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The Ubyssey Feb 13, 1968

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 Non
illegiirimus
carborundum
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIX, No.  46
VANCOUVER, B.C. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13,  1968
224-3916
COURT BARS PERSKY
AMS OK's referendum
to change constitution
— arnold saba photo
TWO BODIES are getting a head start on a contest for   Friday's   dance   which   ends  the   Contemporary Arts Festival. It's a body painting contest,  and   the   person   with  the   largest   percentage of his or her body painted  gets $20. Total nudity is encouraged.
Thirteen run on second slate
By PAUL KNOX
Election of the second slate of Alma Mater
Society executive positions will take place Wed-
lesday.
A total of 13 candidates are running for four
xffices.
Nominated for vice-president are Bob Kleyn,
cience 3, Carey Linde, law 1, and Hank Poulus,
irts 3.
Vying for treasurer are Donn Aven, eng. 3;
Brian Burke, arts 3; and Blaine Kennedy, arts 3.
Hats in the ring for ombudsman are those of
like Doyle, arts 2; Bob Gilchrist, ed. 4; Clay
.■arson, arts 2; Scott Lawrance, arts 3; and Lome
!haw, science 4.
Co-ordinator candidates are Jill Cameron,
cience 3, and Roger Plested, science  3.
An advance poll will be held today in south
Brock and the education building from 11:30
o 3:30 p.m. Another will be held in residences
nd campus libraries from 5 p.m.. to 9 p.m.
Polls Wednesday will be in north and south
Srock, the auditorium, all libraries, the bus stop
nd Ponderosa cafes, and all main faculty build
ings, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
At an all-candidates meeting in Brock lounge
Monday noon, Kleyn said he was running as an
independent vice-presidential candidate.
"There's too much representation of small
cliques in this election,"  he said.
"I think an independent point of view can
reconcile opposing factions on council."
Kleyn said he wanted to operate a co-op
bookstore and cafeteria in the new student union
building.
Linde, editor of the UBC law journal Flea,
said council should have the foresight to prevent
politicking among students.
"If we must engage in politics, let's take it
to Victoria," he said. "Our new president (Dr.
Kenneth Hare) is willing to listen to students.
Council should do so also."
Linde said he had initiated a course evaluation survey in the faculty of law which mades it
one of only two in North America to have such
a survey.
to page 2
see: MORE ALL  CANDIDATES
By MIKE FINLAY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
UBC student court Monday decided Alma Mater Society
presidential candidate Stan Persky is ineligible to be student
head.
Following the decision, a meeting of student council Monday night approved a student referendum Feb. 28 to change the
AMS constitution clause that affects Persky.
Council also accepted a recommendation of the student
court that the AMS presidential election last week be declared
null and void and that a by-election be held March 13.
A total of 6,528 students voted for either arts president
Persky or Brian Abraham, law 1, in the election.
The court's recommendation that the ballots, sealed in an
AMS vault, be destroyed, was ruled unconstitutional by AMS
president Shaun Sullivan.A motion to destroy the ballots was
made by engineering president Lynn Spraggs.
But council decided later in the meeting by a close vote of
10 to nine not to count the ballots.
If the referendum passes, Persky would be qualified to run
under the new specifications.
The amended article in the constitution would limit candidates to students who have been at UBC for one, rather than
two years.
In reference to the recent election confusion, council voted
Background to elegibility, page 9
Pictures, page  7
that the action of five AMS executives violated the intention of
student council when they interpreted counting the ballots to
mean taking a total of the ballots only.
The motion passed nine to six with four abstentions.
"What was done was a mistake and council realizes this,"
said first vice-president Don Munton.
Second vice-president Kim Campbell, who was not consulted
about the executive's decision Feb. 6, agreed that the executive
had acted in bad faith.
"The executive did violate the intention of minute number
10," she said. "It might have been all right had they no
directions from council regarding the counting of ballots, but
they did have such directions."
Persky then moved that AMS treasurer Dave Hoye resign
because he is not a member of the AMS. The issue was sent to
student court.
Hoye said there was no provision in the AMS constitution
stating that a director in the AMS must be a member of the
society.
"This is a thing I have been living with for six months," he
said. "I have put my best efforts into the job and I took the job
with the intention of finishing it."
Persky said bylaw 2(2)4 of the constitution states "active
members shall be entitled to vote at any meeting of the society."
"I'll agree with that because that's what it says," said
Sullivan.
"I want to make it clear the motion in no way reflects on
Dave's activities as treasurer," Persky said. "I'm just playing
the game the way you have insisted the political game be
played."
After debate, council agreed the constitution does not specifically say an officer of the AMS must be a member.
However, Garth Brown, arts 4, challenged this after the.
meeting.   Brown indicated  that both the Societies Act of B.C.
and the Universities Act imply officers must be members.
The Societies Act states "the members of the society may
nominate, elect or appoint any of its members as directors."
The Universities' Act says "the students in attendance at
the university appoint or elect a representative committee of
themselves."
"This at least makes Hoye's eligibility to hold office questionable," Brown said.
Persky tried to withdraw his motion against Hoye, claiming
the debate had become "disgraceful".
But the motion that Hoye resign had been tabled. A motion
referring Hoye to student court was carried. However, council
voted almost unanimously to make Hoye an honorary member
of the AMS.
On destroying ballots, student senator Ray Larsen said
students could force the ballots to be counted by presenting a
petition of more than 500 names to council. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 13,  1968
Name cooked up
for homewreckers
By ELGIN LEE
School of Human Nutrition and Family Ecology.
This could be the new name of the UBC home economics faculty if a proposed change is accepted by senate
at its meeting Wednesday.
The proposal was made by home ec. dean Dr. Melvin
Lee.
A poll Wednesday  found mixed  student reaction  to
the change.
"It's too long and it won't catch on," said Ann Bradley,
home ec. 3.
"It gives a better image,"  said Suzanne King, home
ec.  4.  "Other universities have caught  on  to this  change
and it's given home economists a professional status."
Other reactions:
"Oh NO. It's not practical."
"Ecology is misleading, the whole thing is misleading."
"It leaves out a lot of aspects."
Nancy Shwartz, home economics president, said she
is pleased with the proposal.
"Home ec. in high school is not the home ec. in uni-
/   versity," she said. "It's outdated and misleading.
"Housework, cooking and sewing are no longer the
- central study. Research in the medical and technological
?   field is today's topic in home economics.
"If the name is changed, others would associate themselves with our faculty."
A  meeting  to  discuss the  proposal will  be  held  for
-   home ec. students today at noon in Home Ec. 112.
"Human nutrition is the science of food and nutrients;
!^ the chemistry, biochemistry and physiology of their utiliza-
* tion in cells," says an official senate brief accompanying
^   Dr. Lee's proposal.
» "Anthropological, sociological and psychological aspects   r
of food and nutrition provide research in human nutrition.   ;
Ecology is the study of mutual relations of organisms with
their environment and with one another. »
"The root of family ecology is the study of the family   ;
in its environment.
"Courses in family relations, growth and development,
decision-making   and   consumer   economics,   belong   under
this category. Another under ecology are the environmental   ;
factors.
"These subjects include: food, nutrition, clothing, textiles, housing and design.
"A new title would seem an appropriate representation of the new direction of this school."
Students at Moncton
strike over fee  hike
MONCTON, N.B. (CUP) — Universite de Moncton students
left classes on a do-or-die strike Monday.
A Friday referendum endorsed the strike in protest of a
proposed tuition fee hike. Ninety per cent of the 1,100 students
voted 8 to 2 in favor of a strike.
A strike committee has organized students for duty on the
picket line.
The students claim they will not return to classes until
their demands are met.
They ask for a freeze in tuition fees at their present level,
increased scholarships and bursaries, greater government subsidies to the university, and a definite government commitment
to a program of gradually phased-out tuition fees.
Strike committee head Gaetan Lemieux said he has nationalized the campus police force to help him in the campaign against
scabs. The campus cops are students hired by the administration part-time.
The strike vote came after the board of governors approved
fee hikes ranging from $75 to $110 beginning next September.
Moncton's fees now range from $430 to $525.
Student council representatives tried to sway the board
from raising fees, but the board said it had no alternative.
Though Moncton's fees are among the lowest in the province,
student leaders point out the Acadian French students at Moncton and its affiliated College de Bathurst come from among the
lowest income  groups in New Brunswick.
A protest march of 800 Moncton students and another 350
from Bathurst are expected to petition the New Brunswick government  of Louis Robichaud Tuesday.
Student councils at the University of New Brunswick and
Mount Allision University have declared full support for the
striking students.
Canadian Union of Students associate secretary Colin Leonard was at the Moncton campus last week advising the students.
In Ottawa Monday CUS issued a statement praising the
Moncton students' courageous resistance to the fee hike.
"A tuition fee increase symbolizes what lower income families in New Brunswick justifiably fear —• the overwhelming
financial burden  of higher education.
"An additional fee of $110 in fees will reinforce the Universite de Moncton as a preserve for the rich," the statement
said.
The union calls on the provincial government to step up
its aid to education.
MORE ALL CANDIDATES
from page 1
Poulus said the issues are the same no matter
what political leanings the council has.
"I want to expose che book publishers who
are taking us for 20 per cent of the cost of our
books," he said. "These distributors are exploiting students."
He also predicted a radical student council
next year which would be accessible to students.
Aven said his position as engineering undergraduate society treasurer gave him ample experience for the AMS treasury post.
"I don't think the three candidates really
have different ideas," he said. " We all want to
see the operation of SUB carried out properly.
I think I can do that as well as the other two."
Burke, who is assistant treasurer this year,
said insight is needed into the role the AMS
plays  'with clubs and undergraduate societies.
"Everyone talks about trimming bureaucracy,
but I have the background knowledge to deal
with it effectively."
Kennedy proposed decentralization of the
AMS and more control by undergraduate societies over fee collecting.
"Undergraduate societies should be able to
levy a fee without interference by the AMS,"
he said.
"We should concentrate on providing speakers
from varied disciplines so that students in all
faculties can receive a truly liberal education."
Miss Cameron said the main concern of next
year's co-ordinator will be the Student Union
Building.
"I'll talk to people and see how they want
SUB used," she said. "I'll use billboard space to
inform students of what's happening on campus."
Plested, assistant co-ordinator this year, also
said students should be better informed of campus activities.
He said a common lounge should be established to promote understanding among faculties.
Candidates for ombudsman spent most of
the time explaining the new position.
The ombudsman is responsible for maintaining good feeling among students," Doyle said.
"I'll try to bring together different interests on
campus."
Gilchrist favored the establishment of a fund
for academic reform.
"I'd also like to see an emergency interest-
free student loan fund set up by the AMS, and
some alternative to the present bookstore situation."
Larson said it was a mistake for would-be
ombudsmen to make policy statements.
"I will form my policies with regard to students' wishes," he said.
As well, barriers in the present AMS system,
which he called inhuman, must be broken down.
Shaw said his first concern as ombudsman
would be with  individual problems.
"Council has forgotten about students," he
said. "There's a real need for someone who talks
to people."
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
—  kurt hilgar photo
SUSPENDED   MOBILES,   flashing   lights   and   a speech which  one man  in  the audience described as a  series of McLuhanisms overtook  the armory Monday as part of the Contemporary Arts Festival  which  ends  Friday.
Education budget high but...
By STEPHEN  JACKSON
The provincial budget for higher education
may be the biggest ever, but it is not big enough,
say Alma Mater Society officials.
Premier Cece Bennett last week announced
a record $53 million operating grant to be divided among UBC, Simon Fraser University,
and the University of Victoria.
The three will also share a $12 million capital
grant for construction of new buildings.
Of this building grant, UBC will receive $5
millon, SFU the same amount, and U of Vic the
remaining $2 million.
Division of the operating grant, done by the
advisory board to the department of education,
has not yet been announced.
The total amount alloted by the provincial
Stoffman  wins-
editors are back
By DANNY  STOFFMAN
Ubyssey Labor Reporter
The Ubyssey editorial board Monday slinked
back into the paper's Brock basement office.
The editors, who claimed to have participated in a walkout last Thursday, found that novice
reporters had taken over their old positions.
They begged novice editors to let them back into
their old jobs.
Ubyssey editor-in-chief Danny Stoffman was
hesitant. He said the newcomers were more talented, far less stupid and altogether less slovenly
than the veterans.
But tears flowed from the eyes of news editor
Sue Gransby and senior editor Pat Hrushowy
burped in sorrow.
Hence, Stoffman relented, and the old Ubyssey editorial board was back in  action.
"They never should have used the stupid
story in the first place," the editor-in-chief remarked. "I thought The Ubyssey had culturally
revolted past that kind of thing."
government is $12 million short of the $77 million total calculated by the B.C. Assembly of
Students as the minimum amount required by
the three institutions.
"I'm surprised the budget allowance is as
large as it is, it's not enough," said Don
Munton, Alma Mater Society first vice-president
and student senator.
"It's touch and go whether or not enrolment
will have to be restricted in September."
"Each of the three university presidents has
issued public warnings last fall that if there
wasn't sufficient money it could mean curtailment of enrolmeot," said AMS president Shaun
Sullivan.
