. This
has nothing to do with
class-distinction or authoritarian concepts. On other
issues, it will be the opposite. This is why students and faculty members
will have to work together,
not against each other.
This is what is meant by
participation.
In conclusion, I would
like to say that it is unfortunate, but a fact, that
a reform of his magnitude
does not take place overnight. "Paris ne s'est pas
fait en un jour!" pfend
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THE      UBYSSEY
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flWwc^/^ 4489 W. 10»h
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ATTENTION
MEDICAL and DENTAL STUDENTS
Surgeon Colonel Rogers and Lieutenant Commander
Robertson will present details of the Medical Officers'
Training Plans at 12:30 p.m. on the first and second of
October.
Tues. 1 Oct. —12:30 to 1:30 at UBC "B" Block
—Lecture Room "A".
Wed. 2 Oct.—12:30 to 1:00 at General Hospital
—"A" Amphitheatre.
Essentially the Plans offer tuition, plus good pay as
a commissioned officer, to completion of the internship year.
A career in the Forces is well worth considering, not
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By   MICHAEL   QUIGLEY
A varied musical programme makes up the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra's first concerts on
October 6 and 7: Weber's
Overture to Ruler of the
Spirits, Wagner's Siefried
Idyll, Symphony in Three
Movements by Stravinsky,
and, as previously mentioned, Tchaikovsky's First
Piano Concerto. Conductor Meredith Davies socks
it to the audience of rags
and riches with the pian-
istic aid of Spanish side-
man Rafael Orozco.
Some hints on how to
expand your minds sym-
phonically while retaining
your financial equilibrium:
(a) You can buy season's tickets for all twelve
concerts, prices ranging
from $18 to $45, thus saving 34% under the cost
of single tickets. By flashing your students' card,
you can magically obtain
an   extra    20%    discount.
Cti) You can buy single
concert tickets if your
tastes are eclectic. The
same 20% student discount
also applies. Prices range
betwen $2 and $5.
(c) Finally, there is the
SUPER BARGAIN OF
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will, as in the past, continue its policy of selling
all unbought tickets for
any subscription symphony
concert twentv minutes before the concert starts for
the slim price of ONE
DOLLAR, with flashing of
student's card again required. Using this method,
the chances are good that
the seat you get will be
reasonably decent. (The
chaper seats sell out first.)
However, if the concert is
a sell-out, you might be a
(bit disappointed if you
tramp down to the
Queenie box office to find
all tickets gone.
To close, some fascinating vital statistics garnered from the VSO's biographical data on Young
Uck Kim, who will be
guesting with the symphony next month:
"Between lessons, practice and appearances,
Young Uck Kim plays table
tennis, he is a movie buff,
a great concertgoer, and
a great reader. Two years
ago, he discovered James
Bond and read all the
Fleming novels in one
week."
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COLORFILM (1965) Ben Van Meter 9 minutes. Col.
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THE MATTRESS (1964) Robert Bresson 9 minutes. B&W.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, September 27,  1968 Friday, September 27,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 17
'MY BRIEF MAY BE IRRELEVANT-ZIRNHELT
Alma Mater Society president Dave Zirnhelt has almost
forgotten what he wrote in his
brief on academic reform, The
Future of University Education—Fair Weather or Foul.
"My thoughts have progressed so far that I've almost forgotten what was in the brief,"
Zirhelt told 200 education students at an open forum Tuesday.
"It may be irrelevant except
to the people who made it up
and the people to whom it was
presented. The brief aimed to
work from the top down,
whereas effective change can
only come from the bottom
up," Zirhelt said.
"If nothing else, it may show
just how futile the efforts of
directive  officials  are."
The students heard Zirhelt
and AMS vice-president Carey
Linde, and 10 or 12 took the
platform themselves in the
two-hour discussion.
Linde said he was certain
everybody in the room could
run the university as well or
better than it is run now.
"Our minds are as good and
bright as the faculty," he said.
'Student Power' is simply saying we can do just as good a
job."
Linde outlined education students' role in academic reform.
"The faculty of education is
the most important faculty on
campus," he said. "Yet, you
are training people to fit into
a system."
"The fact that you are at
university means that you have
successfully completed 16 years
in a system which prevents
questions and choice of courses.
"Doing is learning. Let us
make the decisions that affect
us.
"The ultimate problem is
making the university a place
to have fun. Is it too late to
set up a number of junior colleges and make a community
of scholars out of UBC?
SDS
frightens
yankee
WASHINGTON (CPS-CUP)—
If representative Albert Watson had his druthers, the Students for a Democratic Society
(SDS) would be one of the
groups on the U.S. government's blacklist of subversive
organizations.
