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The Ubyssey Mar 21, 1968

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Array — bob brown photo
Sunshine  spring makes  mall  music JmTj
Spring. UBC, Wednesday, March 20. With
sunshine flowers, children, fever, and an incident
about Christ.
Sunshone on Nitobe Gardens, and a philosopher
gathered his students talking of nature and,
undoubtedly, the comparative lengths of shadows.
Breeze from the sea through cherry blossoms.
Sap runs up trunks. Water, still, reflects.
On the main mall, earlier, architecture rebels
built a flexible hexagonal space frame to protest
rigid structures.
Music making people underneath it. Selves in
glory round about. No fear, trust in architecture
students, even trust the campus cop standing in
the musical midst.
And the CBC foreshadowed Easter yesterday,
by removing Seven O'clock Show producer Ain
Soodor from his job.
Poor Ain, all he ever did was fade a hippie into
a Christ image on his show Monday night, and now
he's unplugged.
Even bushy Bill Nicholls, paragon of religion,
Yd' to Ain. Bill s^y's It's a
didn't like \*ttiat they '
neat idea, facnngJiippies into Christg&Ahd he's so
worked up hewant^ft^e*^ ftfcflfcr thing about it.
Ah, well. Lateift-fcho afternoon, the sun lost its
new-found potence lo the salt sea breeze. Last gasps
of erratic winter are still with us. Night fell, and the
philosopher, the flower children, the jug bands, and
UBC's own special species of seagull went home to
bed. No news today.
Even Christ and the CBC packed up eventually.
The glory of spring's first day couldn't last.
Bug  your  gov't
at  today's  meet
UBC students today get
their last chance to confront
their outgoing student
government.
The Alma Mater Society
general meeting at noon in
the armory is open to all
students to challenge,
harangue, argue and propose.
Both old and new councils
will be present to answer
questions on past, present and
future policies.
Main interest will be
constitutional revisions as
listed in today's Ubyssey —
P. 7, 8, 9.  Other items of
business will be reports by
lameduck AMS president Shaun
Sullivan and former treasurer
Twitch Hoye .
AMS first vice-president Don
Mutton is not expected to
add anything to the
proceedings.
The unjustified rag
makes debut today
Your   Ubyssey  is   uneven
on purpose.
Most newspapers  justify
their type by adding or subtracting word spaces to make
„ all the lines the same length.
But modern designers urge
unjustified type, and let the
right  edge  fall where  the
word ends.
We're trying it today.
Just thought you might like
to know.
— bob brown photo Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March   19,  1968
Barber  says  AMS  unwise  to  lease  Aussie
The Alma Mater Society acted unwisely in its
choice of bids for a barber shop in the new student
union building, says Brock barber Peter Van Dyke.
Council Monday night awarded
the lease to Paul Deacon, who
worked previously as barber at the
University of Sydney, Australia.
He proposed to pay the AMS $4 a
square foot annually, in addition to
10 per cent of his gross income —
estimated at $50,000 a year.
Van Dyke has been a barber at
UBC for 22 years.
According to lameduck AMS
president and acting treasurer
Shaun Sullivan, Van Dyke had bid either a flat
rental payment or 11 per cent of a total income
under $30,000, whichever was greater.
For an income over $30,000, Van Dyke would pay
VAN DYKE
on a sliding scale—13 per cent of anything between
$30,000 and $45,000 and 15 per cent of anything
over $45,000 plus the flat lease payment of $2,400.
Sullivan computed ths payments at $7,600 for Deacon
and $5,990 for Van Dyke on an income of $50,000.
Van Dyke said he was not given an opportunity
to meet the lowest bid.
"In being over-anxious to protect themselves, the
council has accepted a bid which does not give the
new barber sufficient economic leeway," Van Dyke
said Wednesday. "I feel that my bid was good and I
don't feel that I could honestly take it any higher.
At a higher bid I would have to push to make a
buck and I'm just not motivated that way."
Deacon has proposed to charge the minimum
union rate for barber ing — $2.
"If the council had been interested enough to
look at my books, they would have seen that a bid
lower than mine is unpractical," said Van Dyke.
"The new barber is a very personable fellow and
should have no trouble building a clientele, but the
summer will be slack. A new barber shop is
scheduled to open in the village and it may be a
drain on his business," he said.
Former treasurer and present financial adviser
to the AMS, Dave Hoye, said he felt council took
every precaution before accepting Deacon's bid. "We
have looked at Deacon's proposed operation from all
angles and his business seems perfectly sound," said
Hoye.
"Deacon comes very highly recommended and
has had a good deal of exp-rience." Commenting on
the loss of his lease, Van Dyke said he felt no ill will
toward the council.
"They were just doing their job," he said.
Weeny boppers invade UBC
Youth had its day at UBC Wednesday.
Four grade seven students from Vancouver's
Talmud Torah school invaded the campus to
conduct an exercise in sociology and graph
plotting.
But they ended up drinking coke in The
Ubyssey office.
Led by Elliott Steinberg, son of UBC English
prof Dr. M. W. Steinberg, the polled students in
the vicinity of Brock and the library about U.S.
involvement in Vietnam, Bobby Kennedy,
UFOs, and education.
Eventually, they found their way to the dank
hole in north Brock where Canada's greatest
university paper is produced.
With the help of Ubyssey photo editor Kurt
Hilger, who hopped upstairs and bought a
round of cokes, the four polled Ubyssey staffers'
reactions to the questions.
"Do you think UFOs are real?" asked
Steinberg.
"What is reality," asked a staffer.
"Does your university education prepare you
for society?" wondered another of the four.
"What is reality?" asked a staffer.
The four were silent. "How long are you
staying at UBC?" asked Page Friday editor Judy
Bing.
"Well, we were supposed to stay 20 minutes
but we've been here an hour," said one of the
pollsters.
"Mom's waiting in the car," said another.
"I think we'd better go," said a third,
draining the last of his coke.
100%
HUMAN HAIR
WIGS
21.95, 31.95, 41.95 & 61.95
WIGLETS
$9.95
BEAUTIFUL  FALLS
$29.95
SALES
10%
Discount  to
U.B.C.   Students
& Personnel
SERVICE
"GONE WITH THE WIG"
49 W. HASTINGS ST. IE"PH°*1E
Between Woodward's and A. & N. 6oO"lZUl
MUM STUDENTS' ASSN
ELECTIONS
7 Positions Contested!
CANDIDATES:
Pres.: G. Mos (Econ.)
J. Tilley (Eng.)
IstV.P.:
2nd V.P.: J. Stewart (Chem.)    Treas.:
P. Victor (Econ.)
J. Dickenson (Econ.)
W. Reid (Chem.)
P. Eby (Planning)
R. Leckie (Eng.)
Sec'ty.:      G. Elliott (Physics)    Cultural Off.: E. Greene (Pol. Sc.)
R. Roberts (Anthro.) A. Nichol (Hist.)
Social Off.: J. Dolman (Eng.)
G. Murtagh (Hist.)
A. Quarry (Pol. Sc.)
VOTE-THURS.: 11:30-1:30
FRI.:       11:00-4:00
(for the HELL of it)
FILMSOC PRESENTS
PRIDE & PREJUDICE
For English  200 Students
LAST CHANCE
TODAY, MAR. 21 - AUD. - 50c
3:30, 6:00, 8:30
W Any man who hates
children and dogs-can't be all bad. 9*.
W. C. FIELDS
This immortal phrase was uttered by a man who, long
before the rebels of today were born, attacked everything sacred in the world of mother and apple pie .. .
W. C. FIELDS. Today W. C. Fields is a whole new thing
with a world of people who are discovering him for the
first time. They run to see his films-quote him and
imitate him. Fields was a comic unto himself. His red-
light nose was a symbol of the profligate who sneered
at the do's and dont's of the world—and then made
the world howl with laughter. The Fields mystique is
growing and growing. In an effort to keep up with the
demand-we present for a limited engagement—two of
his most memorable classics.
"THE BANK DICK"
"NEVER GIVE A SUCKER AN EVEN BREAK"
SPECIAL LIMITED ENGAGEMENT
NOW PLAYING
Hyland
KINGS'Y at KNIGHT
876-3045
SHOW  STARTS
7:30   P.M.
LAST     COMPLETE
SHOWING  9   P.M. Thursday, March 21, 1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
- %
il
< lawrence woodd photo
Lounge  before charity, grads say
Graduating students have decided to put a lounge
in SUB.
More than 170 graduating students met
Wednesday noon in Bu. 106 to decide on this year's
gift to UBC.
They decided in a hand vote to allocate $7,000
of the $10,000 gift fund to provide a senior student
lounge in SUB. The rest will go to the Canadian
Mental Health Association to pay for research into
training retarded children.
A plan to provide scholarships for refuge students
was dropped.
No further action was taken on an earlier
proposal to buy a campus ambulance. Ths suggestion
was dropped after traffic director Sir Ouvry
Roberts said maintenance costs for the vehicle
would be too high.
There would be a chance for a pub in the lounge
if the university administration can acquire a
licence, grad class president Don McDougall said.
"With the new president, Dr. Hare, coming from
Britain where views on drinking are more liberal,
we're hoping he will favor our idea."
Recruiter repulsed
Sir  George  activists  drive   materiels  rep   off  campus
MONTREAL (CUP) — Students at Sir George
Williams University have forced off their campus
a representative of a firm producing equipment for
use in the Vietnam war.
M. R. Tate of Canadian Aviation Electronics,
which makes bombsights and other equipment for
American planes in Vietnam, came to Sir George to
speak on flight simulation.
When he arrived at the 80-seat lecture room,
he found the committee for a Free University
(COMFRU) and the Movement for Socialist
Liberation had distributed a two-page list of details
of CAE's involvement in war production.
An overhead projection screen revealed the
message: "Since CAE is involved in war production,
do you think you have the right to be here, Mr.
Tate?"
Tate then said he would comment on the two
groups' objections at the end of his lecture.
The 35 COMFRU and MSL students objected.
They asked Tate to justify his presence on campus
in view of his company's involvement in the war.
"As far as I'm concerned, there's no personal
profit from war production," Tate said. "I'm here
at the invitation of the engineering faculty. I'll
defer your objections until later."
Tate said he may have been involved in
military activity in the past through his position as
chief engineer at CAE, but has no military
connections at present.
"I'm not an anti-militarist," he said. "But I am
not engaged in any military action at this time."
Tate tried several times to avoid students'
questions. "I would like to speak to those who
came to hear the lecture," he said.
An engineering student who said he was the
chairman of the group presenting the Tate lecture
threatened repeatedly to cancel the lecture if the
protests did not stop. "It is not his concern to
answer your questions."
"People dying in Vietnam is our concern," said
sociology prof David Orton. A student pointed out
that a majority of students had come to hear Tate's
answers on the moral issue involved.
At this point the  engineering student cancelled
the lecture, half an hour after it was to begin and
a full hour before it was to end.
Tate later told reporters it was the first time he
had been turned away from a lecture. "I have
spoken at many universities and other places, but
nothing like this has ever happened before," he said.
Sir George students recently reversed a
decision of the student council to ban recruiters
involved in military production from their campus.
neve SUB
of Sullivan
—How  goes  the  building?
Shaun Sullivan won't be on the student union
building committee next year.
In the face of criticism from members of the
new AMS   executive, the lameduck AMS
president said Wednesday he has withdrawn his
application for membership  on  the  committee.
Vice  president-elect Carey Linde  and
co-ordinator-elect Jill Cameron had both condemned
Sulivan for wanting to control the operation of
SUB.
But Sullivan described this as "complete crap."
"There's a bunch of people running around
this campus who are paranoid as hell," he said.
Sullivan said he has applied for a position on
the winter sports centre committee.
"I thought SUB was the area in which I was
most competent, but I won't serve if people think
I'm trying to control the operation."
Sullivan  also  scoffed   at  reports  of  a  petition
being circulated to halt construction of bowling
lanes in SUB.
"This would cost us $40,000 in unused
materials alone and a whole section of the
building would have to be redesigned,'' he said.
"Personally, I think facilities that are both
social and recreational should be installed in
SUB. Bowling fills this bill adequately.
"I go bowling about once a month,'  'Sullivan
said. He didn't say what his average was.
In other SUB news, building director Dave
Cooper said Wednesday the Aug.  15 deadline for
completion of the building still stands.