"It looks like there will have to be enrolment restrictions because of financial reasons
not academic reasons."
When curtailment is for financial reasons,
there is a real problem of where to cut, Sullivan
said.
"I'm afraid that where the cuts are going
to be made, because it is where they are most
significant, is in the grad school, and this takes
away from the long-term development of this university."
Educating a graduate student costs about five
times as much as does a first or second year arts
student, Sullivan said.
Fewer students would probably be admitted
into freshman year and fewer into graduate
studies, he said. Also, more would be weeded
out in the intervening years.
Bennett has no foresight in educational problems, he said.
"I am absolutely appalled by the complete
laok of planning for the future of education in
this province."
Sullivan said he would like to see an advisory board not dominated by government appointees, as the present one is.
Representatives of the universities, professions, research, business and labor and a minority
of government people should comprise the board
and assign priorities in education for all of B.C.,
he said.
Loaded agenda
faces senate
A recommendation that the faculty of arts' foreign language
requirement be dropped for qualified students highlights a list
of reforms to come before senate Wednesday.
The recommendation, contained in a faculty committee report on the subject, says students with grade 12 level in a language should not be required to study the language at university.
Also on the agenda are:
• presentation of a brief from the Alma Mater Society
on the question of an open gallery at senate meetings;
• discussion of a library committee report on the library's
financial situation;
• a report from the committee on the role and organization of senate.
The role and organization committee proposes establishment of committees on long-range objectives and academic
building needs.
Student senator Ray Larsen said Monday he expected the
most heated debate on the language requirement question.
"This discussion will have great implications for the French
department," he said. "If the requirement is dropped, arts students will cease to be at a disadvantage as far as compulsory
courses are concerned."
HOPE FOR LONG RANGE PRIORITIES
Student senator Mark Waldman, -who is on the role and
organization committee, said he is looking forward to the discussion of the proposals.
"I hope the formation of the two new committees will mean
an assignment of priorities in the university's long-range plan,"
he said. "I think it's good that senate is taking a critical look
at itself."
AMS first vice-president Don Munton, elected to a vacant
senate seat last week, said he hopes to see a committee set up
to examine the open senate question.
SIT-IN CALLED OFF AFTER TALKS
An earlier threatened sit-in at the senate meeting was called
off after a meeting in International House Jan. 31 between
senators   and   students.
The sit-in was approved at a Jan. 9 meeting in Brock by
600 students after student senators said they were considering
resigning from senate. Their resignations hinged on a decision
by senate not to open senate meetings to the public.
Since the sit-in was proposed, student leaders say communication has improved between students and senators.
At the International House meeting, economics prof. Dr.
Robert Clark proposed the formation of an ad hoc committee to
discuss the senate secrecy. This is expected to be discussed at
Wednesday's meeting.
Festival piled on heap
Organizers of the festival of contemporary arts promise a
heap of fun in the armory at noon today.
The heap will be a huge pile of paper boxes, newspapers
and other paper objects called Superpile.
Created by Helen Goodwin and her dancers, the event will
feature treasures hidden in the paper mound. These will include
a dozen signed works by Iain Baxter, scenic calendars by Doug
Hawthorne and an Intermedia paper hoop.
Also at noon will be a program of live improvised electronic music by Wayne Carr in the recital hall of the music
building.
At the same time, the play Orison by Fernado Arrabel
will be staged in Freddy Wood. Director is Adrienne Winter-
mans. At 1:30 p.m. in the armory, Intermedia produces more
light and sound effects, followed at 3:30 p.m. by films made by
Vancouver School of Art students and local underground film
makers. The films go until midnight.
A highlight of the week will be the poet's market Wednesday, Valentine's Day. Seventeen blushing poets will read their
poems in the armory at noon before selling them to rich students. Earlier, two blues and psychedelic bands will groove at
11:30 a.m.  in the same place.
Also at noon Wednesday will be a presentation of experimental vocal music and visuals in the music recital hall. The
festival continues  until Friday.
TORE
ARE
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RfiSIHlflB
FOR
ONE
MAN'S
LIFE-
TIME.
^a^Il^A^^ ' w?v- -^', -pi.
THCU8YSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). The
Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Stucfent Press, of which
it is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo.
Page   Friday,   loc.  24;   sports,   loc.   23;  advertising,   loc.   26.   Telex  04-5224.
FEBRUARY 13, 1968
Motives
Previously, we had not questioned the motives of
student council during the presidential election fiasco.
We had assumed, despite the aura of cynicism surrounding the obsession with candidate Stan Persky's eligibility, that an honest attempt was underway to ensure
constitutionality of elections.
But no one who attended Monday night's AMS
meeting can help but doubt the motives of some student
councillors. For these same councillors who had pursued
the fine points of the constitution regarding Persky's
eligibility were aghast at Persky's indelicacy in questioning the constitutionality of treasurer Dave Hoye's status.
Hoye, it turns out, is not a student. Although a key
member of the AMS executive, he is not a member of
the AMS.
We do not question the efficiency <md honesty of
Hoye's performance as treasurer. Nor do we question his
wisdom in preferring not to add a course load to his
administrative duties. In fact, we hope a sabbatical year
arrangement can be worked out with, the university
whereby AMS officials can remain registered students —
and thus AMS members — yet avoid jeopardizing their
academic records by enrolling in courses*
But we must point out a glaring inequity. AMS
executives and councillors, many of whom were sharply
opposed to Persky's candidacy, used the constitution in
an attempt to stop him., They did this despite the clear
fact that the intent of the constitution is to ensure presidential candidates know the university and that Persky
easily fits this requirement. Meanwhile AMS executives
knew about Hoye's questionable status—yet did nothing.
Council's inept and partisan maneuvering can only
help candidate Persky politically. It is as if council
wanted to make a martyr out of this arts president who
has succeeded in gaining widespread support for a relatively progressive program.
Arrogance
Student court's obiter dictum that the ballots in last
Wednesday's presidential election be destroyed without
being counted is a piece of fatuous arrogance.
We do not question the court's good faith in coming
to the decisions it reached. But we must register our
astonishment at its disregard for the more than 6,000
students who voted last Wednesday and its apparent disrespect for the democratic process itself.
The situation is simple. Students, some of them after
considerable thought and reflection, exfercised their
democratic right to choose a president. Even if the election itself — as a result of student council bungling —
is invalid, the students have a right to know the results
of their voting.
The court's arrogance was carried to Monday's council meeting by the engineering representative who moved
a motion endorsing the court recommendation. The motion did not prove feasible when it was pointed out that
the court's recommendation was — ironically — unconstitutional.
Council hardly improved matters, however, when it
decided not to count the ballots. The decision could mean
that the results of Wednesday's elections will remain
locked up for a year, then destroyed.
There is talk of a petition to urge council to reverse
its decision on counting the ballots. The petition deserves
student support. The desire to find out what happened
last Wednesday has more behind it than respect for the
democratic process. Being human, most students are
curious — they just want to know who won. And so,
we imagine, do the two men who ran for office.
EDITOR:   Danny   Stoffman
City       Stuart  Gray
News Susan  Gransby
Managing        Murray   McMillan
Photo      Kurt  Hilger
Senior     Pat  Hrushowy
Sports       Mike   Jessen
Wire Norman  Gidney
Page  Friday       Judy  Bing
Ass't. City    Boni  Lee
Resplendent in scarlet robes and
white wigs, Paul Knox and Mark DeCoursey dozed on a bench. Ann Arky
reigned supreme. Elgin Lee, draped
in a sheet, walked blindfolded and
carried a sword. "You wouldn't dare/*
she  said.
"Oh, pshaw," said Irving Fetish.
Mike Finlay spent the day in front
of a bar and was thrown in the drunk
tank. Judy Young lit bonfires to dry
him out while Irene Wasilewski knitted  a noose.
Linda Gransby felt persecuted. "But
I'm really not a bad girl," she said.
Norm Gidney put his head on the
block and chipped in to writ. Steve
Jackson, clad in ceremonial red underwear, paid a groat to his executioner.
Hovering overhead were the fotogs,
to wit: Fred Cawsey, Lawrence Woodd
(who blushed), Bob Brown, Chris
Blake,  and Derrek Webb.
Jocks of the day were Bob Banno.
Jim Maddin, Brian Rattray, and John
Twigg, who carried a mace.
i$M^llSiMmmm:mm&M-
A letter which appeared in
Friday's paper concerning engineers was not written by
Brian Thompson, mech. eng. 4.
The letter was a forgery. The
Ubyssey apologizes to Thompson for any embarrassment
caused by publication of the
letter. We wish him and his
engineering colleagues luck in
their search for the culprit.
'Don't  split'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
You stated in your editorial
of Jan. 25 that "the influence
of one home economics student on what happens in council is approximately 16 times
the influence of one arts student." However, at present,
this arts student doesn't have
any representation on the
council due to the fact that
the arts president has decided
that council is irrelevant and
has opted out. I agree that
council is not representative but
I don't think that splitting the
present council into an executive council and an assembly of
45 students is the answer. All
that will accomplish is to
isolate the so-called "brock
bureaucracy" even more than
at present from the genera]
student body.
E,  R.  YACUB.
president, PEUS
Waldman  wrong
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Senator Waldman has criticized The Ubyssey for last
Tuesday's pre-election issue,
which he felt had biased political statements and one-sided
distortion. I disagree. The
Ubyssey's issue of Tuesday and
Thursday were unbelievably
accurate, impartial, and fair in
election coverage. I say "unbelievably" because I have some
general reservations about the
paper's policies; but more because the situation could easily
have been rendered more 'suspicious' than it was. Council
attempted to make a wise decision, and was not faulted for
the attempt. The AMS execu
tive were left with few options, all undesirable; the wisdom of their choice -was questioned (and rightly so), but not
their motivation. Wednesday
night's flare-ups and name-
calling ("fascist" or "idiot" according to political preference)
was understandably lacking in
'frank communication and reasoned dialogue', due to the
electric electoral emotionalism.
But The Ubyssey maintained
an exemplary attitude throughout. I think that for once The
Ubyssey deserves our commendation.
SALLY COLEMAN'S
BROTHER
(Mike Coleman)
law 3
Waldman  foul
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The cry is "foul"; the game
is "let's-blame-the-Ubyssey",
and the culprit is our very own
student senator, Mark Wald-
amn.
If Mr. Waldman is not yet
aware that an intelligent person recognizes a cliche when
he sees one; that language is
usually the best indication of
phoniness or sincereity in a
given argument; that Mr. Abraham (and many other candidates) used trite, meaningless
political statements; and that
the Ubyssey was advising the
student NOT against responsible government, nor against
Mr. Abraham, but against Madison Avenue language; then I
would advise Mr. Waldman to
return to the English 100 classroom.
JENNIFER SCHIFFER
arts 4
•power base' than this? Furthermore, it seems very curious to me that suddenly the
fraternities (the stronghold of
conservatism) should be supporting a candidate who is
running on a platform as radical as that of Stan Persky.
GEORGE   LAMBERT
science 1
Ontology?
Frat  man
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I was very surprised at yesterday's all candidates' meeting to hear candidate Robert
Kleyn speak of himself as being the only 'independent'
choice for Vice-President and
having no power base. I know
for a fact that his campaign is
being run by a fraternity and
that he has the backing of
other fraternities. What could
constitute  a   more   substantial
Editor, The Ubyssey:
What many people do not
know is that the Ontological
Society is merely the working
arm of a pseudo-religious
group calling themselves
"Emissaries of Divine Light"
with "headquarters" in B.C. at
100 Mile House, and the address of their American "headquarters" is Sunrise Ranch,
Eden Valley, Loveland, Colo.
That, in fact, the Ontological
Society and the Emissaries of
the Divine Light are one and
the same thing.
The Ontological Society has
permission to go onto campus
every Wednesday noon to hold
meetings, talking a very intricate, elaborate sort of philosophy which is impressive to
some who are finding it difficult to see pattern or purpose
in life. This Society held a
Symposium entitled "Science
of Survival" on campus Feb. 3
and 4. They believe they can
show you how to make specific
changes in your life to make
specific changes in the world
pattern.
A Symposium is defined as
"an intellectual and varied discussion on a given topic." The
"key" speakers on this symposium were in actuality: Lord
Martin Cecil—"Bishop" of the
Emissaries of Divine Light;
Michael Cecil, his son—"minister" of the Emissaries of Divine Light; LeRoy Jensen—
closely connected with the
Emissaries of Divine Light;
Dr. Ronald Polack—"server"
of the Emissaries of Divine
Light.
While a university should be
devoted to freedom of thought,
one hopes reason will prevail
in the academic atmosphere.
NUDIS VERBIS Tuesday,  February  13,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
CANDIDATES' STATEMENTS
VICE-PRESIDENT
ROB KLEYN
Although it has not extensively been brought out in my
printed platform, one of my
main positions on the AMS
council is that it has always
represented power cliques on
campus, and not the individual
student.
I feel that by avoiding the
concentration of power in a
small group of students by
electing an independent who is
not committed to a minority,
the best interests of students
as individuals can be attained.
One of these areas is residence. Also the registration
mess must be eliminated, and
pre-registration made available
to more students, these points
are important to all students,
and not only to a minority interest. I urge a good measure
of support for this platform.