In South Carolina Republican last week called on the
floor of the House of Representatives for a full-scale investigation by the House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC) of the "most dangerous New Left group operating in the country today."
Watson said SDS plans to
overthrow the U.S. government, and cited as examples
of their tactics the recent Chicago demonstrations and the
disruption of Columbia University last spring.
He said federal agents who
attended the SDS national convention at Michigan State University in June heard sessions
which discussed the "fine
points of firing Molotov Cocktails from shotguns" and other
tactics of guerrilla warfare.
Carel Howe, ed. 3, said students must get out of academic learning into social.
"Unfortunately, people don't
know that learning is a living
thing," she said. "As a primary
teacher I know a child must
learn to socially live in the
world."
Mrs. Use Leis, ed. 3, complained that students were
doming to university for the
wrong reasons.
"I came to the university
because I didn't know enough,"
she said.
"Stan   Persky   says   the   es
sential part of his education
has been to find someone to
love and sleep with. You don't
need to come to university to
find that out. Students should
stick to studies, not university
government."
Last year's AMS president
Shaun Sullivan took the stand
and asked how many students
had actually read the brief.
Twelve put up their hands.
Education prof H. P. Roberts
answered Zirhelt's comment
that nothing in the 12 or 13
political science courses offered was relevent to the govern
ment of the university or of
B.C.
"As far as the student movement in Canada is concerned,
if you had learned your political science, you would know
that university people are not
designed to govern.
"Plato failed as a governor;
Marx was a professor and when
he failed at this, he became
a governor."
"Lenin was noted scholar
and the many volume he wrote
are better off where they belong at the university."
"We  faced  the  same  issues
at the University of Western
Australia 32 years ago," Roberts said. "They have had
representation in the senate
for 36 years."
"In Australia we studied
what other students did. If
you don't like your classes,
walk out, as they do in Europe."
Roberts suggested students
run the food services themselves as they do in universities all over the world.
"If you don't like the university, start your own as they
did in Sweden," he said.
ROTP
REGULAR OFFICER
TRAINING PLAN
IN THE
CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
EDUCATION FOR LEADERSHIP:
The Department of National Defence, through the
Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP), sponsors a
programme of university education and leadership
training for selected numbers of young men who
have the potential to become officers in the Canadian Armed Forces.
Candidates with senior matriculation, junior matriculation, or who are university undergraduates
taking suitable courses, are eligible to apply for
enrolment as officer cadets in the Canadian Armed
Forces. The admission standards are high, but for
those who qualify, the way is open to a challenging
and rewarding career.
ROTP TRAINING AT
UNIVERSITIES:
Since the number of vacancies at the Canadian
Military Colleges is limited, a number of young men
are accepted each year as ROTP officer cadets and
receive  their training at  Canadian  universities.
They are either high school graduates or university
students in any undergraduate year. Undergraduates enrolled in the Armed Forces while they are
attending university continue at their university
until graduation.
Applications for general or honours courses in
Arts, Science, Engineering and several other courses
are considered. Applicants for university training,
and undergraduates, may obtain a complete list of
acceptable courses for ROTP subsidization from
Canadian Forces Recruiting Centres. You may apply
during the academic term but not later than 1 st April.
While attending university, cadets wear civilian
clothes and receive monthly pay at ROTP rates.
Uniforms are supplied by the Canadian Armed
Forces for summer training.
PAY AND ALLOWANCES—
REGULAR OFFICER CADETS:
Tuition and other essential fees are paid by the
Department of National Defence. Officer cadets
entering the Canadian Military Colleges are provided with necessary books and instruments; those
attending university receive an allowance each year
of $125.00 to purchase books and instruments.
Pay rates are as outlined in the attached Pay Rate
card. In addition, full medical and dental care, clothing and other benefits are provided without charge.
Annual leave (30 days plus travelling time) with pay,
may be granted each year, usually after the summer
training period. Christmas leave is also granted.
MEDICAL AND DENTAL STUDIES:
ROTP does not apply to students entering the medical and dental faculties for whom separate subsidization plans are available. Details may be obtained at
a Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre or through the
Director of Recruiting, Canadian Forces Headquarters, Ottawa 4, Ontario.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:
An applicant must have the following qualifications:
CITIZENSHIP: be a Canadian citizen.
MARITAL STATUS: be single and remain so until
commissioned.
MEDICAL: be physically fit for enrolment.
AGE: have reached his 16th birthday, but not his 21st
birthday, on the first of January of the year of entrance
if applying with senior matriculation, or his 20th
birthday if applying with junior matriculation. Consent of a parent or guardian is required if he is under
18 years of age.
The maximum age is increased by one year for
each academic year completed beyond senior matriculation.