"The kitchen is nearing completion — the
coolers and freezers are all installed. Food services
should be the first group to move in."
The barber shop and college shop are also
receiving  final  decorating touches. 4&   *****
M**\ J*-** •■'•■
**\- ■
m ubyssey
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions an
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). The
Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which
il is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo.
Page  Friday,  loc.  24;  sports,  loc.  23;  advertising,  loc.  26.  Telex  04-5224.
MARCH 21, 1968
Clip job
The best deal possible should be made for students
on all aspects of the new Student Union Building
operation — including the barber shop.
Nevertheless 22 years — the length of Peter Van
Dyke's service to students as campus barber —
should have been an important factor in the decision
to choose a barber for SUB. After 22 years on campus
Van Dyke will not find it easy to establish a new
business elsewhere.
After 22 years at UBC, we say, Peter Van Dyke
deserved this minimum consideration: he should have
been given an opportunity to meet the lowest bid.
He tells us that he was not given this opportunity.
And this is exactly the kind of thing critics meant
when they called the outgoing AMS administration
inhuman.
The treatment of Van Dyke is merely one last
disgrace in a disgraceful year.
Study cramps
When study space is as rare as a student without
exams, administrations can be ruthless.   Or, in the
case of food services, have too much Ruth.
Goulash guru Miss Blair, we hear, recently
squashed pleas that Totem Park and Place Vanier
dining areas be used for study from 2:30 p.m. to 4:30
p.m. and from 9:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.  This would
create work space for half the 1,600 residents in the
two complexes
"Impossible", Miss Blair is said to have explained
with a dead-pan face.   "The areas must be cleaned
during those periods."
Since other residence dining halls in Acadia and
Fort Camp are already open nightly, this piece of
bureaucracy is particularly hard to swallow.   Surely
800 students are enough reason to temporarily alter
cleaning with two or three staff.  That such breathing
space be coveted in a time of excessive carbon monoxide
on campus is, we suggest, a bit much.   Come, come,
Ruthie. Don't be a 10-carrot administrator.
—S.E.G.
Attend, dammit
Today's general meeting at noon in the armory
is the most important Alma Mater Society event all
year.   Go to it.   If you need a wishy-washy excuse,
consider that it's a traditional chance to gingerly dip
lameduck execs like Shaun Sullivan and Don Mutton
in a handy pond.
"Being president of this university is a full-time job. So far this year I've had to defend
myself against seven petitions demanding my resignation, 12 motions of impeachment, three
protest rallies, and  18 small demonstrations."
LETTER TO THE   EDITOR
SUB chairman must be elected
Editor, The Ubyssey:
An important issue at today's general meeting will be
the co-ordinator's position. Discussion in The Ubyssey and
elsewhere on campus has re-
reduced this question to nitpicking and name-calling. But
there is a real question of principle involved here and the
only meaningful discussion is
on that level.
If you look a few pages further in today's rag you will
notice a list of proposed constitutional changes. Under non-
controversial number 10 you
will see a by-law as it now
reads followed by the proposed revision. The only difference between the two is that
the proposed revision deletes
the sentence: "He shall act as
Brock management committee
chairman" instead of substituting "SUB" for "Brock". And
the question we should be asking is not, what are the motives
behind this change, but do we
want the co-ordinalor lo be
chairman of the SUB management committee?
SUB is potentially our greatest asset. But it could easily become a $5 million flop. Success
or failure will depend not on
what  the   building  looks  like
but on what the people inside
are doing there. Chairman of
the SUB management committee must be responsible for this
kind of planning. Do you want
thia chairman to be an elected
representative of students from'
all faculties, or someone who
is appointed at random, and
who therefore can in no way
represent the majority of student opinion?
If you choose the first alternative then the SUB chairman
must be chosen from the AMS
council executive. (No other
members of council are elected
by students at large.) Each executive on council has a specific
job: the co-ordinator's job is
to co-ordinate activities. He or
EDITOR:   Danny   Stoffman
City           Stuart  Gray
News            Susan  Gransby
Managing           Murray  McMillan
Photo        Kurt  Hilger
Senior       Pat Hrushowy
Sports         Mike   Jessen
Wire Norman Gidney
Page  Friday         Judy  Bing
Ass't.  City Boni  Lee
Old timers returned to work.
Charles Dickens rewrote endings.
Thomas Gray rewrote everything.
John Kelsey's mystique picked daffodils and led George Elliot down the
garden path. Gwen iPym filled in potholes with porridge. Hew Gwynne
collected cockleshells, which he peddled to a London dairy. Dave Salmon
conned a ferryboat across the Mersey.
she is therefore the logical person to look after the building,
the center of those activities.
Questions about the amount
of work involved, etc. arc ridiculous. No one asked the president if he can handle his job.
When a candidate decides to
run for office he also decided
he is capable and you approve
that decision when you vote for
him.
At today's general meeting
an amendment to this revision
will be proposed, such amendment to read: "He shall act as
chairman of the SUB management committee." Please come
out and support this amendment.
JILL CAMERON
AMS co-ordinator
"He was the very model of a modern
ferry commodore," said William
Schwenk-Gilbert.
John Davies rode a porpoise to
Xanadu. "1*11 buy that," said &amuel
T. Steve Jackson devoured an hallucinogenic lollipop and had pornographic daydreams. Paul Knox tilted
against a windmill to get a lift in
life, and got carried away with himself. "That's not nice/' said Mike
Finlay, as he backstepped onto a
black  and blue  lepreshaun.
Fred Cawsey directed a three-ring
circus. "Well, at least it's flashy,"
said Liberace. Lawrence Woodd jumped from a 50-foot high tower into a
pail of developer, which brought out
the best in him. To finish things off,
Bob Brown juggled discharged flashbulbs.
John Twigg sat in a tree and listened to tales of Edgar Rice Burroughs.
VOICE OF THE PRESIDENT-IN-EXILE
New exec can't escape old attitudes
By STAN PERSKY
I saw Dave Zirnhelt run his first exec meeting
last week. He was forceful and made an effort to
give everyone a chance to speak, but not very much
happened. Most people still seemed hung up on old
ways of thinking.
The exec talked about a joint meeting with the
other B.C. universities, but instead of talking about
what they wanted to do there, or to get out of it,
they yattered for 20 minutes about administrative details like where the Notre Dame students
could sleep.
BREAKAWAY STUDENTS
They talked about the proposed professional students association. Zirnhelt seemed distinctly uneasy
about this, but was very polite and vague. Fraser
Hodge, the engineering president, said he'd cook
up a proposal by May.
I might as well make a prediction about what's
going to happen with PSA. About 90 per cent of the
talk will be devoted to legal bullshit with periodic
threats of dragging everything to student court. Few
will stay cool and consider the idea in terms of
whether or not it's a good thing for students and
whether or not it better serves the needs of engineers, aggies, foresters, etc. (I think it does, by the
way).
JILL SEES DIRTY WORK
The real explosion of the meeting centered around
co-ordinator Jill Cameron's charges about a lot of
political dirtywork going on behind the scenes concerning the management of SUB. She said outgoing
pre*. Shaun Sullivan was behind some of it. At this
point Zirnhelt interrupted and said we shouldn't discuss personalities, it wasn't nice. This was the closest
thing to a liberal statement the bearded Z made. I
thought he was missing a point and I didn't know if
it was purposeful or accidental.
RELATES TO CAMPUS
Anyway, there was discussion of Jill's claims.
At least she was talking about something that
directly related to campus affairs and she pushed
hard enough for the idea to move toward some
solution, rather than just being tabled until "we can
really think about it" or mailed off to a committee.
So far, I have this complaint about the new exec,
and what I'm saying applies to my own friends who
are serving on that body as well as the others:
they're willing to talk about petty administrative
details ad nauseum, and they're willing to talk about
elaborate and distant master plans that may or may
not yield result in a few years. An example of this
is the proposal to band all of CUS together to fight
the book publishers' price monopoly through the
Minister of Consumer Affairs.
NEW EXEC LOST
But they seem entirely lost, so far, when it comes
to talking about things that will actually effect the
conditions of UBC students within the next 12
months. At that point, they get frightened. And
when they're frightened, they fall back on all the
same, safe, unproductive techniques that A-M-Messes
have been using for years. Thursday, March 21,  1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  5
LETTERS  TO  THE  EDITOR
-? Holt  wrong
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In his letter appearing in
the February 27 edition of The
Ubyssey, Prof. W. S. Holt rightly drew attention to omissions
and assumptions in the recent
articles by Mr. Hunter Golay
and (Miss Hilda Thomas concerning implications of the
Tonkin Gulf resolution. However, Holt used the occasion to
present a somewhat controversial apologia for the actions
of the United States in Vietnam, and it is important that
this should not be allowed to
distract attention from the essential immorality of those actions. Holt appears to subscribe to a familiar misconception when he seeks to equate
Hitler's foreign policies with
what he perceives to be the
threat of communism. The
Munich myth has been responsible for the dropping of the
policy of appeasement from the
list of alternatives available to
statesmen. According to the
myth, appeasement failed in
the face of Hitler's threats:
therefore it can never be expected to succeed in the future.
But the attempt to equate the
avowedly aggresive N a z is m
with the doctrinally non-aggressive ideology of communism
can only result in misunderstanding the situation.
The strife in South Vietnam
arose in part because of the
dissatisfaction of a number of
Vietnamese with the Ngo Dinh
Diem regime. Diem originally
received some support from
the French, and later this was
replaced by massive U.S. aid.
American troops are in Vietnam for a variety of reasons,
some of which are entirely
laudable. But the policy of
containing communism seems
to me to be based upon a tragic
misunderstanding of the threat
to American interests. It was,
I think, the late John Foster
Dulles who gave evidence to
the concept of the 'Domino
Theory' — that if one country
is allowed to 'fall' to communism, the rest must inevitably
follow, and that the threat to
the U.S. in the East stems from
China. But this fails to take
account of several aspects: that
the Vietnamese gained their
independence from China in
939 A.D., and subsequently
were successful in retaining it;
that the North Vietnamese
have shown themselves to be
most loathe to receive active
Chinese assistance in the form
of troops — a possibility that
looms larger with every U.S.
escalation of the war; that the
Vietnamese see the conflict essentially in terms of a nationalist struggle for freedom from
foreign domination, and are not
primarily motivated by the desire to spread communism; that
the other countries of Southeast
Asia—particularly non aligned
Cambodia — have no love for
the Vietnamese whose culture
is basically alien to their own,
and they are therefore unlikely
to welcome Vietnamese or
Chinese domination; and perhaps most significantly, that
apart from the rather special
case of Tibet, the Chinese communists have hitherto shown no
serious desire to pursue an expansionist policy.
Certainly the Sino-Burmese
border dispute was settled amicably and without major concessions by the Burmese, notwithstanding the disparity of
the respective powers of the
two   nations.
The situation now is that one
powerful country with enormous industrial resources is
engaged in imposing its will on
a small, backward country.
Whatever justification there
might be for intervention in
theory, the fact remains that
bombs and napalm are singularly, indiscriminate in their
choice of targets, and there is
a growing awareness that the
people of Vietnam are the real
victims — whether or not they
have been afflicted with the
"virus'' of communism. This is
no time to cite precedents for
acts of undeclared war. Surely
rational men everywhere
should exert what pressure
they can to persuade the United States to stop bombing
North Vietnam and to reassess
its policy in the hope that the
encouragement of life rather
than the extermination of communism will be seen to serve its
best interests?
HUGH WILSON
arts 3
Defeat  jocks
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Mike Jessen (Ubyssey, March
14) states he hopes Robert Osborne, director of P.E. and recreation, will "see the light"
and change UBC's policy of
participation rather than building champions. It seems to m"
that the policy we now have
is the right one. Why should
a great deal of money be spent
on a few athletes, no matter
how good they are, at an educational institution for 15,000
or more students ? It would be
far better to direct the money
into a good program of inter-
mural sports which many more
people could join. And the last
thing we need is athletic "scholarships," in effect paying good
athletes to come and win for
us, as is the practice in the
U.S. and at SFU.
If extramurals were cut back,
as I believe they would havo
been last year if the Jocks had
not filled the AMS meeting
the council would have been
able to sponsor a much better
Special Events program and
many other worthwhile programs with the money saved.