CAREY LINDE
First of all, I want you to
know that I am not associated
with the present AMS execu-
ive and I do not have nor do
I want its support. Nor have
I been associated with any
campus political group.
Instead I have involved myself this year with local work
in the faculty of law where I
originated and edited the law
journal and organized a course
evaluation survey.
I propose to bring needed
change in practice and personality to the office of Vice-
President. I shall put culture
and education back on the list
of priorities, and work hard
for greater student control in
the bookstore, housing, traffic,
food services, and the library.
If politics is needed it shall be
directed towards Victoria, and
not towards fellow students.
The issue is clear — we vote
for a meaningful change or
else we perpetuate the reign of
ineffecutal good intentions.
HANK POULUS
We WILL have an open, active student government next
year. I would like to add student-faculty cooperation to:
—fight a publisher-distributer monopoly on texts. We
CAN get fair prices.
—s tart a communications
and resource centre to which
any student can go in the pur
suit of academic and creative
interests.
The AMS CAN be more to
students than an administrative blorg.
TREASURER
DONN AVEN
I believe I can successfully
fulfill the duties, as they are
now stated, of AMS treasurer.
Further, I propose that a
study of present bureaucratic
methods be undertaken, with
a view to eliminating some of
the red tape that presently entangles students who actively
participate in student affairs.
This is not an idealistic "human government" approach,
but rather one designed to
eliminate on a practical basis
one of the major complaints
that students have about the
AMS.
I am strongly in favor of decisive action to be taken on
the present housing survey,
and in conjunction with this
idea, that The Ubyssey be
more fully utilized by the AMS
as a communication medium.
Too few students are aware of
the work presently being done
by the AMS, and I would certainly be in favor of a more
complete, co-ordinated information source.
To summarize: my experience speaks for me and I ask
you as students to consider me
capable of rational decisions,
interested in student affairs,
and concerned enough to listen
to the problems of all students
on this campus.
BRIAN BURKE
The following are a few of
the ideas for which I will press
as treasurer:
1. Assignment of a CUS field
worker to B.C. to help organize the B.C. Assembly of Students programming. 2. More financial support for BCAS's
high school visitation scheme.
3. A university promotion fund
established from AMS year-end
surpluses to promote higher
education during provincial
elections. 4. Re-negotiation of
the terms of reference of the
advisory committees to the
president to widen their powers. 5. Continuing and extending financial support for preparatory research into co-op
housing. 6. Expansion of residential college system established at Totem Park this year.
BLAINE KENNEDY
I have the organizational ex-
Paul Boutelle
BLACK POWER and SOCIAL CHANGE
WED., NOON - BU 106
Paul Boutelle7!; tour through the United States has drawn crowds up to
1^,200 and 1,500 people to hear his call for black power and socialism in
the  U.S.  and  has  won  enthusiastic  support  from  black  power  militants.
UBC YOUNG SOCIALISTS
perience and training to efficiently fulfill the duties of
AMS treasurer. The real importance of the Treasurer lies
in his policy orientation.
1. Decentralize the AMS.
Give all undergraduate societies the right to determine
their own fees, thus increasing
their autonomy and student
involvement.
2. Priority on culture and
academics. We live in a world
of change and the AMS should
be financially aiding all programs that help to give students a broad interdisciplinary
education on issues of contemporary social concern.
3. Human government. Set
up a commission to seriously
examine the whole AMS financial structure.
If you want change, — vote
Kennedy.
COORDINATOR
sonalized,    unstructured    style   student's initiative through the
of government. co-ordinator's office.
I have had no previous affiliation in the AMS; my experience has been with people.
Specifically, as a co-ordinator
my policies will be: future decisions concerning SUB based
on student opinion, learned
by holding general meetings,
and talking with them personally; impartial booking of facilities; publicity of available
facilities and events through
The Ubyssey, bulletin boards
and a special events billboard.
I will use imagination and an
understanding of our problems
to make SUB a place that answers some of the needs of this
campus.
JILL CAMERON
Co-ordinators have been administrators for too long. As a
voting member of council, he
must make his political views
known. I support: student involvement in decisions that effect them; an emphasis on academic problems; a greater variety of campus events; a per-
ROGER PLESTED
After one year as the assistant co-ordinator, I am in the
know concerning campus
events, booking conflicts, SUB
and administrative duties concerning builing management.
I am aware of the council
responsibility or the co-ordinator. My main concern is the
efficient use of SUB. The students must be in the know concerning the SUB's facilities and
the programmed events. The
success of SUB depends on the
OMBUDSMAN
BOB GILCHRIST
It is all too easy in a university of this size to forget that
students are people and not
numbers. It is my intention to
attempt to change this. As Ombudsman, my goals would be:
—to establish an emergency
interest - free short - term loan
for students, set up by the
AMS.—to establish an AMS
academic reform fund.—to institute another bookstore on
campus as an alternative to
the present one.—to find more
study space on campus—to
promote the use of SUB for
the summer months. It should
not be a white elephane for
% of the year.
Obviously, at present, the
AMS does not represent
students. As ombudsman, I will
do my best to correct this. Action speaks louder than words.
CLAY LARSON
I feel the ombudsman must
be independent, sympathetic,
energetic, and determined to
fully investigate student complaints, and seek satisfactory
means of redress. I feel I have
Toi Page 6
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OF  NATURAL  PRODUCTS,   by James  B. Hendrickson.
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TRANSITIONAL ELEMENTS, by Edwin M. Larsen.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February  13,   1968
the necessary qualifications. I
have had experience working
-with student organizations.
Most recently I helped organize the education action committee program which sought
to get public support for increased university funds. I
don't feel the ombudsman
should make prior policy commitments as it would tend to
reduce his independence. As
ombudsman I would vigorously
pursue solutions to your individual complaints.
SCOTT LAWRANCE
Call me communications funnel. I have known gievances
and love alternatives. The I
Ching says "when one has
something to say, it is not believed." I will try to believe
more of you than me. I desire
to know the stuff of politics:
people. Thus, I have never before entered politics.
Imagination and hope grown
from despair have brought me
here. Platform of opening new
communications. All systems
funneling intensely, I will
work given chance.
LORNE SHAW
The duties of an ombudsman
can be summarized in one
phrase — people and their
needs. The areas in which I
feel this post can be most effective are as follows:
1. Dealing with student
grievances against the AMS,
Faculty and Administration.
This is the primary concern of
an Ombudsman and will involve talking with the people
in these areas about the problems students raise.
2. Acting as a liason between students and the AMS;
bringing student opinion to
council. This will involve visiting regularly residences and
common rooms and spending
time simply talking to people.
3. Representing the needs of
presently ignored campus
groups such as commuters and
freshman. Positive action in
these areas would involve organizing a car pool co-ordination service and actively participating in frosh retreat.
These are some of my ideas.
If you feel they are worthwhile
then I would ask for your vote
on Wednesday.
SECONDERS' STATEMENTS
VICE-PRESIDENT
ROB KLEYN
A Power Clique in the AMS
must be avoided. The vice-
president, in particular, must
be able to -work with the president but must also be capable
of independent action. Rob
Kleyn is such a man.
Rob's platform is one of reform — of the AMS, the academic community, and of the
university's image. He favours
direct negotiations with the faculty towards a definite end.
Rob Kleyn possesses personal
initiative but also a quality
that most political aspirants
lack — he can get a job done.
MARK WALDMAN
graduate studies
CAREY LINDE
Carey Linde has proven his
ability to bring imaginative
effort to areas of student concern by the energies he has
exerted in law school this year.
He has the needed foresight to
insure that next year's executive will not resort to such underhanded tactics as have been
displayed this past week by certain members in their attempts
to block the election of Stan
Persky. Carey Linde stands for
the human, decentralized, approach to student problems.
We must vote for a change.
Vote Carey Linde, vice-president.
JAMES J. CAMP
law 2
HANK  POULUS
Hank   Poulus   is   concerned
with important problems facing students — books, housing,
curriculum. He has the leadership qualities necessary to get
action NEXT YEAR on a SUB
co-op bookstore, more independent student housing, curriculum reform, and student involvement in academic affairs.
Hank's experience this year
has included organization of a
downtown radio program produced by UBC students, efforts
to start a student bookstore,
membership on the finance
and student-faculty bookstore
committees, working as assistant AMS treasurer.
DON MUNTON
TREASURER
DONN  AVEN
Donn Aven, third year applied science, has shown his
ability for administration by
his continued participation in
executive affairs. As president
of second year engineering,
and as treasurer of the EUS,
he has proven his competence
in student government.
His close association with the
AMS, through administering
the largest undergrad society
budget, has given him ample
experience in AMS affairs, so
that now, beyond any doubt,
he possesses all the necessary
qualifications for an excellent
AMS treasurer.
F. D. HODGE
ap. sc. 3
BRIAN BURKE
Brian Burke is well qualified
1968 GRAD CLASS
General Meeting
Tuesday, Feb. 20th, Noon
ANGUS 104
All  graduating  students are   asked  to  attend  this   general
meeting  to help decide several  important  questions.
for the post of AMS treasurer.
The complexities of handling
a $500,000 budget demand experience in AMS financial
areas as well as a broad knowledge of student affairs.
Brian's experience comes
from being AMS assistant treasurer this year, as well as being a member of AMS finance
committee. His awareness of
other activities is shown
through his effective work as
vice-chairman of the world
university service committee,
and as a member of a joint
student-faculty advisory committee.
Brian Burke is thoroughly
competent for AMS treasurer
through h i s extracurricular
activities.
MIKE COLEMAN
law 3
BLAINE KENNEDY
Blaine Kennedy, commerce,
3, is a student who has played
an active varied role in the affairs of UBC for several years.
He has been president of 1st
year engineering, traffic coordinator of open house, member of Commerce council and
this year the driving force behind the academic activities
committee.
Blaine has not only had organizational experience and
training but has also shown
himself to be concerned with
the broader problems of university and society. Blaine believes we need a change in the
AMS structure to make it more
relevant to and representative
of the student body. He deserves your vote.
DAVE   GRAHAME
JILL CAMERON
Co-ordinating in the new
SUB calls for more than figuring out which organizations
get what space; it means a
SUB open to all students, regardless of their affiliation, at
whatever time they need it.
As a council member, Jill's
vote will push ideas that are
based communicating with students as REAL people. It is
time to hear what you want—
a vote for Jill means communication and involvement with
issues facing all of us.
LORENZ  VON FERSEN
arts 4
ROGER PLESTED
The co-ordinator handles the
bookings of campus events,
manages Brock, and acts as
chairman of the SUB committee.
Roger Plested is the candidate best qualified for this job.
He has served on the Brock
managment and SUB committees, and this year served as
assistant co-ordinator. He proposes to expand the office of
co-ordinator to include a larger number of campus activities so that the new SUB facilities will be used with a maximum of efficiency.
HARRY MEZERMAN
law  1
OMBUDSMAN
MIKE DOYLE
An ombudsman is responsible for forming a constructive solution from the demands
of the individual student and
the function of the administration.
I know Mike Doyle is capable of this. I know his constructive approach to student
gov't, is free from partial group
interest.
He is an able and competent
mediator between the student
and the administration —
whether that be student or university  administration.
A vote for Mike Doyle will
establish this new position as
an effective bond between you
and your gov'ts.
LLOYD   PLISHKA
arts 2
ROBERT GILCHRIST
I believe that Robert Gilchrist, ed. 4, is the best man
for the position of ombudsman.
Having served a year on AMS
as ed. representative he is
knowledgeable in the -workings of AMS and undergrad
societies. Bob sees curriculum
reform as an area of great student concern and in his faculty
he has worked towards this
on the liaison committee.
When you consider the importance of the position vote
for the man with the best combination of knowledge, experience, and interest — Robert
Gilchrist.
SUSAN  E.  SHAW
CLAY LARSON
The new position of Ombudsman demands an experienced
man. Clay Larson, arts 2, has
had this experience both in
student affairs and as a former
officer in the RCAF, where he
worked in a position similar to
Ombudsman.
The position of Ombudsman,
which involves representing
student grievances, also demands impartiality. Clay Larson, who is not alligned with
any campus group, can best
maintain this impartiality. To
set a high standard vote Clay
Larson   for   Ombudsman.
RON ARMSTRONG
SCOTT LAWRANCE
The position of ombudsman
requires a person with a
healthy disrespect for the red
tape procedures that plague
our student government. In
spite of the fact the AMS is
improving, Scott Lawrance
will have plenty to do next
year presenting students' problems to people who can do
something about them. This is
an area that has been too long
neglected at UBC. Scott, arts
3, is known as a person who is
friendly and interested in quick
and direct communication. He
fits the job's requirements perfectly.
JOHN D. CHURCHLAND
LORNE SHAW
The new position of Ombudsman is to relate student needs
and problems to council by
helping them cut through the
bureaucratic maze. The essential characteristics of an ombudsman must be:
) Availability—Lome Shaw
promises to keep regular office hours, to visit residences
regularly, and to be around
campus when student problems
arise.
2) Approachability — Lome
Shaw is genuinely interested in
all people as individuals and is
easy to talk to. He is not the
'foreboding political type'.