HOW AND WHERE TO APPLY:
Applications and further information can be obtained, at
CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
547 SEYMOUR ST.
VANCOUVER, B.C. 684-7341 Page  18
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  September  27,   1968
urf
Panther gets Reagan's goat
BERKELEY (CPS - CUP)—
Anti-Reagan fever is spreading
from Berkeley to the University of California at Los Angeles.
Student rallies have been
scheduled this week on both
the Berkeley and UCLA campuses after a University of
California board of regents
meeting last weekend limited
black militant Eldridge Cleaver to one campus lecture appearance this fall.
The UCLA academic senate
met last weekend to denounce
the move, and the senate at
Berkeley is expected to take
similar action this week.
Cleaver is minister of information of the Oakland-Jbased
Black Panther Party for Self-
Defense, presidential candidate   of   the  Peace   and  Free-
Soccer Birds
vying for
first place
Joe Johnson's soccer Birds
will do battle this weekend
and first place in the Pacific
Coast league will be the spoils
for the winner.
IUBC is presently tied for
first place with the Vancouver Firefighters after each having won their first two starts.
The Firefighters have a
slight edge having scored five
goals while giving up only one,
while UBC has scored three
goals for  and  one  against.
The Vancouver squad is composed of many tough and experienced players and as usual
they will have to be regarded
as  contenders  in  the  league.
Speed and superior conditioning should more than make
up for lack of experience on
UBC's  behalf.
This conditioning should pay
off this week as the Birds play
three games in seven days.
After Saturdays game UBC
tangles with Burnaby Villa
Wednesday, 8 p.m. at Callister
Park and they return to Thunderbird stadium Oct. 5 to play
Croatia.
The Birds are in good form
exdept for Garry Thompson
who may sit out a game or
two due to a back injury.
This will have little bearing
on the game as Johnson still
has 15 first stringers and even
at practice today he had no
idea as to who would play and
who  wouldn't.
Johnson said "We'll know
just prior to game time who
will  play."
Gametime is 2 p.m. Saturday at Callister Park.
GRAND PRIX
MOTORS LTD.
'SPORTS CARS ARE OUR
BUSINESS"
TRIUMPH
SPITFIRE-TR250-1300
SALES  AND  SERVICE
Special Consideration
to U.B.C. Students
Local   &   Overseas  Deliveries
1162 SEYMOUR
682-7185
dom party, and author of the
best-selling "Soul on Ice", a
book on the Afro-American
experience in America. He
had been scheduled to deliver
a series of ten lectures on
racism on the Berkeley campus as part of an experimental
course  in race  relations.
Also scheduled to address
the seminar are black and
Mexican - American writers,
psychiatrists, and Oakland
police chief Charles Gain.
California governor Ronald
Reagan likened the appointment of Cleaver to "asking
Bluebeard the pirate, the wife-
murderer, to be a marriage
counsellor", and demanded that
the regents rescind the appointment. The state's superintendent of public instruction, Max
Rafferty called Cleaver a
"racist bigot" and said if he
,were allowed to lecture the
state's educational system was
in need of complete overhaul.
The state senate approved
a resolution censuring the university for inviting Cleaver to
lecture, and Reagan threatened a  "legislative investigation
of the university from top to
bottom" if the Panther were
allowed on  campus.
It wasn't, he said, that he
thought the students weren't
responsible enough to be able
to hear whomever they chose,
but that state taxpayers would
not stand to see their money
going for such purposes.
The regents, obviously hoping to calm the fires from both
sides, limited all the participants in the seminar, including
Cleaver to one appearance
rather than ten.
Several regents said they
would not vote to ban Cleaver
entirely because of "the danger
in letting the regents start
naming who could and could
not appear as lecturers."
Students say such a token
UCLA & Berkeley consider the
board's action an encroachment on academic freedom
and an intellectual restraint.
They see the "compromise
measure" allowing one appearance as only a token gesture meant to pacify them.
Students say such a token
is not enough.
Underground Films at Intermedia
575 BeaHy St.
tl
ANDY WARHOL'S "VINYL
and others . . .
Fri., Sat., Sun. (Sept. 27-29) - 8 & 10 p.m.
Donation
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION PAPERBACKS
Specializing in Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393  W.   10th  Ave.
224-4144
HEY YOU!
Jhs. J1 Juan h Open
• TAKE OUT
• DELIVERY
• PROMPT - FRIENDLY INSIDE SERVICE
224-0833
4423 West 10th
Weekends are Wild at . . .
The PalfnA
Birch Bay, Wash. — 6 mi. So. of Blaine
featuring the  soul  music of
Chuck Stanford and Roger Laybourn
for your listening and dancing pleasure
Friday, Saturday and Sunday
Licensed premises . . . bring your I.D.