I am very much in favor of
athletics at UBC, but not for
just the select few. If we let
the athletic fee transfer pass,
that is the way it will stay for
sure.
ADRIAN STOTT.
science 4
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS
CLAUDE ST-DENIS - MIME
Claude Si-Denis is Canada's leading mime — a
great creator and performer in the ancient art of
pantomime. Born in Montreal, he speaks the universal language of the silent
gesture, the speechless expression — brilliantly funny, wistful, deeply moving.
In 1956 when only 21,
Claude Si-Denis won first
prize in the inter-provincial competition "The Golden Crown" which was
broadcast over ihe French
network of Radio Canada.
He presented five of his
pantomimes and triumphed
over 600 competitors.
During ihe next ten years
he travelled extensively in
Canada and Europe, widely acclaimed by audiences
and critics wherever he appeared—either in solo performances or contributing
to shows here and abroad.
In 1965 Claude Si-Denis
created a film which won
honourable mention in ihe
Montreal International Festival. A year later he appeared in featured mime
and comedy roles in the
first colour film distributed over the television networks of Canada. France,
Switzerland, Belgium and
Luxemborg, and Telscope
of CBC Toronto devoted a
half-hour to Claude Si-
Denis's accomplished art.
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BARRIE.   ONTARIO Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 21, 1968
Student money
used to finance
Turner drive
The Alma Mater Society mimeo machine is
churning out campaign literature for Liberal
leadership hopeful John Turner—on student
money.
About 100  letters, with a return address of
TURNER, British Columbia Headquarters, 558
Howe Street, were produced by the mimeo
staff Tuesday afternoon.
They were later given to AMS executive
secretary Evie Popoff to be addressed.
AMS office staff refused to comment on the
production of the letters.   They would only say
all work was to be charged to the UBC Liberal
club.
The Liberal club, as a campus organization,
is a subsidiary of the AMS, and receives
student money from the AMS.
The letters were signed by B.C. Young
Liberal Association president Bob Lewis and
B.C. University Liberal Federation president
Mike Coleman.
The letter invited delegates to meet Turner
at any of three receptions in Vancouver
Saturday.
Civil liberties group
puts Rowan in control
UBC associate professor of political
philosophy Dr. Bob Rowan has been elected
president of the B.C. Civil Liberties Association.
In the annual election held Tuseday, Rowan
succeeded lawyer Sid Simons, presently involved
in the trials of persons arrested for loitering in
front of the court house March 9.
Wednesday, Rowan said he did not foresee
any great changes in the policies of the
association.
"We're dealing with a never-ending series of
surprises. But some of the things we'd like to
see reformed are the Health Act, the Motor
Vehicles Act, and Bill 33."
Bill 33 calls for the government to end
labor disputes in which the disputes are deemed
detrimental to the public interest.
"The drug laws raise enormus problems as
far as civil liberties are concerned," Rowan said.
"We are going to institute a more persistent
effort to effect changes.
"Basically, we'll have a general program of
education and reform."
Ex  UBC  Tory  heads
B.C.  association
A past president of UBC's Conservative
club is the new president of the B.C.
Progressive Conservative Association.
John Fraser, currently a Vancouver lawyer,
steps up from the association's vice-presidency.
He has also been president of the Young
Progressive Conservatives of B.C. He was
elected a governor of the party in 1966, vice-
president in 1967 and re-elected in Janary this
year.
Moneyman to run WUSC
Former Alma Mater Society treasurer and current council
financial adviser Dave Hoye leaves UBC Saturday for bigger
things.
Hoye takes office April 1 as general secretary of World
University Service of Canada. Operating from an office in
Toronto, he'll have a staff of two assistant secretaries, an
accountant, and the Treasure Van staff.
"I've been involved with WUS on campus for about five
years and think I know what the organization is trying to do,"
Hoye said Wednesday.
FILMSOC PRESENTS
PRIDE & PREJUDICE
TODAY, MAR. 21 - AUD. - 50c
3:30, 6:00, 8:30
Last Chance to Find Out
What it's All About Eng. 200's.
IN BROCK
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Mar. 23 from 9 to 1
$1.25 per soul
Presented by UBC Radio-CYVR
Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
SPRING SPRUNG, but why do pretty girls
wear heavy coats on a definitely summery
day ? Paradoxes prevail and class cutting
weather can be expected to continue until
exams end when come the May showers
we missed in April. Enjoy the sun while it
shines.
Vancouver seen music capital
Vancouver may well be the
next music capital of Canada,
says the manager of a rock
music group.
Jim Allan, manager of Tomorrow's Eyes, a Vancouver-
based group of four Americans,
said Wednesday: "M u s i c a 1
trends are felt north-south
more than east-west. Vancouver will undoubtedly become
the melting-pot for both Canadian and American sounds in
the near future."
Many Americans who migrate to Canada to avoid the
draft are musicians, he said.
"This influx is having a
marked effect on the quality
and style of Canadian music.
The logical place for the west
coast sound to resituate itself
in Vancouver."
"A Vancouver sound, which
is a combination of various distinct sound stylings, is rapidly
developing. There are three
predominant sounds which are
joining: rhythm and blues, San
Francisco rock and folk music.
"Papa Bear's Medicine Show
is creating a sound which might
be classified as funky love
jazz.   My  Indole   Ring  is pro
gressing from the Chicago blues
sound to an original off-beat
drug burlesque style. Mother
Tucker's Yellow Duck are
playing a sort of country and
western rock which also has
a complete originality of sound.
"These and other groups in
Vancouver are revolutionizing
the local music media and beginning to have a more widespread influence," Allan said.
"The sound of Toronto, the
present music capital of Canada, is very bland and commercial."
FACTS You Should Know
About Your New Student Union Building
IN BROCK
Finance Committee
Interviews will be held during the week of March 18 to
March 21 for appointment of members-at-large of Finance
Committee.
Letters of application will be received by the Secretary
of the A.M.S., Brock Hall, until noon, Tuesday, March 19,
1968.
Letters should include qualifications, campus interests,
and eligibility forms.
Public Relations Committee
Applications are now being received for Public Relations Co-ordinators and the Public Relations Committee.
Anyone interested in campus communication or in promoting UBC's image and new SUB facilities, submit a
note with your name, faculty and specific interest, if
any to the Vice-President, Internal Affairs, Box 53,
Brock Hall.
RELAX
Your new SUB will provide the following lounge facilities:
—General lounge.
—Clubs  lounge
—Outdoor clubs lounge.
—Conversation lounge (sunken area).
—TV lounge.
—2  music  lounges.
—Reading   lounge.
—Party room—used as a lounge when not booked.
—Party room extension—used as a lounge when not
booked.
—Men's and women's quiet rooms.
For further information, watch for future ads, or
contact the SUB office, 2nd floor, Brock South. Thursday, March 21,  1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Changing the laws, today..
Peruse and ponder for general meet, noon armory
Following are the proposed revisions
to the AMS constitution. Today's general
meeting will consider them in two categories; non-controversial and controversial.
Items the executive sails non-controversial
are word changes or nit-picks designed to
make the great government work more
smoothly. The category also includes item
10 (see box below) which effectively eliminates all the co-ordinator's power by
removing the chairmanship of the student
union building management committee.
Items termed controversial include
clauses changing eligibility requirements
for those seeking AMS office.
NON-CONTROVERSIAL
1. By-law 3 (3)
now reads as follows:—
(3) If in the opinion of Students' Council
a petition for a referendum does not
meet the requirements of By-Law 3 <2),
Students' Council shall request Students' Court to prepare a suitable text.
Proposed Revision
(3) If in the opinion of Students' Council
a petition for a referendum does not
meet the requirements of By-Law 3 (2),
Students' Council shall request Students' Court to prepare a suitable text
for consideration by Students' Council
within fourteen days.
2. By-law 4 (3)
now reads as follows:—
(3) The members of the Students' Council
shall be the following. The requirements for successful completion of
particular years or equivalents are
minimum requirements only:
Proposed Revision
(3) The members of the Students' Council
shall be the following. The requirements stated are minimum requirements only and must be satisfied at
the time of assuming office.
3.  By-law 4 (3) (b)
now reads as follows:—
(3) (b) The Vice-President, who shall have
successfully completed his second
year or its equivalent, and who
has attended the University of British Columbia for at least two years.
Proposed Revision
(3) (b) The First Vice-President, who shall
have successfully completed his
second year or its equivalent, and
who has attended the University of
British Columbia for at least two
years.
4.  By-law 4 (3) (c)
now reads as follows:—
(3) (c) The External Affairs Officer, who
shall have successfully completed
his first year or its equivalent.
Proposed Revision
(3) (c) The Vice-President - External Affairs, who shall have successfully
completed his first year or its equivalent.
5. By-law 4 (3) (d)
now reads as follows:
(3) <d) The Internal Affairs Officer, who
shall have successfully completed
his first year or its equivalent.
Proposed Revision
(3) (d) The Vice-President - Internal Affairs, who shall have successfully
completed his first year or its equivalent.
6. By-law 4 (4) (c)
now reads as follows:—
(4) (c) The Vice-President shall assist the
President in the duties of his office
and shall assume and carry out the
duties of the President during his
absence or in the event of his
resignation. He shall act as liaison
officer for such committees as the
President shall from time to time
designate, and shall represent their
interests to the Students' Council.
Proposed Revision
(4) (c) The First Vice-President shall assist
the President in the duties of his
office and shall assume and carry
out the duties of the President during his absence or in the event of his
resignation. He shall act as liaison
officer for such committees as the
President shall from time to time
designate, and shall represent their
interests to the Students' Council.
7.  By-law 4 (4) (d)
now reads as follows:—
(4) (d) The External Affairs Officer shall:-
Proposed  Revision
(4) (d) The  Vice-President  -  External   Affairs shall:
8. By-law 4 (4) (e)
now reads as follows:—
(4) (e) The  Internal  Affairs  Officer shall:
Proposed  Revision
(4) (e) The   Vice-President   -   Internal  Affairs shall:
HERE'S  THE  MENU
for
THE  LAST  SUPPER
1. Minutes of the last general harangue,
March 23, 1967.
2. Non-controversial constitution revisions.
3. Report of the AMS treasurer.
4. Auditor's report.
5. President's  report.
6. Controversial constitution revisions.
9. By-law 4 (4) (f) (xvii)
now reads as follows:
<4) (f) (xvii) The   Treasurer   shall   be   the
Chairman     of    the    Finance
Committee    which    shall    be
composed of:-
(a) The U.C.C. Treasurer and
two members of the Students' Council to be appointed by the President
of the Students' Council
in consultation with the
Treasurer, and
Ob) Four members in good
standing of the Alma Mater Society to be appointed
by the Treasurer in consultation with the two Students' Council members
of the Finance Committee.
Proposed  Revision
(4) (f) (xvii) The Treasurer shall be the
Chairman of the Finance
Committee which shall be
composed of:—
(a) The U.C.C. Treasurer and
two members of the Students' Council to be appointed by the Students'
Council after hearing the
recommendations of the
Treasurer, and
(b) Four members in good
standing of the Alma Mater Society to be appointed by Students' Council
after hearing the recommendations of the Treasurer.
11.  By-law 6 (1)
now reads as follows:—
(1) The Executive of the Students' Council
shall be:—
(a) The President
(b) The Vice-President
(c) The External Affairs Officer
. (d) The Internal Affairs Officer
(e) The Treasurer
(f) The Co-ordinator of Activities
(g) The Secretary
Proposed Revision
(1) The Executive of the Students' Council shall be:—
(a) The President
(b) The First Vice-President
(c) The Vice-President — External
Affairs
(d) The Vice-President — Internal
Affairs
(e) The Treasurer
(f) The Coordinator of Activities
(g) The Secretary
12. By-law 6 (2)
now reads as follows:—
(2) The signing officers of the Society shall
be any two of the President, the Vice-
President, the Internal Affairs Officer,
the Treasurer, the Co-ordinator of Activities, and the Secretary; provided
that no one person may sign in two
different capacities.
Proposed  Revision
(2) The signing officers of the Society shall
be any two members of the Executive;
provided that no one person may sign
in two different capacities.
13. By-law 7 (1) (i)
now reads as follows:—
(1) (i) Polling booths shall be open from
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on election
day, with the exception of those at
Fort Camp, Acadia Camp, Totem
Park and the Common Block of the
Permanent Residences which shall
be open from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
only, on the day preceding election
day.