3) Affability — The essential
nature of the position of ombudsman demands a sense of
humor and a facility for dealing with people. Lome Shaw
has the desire, ability and personality for this position.
JIM COOKE
arts 4
2/
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
presents
as
THE SCHOOL FOR
m
Witty Comedy of Manners
by  RICHARD   B.  SHERIDAN
ANNUAL STUDENT PRODUCTION
Directed  by John  Brockington
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
FEBRUARY 20 ■ 24, 8:30 p.m.
Student Tickets $1.00
(available   for   all   performances)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCE
Thursday, February 22 - 12:30 p.m.
Tickets:  Frederic Wood  Theatre  Rm.  207  or 222-2678
Support Your Campus Theatre
-■—FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE—^—
W MOUSKE ■ JOCQUE REVUE
Vol.  1, No.  1
Vancouver, B.C., Tuesday, February  13,  1968
THESE PEOPLE are typical education types. You probably run into them in the Ed. lounge,
cafeteria,   or   can.   Maybe   you're   one   of   them.   Probably you wish  you  weren't.
Student guide to Edgie types
Everybody knows engineers are all oversexed
egomaniacs and sciencemen (?) are all undernourished martyrs, but Edgie students, as well as
being frumps and ginks, are also frumps and
ginks of every description.
If you're not sure how to classify that which
you see lumbering toward you in the Education
Building, follow this reliable guide:
MUSIC types figure a Magical Mystery Tour
is a three day  excursion to Revelstoke.
GEOGRAPHY types insist that the whole
campus is gradually slipping into Georgia
Straight, (no pun  intended.)
HISTORY types never insist.   They reason.
PHYS.  ED.  types  carry their gym  strip in
Ed US elections—
Feb. 20-21-vote
The thing is to vote.
»        In the education elections.
I On Feb. 20 and Feb. 21.
From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
!, At the main door of the education build
ing, at the CNIB cafeteria, in the Buchanan
building, and in the Sedgewick Library. ;
Do your bit. Please!
unsealed plastic bags.
MATH types are a drag.
ART types think a calamity is leaving
their white-on-white stitchery in the ceramics
room.
COMMERCE types have a perpetual callous
on the third finger of their right hand, (figure
that one out, bunky.)
ENGLISH types flit through C lot crying,
"If winter comes can spring be far behind?"
SCIENCE types are concentrating heavily on
improving their insipid image.
AUDIO-VISUAL types have two standard responses: "Where the hell's that extension cord?"
and "For god's sake don't TOUCH anything."
LIBRARY types aways finish their term
papers on time, paraphrase all their quotes,
complete their reading lists, and go to church
every Sunday.   In short,  they are nauseous.
The preceding guide does not pretend to cover
everyone in the faculty, but then who gives
space to perverts?
AGENDA OF EVENTS: Tuesday - cartoon -
noon — ed. lounge; Wednesday — pool capades
— noon — Empire Pool and art show — noon —
—ed. lounge; Thursday — variety show — noon
— ed. 100, car rally — noon — Brock and art
show — noon — ed. lounge; Friday — dance —
Brock. All events are free except the Brock
dance. FINALE: SATURDAY - VANCOUVER
HOTEL - $5 - RHAPSODY IN BLUE.
Rub a dub dub
all in a tub
in a boat race
The joint committee of Education and Physical Education
Undergraduate Societies is proud to announce the main attraction of our Education-Phys. Ed week (Feb. 12-16) on campus. I
refer of course to the BOAT RACE. But this is not going to be
just another boat race; this is to be the boat race that alumnae
and undergrads will talk about for years to come. It is the boat
race with a difference!
February 14, at noon.
This event will be held in Empire Pool. That's right — the
swimming pool located beside War Memorial Gym. We hereby
issue a challenge to the presidents of the undergraduate societies
to send a team of four competent boat racers.
The customary procedure of drinking beer will be integrated with a genuine race ACROSS THE POOL on or in any
floating object. (This may not be a boat and may not be engine-
propelled.) It may be a rubber inner tube, pair of water wings,
or whatever you choose, but remember — it must support your
contestant all the way across the pool. Each team is to provide
its own supporting vehicle.
All drinking will be done on the pool deck before each
dompetitor takes to the — — brrr — — water. The race will
be run in relay fashion, with two members of each team on
either side of the pool.
The councils of Education and Physical Education challenge you to be at this first annual one-of-a-kind boat race. The
date again is noon on the 14th of February (tomorrow you
clod!). The place is Empire Pool. Representative teams of four
boat racers and supporting object should be ready to go at
12:35 p.m.
Fret not non-swimmer. Life guards will be provided — our
own, of course.
Apathetic symbol
no longer needed
Mouse ears be damned.
Starting with Homecoming in the fall when Education
won first prize for its Salute to the Polar Regions float and
Education Queen Barb Dee became second runner-up in the
Queen contest, Education has succeeded in squelching its former
apathetic image.
We've sponsored a great folk concert with Ann Mortifee
and Jock Mock; a film, The L-Shaped Room; and a fantastic
Christmas party for kids, complete with Santa Claus; the same
Santa Claus, lush that he is, who has led our boat race crew
to top positions every time out    Well done guys!
We held a tremendous Future Teachers' Conference and
are now initiating a unique night school project. But let's get
down to the basics for a minute — our illustrious Alma Mater
Society representative, Bob Gilchrist, won the dubious distinction of becoming number one shit shoveller during aggie
week.
Thanks Bob, we really appreciated the laurels you brought
home, but where the hell's the fluorient you ordered?
Don't miss our big schedule of Education Week special
events including a Roadrunner festival, a leg auction, an art
display, a variety show, and our big Rhapsody In Blue formal.
We've got the friendliest people on the campus in our
faculty, so come on over and see what we have to offer . . .
ALL IS CALM NOW
but wait till POOL CAPADES! Page 2
MOUSKE-JOCQUE REVUE
Tuesday, February  13,  1968
MOUSKE-JOCQUE REVUE
In  the  beginning  god  created   Phys.  Ed.  and   plain  Ed.
This   is  our  effort.
Editors: Joe Kenward, Susan Lamb.
Ass't  Editor:  Joy Arthur.
Contributors: Paul Bailey, Marg Clements, George Costello,
Doug Edgar, Gary Gumley, Gord Hay, Barry Kingsely, Lome
Lindsay, Barrie Mowatt, Janice Ramsay, Bryan "Zeke" Rattray,
Sue Shaw, Ivan Somlyoi, Linda Spratt, Sheila Watson, Ernie
"T. J." Yacub.
Remember . . .
"All cattle, front and centre."
That's the rallying  cry on Trustees Day, March  12.
School officials — the superintendents and the trustees —
arrive each year for supposedly one reason, to interest students
in their districts. They bring brochures, slide-shows, and sales
pitches. And lately, trouble.
Students eager for positions and too dumb to read their
B.C. Teacher Federation booklets have been verbally committing
themselves, often into unbearable teaching situations. Primary
specialists have been stuck with grade sevens and Geography
majors with Phys.  Ed.  classes.
These officials have no legal right to ask you to sign a contract; technically you cannot sign until graduation. But all the
same, you're in one hell of a fix if you do commit yourself. By
the time you yank yourself loose, it may (be too late for a permanent position.
So come March 12, go — see the displays, talk to the district representatives. Find out which areas appeal to you. But
do not sign a contract. Do not commit yourself in any way.
Better a placement based on four month's thought than a snap
decision on Trustees Day.
After all, there's a teacher shortage, remember?
/pres. eo.<t.s. ]
I  can h&T<Mt|  *i*it til mxt
J    apattetic four fifth*...
damn
rrvi
floutfrs
hav*
3ph ids
Just weight
Education has more weight to throw around than any other
faculty. Or so says the voting system of the Alma Mater Society.
Based on attendance at last year's polls, Education is the
only group on campus to have a weighted vote of three, in
comparison to one of Arts and two of Engineering.
The system works as follows: one vote for a poll of one to
500, another for 500 to 1,000, and a third for 1,000 plus. Last
year, Education was the only faculty to get more than 1,000
voters out.
The annual revision of the AMS constitution is once more
underway, and the weighted vote is presently being scrutinized.
The decision has yet to be finalized, however, so when the
polls open next Tuesday and Wednesday, get out there and
vote. All 3,000 of you. We did it before and we can do it again.
Thumbs up
Vancouver's high schools are monumental failures in educating their students.
Ask any student who is presently chained to their institution
by social pressure. Some refuse to accept the trivial datum and
useless knowledge (????) of these farcical establishments and
have enough guts to quit, to say to hell with it!
Vancouver's high schools have failed because their training
environment suppresses learning. The student is trained and
bred to pass meaningless examinations! in order to enter society
with a graduate certificate.
Society is now beginning to change; that piece of paper is
accepted for what it is — a thin slice of dead wood.
It is no evaluation of the bearer's knowledge, wisdom, or
intelligence. It is an evaluation of his patience, will power, and
pain endurance ability.
Vancouver needs a freer attitude in its secondary education
institutes — freedom for learning; freedom from the social
demands that have attached their entrails to our education
system.
As Education students you are told that such freedom will
occur in the near future and that it is actually happening now,
but these changes don't occur overnight, they take time. B.S.!
Make it happen now, as soon as possible! If you have ideas
about freeing the student from his present situation, apply
them when you teach.
Listen to and learn from the free thinkers on the faculty.
Carry out their ideas next fall.
If you fail; if you are squashed; QUIT and work for a free
school (there will be more of these in Vancouver as the year
progresses).
If you are honestly interested in Vancouver's education
system and in the pupils who are being so sadly abused then
you can do it.
If you aren't or if you feel you can't, I pity you!
— P.B.
Exciting program started
A new and exciting project has been organized by the Education Undergraduate Society.
It will test the talents of our faculty members.
Volunteer student teachers have been turned
loose on the unlearned masses of Vancouver.
In a small class situation, students with academic problems can get help from a qualified
(choke) person without paying through the nose.
With only six students to a class, personal difficulties can be more easily overcome.
The students have a say in what they wish
to take during each week of the six week
programme.
Classes are held at Killarney Senior Secondary every Tuesday evening, and depending on
class response, run from between one and two
hours.
Enrolment includes 300 of the 1000 students
in the school and is "staffed" by 46 members of
our faculty.
The response to this project seems to indicate a very serious need for more programs of
the same type.
Almost one-third of Killarney students felt
they needed extra help. This is not due to slackness of Killarney teachers. The school simply
has too many students and too little time to deal
with them. Each future teacher should realize
that this is a common problem.
Perhaps an enlarged program carried out by
sincere student teachers will alleviate some of
the problems caused by over-crowded and overworked schools.
This being the first year for this experimental
programme, we naturally want complete success.
Variety varies
Education's second annual Variety Show arrives Thursday,  Feb.   15.
Some 15 acts, ranging from poetry reading
to folk singing, will present a two-hour show in
Ed. 100 at noon.
Three faculty judges will choose winners for
the prizes of $25, $15, and $10.
Due to the small size of the auditorium and
the enthusiasm of students, Educational Television will film the show and present it in the
Ed. Lounge.
For this reason only one school is being used
this year, and only secondary students in their
final three years are taking part.
If a success, (and reaction thus far has been
fantastic), the operation will be expanded next
year. More faculty members will be able to take
part, and more Vancouver schools will be used.
School authorities and parents are optimistic
about future expansion.
Long range possibilities for the project include day classes and credits for participating
teachers. We believe that such a plan could be
beneficial both to the students and to the student teachers.
We only hope that enough people who are
truly interested in becoming devoted teachers
will give a little of their valuable time to assist
a student who really needs help and who can
only repay you with a simple  "Thanks."
Debased degree
is students   aim
Assuming that Joe Student (an assumed name
obviously) is oblivious to the universally accepted concept of the conceptual university
student studiously studying to gain a gainsworthy
but utterly degraded degree of sheepless sheepskin, he will go through his four or five years, if
not more or less, with the sheepish notion of
achieving notable and creditable results resulting
in credit in the bank, since he banks on desirable
marks which he markedly desires in his course
of studies for which he curses more than he
studies, even for the tests which he detests but
writes for the right to stay and play gamely
at this game of life, compiling corruptible but
compelling ideas that ideally should be completely and explosively expelled with or without
explanations of these momentarily fabulous fads
expounded by public figures mounting waves of
publicity wavering through controversial subjects subject to controlling influences or inflections of public or private opinion in previous
publications or any other of the mass media used
as the medium of common communication by
commercial interests interested in the amazing
proportions of amused students like you who
forgot that this is all an assumption in one
sentence and even if you remembered, so what? Tuesday,   February  13,   1968
MOUSKE-JOCQUE REVUE
Page  3
Dumb jock?
Dumb Jock eh? Well you cruddy artsman, or whatever
the hell you are, we end up taking many of the same courses
as you, plus some from science. Granted, it's not nearly as rough
as medicine, or engineering (in work load), but it's no slacker
than Arts, Education, or Science.