SPECIAL EVENTS "SPEAKERS"
"HUELGA"
(The Grapes of Wrath)
Film   on  Delano  Farm  Workers'
STRIKE
Tuesday, Oct. 1st - 12:30 - Hebb Theatre
Introduced  by Union Organizer, Tony Mendez
SENSATIONAL!!
UBC MEMBERSHIP DISCOUNT PLAN
FOR STUDENTS AND FACULTY ONLY
APPLY NOW AT YOUR
UBC ASSOCIATED TIRE CENTRE:
3601  West 4th Ave. (at Dunbar)
732-7241
NO COST - NO OBLIGATION !
YOUR BENEFITS ARE:
40% Discount on New Tires
(Summer, premium, wide ovals, winter tires)
25% Discount on all Recaps
(Summer & Winter)
70% Discount on Front End Alignments
Parts (Shocks, Ball Joints, etc.), Labour and Wheel Balancing
70% Discount on Mags, Chromes & Accessories
SAVE NOW!
Drive in to ASSOCIATED —
— Ask For Your Exclusive Discount Card —
OUR NINE ASSOCIATED TIRE CENTRES
TO SERVE YOU BETTER:
6791 Kingsway, Bby.
524-2255
275 Kingsway, Van.
874-4543
3765 Canada Way, Bby.
433-1432
712 Marine Drive, N. Van.
985-8265
4811 Main St., Van.
874-8131
607 Victoria, New West.
524-2264
13654—104th Ave., Surrey
588-1266
805 Wesfstr Hwy., Richmond
278-5171 Friday,  September 27,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  19
LC'VlVi
&m&££$-%t
mVDAS
• Guaranteed as long as
you won your car
• Free 15 Minute Installation
• Free Inspection
• Installation Specialists
• Custom Pipe Bending
876-6631
685-4417
10%  Discount to
U.B.C. Students & Staff
by mentioning this ad.
DUAL EXHAUST SPECIALISTS  -  SHOCK ABSORBERS
1875 KINGSWAY
MUFFLER
SHOPS
— dick button photo
SPORTS CAR ENTHUSIASTS examine some of the Sports car clubs' cars in the Club's day exhibit
near SUB's  north entrance. Several  ralies are among the future activities of the SCC.
UBC Sports Car club
prepares for big year
Clubs day '68 saw the biggest display ever for the UBC
Sports Car club.
The club was first formed
in the late 1'950's and is presently one of the largest and
most active clubs on campus.
Activities revolve around
it's main event of the year,
the Thunderbird Rally, which
occurs during the last weekend in * January.
The rally enjoys the prestige of being a National Auto
rally supported by the entry
of factory teams in their quest
(for the Canadian National
Rally Championship.
The rally is usually about
1000 miles long through the
snows of the interior of B.C.
which ranks it as the second
largest rally in Canada, behind
the  Shell  4000.
In addition there are the
October Totem Rally and the
Spring Lion-Lamb gymkhanas.
These major events are supplemented by a dozen "club"
events such as rally schools,
gymkhanas, ralleyttes and last
but not least parties.
The club holds its meeting
on the first Thursday of each
month in Chem. 250 and holds
daily "Bench Racing" sessions
in the outdoor clubs lounge
area in SUB.
ViceJPresident Craig Sand-.
erson says: "With a host of
activities planned:—this promises to be the best year ever
new members to learn and partake in motorsport activities
promoted  by   the   UlBCSCC.
This Sunday will see the
club kick-off its first event of
the season—a free  gymkhana
for UBC students only.
Registration starts at 9 a.m.
on Sunday, Sept. 29, in "D-
Lot" (back of the Aggie barns).
Gymkhanas consist of individual cars racing around a
course laid out on the parking
lot.
Cars will compete in six
categories: large sports, small
sports, small and large sedans,
american sleds and a special
powder-puff event for the fairer sex.
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers, rubbers.
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10%  discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10th - 738-9833
- DANCE -
TOTEM PARK
To The "Paisley Universe" and Lightshow
Saturday, September 28th
9 - 1 a.m.
BIRDS, 75c - BIRDWATCHERS, $1.00
NOTICE TO '69 GRADS
Your FREE Grad Photos
Now Being Taken
Mobile Studio Locations
Sept. 23 to Oct. 4 Oct. 7 to 22
Parking Lot near Behind Brock
Education Bldg. (South)
Arts Students Anytime
Hours — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointment Needed — No Cost
(This Service is Covered by Your GRAD FEE)
CAMPBELL STUDIO
FALL and WINTER SPORTS!
WE WISH TO  EXTEND  OUR  GREETINGS TO  ALL  NEW  AND   RETURNING
STUDENTS TO ANOTHER YEAR AND WISH  YOU  ALL  SUCCESS.