Proposed Revision
(1) (i) Foiling booths shall be open from
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on election
day, with the exception of such advance polls as Council may approve.
14.  By-law 10
now reads as follows:—
A request by the Society to the Board of
Governors for an alteration in the amount
of the membership fee of the Society as
fixed by the Board of Governors under the
Universities Act shall not be made until
the request has been approved by a referendum by secret ballot of the active members of the Society. Two weeks' clear notice of intention to hold such a referendum shall be given by the Secretary of
the Society on resolution of the Students'
Council or a petition signed by five hundred (500) active members in good standing of the Society, and the proposed request shall not be deemed to have been
approved unless twenty percent (20%) of
the active members vote, and two thirds
of the votes cast approve the change.
Proposed Revision
A request by the Society to the Board of
Governors for an alteration in the amount
of the membership fee of the Society as
fixed by the Board of Governors under the
Universities Act shall not be made until
the request has been approved by a referendum by secret ballot of the active members of the Society. Such a referendum
shall be held in accordance with the provisions of By-law 3, as it may be amended
from time to time.
10.  By-law 4 (4)  (g)
now reads as follows:—
(4) (g) The Co-ordinator of Activities shall
be responsible for the co-ordination
and booking of all Alma Mater Society functions and events. He shall
work in close co-operation with the
Treasurer to ensure the financial
success of the various activities of
the Society. He shall act as Brock
Management Committee Chairman.
Proposed Revision
(4) (g) The Co-ordinator of Activities shall
be responsible for the co-ordination
and booking of all Alma Mater
Society functions and events. He
shall work in close co-operation
with the Treasurer to ensure the
financial success of the various
activities of the Society. Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 21, 1968
15. By-law 11  (8)
now reads as follows:—
(8) The Treasurer shall annually deposit
$1,500.00 in the Brock Art Fund, such
fund to be used at the absolute discretion of the Brock Art Committee for
the purpose of purchasing art exhibits,
and that any requirements in excess of
the compulsory grant be evaluated by
the Students' Council.
Proposed Revision
(8) The Treasurer shall annually deposit
$1,500.00 in the Student Union Building Art Fund, such fund to be used at
the absolute discretion of the Student
Union Building Art Committee for the
purpose of purchasing art exhibits.
16.  By-law  19 (1)
now reads as follows:—
(1> The Constitution and By-laws may be
amended by extraordinary resolution
of the Society, or by a referendum
passed by two-thirds majority provided
that at least fifteen percent (15%) of
the active members vote.
Proposed Revision
(1) The Constitution and By-laws may be
amended by extraordinary resolution
of the Society, at a general meeting, in
which case a two-thirds majority shall
be required, or by a referendum, which
shall be subject to the provisions of
By-law 3 (1), (2), (3), (5) and (6>.
17.  By-law 22
now reads as follows:—
Among the principal functions of the
Ubyssey and other publications from time
to time serving as news organs of the Alma
Mater Society shall be the advance notification and sufficient advertisement to the
Society's membership of the events listed
in the Social Calendar of the student handbook, together with the publication of
such social or athletic events or other matters as the Students' Council may direct
to the attention of the Internal Affairs
Officer.
Proposed Revision
Among the principal functions of the
Ubyssey and other publications from time
to time serving as news organs of the
Alma Mater Society shall be the advance
notification and sufficient advertisement
to the Society's membership of the events
listed in the Social Calendar of the student
handbook, together with the publication
of such social or athletic events or other
matters as the Students' Council may direct to the attention of the Vice-President
—Internal Affairs.
18. By-law 23 (4) (a)
now reads as follows:—
(4) (a) Men's Athletic Association team
managers and members are subject
to the eligibility rules established
by the Men's Athletic Committee.
Proposed Revision
(4> (a) Men's    Athletic    Association    team
managers and voting members are
subject to the eligibility rules established by the Men's Athletic
Committee.
19. By-law 23 (5) (a)
now reads as follows:—
(5) (a) The Alma Mater Society Eligibility
Committee shall be composed of a
Students' Councillor as Chairman,
one other Students' Councillor, and
one other Alma Mater Society
member, all of whom shall be appointed by the Alma Mater Society
President, and the President of the
University Clubs Committee.
Proposed  Revision
(5) (a) The Alma Mater Eligibility Committee shall be composed of the
A.M.S. Secretary as Chairman, one
other Students' Councillor, and one
other Alma Mater Society member, all of whom shall be appointed by the Students' Council, and
the President of the University
Clubs Committee.
20. By-law 4 (6) (i) (ii)
now reads as follows:—
(6) (i) (ii) Student members shall be appointed to those University,
Faculty, Senate and Presidents'
committees as is required by
the University Administration.
Proposed Revision
(6) (i) (ii) Members shall be appointed to
those University, Faculty, Senate and President's committees
as is required by the University
Administration.
21.  By-law 7 (2)
now reads as follows:—
(2) No student shall hold more than one
office on the Students' Council during
any one session.
Proposed Revision
(2) No member shall hold more than one
office on the Students' Council during
any one session.
CONTROVERSIAL
22. Proposed  Revision
Add new By-law 1 (1) (c) as follows:—
(1) (c) Any    elected     Executive     officer,
while serving his term of office.
23. By-law 1   (5) (a)
now reads as follows:—
(5) (a) On a member ceasing to be a registered student of the University of
British Columbia, or on ceasing to
be a student of an affiliated college.
Proposed Revision
(5) (a) On a member ceasing to be a registered student of the University of
British Columbia, or on ceasing to
be a student of an affiliated college, unless he is a person declared
to be a member under By-law 1
(1) (O
24. By-law 4 (3) (a)
now reads as follows:—
(3) (a) The President, who shall have successfully completed his second
year or its equivalent, and who has
attended the University of British
Columbia for at least two years,
and who has not previously held
the position of President of the
Society.
Proposed Revision
(3) (a) The President, who shall have successfully completed his second year
or its equivalent, and who has attended the University of British
Columbia for at least one full winter session (September to May inclusive and consecutively), and
who has not previously held the
position of President of the Society.
25. By-law 4 (3) (b)
now reads as follows:—
(3) (b) The First Vice-President, who shall
have successfully completed his
second year or its equivalent, and
who has attended the University of
British Columbia for at least two
years.
Proposed Revision
(3) (b) The First Vice-President, who shall
have successfully completed his
second year or its equivalent, and
who has attended the University of
British Columbia for at least one
full winter session (September to
May inclusive and consecutively).
26. By-law 4 (5) (b)
now reads as follows:—
(5) (b) Upon the moving and seconding of
any motion, any voting member of
Students' Council may move that
voting on the motion before the
Council be taken by a weighted
vote.
Poposed Revision
(5) (b) Upon the moving and seconding
of any motion, any voting member
of Students' Council may request
that voting on the motion before
the Council be taken by a weighted
vote.
27. By-law 4 (5) (c)
now reads as follows:—
(5) (c) If the motion for a weighted vote
is seconded and the motion is carried, voting on the motion before
the Council will be taken and computed as follows:—
Proposed Revision
(5) (c) If a request for a weighted vote is
made, voting on the motion before
the Council will be taken and computed as follows:—
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UNDER GRADS
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Phone  or  Visit The
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547 Seymour St.
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684 - 7341 Thursday, March 21, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
28. Proposed Revision
Add new By-law 7 (4) and (5) as follows:—
(4) In the event that an Executive position becomes vacant, Students' Council shall call a by-election, and such by-
election shall be held in accordance
with the requirements of By-law 7 (1)
(c) to (j).
(5) In the event that an Executive's position becomes vacant with less than a
period of two months remaining before
the Annual General Meeting of the
Society, Students' Council shall have
the power to fill the vacancy for the
period of time remaining by appointment.
29.  By-law 21   (1)
now reads as follows:—
(1) Honoraria shall be granted to the
President and the Treasurer of the Society and to the Editor-in-Chief of the
Ubyssey consisting of the equivalent
of their tuition fees at the University
of British Columbia during their term
of office.
Proposed Revision
(1) Honoraria shall be granted to the
President and the Treasurer of the Society and to the Editor-in-Chief of the
Ubyssey consisting of six hundred dollars ($600.00) or the equivalent of their
tuition fees (whichever is greater) at
the University of British Columbia during their term of office.
30. By-law 21  (3)
now reads as follows:—
(3) An honorarium of two hundred dollars ($200) shall be granted to the Editor of Totem, honoraria of one hundred
dollars ($100) each shall be granted to
the Co-ordinator of Totem and to the
Photography Editor of Totem.
Proposed Revision
Delete By-law 21 (3) and add new By-law
21 (3> as follows:—
(3) Honoraria shall be granted to the First
Vice-President, the Vice-President —
External Affairs, the Vice-President —
Internal Affairs, the Secretary, the Coordinator of Activities, and the Ombudsman, consisting of two hundred
dollars ($200).
31. By-law 21   (4)
now reads as follows:—
(4) An honorarium shall be granted to the
Co-ordinator of Activities consisting of
two hundred dollars ($200).
Proposed Revision
Delete By-law 21  (4) and Renumber Bylaw 21 (5) as By-law 21 (4),
32. By-law 23 (5) (c)
now reads as follows: —
(5) (c) Powers: The Eligibility Committee
shall have the power, subject to
the approval of Students' Council,
to declare any student ineligible
for all his offices if he fails to comply with the requirements of Bylaw 23 (1), (2) or (3). The Committee
shall also have the power, subject
to ratification by Students' Council, to exempt any student or students from eligibility.
Proposed Revision
(5) (c) Powers: The Eligibility Committee
shall have the power, subject to
the approval of Students' Council,
to declare any student ineligible
for all his offices if he fails to comply with the requirements of Bylaw 23 (1), (2) or (3) or By-law 4
(3). The Committee shall also have
the power, subject to ratification
by Students' Council, to exempt
any students from the requirements of By-law 23 (1), (2) or (3).
33. By-law 9 - Students' Court
Add new By-law 9 as follows:—
(1) There shall be a Students' Court which
shall be the sole interpreter of the
meaning of the Constitution, Code and
By-laws of the Alma Mater Society and
shall deliver a written opinion upon
any portion thereof at the request of
Students' Council, or any active member of the Society.
(2) The Students' Court shall be empowered and is hereby empowered subject
to Section 61 of the "Universities Act"
and Section 28 of the "Societies Act"
to exercise disciplinary powers over
students and Alma Mater Society organizations.
(3) For greater certainty, the Court shall
have jurisdiction:
(a) over individuals:—
(i) for any alleged violations of
the Alma Mater Society Constitution, By-laws or Code;
(ii) for any alleged violation of
any rule, resolution or regulation passed by the Students'
Council or the Society for the
governance of the members;
(iii) for any behaviour deemed unbecoming to a student of the
University or a member of the
Society,
(b) over Alma Mater Society organizations:—
(i) for any alleged violations of
the Alma Mater Society Constitution, By-laws or Code;
(ii) for any alleged violation of
any rule, resolution or regulation passed by the Students'
Council or the Society for the
governance of the students;
(iii) for any alleged failure to maintain a proper standard of conduct at any event sponsored or
organized by the  organization.
(4) For any violation of subparagraph (a)
above, the Court may:
(a) impose fines not to in excess of
$5.00 per member;
(b) suspend that individual from all
Alma Mater Society privileges for
any period less than one calendar
year.
(5) For any violation of sub-paragraph (b)
above, the Court may:
(a) order that restitution be made by
payment out of the general funds
of that organization of such amount
as the Court shall see fit in all circumstances, all such amounts to be
applied toward remedying any loss
or damage caused;
(b) in extreme cases order, in addition,
the suspension of that organization
from the Alma Mater Society.
(6) No judgment of the Court pronounced
under the jurisdiction conferred by
paragraph (1) of By-law 12, shall be
enforceable against any person or Alma
Mater Society organization judged
guilty until it is ratified by a majority
vote of Students' Council.
(7) (a) Any student or Alma Mater Society
organization judged  guilty by the
Court shall have an appeal, as of
right, to the Faculty Council.
(b) No appeal may be taken from an
acquittal by the Court.
(8) (a) The   Court   shall   consist   of   five
judges and two alternate judges to
be appointed by a majority vote of
the last joint meeting of the incoming and outgoing Students' Councils or by a two-thirds majority of
Students' Council.