During our four year Bachelor of P.E. program, we take
two years of English; first year Math, Chemistry, Biology, and
Psychology; senior courses in Anatomy and Physiology (taken
with Rehabilitation Medicine types); an outside single major (3
senior courses of Eng., Math, etc.); plus at least twelve units
of academic electives. That's only about two-thirds of our
degree, you say.
Well, we have some P.E. theory courses in addition —
courses such as Principles, History, Administration of P.E.; two
health courses, plus five electives such as Physiology of Exercise,
Kinesiology, and Tests and Measurements. All these courses
are half a year long and worth 1 and a half units. Some are
slack, some are tough — depending on the prof.
Then, we also have nine units of one-unit activities such as
gymnastics, basketball, swimming, etc. In these we have to be
knowledgeable in all aspects of the game — tactics, rules officiating, etc. We also have to demonstrate proficiency and
teaching skill.
Some of these are a real "cup of tea", verging on the
ridiculous. How can you take a full term of bowling, for instance. However, you'd be rather surprised at the detail in a
course like Track and Field.
No, you don't have to be an athlete to be in P.E. In fact,
the proportion of extramural athletes in P.E. is probably no
greater than any other faculty. All the activities have an introducing course and the overall aim is toward teaching the
sport.
Because of these activity courses and the obvious supposition that they're slack, we need 69 units to graduate. It is a
fairly relaxed program but quite in comparison with others
at this university.
Learning?
Okay children, you may now go outside for recess.
We've all heard that at one time or another when we were
kids. Well, we're no longer children but we are still treated
that way.
How many classes do you attend just because the prof takes
attendance mentally or otherwise? Just for the hell of it, skip
every class tomorrow which you think is useless or which you
feel you can put to better use. Then the following class day go
and find out how many stayed away.
Offhand, I'd say very few people have the strength of their
convictions to actually buck the system.
Of course, we then come to the problem of differing values.
To some, it is enough to go to a lecture, tape the prof's ideas,
memorize them, back them up with some facts from a text, and
spew them back on the exam. This, I submit, is not learning.
The only reasoning required is in the organization of
"learned" material.
This is supposed to be a university; a place where new
thoughts, new ideas should be nourished — a place which will
produce the leaders who can solve the many problems facing
our society and the teachers who can motivate and open the
doors to new experience! Instead, it has become a factory where
robots hot off the production line fill the vacant spots left by
human beings. Bloody awful predicament!
Students haven't the wealth of knowledge or experience to
comment on matters concerning their education, such as: curriculum, professors, administration, facilities, etc. Damn it all,
come down out of your ivory tower and try talking to a few!
You'll probably find some with good, fresh ideas, and probably
a fairly good notion of what is going on.
Just because they haven't been around as long doesn't mean
they might not be able to look at a course from a different angle.
The mark of the true teacher is realization that he can learn as
much from his students as they can learn from him.
System outdated?
The views expressed in this editorial are my own and.not
necessarily those of the editor or other students in the school.
With all due respects to the good teachers in the School of
PE and Rec. there is a long overdue change needed to bring
the level of our program to that of other progressive PE departments across Canada.
In order to raise our standards to those of the rest of the
university we need a change in the structure and some new
blood on the faculty.
It's not enough to lecture from a ten year old set of notes.
Neither is it enough to hand out oral assignments to a class of
forty and consider this total involvement. It is merely an easy
way out of preparing for a class.
PE students have traditionally kept quiet. Now, perhaps, a
few will start thinking, if they haven't already done so. A few
will start voicing their opinions.
If you have something to say but wish to protect yourself,
you can do so by writing for The Ubyssey anonymously. Don't
be malicious, and try to toe constructive, if possible.
— E.R.Y.
KlMeSl©i.O(JV   f
^*
Schools for everyone
Are our school buildings obsolete? This is
the question that must be seriously considered
before great sums of money are poured into
the building of more traditionally planned
schools.
Traditionally, schools have been built solely
as facilities for educating the youth of society.
To this end they have succeeded. Yet, these
structures, built at great expense to the taxpayer, lie unused for many hours per week, and
not uncommonly, through the entire eight weeks
of the summer holidays. How can a society,
striving for efficiency, justify this disuse? How
can  it  justify the  expense?
In several communities in Eastern Canada,
this lack of forethought has been overcome. The
present trend is to the building of Multipurpose
Education Complexes. In Vaudreuil, Quebec,
"La Cite des Jeunes" is an example of one such
complex. In this case, the complex combines a
technical institute and a secondary school whose
facilities have been built with the idea of their
being used not only by the students but by the
whole community.
"The collection of buildings at the "La Cite"
was designed for maximum efficiency. Formerly,
each school required a library, gymnasium, cafeteria, chapel, audio - visual services and art
studios. All of these installations were costly
and yet served only a limited number of pupils.
To reunite several buildings on one site permitted avoiding this costly duplication of services. By a system of efficient rotation all
students of the different institutions are able
to benefit from the more complete services.
At the "Cite des Jeunes" each of the institutions contributes to the total benefit, of the
entire complex. Thus, the trade school within
the water purification plant not only provides
the purification and sewage services but also
trains technicians in the laboratories. Also, the
central heating plant looks after all the buildings of the campus at considerably reduced costs,
while teaching students the techniques of such
plants.
The Sports Centre is used by all students
during the day, and in the evenings and on
weekends by adults who also profit from com
petent instructors. The Cultural Centre will
offer a library of 125,000 volumes and a vast
auditorium will be available to all for widely
varied productions.
Because the complex is entirely self supporting, Technology students make necessary
repairs to any defective equipment, while the
recreation students provide programmes for both
the students and the community. The Secondary
School students take charge of providing the
evening adult courses be they academic, technical, or artistic.
How close is Vancouver to such a complex?
Presently, plans are under way for the building
of a combination school and community centre.
This new multipurpose complex, to be built at
Britannia Secondary School, will make all the
facilities (classrooms, shops, labs, library, gymnasium, etc.) available not only to the students,
but to all the individuals in the community.
This, if the trend continues, will eliminate the
building of schools and community centres as
separate entities. No longer will the community
centre have to rent the school building for a
programme.
A full time professional recreation director
will be an integral part of such a complex. All
the programming outside of school activities will
be the responsibility of the director. The total
programme will be planned by both school officials and the recreation director. This cooperation, extending throughout the staff of the
complex, will enable the proper development of
the total programme and make for the most
effective use of the facility.
This is the beginning of a trend which must
continue if we are to contribute to fulfilling the
needs of the community both educationally and
recreationally! Not only is forethought in the
planning of such complexes essential but there
is a need for better understanding between the
professional educators and recreationsists who
will jointly administrator such a complex.
All too often it has been found that a facility,
no matter how well planned, is almost useless
without a fully competent staff to administer it.
The continuation Of this trend, and it must continue, can do nothing but improve our presently
obsolete system! Page 4
MOUSKE-JOCQUE REVUE
Tuesday, February  13,   1968
I
PIED PIPER PLAYS plaintively while withering students await fate of black hooded henchman preparing victims for unspeakable terror, all in aid of PE-education week. Stunts
continue  until   Friday.
Future teachers congregate
So you hate bubblegummers, eh?
Pity the Ed. US; they played host to 325 of
them for the weekend  of January  25-26.
Occasion? It was the first Pacific northwest
future teachers conference to  be held at UBC.
The conference was a bright, well organized
and quick-moving success.
High school and university students from
throughout the Pacific northwest toured the
campus, discussed topics ranging from professionalism to sex and the university student and
sat in on education lectures.
The sponsor's conference held in conjunction
with the PNWFTC was a successful experiment
with many prominent educators in attendance.
The greatest single achievement was the
enthusiastic response of the university students
to establish a Pacific North West university
education  council union.
This will give students from the high schools
an opportunity to see what all of the education
colleges in B.C. and Washington have to offer.
It will also be of benefit to university students in their bid for a pre-professional association  with  the  teaching federation.
Acknowledgements from sponsors, university
delegates,  special  guests  and  faculty  who par-
Jokes and jollies
Miss Dradshaw, a comely high-school teacher,
had saved money for several years and was
finally aboard a sleek ocean liner for her long-
anticipated trip to Europe. Aboard ship, she
wrote:
"Dear Diary: MONDAY. I feel singularly
honoured this evening. The Captain asked me to
dine at his table. TUESDAY. I spent the entire
morning on the bridge with the Captain. WEDNESDAY. The Captain made proposals to me
unbecoming an officer and a gentleman. THURSDAY. Tonight the Captain threatened to sink
the ship if I do not give in to his indecent
proposals. FRIDAY. This afternoon I saved 1,600
lives.
• • •
A sweet young schoolteacher who had always
been virtuous was invited to go for a ride in the
country with the P.E. instructor, whom she
admired. Under a tree on the bank of a quiet
lake, she struggled with her conscience and with
the P.E. instructor and finally gave in to the
latter. Sobbing uncontrollably, she asked her
seducer, "How can I ever face my students again,
knowing I have sinned twice?"
"Twice?"   asked   the  young  man   confused.
"Why yes,'' said the sweet teacher, wiping a
tear from her eye, "you're going to do it again,
aren't you?"
ticipated in the conference have been very
favourable.
It is hoped that a greater liason between
these groups will result.
Conference chairmen Barry Mowatt and Kir-
sten Wahlstrom extend their thanks to every
education student who participated in the conference and especially committee chairmen Tami
Burgess, Judy Wolfe, Tom Spratt, Ester Howe,
Connie Young, Carol Smith, Freddie Lowe, Lome
Stewart, Sue Shaw and George Foster.
Open car rally
Thursday noon
The Physical Education and Education Faculties are sponsoring an open car rally Feb. 15—
gratis.
Starting in front of Brock Hall, the rally will
commence at 12:30, each car leaving at one
minute intervals
The route will take approximately an hour
to drive over, and will be fairly easy since this
is a fun-event. Entrants are required to supply
their own vehicles (surprise! surprise!) and
should bring along a map of the city. Special
awards will be given to the best male and best
female drivers and navigators, and for the driver
with the most demerits. Everyone is invited to
join in the fun Feb. 15—Don't forget.
Save a label,
give to a jock
If you have a Kraft label from Velveeta,
Miracle Whip, Liquid Dressings, Cheese
Slices, Cracker Barrel, Kraft Dinners, Peanut Butter, Cheez Whiz, Parkay, or any of
the Jams, Jellies, or Marmalades — WE
want them.
Enough labels could be worth $50,000
to our Olympic team. Torn labels are quile
acceptable as long as they are recognizable.
Gather your wrappers and deposit .hem
in the boxes located in the foyer of the
Memorial Gym and the lounge of the Education building.
If you find yourself too physically exhausted to drag yourself over to the gym,
feel free to place your labels in the hands
of any able-bodied Phys. Ed or Rec. student
who will happily execute the task for you!
Sweet factory-
just what is it
Just what goes on day after day in that monstrous building
on the outskirts of campus, beside which can be detected a
cement pond rather larger than the library pond?
Several things may be noted in connection with this building. To begin with there is a continuous stream of greenness in
and out ('snot what you may think).
Another significant factor is the odious odor which pours
out of this building and seems to hang like smog at nose level.
Not only are the visual and olfactory senses stimulated either
directly or indirectly (who knows!) by this edifice (gym, you
clod!) but auditory senses are also affected.
However, these are only superficial observations. On closer
investigation (after a detailed study) it was found that the green
stream is composed of students in the School of Physical Education and Recreation (jocks); the odor is caused by the manufacture of a by-product commonly known as  "sweat";
But, just what effects do these weird phenomena have on
the rest of the campus population? To answer this question we
have interviewed a few representatives of the relatively significant, but not extremely prominent faculties.
The question asked was, "What is your misconception of
Physical Education, i.e. what does Physical Education mean to
you?"
The results:
Home Economics: "Sweat . . . what a way to ruin fabric!"
Nursing: "Significant factor in the overcrowding of hospitals"
Forestry: "Wooden gym floors."
Agriculture:  "Well, if sweat could be used as a fertilizer
Arts: "Like man, it means big, beautiful muscles or love."
Science: "Just a minute and I'll work it out with my slide
rule."
Engineers: We regret that at the time of the survey the
geers were too busy playing with their toy trucks on Main Mall.
Education: "No comment."
VIEW FROM THE TOP
ZEKE
Well friends and neighbours, in case you didn't realize it,
the PEUS White Globetrotters Intramural Basketball team has
once again captured the coveted Intramural "A" league Championship Trophy.
The PEUS team looked not on this game as just another
championship match. This was a game of pride, a game of
honour, for the championship that the White Globetrotters had
lost to Forestry one year earlier was the 1st championship in
four years that the 'trotters had lost.
In postgame ceremonies at the Fraser Hilton Roger Smith
was presented with the game ball for his fine two-way game.
Frank Dyck was presented with the MVP award and Bruce
Robertson received the Come-back player of the year award
(last year he was having problems, i.e. he got hitched). Guttiest
Player award went to another rookie—Dave Backie who played
with a knee injury that would have kept most men out of action.
As a result of a specially staged contest dreamed up and
sponsored by the "tree" crew (as they still wanted to win something) it was P.E.'s Zeke Rattray who staggered off with the
"Biggest Bladder" award or as it came to be called "The Longest Pause that Refreshes."