WE INVITE YOU TO  DROP IN AND SEE OUR COMPLETE STOCK
OF ALL SPORTING GOODS
LOWEST PRICES - BEST SERVICE
North Western Sporting Goods Ltd.
10TH AVE. AT ALMA ROAD
224-5040
10th & Burrard
736-0261
Coming Soon
Your New 1968
STUDENT TELEPHONE
DIRECTORY
"BIRD CALLS"
Buy a Pre Sale Ticket Today
ONLY-75c-ONLY
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
AMS BUSINESS OFFICE, BROCK
PUBUCATIONS OFFICE, BROCK Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  September  27,   1968
TWEEN CLASSES . . .
Lifesaving course
tonight at Empire
The Red Cross Royal Life
Saving Instructor School
starts tonight at 6:30 in Empire Pool. Bring suits, warm
clothing, pencil and paper.
Free. Lasts two weekends
plus exam.
SPECIAL EVENTS
"The Grapes of Wrath" film
on the California farm workers' strike, Tuesday, Oct. 1,
Hebb theatre, 12:30.
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
First meeting of the Alumni
Association's Commission of
Student Participation in University Affairs will be held
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1 in
Engineering 201. All students
are welcome to attend.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
"What's your role ?" Rev.
Hadley guest speaker in Ang.
110 today at noon.
EAST ASIA SOCIETY
First gathering tonight at 8
p.m. at 1032 Davie Street.
Bring a friend and refreshments.
NISEI VARSITY CLUB
Frosh mixer tonight from
8:30-12:30 at SUB 209. Prerecorded music. Frosh: 25
cents; Member: 50 cents.
FORESTRY
UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
"Undercut '68" coming to
SUB on Oct. 11. FUS campus-
wide hard times bash with
Hank and the Hobos.
PRE-LAW
First general meeting today
at noon in Ang. 414. Guest
speaker, introductionof
queen candidates.
ACEI
General meeting Monday
noon, Ed 201. Speakers: Mrs.
Mackenzie, member international executive.
AQUA SOC
Club dive this Sunday, 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. at Porteau,
north of Horseshoe Bay. Free
coffee, soup, etc.
PHRATERES
All-phi today noon, Bu. 104.
AQUA SOC
NAUI certified course, information in Bu. 214 or SUB
215, at noon.
SKYDIVING CLUB
Short meeting in Bu. 221
Tuesday, Oct. 1.
HISTORY UNION
Founding meeting today
noon, Bu. 220.
ALPHA OMEGA
General meeting Monday
noon, SUB 213.
HILLEL HOUSE
Dr. Christenson, Danish community    centre    head,    will
speak Monday noon in Hillel
House on Danish underground's rescue of 80,000
Jews from Gestapo in W.W.
II.
SCIENCE UNDERGRAD SOC
Science jackets and sweaters
on sale daily noon in Math
annex 1119.
SCIENCE UNDERGRAD SOC
Science anti-calendar, The
Black and Blue Review, on
sale daily in common room,
Ma. annex 1119.
SAILING  TEAM
Meeting Monday noon in
SUB meeting room C for all
interested in trying out.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau: today noon, Bu.
100, Ibsen's Peer Gynt; Monday noon, Bu. 100, Meaning
of History.
OMBUDSMAN'S OFFICE
Interested students still needed to help run office. See
Bob Gilchrist or leave name
in AMS Box 76, Brock.
STUDENT CHRISTIAN
MOVEMENT
Fall camp, "a weekend with
Alice" at UBC Forestry
camp, Haney, Oct. 4-6. Application forms at AMS office,
information at 224-3339.
HELLENIC CLUB
Greek folk dancing Monday,
Sept. 30, 7:30 p.m. at International House. Instruction
given.
SUB FORMAL
OPENING COMMITTEE
Meeting Monday noon in
SUB meeting room D for all
interested.
COMMERCE US
Dance in Totem Park to "the
Paisley Universe and light
show" Sat. Sept. 28, 9 p.m.-
1 a.m. Birds 75 cents, Birdwatchers $1.
SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
Important general meeting
today at noon in Bu. 224.
Selection of delegates to convention. New members welcome.
PHYSICS SOCIETY
Physics society general meeting today in Hen. 307 at
noon.
ALLIANCE FRANCAIS
Informal conversation groups
every noon, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday in
Bu. 234. Native French
speakers will participate as
group leaders. Club meets
every Friday noon at International House.
CIRCLE K
Orientation meeting in SUB
council chambers at noon
today.
PANGO PANGO   (UNB)   —
Pango Pango was in an uproar
today as a cold wind roared
down from the north on the
pleasant little country.