(b) The Chief Justice shall be entering
the course prescribed for third
year law students of the Faculty
of Law.
(c) The Chief Justice and at least one
other judge, and at least one alternate judge, shall be members of
the Law Students' Association.
(d) When appointed by the Chief Justice to sit on a particular hearing,
alternative judges shall have a full
rank and authority of judges.
(e) A quorum of the Court shall be five
judges.
(f) The   Students'   Council  shall,   by  a
two-thirds majority vote, provide
Rules of Procedure to guide the-
conduct of all hearings before the
Court. The Rules of Procedure
shall be included in and be part of
the Code of the Society.
(g) Each individual accused is entitled
to be represented by any one active member in good standing of the
Alma Mater Society.
(9) A Clerk of the Court shall be appointed at the last joint meeting of the incoming and outgoing Students' Councils by a two-thirds majority of Students' Council. His duties shall be:
(a) to publish a notice in Form C for
each sitting of the Court.
(b) to prepare a room suitable for a
sitting of the Court for the time,
day and place specified in the notice of charge duly received by the
accused in that proceeding.
(c) to take possession of and be responsible for the production of all
exhibits and other materials relevant to a proceeding.
(d) to record the course of the proceed
ings and, in particular, the points
of evidence adduced by counsel
and to keep the same in a bound
volume in a secure place.
(e) to request of each witness and each
accused called to give testimony,
an undertaking in the terms of
Form D.
(f) to request of each witness and each
accused a statement of his name,
faculty and year.
(g) to record the judgment of the Court
in a bound volume to be kept in a
secure place.
(h) to publish by notice in the Ubyssey
the decision of the Court and the
recommendations of the Court (if
any) with regard to the prevention
of a recurrence of the offience
charged.
34. By-law 10-Student Senators
Add new By-law 10 as follows:—
(1) There shall be four Senators who shall
participate fully in the research, discussion and decision-making of the
Senate and its Committees, taking into
account the interests of the student
body and the University community as
a whole.
Student Senators are not directly accountable to the Students' Council of
the Alma Mater Society, but it is hoped
and anticipated that from time to time,
student Senators will report to the Students' Council, its subsidiary organizations, and any other interested student
groups, on the issues facing the Senate
and its deliberations and decisions relating thereto.
(2) One of the four Senators shall be registered in the Faculty of Graduate
Studies and shall be nominated and
elected by the membership of the Faculty of Graduate Studies only. The remaining three Senators shall be nominated and elected by the remaining
members of the Society. Students in
Graduate Studies may be nominated
for any of the three remaining posi- .
tions, by any member, provided that
such candidates shall clearly show on
their nomination papers that they are
not candidates for the Graduate Student seat. Each Senator shall serve a
term of two years.
(3) (a) Nominations   for   the   positions   of
student Senators will open on the
first day of registration and close
no later than two weeks before the
day of election,
(b) Elections for the postions of student Senators in any given year,
will take place on or before October 31, two Senators to be elected
each year. Elections shall be held
in accordance with the provisions
of the Constitution and Code and
in accordance with election procedures passed by Students' Council and in force at the time the
election is held. For transitional
purposes, there shall be no regular
election for the Senator for the
Faculty of Graduate Studies on or
before October 31, 1968, but this
sentence of this By-law shall have
no further force or effect beyond
October 31, 1968 and shall be deleted from the Constitution beyond
that time without the requirement
of further revision.
(4) All questions of eligibility arising from
the following requirements are to be
decided by the Registrar of the University and a member of the Executive
of the Students' Council of the Alma
Mater Society.
(a) A candidate for Undergraduate
Senator must be a student in the
academic year most recently taken
prior to the election and must have
taken a full winter session programme of studies at this University and attained at least a second-
class standing.
(b> A candidate for the position of
Graduate Studies Senator:
(i) must have been granted clear
admission to, and be enrolled
in, the Faculty of Graduate
Studies.
(ii) the student, in the academic
year most recently taken prior
to the election, must have taken
a full winter session programme
of studies at this University
and attained at least a second-
class standing.
(5) To retain eligibility for Senate membership, a student Senator must continue to carry satisfactorily a full academic load in a regular winter session
in the faculty in which he is registered
at this University.
(6) Vacancies caused by withdrawal of a
student Senator from the University or
by resignation from office, or by failure to maintain elegibility requirements, shall be filled by the holding of
a by-election which shall conform to
the requirements of this Constitution
and Code and any election rules and
procedures passed by the Students'
Council which are in force and applicable. A Senator elected by a by-election shall be elected for the term remaining to the Senator whose office
has become vacant. Should a vacancy
occur in the office of the student Senator from the Faculty of Graduate
Studies, only the members of that
faculty will vote in the by-election
held to fill the vacancy.
35. Present By-laws 9 through 25
to be renumbered 11 through 27 inclusive.
36. Present  By-law  12
to   be   amended   by   deleting   subsections
(5) and (6). Education
for
Leadership
Are you the young man who can accept a challenge? if you want a University
degree, and if you have the desire and determination to excel in studies, sports, and
personal development you will find that challenge at one of the Canadian Military
Colleges.
The Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP) is your opportunity to achieve your
education goal, with all expenses paid, and to become a career Officer.
Go with us. The Canadian Armed Forces. Thursday, March 21, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  11
NORAD:
By JOHN KELSEY
Candian  University Press
Come May 12, Canada will renew her agreement
with the U.S. and remain a nuclear dumping
ground for the sake of American cities.
It's called NORAD. It started in 1958 and is
now up for renewal. NORAID's supposed to defend
North America from Soviet bombers.  Paul Martin
thinks it gives Canada a voice in hemisphere
defense policy.
He's kidding us.  All it actually does is cost $130
million a year and sell 4,000 miles of undefended
border for a few obsolete Voodoo fighters and
Bomarc missiles.
The original NORAD agreement gave away the
military control: "Temporary reinforcement from
one area to another, including the crossing of the
international boundary, to meet operational
requirements will be within the authority of commanders having operational control."
The NORAD commander is an American general
based in Colorado Springs.
External affairs minister Martin recognizes the
problem of sovereignty—the U.S.'s real defence
system, the   anti-ballistic missile net, doesn't need
any bases in Canada and so Canada isn't involved
or consulted.   They just shoot the junk down
over Canada.
Martin wants to be consulted.   On Nov. 13,
1967, he told the Canadian Club in Toronto: "Unless
one is prepared for a complete transformation in
our relations with the United States, Canada has
two options: to make some contribution to the
bomber defence system — and thereby to exercise
some control over it — or to give the United
States freedom to defend North America, including
use of Canadian territory.   I, for one, am not
prepared to accept the second."
Trouble is,  the U.S. doesn't need Canadian
territory to shoot down missiles.   They just
land here.
Martin reiterated his statement before the
commons defence committee on March 7: to have
How Paul Martin and the
sold out to the pentagon
diplomatic  niceties.
a voice at all, Canada stays in NORAD and
worries about bombers.
But what is NORAD and has it given Canada
any voice?   It's to paste whatever the Soviets
use for B52s as they come over the pole.   With
our 60 obsolete Voodoo F-101B fighters and our
handful of Bomarc Bs at La Macaza, Quebec and
North Bay, Ontario.   It directly implicates us
in Vietnam, where the NORAD 552nd wing flies
surveillance missions for  U.S.  forces.   And  we've
got the keys to a little satellite tracking camera
at Cold Lake, Alberta.
In July, 1966 the U.S. declared its Bomarcs
surplus — not merely obsolete, but surplus —
and gave them to the navy for target practice.
Voodoos were designed for Korea and went
out of production in 1960.
Maybe keeping the obsolete junk in order and
signing up for more does guarantee Canada  some
say in UjS. war policy.   Martin thinks so.   The
last near-war crisis  was in 1962, when Kennedy
nearly bombed hell out of Cuba for having her
own defence missiles. Prime minister Diefenbaker
heard it on the news.   And Canada's had an
enormous say in U.S. Vietnam policy.
If there's an attack threat at all, which is
doubtful, it's via missiles.   The Soviet Union had
1,000 bombers when NORAD unfolded in 1958;
today it's got 150.   China hasn't any.
The U.S. main defense is its new, all-American-
soil ABM system.  It disposes of incoming nuclear
junk over Canadian territory with Spartan
missiles.   Canada gets the intercepted warheads,
with all their attendant fall-out, shock waves,
radiation, heat, x-rays, debris and force.   American
cities get the missiles leaking throught the ABM
umbrella.   They don't even ask  Martin about the
ABM net —■ he reads it in Time.
Since the Strategic Air Command (SAC), the
U.S. nuclear defense-attack command, is operated
entirely outside both NORAD and NATO, it isn't
likely anyone will head before the big fire starts.
Neither the PM's office, the defense department
or the external affairs department will talk about
parliament  hill   gang   have
in   a   quiet   exchange   of
what happens on May  12.   Government policy has
not yet been formulated.
Just like last time, the agreement will be
signed in secret and released later.   Just like last
Aug.  12, when Canada signed another pact placing
the  whole continent under U.S.  command for
the duration of any nuclear emergency.   That one
was for civil defence purposes and cleaning up
after the fire, but even it wasn't released until
the daily press sniffed it out in late October.
NORAD's getting a bit of a public airing.   It
isn't scheduled for commons debate at all.  But the
New Democratic party keeps bringing it up
during house sessions   of the ways and means
committee, currently discussing ways to chop
Sharp's budget.   Defense critic Andrew Brewin
managed an anti-NORAD speech to save the $130
million a year last Friday,  and Grace Mclnnes got
another off Tuesday.  University of Saskatchewan
at Saskatoon professor John W. Warnock wrote
a 29-page brief, which lias been mailed to all
MPs.
Elsewhere, the Movement for Socialist Liberation in Montreal is preparing pamphlets for a
tentative Ottawa demonstration outside the Liberal
leadership convention April 6 weekend.   Said the
movement: "NORAD, as a defence system, is antiquated, useless and expensive.   It represents U.S.
manipulation of the whole North American continent and is yet another manisfestation of neocolonialism.   Canada's defense policy will be
a joke in history books, but somehow it is hard
to laugh today."
The movement is working on an article for
Our Generation magazine, and the next issue of
Canadian 'Dimension will have some stuff by
Warnock.
Small stuff.  Up on parliament hill, Paul Martin's
men are drafting the new agreement right now
— an exchange  of diplomatic notes to make sure
Canada will acquiesce to a defense strategy that
pops all the big ones over her territory, pays
for the privilege, and continues to pretend she has
a pipeline to the U.S. brass.
Democratic 10-year plan
solves election problems
By GABOR MATE
Discussing the American presidential
campaign the other day, a few of us came up
with the solution to the Democratic quandary.
To have Johnson as their candidate, we
decided, is for the Democrats to commit suicide.
What they need is a young man with a fresh
image, who is not fully committed to the war
in Vietnam.  Bobby Kennedy, obviously.
But while Kennedy will draw the votes of
many people who have been sucked into
believing the American political system still
offers genuine alternatives and Kennedy is that
alternative, his candidacy is not sufficient to
attract the votes of the southern conservatives.
No, to attract the southern votes the
Democrats should chose a man from the South,
a vigorous anti-Communist,  a man who has
proven his ability to wheel-and-deal in the
southern fashion.   Nobody, we decided, .could
play this better than (Lyndon Johnson.   Hence,
it is our suggestion that the Democrats
nominate Bobby Kennedy for president, with
Lyndon B. Johnson for vice-president.
This combination will narrowly defeat Nixon
in 1968, after which Kennedy will initiate
spot-bombing of Chinese military installations.
In 1970 Bobby Kennedy could be assassinated.
Johnson would once more become president,
and — following policies Kennedy will have
initiated — he will extend the war with
Red China.
1972 Johnson will handily defeat the ultra-
conservative Reagan and will then proceed
to invade the whole world.   But he will run
into problems.   There will be riots in the
ghettos, people will get increasingly dissatisfied
with the escalating world war, and the credibility gap will widen still further.
In  1976,  therefore,  the  Democratic party
will search for a young man with a fresh
image, who is not committed to the world war.
Teddy Kennedy, obviously.
But while Kennedy will draw the votes of
many people who have been sucked into
believing the American political system still
offers genuine alternatives and Teddy Kennedy
is that alternative, his candidacy will not be
sufficient to attract the votes of the southern
conservatives.