For any of you that may be interested the championship
trophies will be presented to the team members at their respective home towns during various local festivities.
Frank Dyck will be accepting the Trophies on behalf of
the team at the Annual Matsqui Bull Show — to be held sometime in May. Atta boy Frank.
Dave Backie will be receiving the trophies in conjunction
with the annual New Westminster May Day celebrations usually
held in March.
The annual Oak Bay Regatta held sometime in August will
be the place where Bruce Robertson will accept the trophies.
Roger "Apache" Smith will get his (pun?) in conjunction
with the Annual New Hazelton Frontier Days Celebration held
every Saturday night.
Bob Murray will accept the trophies during the Creston
"Burn-a-Barn Week" celebrations in sympathy with the local
Doukhobor contingent.
At the annual Essondale Spring Tea and Fashion Show (held
early in June) Geordie "Golden Boy" Caldow will once again
receive the trophies  on behalf of the team.
Bryan "Zeke" Rattray has the privilege of representing
P.E. at the Annual Osoyoos Cherry Carnival, held on Dominion
Day.
If any of you happen to be in these particular communities
during these celebrious moments, team advisor professor Frankie
Gnup advises you to attend.
Apparently there is now a movement in the P.E. faculty to
v,pvo the mementos of the PEUS White Globetrotters, victorious
exploits permanently enshrined in the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame
as not even the Boston Celtics can boast of a record that contains only one loss in five years of competitive basketball.
Well that's all for now and as an old trapper friend of mine
used to say,  "Never say whoa in a tight spot." Tuesday,  February  13,   1968
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 7
Gears hate hacks
MONTREAL (CUP) — Newspapers and engineers just
don't mix.
At Sir George Williams University they dumped several
thousand copies of the paper, and at the U of Calgary they
hung the paper in effigy.
The Sir George plumbers were upset over coverage
given to a protest against engineering week.
At Calgary the Gauntlet failed to cover the departure
of the campus beauty queen. She was going to Waterloo
to run for Canadian university queen.
At Sir George they were even more violent. They tried
lo destroy copies of last Friday's Georgian, mainly because
its editorial panned engineering week and  its displays.
But they blew it in their haste to do their damage.
They picked the wrong papers.
What they threw out were a few thousand back issues
which were to be bound into yearbooks.
URBAN  RENEWAL  QUESTION
To solve or not to solve
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Urban renewal is social disaster.
It was this and more to a panel of five experts at the UBC school of social work who discussed whether or not urban renewal is a physical solution, to a social problem.
"We're slightly disenchanted with what's happened in respect to urban renewal's effects. It's
physical action resulting in social disaster," said
Trudeau backed
Trudeau: the best man for the West.
This is the belief of a new campus group
determined to see justice minister Pierre Eliot
Trudeau elected Liberal party leader and Canada's fifteenth prime minister.
The non - partisan group, led by political
science grad students Gerry Hbldrinet and
George Haynal, already has 15 members and is
pressing for more.
Haynal says he sees Trudeau as the best choice
for a number of reasons.
"He's a dynamic personality, a convincing
federalist ,a thinker, and has been tremendously
successful in parliament," he said.
The fundamental philosophy of the Back
Trudeau group, he said, is that confederation
is a delicate balance between the provincial and
federal powers and that a strong spokesman is
needed for the federal authority to make the
country coherent as well as united.
"We have no real political affiliation," said
Haynal. "We're simply concerned about the
quality of Canadian politics."
He said the aim of the campaign on campus
is to demonstrate western support for Trudeau.
"We've heard that Trudeau won't run for
the (Liberal leadership if he doesn't have a show
of support for the West.
"So we're going to try to get a lot of signatures to show him he has supporters  here."
The group will try to get Trudeau to speak
at UBC as soon as he announces his candidacy
for the leadership.
An organizational meeting of the Back Trudeau  group will meet Friday noon in Bu. 204.
CUS escapes probe
BURNABY {CUP) — The Simon Fraser student president won't get to investigate the Canadian Union of Students.
His council voted 6-5-1 against giving him
$300 to do it.
Art Weeks planned to fly to Ottawa along
with the University of B.C. student president
Shaun Sullivan and a rep from the University
of Victoria council to investigate CUS.
"I want to see their operation. I want to
see their staff. I want to see their officers," he
said.
"All we receive from CUS is a barrage of
mass-mailed literature and a receipt.
"I expect to come back with a firm promise
that CUS will juice up their West coast operation instead of referring to us as country bumpkins," he said.
In Ottawa Friday, associate secretary Daphne
Kelgard denied anyone from the secretariat
ever used the term.
"I don't particularly appreciate the reference
because I was born in B.C. myself," she said.
Larry Bell, researcher with United Community
Services.
"The trouble with you social workers is that
you're a bunch of bleeding hearts," Bob Collier,
assistant professor in the UBC school of planning,
told 50 social workers.
Social workers sympathized with the poor
and downtrodden in the urban renewal areas but
don't offer any concrete solutions for organizing
them, he said.
"The main problem is social workers remain
outside the political streams."
"You can't come to grips with the urban renewal problems until you become political."
Bruno Freschi, an architect with the firm of
Erickson-Massey, said urban renewal is a physical solution to a physical problem.
"I have to see urban renewal as part of a
larger fabric — loosely called the city. It has
been the most convenient way of performing
major surgery in a city,'' he said.
Mrs. Hilda Simons of UBC's extension department said one problem is that people still
tend to view property as sacred.
"Property decays, transportation systems become totally in adequate. We have the technology
to build any kind of city we want to," she said.
"Urban renewal is a political umbrella, not
a solution", said Gerrard Farry, a researcher in
the city planning department.
"Under it are civic improvement groups, professional associations, real estate interests and
others," he said.
"Our cities are essentially Model-T style.
They're somewhat anti-social, not economic, have
many hazards, are under represented politically
and overgoverned bureaucratically. Urban renewal is seem as a way of overcoming these problems", Farry said.
"Part of the rules of the game of urban renewal is to go out and find lots of social problems," said Bell.
"Nobody has proven that urban renewal alleviates the problems."
Gripes - praise
to fall tonight
Students with gripes or praise for first-year
courses can air them tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the
Totem Park canteen.
A committee established by the faculty of
arts will be there to assess student reaction to
first year courses.
The committee will also discuss the results
of a questionnaire given to first year students
to examine the Arts I programme.
Students from higher years are also invited.
The committee consists of five faculty members, chaired by classics prof. Dr. William
Dusing. "This was done two years ago and was
very successful," Dusing said Monday. "This is
an important opportunity for students to influence decisions which concern the most difficult
year of student life."
A second open session on first year problems
will be held Thursday from noon to 2:30 p.m.
in Buch. 102.
Dusing said students could help the committee by writing out their presentations, although
this is not essential.
SERGEANT-AT-ARMS of student court refused to admit
Ubyssey photo editor Kurt Hilger to the court meeting
Monday. So Hilger contacted the Varsity Outdoors Clubs-
man Bob Woodsworth, who was supplied with a camera
and lowered from the Brock Hall roof to take pictures
through the windows of the council chamber.
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"field with a future"
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FILM
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FACULTY OF PHARMACY
GEORGE CUNNINGHAM BUILDING
(al South  End  of the Wesbrook  Building)
COME & SEE WHAT IT'S ALL ABOUT
THURS., FEB. 15# 1968
12:30 - Rm. 171
Education  Committee of the
Pharmaceutical  Association   of   B.C.
410 Dominion  Bank Building,
207 West Hastings St., Vancouver 3, B.C. Page 8
THE     U BYSSEY
Tuesday, February  13,  1968
Students' war
Battle  vs  world   for   power  on   the   university  front'
By JOHN KELSEY
Canadian University Press
While college editors spent January, 1968,
lancing obscenities through clouds of pot smoke,
the war between students and the world escalated
quietly.
Noisy protests erupted in only five cities,
down somewhat from November's anti-Dow protest fever, but legislative battles for student
senators were won in five more.
A University of Western
Ontario student dramatically
ascended to the board of governors, and the university of
Alberta rejected a student
governor. "We don't believe
in student power,'' said U of
A student president Al Anderson.
Three  University of B.C.
senators asked their constituents if they could quit because KELSEY
they weren't getting anywhere, and the university   of  Calgary's  academic  president   did   quit
because he couldn't talk to his board.
And across the country students cooled it in
drunk tanks as winter carnival fever highballed
through central Ontario, Manitoba and the Lake-
head.
The most visible battlefronts last month were
in Quebec City and Waterloo, Ontario. At Waterloo Lutheran, the university fired two professors, George Haggar and Gray Taylor. Both
were good teachers, but both were loudly critical
of the university and its administration.
Four hundred students retaliated with a class
boycott and day-long teach-in Jan. 17, but the
student council backed down and refused to support the action. The Canadian Association of
University Teachers is investigating, noboby's
been rehired, and the issue is in for a several
month stall.
STUDENTS SEE RED
But a week later, 1,000 Quebecois students
travelled to Quebec city to demonstrate outside
the legislature. Grievance? Government channels had held 33,000 of 68,000 student loan applications in red tape masses, causing starvation
on the campuses. The minister promised to speed
it up, but UGEQ leaders called it stalemate.
The biggest fight of all is shaping in Saskatchewan, where premier Ross Thatcher has raised
tuition fees, removed high school teacher's salary
bargaining rights and in preparing to assume
direct financial control of the university. Students, teachers, professors and staff are mad as
hell. It will remain just a battle of words until
later this month when the legislature reconvenes
to enact Thatcher's threats. Student organizers
are waiting, and organizing.
The other visible eruptions were relatively
minor: engineers at the University of Toronto
snowballed anti-Dow protestors, and University
of Windsor students rallied for a free student
press.
ADMINISTRATION FORCES RESIGNATION
There, the 100 who marched through the
snow protested the administration-forced resig-
Arts grad meeting
attracts only one
Just one student turned up for the arts
graduating class meeting Monday noon.
"It's a pity that with so many arts grads
so few should show interest," said class representative Susan Moir.
There are 973 students in fourth year arts.
On the agenda for the meeting were expenditures, honorary positions, and grad functions.
Of special interest was the choosing of a
class gift to undergraduates.
"I'd suggest something for SUB, an ambulance, or additions to study facilities in the
library," Miss Moir said.
She would welcome suggestions for a gift,
she said.
Another meeting is scheduled for Thursday
noon in Bu. 104.
Those graduating students who cannot attend
the meeting but who have suggestions should
phone her at 263-6878, or arts grad class representative Linda Kerr, at  266-5857.
nation of Lance co-editors John Lalor and Marian
Johnstone. It took more rallies, a strong student
council statement of support and a Canadian
University Press investigation, but editor Johnstone was re-instated and the paper's autonomy
guaranteed. Lalor is still out. What stated it all?
A few shifts, and Jerry Farber's the Student as
Nigger article.
Lalor's not the only editor out for obscenity
—Argosy Weekly editor Allan Rimoin was fired
by the university president Jan. 31 after a hassle
caused indirectly by the same article. His publications advisory board is against him, and the
whole mess in Sackville is obfuscated by a haywire newspaper constitution.
"They all agree the constitution should be
re-written, but they think it's expedient to fire
me first," Rimoin said.
Meanwhile, 24 college papers in Canada have
printed the Student as Nigger piece, partly as
a solidarity gesture with Rimoin, Lalor and
Mount Royal Reflector editor  Allan Wilson.
Wilson was also threatened with expulsion
by the board of trustees, which later relented
under student pressure.
The tempests grow deeper when you read
the article itself — each flurry reinforces its
message. The people in universities — students
and teachers —■ don't control universities. Negroes in America are second-class citizens, and
so are students in universities.
SENATORS—REAL  OR SHOW?
Academocratically, five campuses got a total
of 17 senators. Seven are at the University of
Manitoba, the largest catch to date. Dalhousie
and the University of Victoria got three each,
Brock got two, and St. Francis Xavier got two.
But St. F. X's aren't real — they don't vote.
One of them, council president John Gorman,
profusely praised the university's liberal administration anyway.
Students also advanced on the senate committee front. Dalhousie, Memorial of Newfoundland and Waterloo all got students onto key
planning committees. The total so far is 15 universities with senators, and negotiations are now
on at the University of Toronto and McGill in
Montreal.
The University of B.C. got its four senators
last spring. They've been there long enough to
conclude the senate will never open its secret
chamber, so three went to a student meeting
and asked their constituents for permission to
quit.
Students said no, planned a mass sit-in at
the next senate meeting, and negotiations with
the senate for openness opened again. The explosion was slated for St. Valentine's Day, but
the threat has both sides talking again and it's
been cancelled. The students so far remained
senators.
Last year's major battleground, the countrywide CUS front, enjoyed relative peace — one in
(Prince of Wales College) and none out. A new
drop-out front may Be opening in the Canadian
University Press, with one (Carleton University)
out and two in.
Simon Fraser students overwhelmingly voted
solidarity with the National Liberation Front;
which, in turn, is currently on the offensive in
Vietnam. A reversal at Montreal's Sir George
Williams, where council president Jeff Chipman
resigned over war recruiting—he's for it, council
isn't —• and was re-instated by a student general
meeting.