The wind combined with the
student turmoil in Pango Pan-
go's university to create a low
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75$, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
WHEN PLANNING YOUR NEXT
dance or party, book through our
agency. Exclusive agents for the
Boston Teaparty, Blue Crusade,
Witness, Exotics & many more, Dan
987-67B1.
pressure area along the eastern front.
The Daily Busy Bodie's editor Al Birnie is a fink. He's
going to try to sue himself for
libel.
Weatherman Jugs Wordnik
refused further comment on
the weather situation.
GEOLOGY'S "BACK FROM THE
Bush Bash!" Sat., Sept. 28 — Hastings Auditorium. Tickets "$3.00
couple. G. & G.  110.
"UNDERCUT '68" FIRST BIG BASH
in SUB, with 'Hank and the Hobos',
Oct.   11th.   Dress:   hard-times.
DANCE TO THE FIVE MAN CARGO,
Friday, Oct. 4th, at Place Vanier.
Resident $1.00, non-residents $1.35.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
GOLDEN RING, DARK-BROWN
stone. Family's keepsake. Reward.
Please  call   681-2073.
LOST PAIR OF GLASSES, ANG.
building. Brown horn-rimmed ladies.
Call  Val   733-8855.
LOST: FRI. MORN. BETWEEN B
lot & Ed. Bldg. One pair men's
glasses. Name on frame. Ph. 435-
4895.
FOUND: MAN'S GOLD WRIST
watch, Angus Men's washroom, main
floor. Owner identify.  Phone 733-9044.
LOST MON. SEPT. 24 ON CAMPUS.
Man's watch. Gold case. No strap.
Reward.  Call  Don  929-1705  after  6.
17,324,025.2 EMPTY BOTTLES OF
various descriptions at "Undercut
'67", owners may claim same at
"Undercut  '68".
Rides & Car Pools
14
GOT TO HAVE OTHER DRIVERS
Richmond carpool. Vic. Blundell and
No.   3-4.  Phone Ralph  273-3289.
WANTED: ALTERNATE DRIVER
Hollyburn Park Royal area. W
Van. Ph. 922-4027.
FUNSEEKERS: ONE (1) MORE
driver needed for car pool from
Capilano Highlands. Phone Lance
at 987-9902.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED BEDS: BUNKS OR SINGLE
preferably with mattresses. Also
want two desks. Phone Terry, 224-
079*!.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'63 RAMBLER STATION WAGON,
$795. Must sell! 224-0355 after 5:00
p.m. or before 9:00 a.m.
'51 FORD CUSTOM V8, USED BY
widow. Mech. very good. Radio,
tow   hitch,  $150.  733-3626.	
PEUGEOT, 1961, MOD. 403. GOOD
tires. Best offer! 876-5077, after 6
p.m.   	
1965 PONTIAC WAGON, AM-FM
radio, power windows, 43,000 miles,
$1800.  Cash or best offer.  736-5147,
'67 V.W. DELUXE; RADIO, GAS
heater, great shape. Must sell! Don
Rm.  27, 224-9880.
1964 V.W. DELUXE, PLUS SNOW
tires and extra heater. Good condi-
tion.  $800. 224-3052.	
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
YOUR    STUDENT    TELEPHONE
directory.   Buy   pre-sale   tickets  for
75 cents from Bookstore or Publications Office,  Brock Hall.     	
VARSITY  SPECIALS
Students'  desks    from 14.95
New bunk beds  pair 29.50
Book cases  ~   from 8.95
New  252   coil  Hollywood  bed
complete    49.50
We carry a full line of precision-cut
unpainted furniture at lowest prices
ever.
KLASSEN'S
3207 West Broadway RE 6-0712
(Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store)
THE WORLD'S LARGEST SELLING
35 S.L.R. $40. Others $34, $25. Factory  prices.   Ph.   SID  298-9110.
1965 DODGE DART, NEW CLUTCH,
V-8, radio, maroon, non-Canadians.
$1095 or best.  228-9166.	
'58 PLYMOUTH, 4 _DOOR, AUTO.
Must  sell  $125  or  offer.   733-4077.
'56     AUSTIN,     RELIABLE, WELL-
maintained,    mechanically sound,
new   brakes,   snow   tires, for   $250.
Mika   at   922-8441.
1965 VALIANT V200, 4-DR. SEDAN,
A.T. deluxe. $1,500. Dr. Arnold,
Room 121, Chemistry. 684-9886 after
6  p.m.
Motorcycles
26
1966 HONDA, MODEL 166, SPORTS.
Immaculate condition, cheap. Ken
Lee,   736-6631  or  874-3089.	
WANT    CARPOOL, WEST    BAY
area,  for  9:30's.  Barb  922-5625.	