In  1976 the Democrats will have to search
for   a new presidential candidate.  They will need a young
man with a fresh image who
is   not  fully   committed  to
Johnson's war policies.   Obviously, Teddy Kennedy.
But while Teddy Kennedy
will draw the votes of some
jP|ljTjj||m^^    people who will still believe
n. "*•*■•"  ^B   that the American system still
MATE offers  genuine  alternatives
and that Kennedy  is that alternative, his
candidacy will not be sufficient to attract the
votes of the southern conservatives.
No,  to  attract the  southern  votes the
Democrats should chose a man from the south,
a vigorous anti-Communist, a man who has
proven his ability to wheel-and-deal in the
southern fashion. Who else but Lyndon B.
Johnson?
The Kennedy-Johnson  combination will
narrowly defeat Nixon in 1976, after which
Teddy Kennedy will declare war on Mars . . .
The New Feminine Mystique
The age of chivalry is not dead. A vaguely clinging slither of crepe, the crash of layered lace
at your throat brings it back to life. It's all part
of the Romantic Look *•—  A "T"^^ lv  |f(^
in  the Flair  Shop,  at t./\ I V-*J IN O Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 21, 1968
The dateline is George Washington junior high
school, Oakland, California. Rather than review
this book, I thought the best thing to do would be
to  give  a  sample  of it.  Herndon  says,  "In
this book I'm trying to tell about my year teaching
—learning to teach—in a public school, a year
spent in a particular school, at a particular
time, and with particular students.  These
particulars are my anecdote. It is certainly the
anecdote that counts. Not the moral, the point, or
the interpretation."
The Way It Spozed To Be as a narrative is
intelligent, bitingly witty and carries an enormous
feeling for what learning and teaching are like
inside the classroom.
The thing about Herndon as a man that comes
through refreshingly is his ability to remain
unfrightened when faced with  any display of
vitality, originality or response on the part
of his students.
He just happens, along the way, to make some
pretty important statements about education,
black people, the middle-class value system
(where, possibly, the only realistic response from
his students is to say no to it), and, at the
same time, unfold a narrative of 'the long season'
that carries a real structure of language and of
California as the particular place where he's at.
—Stan Persky
THE
WAY
SPOZED
TO BE
A book by James Herndon (New York, Simon
and Schuster, 1968).
Mrs. y—
the end
of advice
Skates analyzed my situation for me: the
sub (Mrs. A) had said I was incompetent, and
the consultant (Mrs. X) had come down to talk to
me. Neither she nor Grissum had been satisifed;
they couldn't quite decide, so the language
supervisor (Mrs. Y) arrived in a couple more
days to observe me and my classes. It was a
catastrophe.
Mrs. Y. arrived in the afternoon, just In
the middle of 7B's editing  period—the third
stage of their composition unit.  The stories had
already been written and read aloud, and now
had been passed out to other kids for them
to edit—make corrections, remarks, suggestions
—and give back to the writers.   It was work
everyone liked; they corrected with crusading
zeal and  commented freely and at length on
the cover sheets I gave them.   It was the only
time in the whole day when I really knew
what we were doing.
Mrs. Y sat in the back of the room, •watching,
I suppose, the kids talking back and forth about
the papers and writing on them and showing
what they'd written to everyone else, and
observing me walking around, looking at the
work, making a mark here and there,  talking
to a kid—period passed  quickly.   Near the
end some of them read the comments which
had been made on their work and there was
a lot of spirited arguing back  and forth.
Then the bell rang, and I was hoping she
would go on back downtown, but no luck.
She stayed there in the back of the room, nodded
to me, said nothing, didn't ask what the kids
had been doing; 8B entered, and we opened
up with a dull fifteen minutes of instruction,
on how to use quotation marks.   I demonstrated
on the board, explained, referred to pages in
the book.   8B couldn't have been less interested,
but the presence of Mrs. Y—whom they didn't
know—inspired them to the kind of phony
eagerness they reserved for visits from important people like Grissum or Miss Bentley.   Even
that wore off before the period was half over,
but by that time I had assigned them a bunch
of sentences to punctuate with these same
quotation  marks, so they had to make a show
out of that too, writing furiously.
By the time that wore off, the period was
over.   I felt uncomfortable with Mrs. Y in the
room, just sitting there.   I knew she was there
to judge my work, and, considering that I
knew she  was there to judge my work, and,
considering that I didn't know what I was doing,
I wished they could have waited awhile.   Not
yet! I wanted to say; come around later when
I've got it all figured out!   7B had been at their
best — bright, witty and peaceable, doing
something they liked to do, and 8B had conned
themselves into a semblance of respectability.
Surely she'll go on back now, I thought, but
someone must have tipped her off — she was
determined to stick around and have a look
at 7H.
They came hooting up the
stairs as usual, their
day almost over, one more
crazy period. They flung
themselves into the room
shouting information, what
Roy did in Mr. Brooks7 room
and what Mr. Brooks sav,
what Alexandra say then and
so Mr. Brooks he say it ain't
no business of Alexandra's
... the usual jubilant five
minutes, ending up normally
with the question: What
we going to do today,
Mr. Herndon?
I had already given that qu°stion some
thought, in view of Mrs. Y.   For the first time
I wished old Virgil was back so we could put
on our reading groups -which looked so good
to Harvey.  On the other hand I'd been thinking
it was about time to start them up again,
choose some new leaders to take Virgil's
place .  . . why  not?   I thought. After all, it
was about all we had to show Mrs. Y.   So I
decided to try it with Judy and Wade, a big kid
who read pretty well and who didn't have any
outstanding quarrel with anyone; after some
shouting to get everyone in seats and quiet,
I announced we -were going to have reading
groups.   Immediately a  chorus of yells went
up, mostly to the point of who was going to be
the leader of the other group?   Each one suggested himself, and each suggestion met with
loud and derogatory comment. I proposed Wade.
General outrage at my stupidity. What?
Wade?   That watermelon-headed . . . and so on.
Wade got mad then, of course, and rose up,
threatening to whip someone's black ass, and
inevitably then proud Alexandra  took it
upon herself to call Wade down.
But poor Wade, like everyone else there,
was afraid of Alexandra so he quickly discovered he was mad at Harvey and called him
down so it would seem like he just didn't have
time for Alexandra.  Everyone was standing
now,  rushing around to confront someone else
or yelling across the room; Roy, out of everyone's league as far as fighting was concerned,
dashing up to  me to laugh and laugh—
it was a madhouse.
Still, we'd had uproars before.   We had
them every time some new arrangement had to
be made in the class.   (We had them other
times, too, for other reasons or for no reason
as far as I knew, but this kind was predictable.
I should have thought of it, in view of Mrs. Y.)
The uproar meant simply that they weren't sure
what was going to happen, that as soon as it
was possible to be heard I would have to
explain it to them while they examined the
proposition from every angle for hidden dangers
and traps, and then we would go ahead and try
to do it or else abandon it if it proved too
risky.   I mean to say I was used to it, and
although Mrs. Y was still there in the back of
my mind,   I thought she'd see what the panic
was all about and it might even be a useful
demonstration.   I got ready to begin cooling
everyone off, thinking that perhaps we should
have two, may be three more reading leaders
which would take the pressure off of Wade
and the group too, planning how to explain
it for all of us.  I moved over to deal with
Alexandra first, who by this time was angrily
claiming that Wade was trying to start a fight
with her so's she would get in trouble and
continued on Page 13 Thursday, March 21, 1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
from Page 12
how she didn't let nobody pick on her . . .
but all of a sudden everyone shut up and I
looked around and saw that Mrs. Y was
standing there in front of the class.
In all my life, said Mrs. Y, I have never
seen such a rude, disorderly, disgraceful class!
Grissum
steps in
It was in the kids' language that Mr. Gris-
son's name always came out Grissum. They
didn't intend to ridicule him; it just came out
that way. In time many of the teachers could
be heard saying Grissum too, and looking back
at these pages, I find it written that way
more than once.   Around GW it just seemed
to fit.
He called me into his office the day after
Mrs. Y's visit.   Her moral lecture to 7H about
courtesy and behavior had not been a success,
a fact which both surprised and angered her.
It had probably always worked for her—■
meaning that the kids, whatever kids, had
lowered their heads and looked ashamed
and shut up while being lectured.   It probably
hadn't made anyone more courteous in the
long run.
Anyway, 7H didn't take to
head-lowering. They had
started in immediately to
argue with her. They weren't
doing anything wrong, they
interrupted her say, Why
was she coming into their
room talking like that? This
Mr. Hern-don's class, it ain't
yours! How come you spozed
to be here telling us what to
do?
It got worse and worse.    Mrs.  Y  couldn't
believe her ears.  I sat down; it was all hers.
Harvey stood up and said indignantly, We're
trying to get our reading groups and you
won't let us do it!   Alexandra got mad and
stood up too and yelled that no one was going
to tell her that she wasn't nice, whereupon
Roy yelled out that Alexandra wasn't nice nor
her mama either and everyone else laughed
and Mrs. Y screeched out that she'd never been
so insulted in her entire life, and left.
Mr. Grisson wanted to know if I thought it
correct that my class should be allowed to
insult a visitor.   No, I didn't, I said.   On the
other hand, I said, no one had insulted her
at all until she got up and called the class rude.
Since she'd decided to take charge of the class,
I figured she wanted to go ahead and handle it.
He considered that. Then he said, Why do
you suppose she decided to take over your
class?
Well, from what she said, she thought they
were acting badly and wanted to straighten
them out. I feel she should have left them alone.
I went on to tell him what we'd been doing,
explained that the uproar was caused by the
approach of a new arrangement and so on.
Did you appoint a reading leader? he asked.
Yeah, I said, I suggested a kid.
And do you think the students were going
to be able to pick out a better person to be
leader?
No, I admitted that Wade was probably the
best one.  I tried to explain that we would
have ended up with Wade anyway, tried hurriedly to mention 7H's fears about reading,
reading leaders, but time had run out. He told
me to expect him today, last period.
The class needs a firm reprimand for yesterday's actions, he said, and obviously he,
not I, was the person to accomplish that.  Also,
he added, that class is going to be here, all
together, all this year.   I think it best they
understand once and for all how they are to
behave. And you yourself will be able to
see an excellent method for insuring that.
Last period that day 7H piled up the
stairs, but stopped short when they saw Grissum
standing by the door.   We all went into the
room; the kids sat down and I took up a
position over by the windows.   Grissum stood
in front of the class, erect, looking straight
ahead —■ we all waited until the bell rang.
At that, Grissum told them in a few short
sentences that they had misbehaved, explained
the high status of the visitor, described her
shock.  He wondered if they desired it to be said
downtown that GW was a school where visitors
hated to come,   for fear of being insulted.
Then he told them that Mr. Herndon would
pass out paper—I went over to get it—and that
they were to wait in silence while he wrote
something on the board. While he wrote, I
passed out the sheets.   The kids were all saying, Thank you,   Mr. Herndon, in meek voices,
trying to make things right. Grissum finished
writing and turned around.  He began by saying
that what he'd written was a contract.   Do
you know what a contract is?  He told them
briefly that it meant that both sides agreed to
do certain things, that neither side was to
break faith, and then he told them to copy
the paragraph on the paper I'd handed out.
The   paragraph itself said  something  about
how I the undersigned promise to behave
properly and according to the standards of GW
at all times, etc.   It didn't say what Grissum or
GW was promising to do for them.  I stood
around, feeling vaguely as if I should be copying
it down too.  Grissum stood erect and motionless in his light gray suit.  No one said anything.   It lasted about fifteen minutes—it
took a long time for 7H to draw those words
on the paper, for that was what most of them
had to do, of course ,draw those words, leave
spaces, connect those letters, space, draw
some more.
Finally Grissum told them to
sign their names at the
bottom. They all did. Then he
went to each kid and
collected his contract,
shaking each one's hand as
he did so. Then, all done, he
told them they'd shaken
hands on the bargain, they'd
made an agreement, and he
was going to keep those
contracts in his office for
the rest of the year. He knew
no one there was going to
break his contract. Am I
right? he asked them. Yes,
Mr. Grissum, we all agreed.
Good, he said firmly, and off
he went.
There were about ten
minutes left in the period,
during which all hell broke
lose.