And everywhere the pall of pot smoke. The
university of Manitoba discovered some profs
smoke it. Winnipeg good burghers blew their
collective cool. Catholic Loyola of Montreal
outlawed drugs of all kinds, shortly after police
found 100 hippies stoned in a Montreal church.
Finally, January boded ill for the early blooming student activists in Ontario. A committee of
university presidents meeting at Waterloo Jan.
20 declared, "There is no such thing as a student
right to representation in the university government." Academocracy leads to sham democracy,
they said.
The're not the only ones catching on. Toronto Star business columnist Jack MacArthur,
who talks directly to those who own Canada,
Jan. 30 warned that if student power ever gets
out of control and takes over the university,
students might use it for their own ends and not
the country's ends. State power moves in, crush-
ingly, he said.  Believe it.
What's a musical?—
hard work and time
By JADE EDEN
What makes a musical?
More than 100 UBC students have been busy since
before Christmas finding out.
The Musical Society's cast and production crew are
seeing the results of their efforts as the musical comedy
Half a Sixpence, which runs to Thursday in the auditorium.
Ask them what makes a musical.
They'll tell you time: time to learn lines and songs
and dances, and time to rehearse and re-rehearse until
all three are perfectly harmonized.
Time to design and build sets, plan the program,
publicize, and sell tickets.
Hours to paint sets and synchronize lighting, collect
props and select costumes.
They'll tell you enthusiasm: it's 11 p.m. and you're
tired because it's the fifth night in a row that you've
been at rehearsal.
And the director calls for your number to be done
one more time, and this time act less constipated, so you
smile and take your place on stage.
Well after midnight, you arrive home to get a few
hours sleep before attending classes and yet another rehearsal the next day.
The obvious question is, is it worth it?
Yes, according to Ken Irwin, who plays the lead role
in Half a Sixpence.
Why?
"Because   of   the  experience,   the   enjoyment,   and   the
friends  you  make  while  being  involved  in  this  kind  of
production. I think a musical is simply more fun than other
theatricals for both cast and audience," Irwin said.
HALF A
SIXPENCE
AUD.-FEB. 13-17
Student Performances 75c
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SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT Tuesday,  February  13,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
— kurt hilger photo
YESTERDAY UPON THE STAIR, I met a man who wasn't there, but someone said he was busy
reading  AAcLuhan-like   passages   in   the   armory for the Contemporary Arts  Festival.  The
mystery   man's   performance  was   part  of   multi-media happening.
DOOR  DRUMMING . . .
. . . DELAYS  SPEAKERS
Court  proceedings  packed
UBC student court declared Stan Persky ineligible as a candidate for Alma Mater Society
president after deliberating for four hours Monday.
The decision came at 7 p.m. Earlier a stormy
three hour session of the court at noon saw more
than 200 students attempt to gain entry to the
chambers by various means.
Students argued with the sergeant-at-arms,
who admitted only 75 students to the public
gallery. Some came down over the roof, in
through the windows, and beat on the doors, but
were unsuccessful in their efforts.
The five justices, Allan Stewart, Gary Mc-
Shane, Al Donaldson, Peter Gerger, all law 3,
and Carol Powlett, law 2, maintained the court
had a right to apply their interpretation of sections of the constitution to particular instances.
This was objected to at the beginning of
procedures by defense lawyer Steve Gill.
The justices said in a unanimous decision
that Persky will not have attended two academic
years by March, the time the constitution stipulates he must take office.
The justices accepted a definition of "year"
from September to May.
They also recommended that the election be
declared null and void and the ballots be destroyed.
UBC director of information Arnie Myers
and public relations officer Jim Banham tried
to get into the chambers but both found the stairs
leading up to the second floor of Brock clogged
with students.
Looking ait the students crowded outside the
chambers, AMS treasurer Dave Hoye said student
court isn't a circus.
"iDo you think they let everyone in downtown when there's a rape on?", he asked.
Prelimina]~y objections to the absence of two
of the usual seven justices were made by Gill.
Chief justice Stewart said one justice had a
conflict of interests and decided not to sit; another became seriously ill Monday morning.
All this time Vancouver's Town Fool Joachim
Foikis attempted to enter but was (kept out by
the  sergeant-at-arms.
Both Gill and prosecutor Bob Johnston objected to the lack of delimitation of student
court's jurisdiction. Gill moved for adjournment
to B.C. Supreme court for a writ of prohibition
but was overruled by Stewart.
Persky's case was argued by law students
Gill and Mike Harcourt, law 3.
The AMS, who originally asked student court
to interpret the section of the constitution on
eligibility, was represented by Bob Johnston,
law 3, and Dave Gibbons, law 2.
The   section   of  the  AMS  constitution  that
was referred to student court for interpretation
is By-law 4 (3) a.
It reads:
"The president . . . shall have successfully
completed his second year or its equivalent,
and . . . has attended the University of British Columbia for at least two years and . . .
has not previously held the position of president   of the society."
Gill argued that this section was so ambiguous it allowed so many different interpretations that student court could not decide arbitrarily on one interpretation.
He questioned the meaning of the words
"year" and "attended". He said "year'' could
be a calendar year from January 1 to Dec. 31
or an academic year from Sept. 1 to Aug. 31 or
it could mean two full winter sessions.
Thus student court is forced to take an
interpretation of the arbitrary meaning of the
word "year", Gill said.
Persky has been at UBC since the fall of
1966 but has only 27 units. He is listed in the
registrar's office in third year honors anthropology,   conditional.
Persky, testfying as a defense witness, said
he was asked by his teacher to join the honors
program and later met with honors advisers
and was admitted to the program.
Johnston called UBC Registrar Jack Parnall
as an expert witness on Persky's academic
standing.
Parnall testified that Persky had conditional
standing before being admitted to third year.
He said Persky had only 27 units last year.
Just then a Varsity Outdoors Club member
swung down from the roof on a rope, took pictures for The Ubyssey, and was hauled up again.
The audience applauded.
Johnston presented as evidence a statement
signed by Parnall of Persky's academic record.
In cross-examination Gill asked Parnall if
Persky was an active member of the AMS. "As
far as I know," Parnall replied.
Gill also asked if Parnall had been consulted
when the pertinent sections of the constitution
on eligibility were drafted.
Parnall said no.
Then a crowd of students beat on the doors
for a minute, stopping the court proceedings.
Two more mountaineers landed on the ledge
and one made it inside.
Johnston submitted that the two year requirement must be fulfilled by the time of
nomination or election, not including a summer
session.
He said in his argument that the motion of
the AMS was irrelevant, that student court
could not decide on a particular candidate's
eligibility but only interpret the AMS code and
constitution.
Elections slated
Three candidates are contesting the presidency of the
education undergraduate society.
They are George Hollo, ed. 4; Barrie Mowatt, ed. 3; and
Gerry Olund, ed. 4.
Judy Wolfe, ed. 1, became education vice-president by
acclamation when nominations closed Wednesday.
Susan Shaw, ed. 2, and Judith Sigurdson, ed. 3, are nominated for Alma Mater Society representative.
Secretary nominees are Margot Haller, ed. 1, and Barb
Landels, ed. 3.
Nominated for treasurer are Richard Chang, ed. 4, and
Bonnie Lefever, ed. 3.
Judy Larson, ed. 1, is public relations officer by acclamation.
"This is a much better turn-out than last year," said education president Gary Gumley. "There were only two or three
nominations for all the offices and nominations had to be
extended."
Students may vote for candidates Feb. 20 and 21 in the
education cafeteria, or main entrances to education or Buchanan
buildings.
An all candidates meeting will be held in the education
lounge at noon Monday.
Elected officers will assume positions March 14.
Democracy favored
TORONTO (CUP) — Students and profs voted 27-22 Feb. 6
in favor of full democracy in University of Toronto government.
But not before the principal of Innis College (U of T) predicted chaos if this happened.
Speaking in a debate on student power, Dr. Robin Harris
said university education would be ruined if students and profs
had a full say in running the institution.
He said while the university is now a political situation,
full democracy would limit individual freedom for profs and
students because they would have no time to learn and think.
The university is not a legislature, he said. "The party
system, where people constantly attack each other, is not appropriate to the fulfillment of the aims of the university."
Student council president Tom Faulkner, also in the debate,
said students have no say in determining the values of the university. "The only way a university can have standard values
of excellence is if it's run in a democratic way."
A third speaker in the student power debate said the university is essentially a reflection of society. Student power is
thus an issue with society rather than the university, she said.
FILMSOC PRESENTS
Hold Me While I'm Naked
Eclipse Of The Sun Virgin
"Sins Of The Fleshapoids"
TODAY - AUDITORIUM
12:30 - 2:30 - 50c
CARIBBEAN
STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
presents
AT INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
MONDAY,  FEBRUARY   19-12:30   P.M.:    An address by a West Indian graduate
student — "The Emergence of a West
TUESDAY,   FEBRUARY  00-12:30   P.M.:
Indian Nation".
A paper by Bert Nepaulsingh, Graduate Student — "West Indian Literature
In   English".
: A paper by Patrick Alleyne, Graduate
Student—"The Role of the Scholar in
the  West  Indies"
WEDNESDAY,  FEB.  21   -   11:30  A.M.:    "Cook   Up"   Lunch   Time.
8 P.M.: A Caribbean Revue—An Evening nf
West Indian Entertainment, Featuring
Calypso, Folk - dancing, Steel-band
music,   etc.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 02—8  P.M.       :    An  Evening of West Indian Films.
FRIDAY,   FEBRUARY   23-8  P.M.
to  1   A.M.
LEGION   HALL-6th   &   COMMERCIAL
Calypso   Carnival   dance,   Music   by
Trinidad  Moonlighters  Steelband,  and
the   Caribbean   Natives   Combo.
Admission:   $2.00.  Tickets  are  obtainable  at   International   House.
In   addition   to   the  above,  there  will  be   an  exhibition   of  Art,  Crafts,   and
Literature daily in rooms 400 and 404,  International  House. Page   10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February  13,   1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Sixpence for  75  cents
MUSSOC
Half a Sixpence 8:30 p.m.
nightly till Saturday, auditorium. Students 75 cents, tonight,
Wednesday night, Thursday
noon.
MUSIC LECTURE
Dr. Alec Harman, University
of Durham, eminent musicologist, will speak on the aesthetics of music in the Baroque
era, 8 p.m., Wednesday in the
recital hall, music building.
ONTOLOGY
Guest speaker Dale Maranda
considers   Man:   Dust   or   Destiny?,   Wednesday   noon,   Bu.
223.
ARTS
First new arts council meeting: open to all, noon Wednesday, Buchanan lounge.
VARSITY FLYING CLUB
Reach for the Sky. True life
story Of Douglas Bader, WW II
legless pilot, 7:30 p.m., Wednesday SFU auditorium.  $1.
SOUTH EAST ASIA
PROJECT
Dr. Bill Wilmott on Does
Vietnam Exist, noon today,
Ang. 110.
Clive Ansley  on  Credibility
Gap, and S.E. Asia noon Wednesday, Ang. 110.
DANCE CLUB
Tuesday — samba; Wednesday — cha,  cha; Thursday —
pin classes; Friday — open.
HOUSING  SURVEY
COMMITTEE
Housing survey is out. If you
received one, fill it out return
it  as  soon  as possible  to  the
AMS office.
EDUCATION US
Free   cartoon   festival   noon
today, ed. 100.
PEUS
General meeting noon Wednesday, gym 211-213.
ACE
A children's panel discusses
What I like About School, noon
Wednesday, ed. 204. Non-members 10 cents.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau:   After   constitutional conference, noon today,
Bu. 203.
VCF
Informal meeting 5:30 p.m.
today in Mildred Brock. Michael Griffiths on 20th century
Christianity — advancing or
retreating.
EC SOC
Election committee meeting
today noon, Ang. 213. Elections Thursday noon, Ang. 213.
PRE-MED
Wednesday meeting cancelled.
NEWMAN CENTRE
General   meeting   Thursday
noon in Bu. 203. Concerns coming elections.
GERMAN CLUB
Kommen Sie und Sehen Sie
einen Film Van Stuttgart. Wir
diskutieren    den    Tanzabend
anch.
SKYDIVERS
Anyone  interested   in   packing   lessons   at  Abbottsford   7
p.m.  Wednesday  meet  in  the
clubhouse noon Wednesday.
COMMERCE US
Second slate AMS candidates
speak   noon,   today   in   Angus
lounge.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Film,    the    Poppe    Project,
noon Wednesday Ang. 207.
FILMSOC
Dirty movies in auditorium
today — Hold Me While I'm
Naked, Eclipse of the Sun Virgin and Sins of the Fleshapoids
at noon and 2:30 p.m. for 50
cents.
IL CAFFE
Lucio Marampon  speaks   on
II Mercato Commune, Wednesday, noon, IH.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Paul   Boutelle   discusses
Council, administration
aid waiting students
TORONTO (CUP) — University of Toronto student president
Tom Faulkner wants paychecks for students.
He made the appeal as a long-term solution to problems
of student aid.
The Toronto student council has made $5,000 available to
students still waiting for second instalments on their province
of Ontario student aid plan (POSAP) loans. The administration
has also put up an undisclosed sum of money to the fund.