RIDE    WANTED     VIC LOLTGHEED
and Holdom, North Burnaby for
8:30's.   298-9472.
RIDERS WANTED FOR CAR-POOL
in Killarney and Thompson School
areas.   9:30's.   Jim   433-5118.
DRIVERS NEEDED EAST BURN-
aby from Canada Way and Edmonds
8:30's - 5:30's, M-F. Call Gordon,
522-1950.
Special Notices
15
UBC BARBER SHOP (IN THE VIL-
lage) now with 4 barbers to serve
you better. Open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.. 5736
University Boulevard.	
"BACK FROM THE BUSH??" "GO
to the Bash!!" Sat., Sept. 28. Hastings   Auditorium.    Tickets   $3.00
couple — Q  & Q 110.	
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find it across from
the Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway.	
1967 SUZUKI 250X6, HELMET, ROLL-
bar, sprockets. 731-3480. Offers!
Geofl.	
1965 YAMAHA MOTORCYCLE 250CC.
Hardly used since last September.
Good condition. Phone Don 876-1587.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
SKIS & BOOTS. UNIVERSAL, DYN-
namic VR, Kastle skis. Le Trappeur,
Hadever ski boots. 266-5859 and ask
for  Bruce. __
ONE COMPLETE SCUBA OUTFIT
(6'1"),  $150. Phone Brian 876-6980.
PHILIPS TABLE COMB. RADIO-
record player. Best offer. Silvertone
portable record-player $15. Call John
at  733-2469 after 5:00.   	
MUST SELL FULL LENGTH RED
ladies' suede coat. Size 12. Leaving
for  tropics.   733-1831  after  6:00p.m.
SMALL FRIDGE FOR SALE. GOOD
condition.   Phone   731-6894.   Only  $25.
4x5 SPEED GRAPHIC CAMERA
accessory rangefinder and Solenoid
release. Optar 4.7 lens. $150 with
flash gun, film and pack holder.
Phone  921-7051.        	
MUST SELL NEAR-NEW MAJESTIC
portable typewriter, perfect shape.
$40 or best offer. 684-6864 after 6.
BED,  ONE YEAR  OLD  $30.   738-0194.
BARGAIN—HAVE RETURN TICKET-
Montreal-London Tuesday evening,
Oct.   1.   $125.  Phone  Doug,   732-5627.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Miscelleous
33
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice. Upper Tenth Barber —■ Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue.
224-6622
Repairing—All Kinds
35
IWW INDUSTRIAL UNION 620
(Schools) Organizational Meeting.
2411 Stephens St. 8 p.m. One big
Union.
Scandals
37
UBC BOWLING CLUB
Mon.   night   league   (mixed).   Meeting
Thurs.,   Oct.   3   in   Henry   Angus   207
at   12:30  p.m.   —   All   Welcome.
DIAL - A - DATE
P.O. Box 3348-U
Vancouver 3, B.C.
Send    $1.00   with   your   name,    age,
description,   telephone   number,   likes
and   dislikes,   for our  monthly
•DIAL   -  A   -  DATE"  list
Your name will be on it.
PROVINCIAL BURSARIES NOW
available. All students must collect
bursaries at cashier's wicket, main
floor, Administration building, Monday  to Friday,  9-4 p.m.
68 — INVITATION — 69
A students' directory to entertainment at student rates. At the Bookstore; at HE and She Clothing Shop
(the Village); at Fort Camp, Totem,
Acadia canteen shops. $2.50.	
JOSE FELICIANO, OCT. 24, 8 P.M.
First big concert in SUB. Limited
tickets available. Ticket sales begin
soon. Keep watching! In concert
Jose Feliciano, SUB, Thurs., Oct.
24, 8 p.m.
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to know.
REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR IN-
surance by as much as 20%. All
risks insured and no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott
299-9422.
Travel Opportunities
16
MALE SWISS STUDENT, 23, WISHES
company (pref. fern.) for car trip
to Olympics. Respectable and sports
loving person.  Call  736-7846.
Wanted Information
17
URGENT: CATHERINE McNAUGH-
ton of Montreal, please contact
Krysia Mercer—office hours: 522-
3911 or at 1110 Cardero, Apt. 503.
Eves and weekends or call home.
LARGE REWARD! FOR RETURN
of or information leading to the
return of a purple 10 spd. bicycle
missing from steps of Hennings Bid.
Tues.  24.   RE  8-9423.
CLIMAX — THIS WEEK AT THE
"Bush Bash". Tickets $3.00 couple.
G.  & G. 110.	
WHAT WENT ON AT "UNDERCUT
'67"? Come to "Undercut '68" and
find  out. Friday, Oct.  11,  SUB.
IT DOESN'T TAKE A SLIPSTICK
to figure out that if one drinker
can taxi from the Arms for about $3
then 5 can go for 60c each. 224-5025.