**************4»
DANCE,:.; FABULOUS
COASTERS
HELD OVER TONIGHT
AND ALL NEXT WEEK
iKmg of (EUthfi
1275 Seymour St. Reservations MU 1-4010
NOW OPEN 6 NIGHTS A  WEEK!
♦***** *********
FAMOUS ARTISTS LTD.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
APRIL 2 TO 6 AT 8:30 P.M.
SAT. MATINEE AT 2:30 P.M.
sf**11
THE SOVIET NAVY
ENSEMBLE
singers   'dancers-   musicians
PRICES: EVES.: 6.00, 5.50,4.50, 3.50,2.50
MAT.: 5.00, 4.00, 3.00, 2.00
Tickets available in the Bay Box Office,
Main Floor at the Bay — Dailit 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. Phone 681-3351. Page 14
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 21, 1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Dogans debate Virginia
NEWMAN CLUB
Who's    Afraid    of   Virginia
Woolf,   lecture  and  discussion
by Dr. J. Hulcoop at St. Mark's
lounge, noon today.
CHORAL   SOCIETY
Turn in all music by Monday
to Brock ext. 360.
ALPHA OMEGA
Annual  meeting  today  7:30
p.m. in grad center.
MUSIC US
University of Oregon concert
band,   today,    1   p.m.,   Brock
lounge, admission free.
SCIENCE US
Old exams now on sale, noon,
in Hennings lobby and SUS
common room <Math annex
1119). Large selection.
CUSO
Hear Judy Pullen, returned
volunteer on Tibetan refugees,
75,000 Fled, Friday noon, Bu.
104.
DANCE CLUB
Today — pin exams, Friday
— novelty dances, Saturday —
pin party-social mixer at
lounge with Mr. Pedersen's
studio.
VOC
Exchange with International
House, Friday night at IH. All
VOC members welcome.
SCIENCE US
Science general meeting today noon in Henn. 201. From
here science students will go
en masse to AMS general meeting in armory.
Profs, courses
being tubbed
Black and Blue
Science students are reviewing their courses two ways this
spring.
More than 12,000 questionnaires for the third edition of
the Black and Blue review,
the science anticalendar, have
been distributed to UBC science
students already busy studying
for final exams.
The anticalendar aims at criticizing professors and courses
in order to enlighten students.
Review editor Fran McGrath
said Wednesday the questionnaire is mainly objective. Professors are graded on a seven
point scale on such things delivery, availability out of class
and presentation of abstract
theories.
"There is room for subjective comment after each
question," Miss McGrath said.
She said the objective questions will be analysed by computer, while subjective
comments will be evaluated by
hand.
The review will be distributed on campus in September.
'African Elites'
A Talk Today
NOON AT
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
by
DR.  F.   STOCKHOLDER,
Quondam  Lecturer in  English
University of Ghana
Coffee
ROBSON HOUSE
Robson house dance cruise
tickets now available from any
Robsonite. Ship leaves north
foot of Denman at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday for Belcarra Park
lodge. Action from Winnipeg
will be playing.
VIETNAM COMMITTEE
Hear Vietnam veteran Francis Rocks, member of Vietnam
Veterans Against the War,
speak today 3:30 p.m., Bu. 106.
COLLEGE LIFE
Teach-in   with   Dr.   Ross   on
the resurrection noon today in
ed. 1006.
MUSSOC
Spring 'banquet 7 p.m. at the
Wayen,  158 East Pender. Sign
list in clubroom Friday.
VCF
Friday noon — What Makes
Sacred Music Sacred? Ang. 110.
CLASSICS CLUB
Prof. E. J. Kennedy speaks
on current developments in
English classical education at
8 p.m. Friday, 4155 West
Twelfth.
SPANISH AND ITALIAN
DEPT.
Spanish conversations in
stage room at IH every Friday
3:30 to 5:30 p.m., all students
welcome.
CO-OP
Today's   meeting   postponed
until   next   Thursday.   Anyone
interested    in    forming    co-op
house call Blaize at 224-9835.
CLASSICS   DEPARTMENT
Prof.   E.   J.   Kenney   speaks
on understanding Lucretis, today noon in Bu. 100.
CURLING  CLUB
Genral   meeting   and   elections Tuesday noon in Bu. 202.
Very   important,   everyone   attend.
EL CIRCULO
Meeting   today  noon  in   IH
402-404 with tapes on La Zapa-
teria    Prodigiosa    by    Garcia
Lorca.
EDUCATION US
PTA member speaks tomorrow in ed. 100 on the role of
the association in schools today.
Sav£ on ftookA
We BUY and SELL new & used
university or high school text books
hard covers or paper backs
(fiuAy "ff' (BookA
146 W. Hastings St. MU. 1-4931
across from Woodward's
VOLKSWAGEN
SPECIALISTS
Large Stock of Parts on Hand
CERTIFIED MECHANICS
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th 224-0828
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75c, 3 days $2.00.
Commercal—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
CARL GRAVES AND SOUL UN-
limited, March 23, Kerrisdale Community Centre, 8-12:00, tickets $1.50
KU   232   or   door.
A GIANT DANCE TO THE ORGAN-
ization. Mar. 23, from 9 to 1 at
J1.25/soul.
Lost & Found
IS
LOST:    GOLD    CHAIN    BRACELET,
Fri., Mar. 1 in Chem. Bldg. 736-7063.
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
VARIED SELECTION OF
NEW SPRING FASHIONS
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10% discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10TH - 738-9833
POUND: THREE MEN'S WATCHES
& sev. glasses, identify & claim,
Pub.   Off.,   Brock   Hall.
LOST: MY WALLET! PLEASE PH.
Glen 224-6774 or turn in to Pub.
Off.,   desperate   for   I.D.!
LOST MY BLACK PURSE WALLET!
Sani, 876-1246 or turn in to Pub.,
desperate   for   I.D!
LOST: MY SHOE! BLACK LEA-
ther Slingback between Acadia and
Library. Please phone Blaize at 224-
9835.
Scandals
37
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
A*,e. 228-8933.
BIO BAND BLUES! YES MARTHA
the Organization will be here Sat.
YOU CAN MAKE GREAT MONEY
this summer with Kiss Cosmetics,
the  distributor with a difference.
"75,000    PLED"    HEAR   JUDY   PUL-
len Friday, noon,  Bu.  104.
Typing
40
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
TYPING   —   ELEC.   MACHINE
Phone   738-7881
EXPERT   TYPIST   —   ELECTRIC
224-6129  —   228-8384.
SHORT NOTICE TYPING DURING
the day; 25c page; phone Ruth,
RE   8-4410.
TYPING.  PHONE 731-7511 — 9:00 TO.
5:00.   266-6662 after  6  o'clock.
LOST: RED, WHITE, BLUE INDIAN
sweater "with curling design, chemistry, Tuesday. Reward. Phone Sue
224-9749, Rm. 631.
LOST: MEN'S GLASSES, BLACK, IN
black   case.   Call  Brian   263-0351.
REWARD: WOULD THE PERSON
who took my leather jacket and
sweater from the rack outside Chem.
370, Tues. afternoon, please return
the glasses from the pocket to the
Publications Office.
Special Notices
IS
■;BC BEAUTY SALON. EXPERT
styling and cutting. No appointment necessary. 5736 University
Blvd.,   228-8942.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOW-
ship execution, on skull hill, Hubert
Putcher, BU 100, March 18, 20 &
21   at   12:30.
ATTENTION COEDS — BE SAFE
and confident in all situations.
Parties, strange cars, automatic
elevators, blind dates, dark streets.
New pamphlet shows how to use
shoes, purse, umbrella or plain psychology to handle jostler.s or attackers. The best of judo, karate and
aiki-do plus a new chart of over
40 nerve centres and pressure
points. Easy to read, easy to learn.
Pamphlet plus chart only $1.25. No
C.O.D. Available now through Box
128,   Station G,  Montreal  18,  P.Q.
SOUL TIME: THE ORGANIZATION
comes on strong. March 23 from 9
to   1   at   $1.25/Soul.
EXAMS NOW AVAILABLE — COM-
plete set of exams—1965-66-67—set
of 3, 25c—on sale daily at noon in
Hennings lobby or in Science Common Room, Math Annex — Chem.,
Math, Physics, Zoology, Geology,
Microbi, English, Economics, Computer-science.
EXPERIENCED   ESSAY   TYPIST,
reasonable rates.  Phone 683-2859.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
SI
Help Wanted—Male
sa
Help W'led—Male or Female    53
BABY    SITTER   FULL   DAY   MON-
day,    mornings    Tues.,    Wed.,    Fri.,
Oftcne   681-3966   after   11:00   a.m.	
EARN $50.00 PER DAY WITH
YOUR NOSE!
Short-term summer employment on a
medical research project for person
with exceptionally keen sense of smell.
If you think you can identify individual persons easily by smell, please
phone 228-2575 for appointment for
odour testing. Successful applicant
must demonstrate superior ability to
identify trace amounts of pure chemicals by their odour.	
ITALIAN SCHOLAR TO RESEARCH
ZUST automobile. Possibility of free
trip to New York this summer. MU
4-7994.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
WANTED NATIVE FRENCH
speaker for conversation, 1 or 2
hrs. per week; W. Cohn (Sociology)
228-3830  or  263-6372.
Tutoring
•4
GRADS OF KILLARNEY GRAD RE-
union March 28, 7:30-11. All grads
and former teachers are invited.
DANCE WITH THE TRINIDAD
Moonlighter's Steelband Friday 9
p.m. at International House. Everyone   welcome,   75c.
DR. F. STOCKHOLDER. QUONDAM
Lecturer in English, University of
Ghana will speak on "African
Elites". Upper Lounge, noon today,
(not 9 p.m. as formerly advertised).
Travel Opportunities
II
CHARTER FLIGHT TO LONDON, 2
seats. Dept. July, ret. Sept., phone
738-9643,  5-7 p.m.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Best prices, Busy "B" Books, 146
West   Hastings,   681-4931.
AUTOMOTIVE b MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
11
'55 ZEPHYR ZODIAC, RADIO VERY
reliable, extra parts, good tires,
685-4037   after   6:00.
EEYORE FANS — '54 AUSTIN GOOD
condition. $50. Phone 681-0558 after
5:30 p.m.
1964 MAROON VALIANT WITH
standard shift. $900. Please call 922-
5888   after' 5.
1966 MGB SPORTSCAR. EXCELLENT
condition; radio; wirewheels; new
tires;   $2,250.00.   Russ,   922-4935.
Automobiles Wanted
21
Cl-64 6 - CYLINDER AUTOMATIC
station wagon prefered, not necessary, for cash, phone 299-0932 Sunday   12-4.
Automobile Parts
23
HARDTOP FOR TR-4 IN VERY
good condition, $125, phone 732-
6315,   between   5:00 and  7:00  p.m.
Motorcycles
26
1965 DAMAGED HONDA 50. GOOD
for parts or can be repaired. Motor
in  mint condition.  224-9720.
'66   HONDA,   4,000  MILES  — $125  OR
nearest   offer—Call   685-6795.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Miscellaneous     32
LBC BARBER SHOP, IN THE VIL.iT-
age,  open  6  days a week.
FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS AND
sciences other undergraduate subjects to fourth year. Canadian Tutorial   Centre,    736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
—  OLD   TOTEMS   FOR  SALE  —
1963,   1965  &  1966  issues  50c.
Campus  Life's  25c.   Publications Off.,
Brock   Hall
NEW LINES AT THE DISCOUNT
House' of tape-players, tape recorders, all sizes in transistor and electric radio's, watches, luggage, binoculars, jewelry and gift items; 1500
latest style ladies bathingsuits to
choose from, wholesale prices on all
merchandise. 3235 West Broadway.
Phone   732-6811.
SEVERAL HAND KNITTED DRESS-
es from $10.00, size 10-14, make to
order, knitted & crochet dresses &
dressmaking — 224-3672, 4689 West
12th Ave.
ADMIRAL PORTABLE RECORD
player, $50; electric guitar amplifier, $25; both in excellent condition,   phone   731-2870.	
NEW! 100-WATT TRAYNOR AMP.
Also 2—15" JBL D140F speakers in
cabinet,  offers,  phone Pete 988-4564.
FRENCH-MADE PUPTENT WITH
built-in groundsheet, flysheet and
poles,    $30.   Please   phone   224-0981.