TOM USED TO DESIRE LIFE BY
the fire. Now "Y" has Tom, singing
a wedding song. — US.	
DEVELOP YOUR THINKING ABIL-
ity. Read "The Technique of Thinking",  available  in  SUB  and Angus.
NEW LIGHT HOUSEKEEPING
room, two blocks from UBC express.
Everything supplied. Private entrance, bath shared with one stu-
dent.  Male  preferred.  AM  3-4493.
ROOMS ON CAMPUS (M) 224-9662.
2250 Wesbrook,   kitchen  privileges.
ACCOMMODATION AVAIL ABLE
close to UBC. 2 male students. Bed/
breakfast.  Phone 224-4294.	
LARGE SINGLE ROOM. BREAKFAST
made when food supplied. Ironing.
Mrs. Roberts, 3215 W. 34th. Ph. 261-
2831.   $40  month.
FURNISHED ROOM, USE OF KIT-
chen. Female $55. 2391 West 10th,
738-	
GIRLS: CALL 228-9127. ROOMS, ONE
single, one double. Share own kitchen, bathroom. Any nationality.
Non-smokera.       	
LARGE FURNISHED ROOM FOR
male, kitchen privileges. Blenheim
and  21st.   Phone:  733-8702.
TWO SLEEPING ROOMS $45 & $60.
Men or Women — Suits 2 to 3 —
No restrictions. Near Beach &
T'.B.C.   224-3833. 	
FURNISHED ROOM. ALL MALE
student house. Kitchen and other
facilities. Phone 738-0784 or 736-
7128   (Paul).
Room & Board
82
INSTRUCTION
Typing
40
FAST , ACCURATE TYPING MY
home, 25c per page. Phone 325-6637.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call 277-5640.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
— Experienced essay and Ihesls
typist.  Reasonable rates.  TR 4-9253.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
PHOTOGRAPHER REQUIRES GIRL
assistant one or two mornings per
week.  325-2433.
GIRLS REQUIRED BY VAN. FIRM.
Sales dept., part-time, free training.
Echelon   Enterprises,   736-6223.
Help Wanted—Male
52
MEN WANTED TO DELIVER FOOD
orders. Late evening work. Must
have own car. The Friar. 224-0833,
4423  W.  10th.
Male or Female
53
STUDENTS — EARN WHILE YOU
learn. Part-time contact work management opportunity. Promise good
money and invaluable experience to
those who qualify. For interview,
call Ralph  929-2454,  6-8 p.m.
Special Classes
63
STUDENTS AND PARENTS WHO
need to improve their French have
very good opportunity by calling
Emmanuel Piarron at 683-6192.
ROOM AT UBC GATES — REDUCED
rent to nursing student in return
for   small   amount  of   help.   266-8642.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS
at Phi Delta Theta House. 2120 Wesbrook, 224-9073.
FOR 2 QUIET AND CLEAN MALE
students with Chinese family. Pleasant upstairs rm., 3 meals, $85 per
month. 876-3127 or 568 W. 19th Ave.
Furn. Houses  & Apts.
83
BASEMENT SUITE, FURNISHED.
4100 Block W. 15th, private bathroom, entrance; phone available,
Oct.  1st. 224-0796.
STUDENTS, 2 TO SHARE HOUSE
with same, vicinity of Cambie &
20th for October 1st. Contact Glen
David or Normand at 2316 Dunbar
after  5:00 p.m.
GIRL PREF. OVER 21 TO SHARE
2 bedroom suite, $70 mo. Sharon
Hayworth, 2174 W. 14th.
TWO FELLOWS WANT THIRD TO
share furnished, 2 bedroom apt., 21
or over. Your share $50, plus food.
Phone 738-1400.
LARGE CLEAN 2 RM. STE. FURN.
All facilities $100.00. Quiet couple
onlv.   1st   &   Alma,   738-0425.	
KERRISDALE SMALL BSMT.
suite, shower, telephone for quiet
girl. No boyfriend. Avail, immed.
in return for early evening baby
sitting, boys 7 & 4. 266-5919.	
BASEMENT SUITE AVAILABLE
to responsible female student in
exchange for one or two nights
sitting per week for 10-year-old girl.
Small charge for electricity. Phone
AM  1-7119 after  7 p.m.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY,
Russian lessons given privately by
B.A., M.A., B.L.S. (McGill). Phone
736-6923.
WANTED SENIOR STUDENT TO
share unfurnished apartment with
two others. Phone 263-6180 after 6
p.m.	
SUITE FOR RENT FOR TWO FIRE-
place, private bathroom and entrance, close. 4324 W. 11th. Call
228-9358.

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