HELP GUNVOR AND GRAHAM Escape. Auction and sale of antiques,
furniture, paintings, oriental house
fixtures, 55cc Honda, Girls Bicycle,
Record Player, Records, Books,
Clothes ad infinitum. March 20th -
30th.  2097 West  6th,  No. 4.
4   TRACK   STEREO   TAPE   RECORD-
er. Phone Ted 224-4263.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
II
UBC GRADUATE MAN REQUIRES
unfurnished suite or furnished small
suite or room with light cooking facilities. Separate entrance from May.
Prepared pay six months advance
rent. Phone 733-0767 or 254-7184.
Room & Board
IS
MOVE ON CAMPUS FOR EXAMS.
Good meals, quiet study space.
Males only. 224-9665 after 6 p.m.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
18
WHISTLER   MTN.   —   HUGE   CABIN
fer  rent,   224-7438.
SENIOR STUDENT WANTED TO
share large house. Dunbar district.
Available immed. Phone 738-8400 after  6  p.m. Thursday, March 21, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 15
The Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association
held its spring conference recently in Edmonton and UBC's
athletic director R. J. (Bus)
Phillips was there. Your agent
had a long talk with Bus about
the Alberta conflab which had
many interesting results.
Two universities were accepted as associate members at
the meeting. The University of
Lethbridge will enter the
WCIAA in 1969-70 to compete
in basketball and five minor
sports.
The University of Victoria
will start competing in basketball, hockey and five minor
sports in the same season.
Also entering basketball play
in 1969-70 is Brandon University, which has been an associate member comneting in
minor sports for some time.
Another long - time associate
member, the university of Saskatchewan at Regina, will join
those playing basketball in
1969-70.
Thus th*"* lineun of WCIAA
universities playing ice hock^v
after next season will includ*-*
Victoria, TTBC, Caloarv, Edmonton. Saskatoon. Win-ripe*?.
Brandon and the Universitv of
Manitoba.
UBC MISSING
Those playing basketball in
1969-70 will include Victoria,
Calgary, Edmonton, Lethbridge, Regina, Saskatoon,
Winnipeg and the University
of Manitoba.
You'll notice that UBC is not
in the latter list but Phillips
said there is a possibility we
may be. "The men's athletic
committee will have to make
the decision on whether or not
we re-enter the WCIAA in
basketball in 1969-70," said
Phillips.
Because there are more teams
in the hockey and basketball
leagues, a new schedule has
been drawn up. There will be
14 league games with each
team playing the others once.
Four teams will enter the best
two-out-of-three semi-finals.
MONEY SHARED
The final series will also be
a two-out-of-three affair. In the
playoffs, the top team would
be home team and all expenses
and revenue would be shared.
If UBC re-enters basketball
play, however, the Thunderbirds would have to play a
Monday game or else make an
extra trip to the prairies since
there are seven teams to play
there.
It's financially feasible for
the Birds to return to the
WCIAA fold in basketball, according to Phillips, but not so
in football.
PLANES EXPENSIVE
If UBC was to re-join the
collegiate football league, the
grid men would have to make
four trips to the prairies and
for a football t°am, trins bv air
are the height of expense.
The Birds would only be able
to play one series outside the
WCIAA in which they would
play eight games.
Next year thre° collpciate
football stamps will be played
in Canada. There will be two
Sf-rni-final series to qualify for
the  College bowl  in Toronto.
There will be a Western Bowl
to match the winner of the
WCIAA and the Ontario-Quebec Intercollegiate Association
and an Atlantic Bowl which
would see the Maritime and
central Canadian Association
winners square off.
GAMES TELEVISED
The Central Canadian Athletic Union is negotiating with
the CBC to televise their playoffs and championships in basketball, hockey and football. A
decision should be reached in
June on this matter.
While participating in
WCIAA basketball in 1969-70
would probably be cheaper for
UBC than the present setup,
the same can not be said for
football as some of Phillips'
facts show.
HAWAII CHEAPER
According to Phillips, it is
cheaper for the football Birds
to go to Hawaii than to Calgary. Hawaii guarantees UBC
$7,500 take home thus eliminating most of the trip cost.
And about basketball, Phillips says that the Birds can
travel to Alaska and play the
University of Alaska and Alaska Methodist University for
the grand sum of $91. Again
the low figure is due to the
high guarantees offered by the
two universities.
Turning to other subjects,
Phillips said that the free admission policy extended to UBC
students for on campus games
may continue next year. "We
have applied for a board of
governors grant for this pur-
nose,"  said  Phillips.
Phillips also felt that grad
students should contribute tr*
the athletic program as do
other students. Presently, grac"
students get in free to game"
but don't contribute any money
to the program.
IMPORTANT NOTICE
The UBC - SFU bask-tball
clash of next year will be a
b^st two-out-of-three series as
this year's total point two-gam*-*
series proved nothing.
TO ALL
STUDENTS AND FACULTY
The
Bookstore
will be
closed
ALL DAY
THURSDAY, MARCH 28TH
AND FRIDAY, MARCH 29TH
FOR
Annual   Stocktaking
THE STORE WILL REOPEN
MONDAY, APRIL 1ST
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1967-68
Effective September 29, 1967 to April 14, 1968
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS —
SATURDAYS —
SUNDAYS   —
12:45 to_2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
•Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
February 23, 24.
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c.
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. — Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205
AMS GENERAL
MEETING
come milium VOTE
THURSDAY  MARCH 21
NOON - ARMOURY
STORAGE?
CALL
224-3111
MOORE'S / ATIAS
TRANSFER
VAN LINES
Alio
Moving — Shipping
Dance To The
TRINIDAD
MOONLIGHTER'S
STEELBAND
FRIDAY, 9 P.M.
75c
AT  INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
EVERYONE  WELCOME Page 16
THE      U BYSSEY
Thursday, March 21, 1968
Tourney features
next years stars
— bob brown photo
JUMP   BALL   in   one   of   Wednesday's   high   school   basketball   tournament   games   in   War
Memorial  Gym  is typical  of  the  action  you  can see  today and  Friday for only fifty  cents.
Soccer Birds in action
By JOHN TWIGG
Thunderbird soccer coach Joe Johnson is a
busy man even though his team has finished its
league games.
Today there will be an exhibition game
against the Oregon Ducks from the University of
Oregon in Thunderbird Stadium. Kickoff is at
12:30 p.m. and students are admitted free.
Johnson knows little about the Ducks except
that last year the Birds beat them 3-1 in terrible
field conditions. He promises more goals this
year if the weather stays clear.
Three of UBC's first string will not likely
see action due to injuries. Keith Brookes has a
concussion, John Haar has a leg injury and Jim
Berry has a pulled tendon after Sunday's game
against Columbus.
There was also Pacific Coast League soccer
news in further developments in the Thunderbirds' protest of their game against Victoria
Oaks.
In that game, the Birds were on the wrong
end of a 2-1 score after leading 1-0 with ten
minutes left. But UBC had a goal called back
and Victoria tied the score a minute later.
The momentum carried Victoria to a win, but
that isn't the only reason for the protest. The
game was featured by weird calls and disagreements between linesmen and officials. In other
words, Johnson has a legitimate complaint.
Last night, league officials called for the
findings of a committee formed to investigate
the matter. The officials want the findings so
they can come to a conclusion on the game. The
fact that the league asked for the report is heartening to UBC fans, and the length of time taken
by the committee is also encouraging. The findings will be released early next week.
"I hope that we won't need the game to win
the PCSL," commented Johnson.
Johnson was also planning to have his Thun
derbirds play a team from SFU next Thursday,
but a series of phone calls Wednesday between
SFU's director of athletics Joe Davies and UBC's
Buzz Moore had the game called off.
The Ubyssey learned of this late Wednesday
afternoon and then phoned Davies for an explanation.
Davies was displeased with a story in Tuesday's paper regarding the rugby game between
the UBC Thunderbirds and an SFU team. UBC
won the game 18-6 but Davies objected to the
naming of SFU's team as the Clansmen, to him
it implied that SFU's team was of varsity
calibre.
Davies took great care in pointing out the
SFU players were members of a club that was
interested in playing rugby, but were by no
means SFU's representatives on the varsity level.
The Ubyssey implied SFU's team was of varsity calibre by printing a quote from UBC's
rugby coach Donn Spence saying, "the talk of
SFU rugby being a club sport is bunk," and
The Ubyssey then stated SFU's players had as
much experience as the Birds.
However, Davies regards some SFU sports
as still in the club stage, among them rugby and
soccer. And Davies should know how to classify
his teams.
Because of the adverse publicity his rugby
team got, Davies decided not to play the UBC
soccer Thunderbirds for fear of more adverse
publicity.
But when The Ubyssey found it was the reason for having the game called off, the sports
clear that SFU's teams are of "club" calibre,
clear that SFU's teams are of club calibre.
Consider it done, Mr. Davies. But why did
SFU expressly challenge the Thunderbirds?
The game against an SFU team next Thursday in Thunderbird Stadium stands, as well as
today's game against Oregon.
27
■ FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE.
rr
Waiting 9er CjcM
X§
tt
by SAMUEL BECKETT
with
Robert- Clothier Gregory Reid
Lee Taylor
Directed by Stanley Weese. Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox.
MARCH 22-30, 1968
Student Tickets $1.00
(available for all  performances)
Special Student Performances
Monday, March 25th    7:30     p.m.
Thursday,  March 28th  12:30  p.m.
Si
Tickets: Fredric Wood Theatre Room 207 or 228-26
Support Your Campus Theatre
■■mb^hbFREDERIC WOOD THEATRE^——
W
The twenty-third annual B.C.
high school basketball tournament enters its second day today in War Memorial Gym.
Wednesday's games brought
few surprises as the favored
teams usually won. Among the
highlights were Oak Bay's 60-
35 win over Prince George,
North Van's inspired win over
Queen Elizabeth 54-49, Burnaby Central's easy win over
Trail 72-35, the high-scoring 72-
52 game in which Sentinel beat
Chemainus and David Thompson's classy win over Cowichan
62-52.
The eight winners of Wednesday's game are playing from 4
p.m. to 11 p.m. tonight.
Prince Rupert goes against
David Thompson at 4 p.m.,
North Van and Burnaby Central start at 6:15 p.m., Vancouver College and Sentinel play
7:45 p.m. while Oak Bay and
Abbotsford ba+tle at 9:15 p.m.
The most valuable player
award is as hard to pick as is
the winner, but some of the
players  to watch  are four  of
the Oak Bay players, Don Burrows, Dave Morgan, Tom Holmes and Brent Mullin, while
Bob Clark, the unheralded
North Van forward who scored
18 points in Wedesday's game
may also be in the running.
Several other players are in
the running, but the emphasis
of the tournament is on the
team winning the Sparling
trophy.
The trophy and the tournament were initiated in 1946
and have since been through
several gyms. This year a new
gym will be used as the final
game will be played in the
new Pacific Coliseum.
That game starts at 9 p.m.
with a prelim at 7:30 p.m. for
the third and sixth place positions.
Admission to the tournament
is only fifty cents for students
at UBC and this allows you to
come and go all day. Be sure
to buy a program, a good deal
at 25 cents.
And don't forget cotton batting.
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT - TRAINING PROGRAM
Sous' Clubs of Vancouver: Students, mole/female, who would be interested in a part-time employment-training program during the 1968-69 school
year — working with boys — are invited to contact the Placement Office
(in person or phone 228-3811) to arrange an interview for Thursday,
March 28th, 9 - 2 p.m.
INTRODUCING...
NEW POLICY FOR DUNBAR THEATRE
OPENING TONIGHT, MARCH 21
ALAN
BATES-
klHG^H^APffs
COLOR »» DELUXE
PHILIPPE DE BROCA
PIERRE BRASSEUR
JEAN-CLAUDE BRIALY
GENEVIEVE BUJOLD
ADOLFO CELI
Dunbar
224-7252
DUNBAR .1 30th
SHOW   TIMES
7:30 and
9:30
"WI"
m
m
'.••***••.
Festival of
William Sim
SUNDAY2p.m. ONLY
™ HENRY
Adults 2.00
Students 1.25
LAURENCE
OLIVIER
Mar.
31
HAMLET
LAURENCE
OLIVIER
M
SiiL
Apr.
Vmifu 7
LAURENCE
OLIVIER
324-)7)0V
4J7J W. 10th
OTHELLO
SUNDAY MATINEE ONLY - 2 P.M.

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