Similar funds have been set up at Montreal universities,
where students have the same problems.
POSAP officials attribute the slowness to the increase on
POSAP requests over last year, to problems with the province's
computer, and to the time needed to handle the complex forms.
Similar reasons are cited by Quebec authorities for slowness
of loan fund disbursements.
Faulkner said last week he expects the already complex
POSAP application form to be even more difficult to complete
next year.
"The only satisfactory solution is a system of stipends, granting tuition and living allowances to all students qualified to
attend university," he said. "At the moment such a system
exists for graduate students only."
The concept of a student stipend is not new. Both the Canadian Union of Students and l'Union Generale des Etudiants du
Quebec have adopted the concept in their official programs,
though governments have been mute on the subject, except for
Newfoundland, where students in senior years get $50 a month,
$100 if they are from out-of-town.
Black Power and Social
Change, Wednesday noon, Bu.
106.
HILLEL
Michael Goldberg, a register
to the American Selective Service system speaks on th ethical and psychological pressures
leading to this major decision
—I Chose Freedom and Emigrated to Canada. Wednesday
noon, Hillel hut behind Brock.
MARKETING CLUB
Annual banquet will be held
Thursday at 5:45 p.m. in the
faculty club. Dr. Robert Hollo-
way is guest speaker. $3 for
members and $4 for non-members. Bar available.
Editor fined by court
SALEM, Oregon (UNS) — Oregon supreme court last
w.:ek unanimously upheld the contempt of court conviction
of Annette Buchanan, a former student newspaper editor.
She was fined $300 for refusing to disclose names of
news sources she used in a story about marijuana on campus in 1966.
FROM URBANA 67
Michael Griffiths
20th Century Christianity —
Advancing or Retreating?
Sponsored   by   Varsity   Christian   Fellowship
Today - 5:30 - Mildred Brock
REFRESHMENTS   SERVED
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00. 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
CARIBBEAN     WEEK     IS     COMING
soon!    Feb.   19-23.
DANCE TO PAPA BEAR'S MEDI-
cine Show on Feb. 17. 9:30-1:00 in
Place Vanier  Ballroom.
'68 GRAD CLASS PARTY — AT
Johann Strauss, Feb. 21. Tickets
$2.50 per couple from A.M.S. or
Faculty Reps. Hurry — Supply
Limited.
DANCE THIS FRIDAY FEB. 16
with George Cuba Quartet at International   House.
Greetings
12
Valentine Greetings
12A
NOOTKA   SIXTH FLOOR  WE   LOVE
you.   Your   crazy   Valentines.
DEAR SKYRESH BOLGOLAM:
Happy Valentine's Day. Love, Glum-
dalclitch.
PEAR CH1EFIE BABY. ONLY 170
days to so, I miss you. Californy
Horny.   P.S.   Me   Too,   Ralph.
AVAILABLE     TOMORROW:
Gnump  for  my  Valentine.
ONE
LAURA  Y      THIS
is    a   Luv   Luv—Luvalentine,    from
Goon.   Sidney   L.
DEAR   DENE'S   ORDIE—LOVE   AND
Cuddles   etc.  Alphonse  B.   P.
HAPPY   VALENTINES   DAY   MARI-
lyn.  Love  Malcom.
ROBBIE    H     "BEST
cause your biggest". Love Joan,
Margo, Vikky, Cathy, Suzanne,
Cindy,   Fern.
MR. P., THE "ALMOST" LUNUCH.
Happy Hearts Day, I hope you rise
to   the  occasion.   B.
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY. TO
Sir with Love from Section 44.
English   100.
TO WOJTEK.  L'AMOUR EST  BLEU.
Love,   Thaedra.
Lost & Found
13
LOST IN GEOLOGY BLDG. Woman's gold ring with black and
white pearls. Deposit at Ubyssey
office  or   phone   433-6454.
Travel Opportunities
IB
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'56     FAIRLANE,     T-BIRD    ENGINE,
clean  interior,   $125.   Phone   731-3503.
1961 STUDEBAKER LARK. GOOD
Condition. Owner returning England. Available early March. $550
or near offer. 733-4464 after 4:30
p.m.
$85 OR NEAREST OFFER. 1955
Dodge 2 - Door Hardtop. Reliable
Transportation. Call Norm, 224-7298
after  7:00 P.M.
Automobiles Wanted
22
CASH FOR '53-54 CHEV STATION
wagon or sedan delivery in good
shape,   278-1560   evenings.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -   Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New  and  Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O      Motors      S
R E
T       W
146 Robson H
688-1284
HONDA 50CC '65. PRICE INCLUDES
helmet and rain suit. $125. phone
Bryan,    922-6629.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
Scandals
37
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
Ave. 228-8933.
FOUND. PAIR OF GLASSES IN RE-
cital Hall Thursday, Feb. 8. Claim
Pub.   Office.
LOST. PAIR OF BLACK FRAMED
specs. Buch. Fort Camp area. Return   Sharon   224-9038.    Pub.   office.
LOST. SMALL BLACK PURSE.
Need Identification! Please return.
A.   Gunderson,   224-9022.
LOST FEB. 5. LADIES' BLACK
glasses in car. Please leave at International House or phone 434-
3797.
Rides & Car Pools
14
WANTED — RIDE TO CASTLEGAR
area. Mid-term break, phone 224-
9794,    Schwartzenhauer.	
GRADUATE STUDENT REQUIRES
ride or riders weekdays from White
Rock.   Call   536-6878   evenings.
CAR POOL NEEDED 8:30, 5:30.
Monday, Wednesday, Friday after
mid - term Break. Phone 278-1337,
Jerry.
THREE GIRLS NEED RIDE TO
Rossland or vicinity, mid - term
Break. Phone Jeanie or Gael 738-
815'6.
WbM pizza TThM
Dine In
— Take Out —
Delivery
Across
the street from  the
Fraser   Arms
1381   S.W.
Marine  Drive
263-4440
NOTICE
This
s published notice of the
Liberal
Club
constitutional   meeting
FEB.   29  -  BU  204
Special Notices
15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
rates? If you have a valid driver's
license and good driving habits you
may qualify. Phone Ted Elliott,
321-6442.
EXHIBITION PING - PONG. SEE
UBC's best play Tues., Feb. 13, 1
p.m.,    International   House.
PA  BEAR'S MED.   SHOW.
Vanier   9:30-1:00   Sat.   Feb.
17th.
LA TROUPE GROTESQUE (SATIRI-
cal comediens) will perform at 8:30
p.m. in Room 100 of the Jewish
Community Centre, 41st Ave. &
Oak St. on Sunday^ February 18th,
Admission   50   cents   per   person.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Male
52
Help W'ted—Male or Female    53
SWIMMING INSTRUCTORS NEED-
ed at Abbotsford for the months of
May and June or all summer if
desired. Good wages, apply to Mr.
W. Moxon, Matsqui Municipal Hall,
South  Fraser Way,  Abbotsford, B.C.
RESPONSIBLE STUDENT TO KEEP
house in University area (U.E.L.)
for three children, 11, 10 & 8 years.
Able to attend lectures during day.
Cook and tidy house. Feb. 25 to
March  3.   224-7003.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
Tutoring
64
FRENCH, ENGLISH, HISTORY, RUS-
sian, Library Science tutoring given
by  B.A.,   M.A.,   B.L.S.   736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
Tl
—  OLD   TOTEMS   FOR  SALE   —
1963,   1965   &  1966  issues   50c.
Campus  Life's  25c.   Publications  Off.,
Brock   Hall
LEICA   WITH   F.3.5   ELMAR   LENS,
1/1000th sec,  leather case,  $55,  phone
266-5472.	
19"   GE   TV — GOOD  CONDITION —
$18.00,  phone  224-0981.	
WANT TO BUY: SECOND-HAND
bicycle (preferably girl's). Contact
room  635,   224-9897.	
ARTIE. HALF A SIXPENCE NOT
enough. I want more. Come to And.
8:30   tonight.   Ann.
ANN. TONIGHT 8:30 IN AUD. %
Sixpence becomes whole. I love you.
Artie.
SECOND TERM'S BIGGEST DANCE:
Place Vanier Feb. 17th, 9:30-1:00
with  Papa Bear's Medicine Show.
DIRTY   FLICKS   IN   THE  AUD.
day,  12:30,   2:30 —  50  c.
TO-
Sewing - Alterations
38
DRESSMAKING AND TAILORING
on ladies' garments. Alterations.
For   information   phone   263-8769.
Typing
40
EXPERT    TYPIST    -    ELECTRIC
224-6129    -   228-8384.
UNIVERSITY TYPING SERVICES,
2109 Allison Rd., 228-8414, around
the corner from World Wide Travel
next to RCMP open 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Monday   to   Friday.
TYPING — 25c PAGE — DOUBLE
spacing, legible work — Call Mondays to Thursdays and Sundays
after  10:00  a.m.,   738-6829.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST AVAIL-
able for home typing: reasonatTle
rates,  call  RE 1-7607.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing, please
call   277-5640.
TYPING SERVICE
Mrs.   Gail   Symons
224-6435 —  3885 W.   12th Ave.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
MEN'S   BUCKLE   SKI   BOOTS—SIZE
9%.   New!   never   been   worn.   $50.00.
Phone  736-7871  after  6.	
ONE     PAIR    MEN'S     SKIS,     POLES,
boots   size   10%.   Used   once.   $40.00.
733-0381.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
■1
MOVE ONTO CAMPUS — ROOMS
available (M) 224-9662, $40.00 mo.
2250 Wesbrook. Meal Services close
at hand.	
ROOM MATE WANTED FOR WEST
End apt. $45 month. Arriving 8:30.
Eric  Stangle,   985  Nicola,   No.   103.
LARGE PRIVATE ROOM & BOARD
for quiet male student. 4595' W. 6th.
Phone 224-4866.
Room & Board
•t
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS.
For three male students, double
room    accommodation,    224-7720.
LARGE SINGLE ROOM & BOARD
for quiet male student, 4595 W. 6th
phone   224-4866.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS
available now, phone Don, 224-9665,
after   6  p.m.
IT'S UNANIMOUS! BEST ROOM &
board on campus at the Deke House.
Phone 224-9691 for more information.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
BUY - SELL - RENT
TYPING.   PHONE   731-7551   -   9:00   to
5:00.   266-6662 — after 6  o'clock.
HOLD ME WHILE I'M NAKED
Today in the Aud. 12:30, 2:30. 50
cents.   Wheeeeee.
TYPING — 25c PAGE — DOUBLE
spacing, legible work — Call Mondays to Thursdays and Sundays
after  10  a.m.,  738-6829.
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Tuesday,  February  13,   1968
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 11
ApuhL balk.
By MIKE JESSEN
Ubyssey Sports Editor
UBC is number two but it doesn't try harder. Saturday
night, to the cries of "SFU is number one" and "UBC is number
two", the UBC Thunderbirds went down to their most humiliating basketball defeat in years to the Simon Fraser Clansmen.
The 64-39 score indicates exactly how the play in the game
went. The Birds were outplayed in every department. They
couldn't shoot and they couldn't rebound and if you can't do
these two things, you don't have a hope of winning.
But more important than shooting and rebounding, the Birds
were psyched-out. Both teams were extremely nervous at the
game's start but the Birds were nervous throughout the game.
The two teams were atrocious at the beginning of the contest, but when Brian MacKenzie sank a foul shot with two
minutes gone in the game, SFU settled down.
It took the Birds nearly seven minutes to score their first
point, a free throw by Dave Rice, but by that time they were
down nine points. The closest UBC got was near the end of the
first quarter when they narrowed SFU's lead to five points.
"I've never seen them play so lousy," said coach Peter Mullins after the game. "They didn't do anything well."
When informed that the Birds had shot 22.9 per cent, Mullins said he was surprised the average was that high.
"We just played one of those bad games that come along,"
added Mullins. "Simon Fraser played a damn good game."
When one of the Birds was asked if he was nervous during
the game he replied, "No, but I don't know what the brown
stuff in my pants was."
SFU's athletic director Lome Davies said he thought the
theft of his team's uniforms prior to the game had an effect on
the outcome.
"The boys were thinking more about their uniforms than
the game and so there was less pressure on them," said Davies.
GYMNASTS COME TO UBC
The finest gymnasts in the western hemisphere will gather
in Vancouver Feb. 29-March 2 for the four nation North American gymnastic championships.
Canada, Cuba, Mexico and the United States will participate
in the meet tol be held in the Pacific Coliseum and UBC's War
Memorial Gym.
Full teams of twelve gymnasts (six men and six women)
will compete in the optionals at UBC on the second day of the
tournament, March 1.
Tickets for this international tournament can be obtained
at the Vancouver Ticket Center, Eaton's stores.
Special student tickets costing $1 can be obtained from
the Memorial Gym office for the afternoon performance at the
UBC gym. There are 3,000 seats reserved for students for that
performance. Students can also buy tickets to the March 1 night
events at the gym office.
CUBA'S ENTRY MAKES HISTORY
Cuba is being represented for the first time in the championships. They have refused to attend previous tournaments because they were held in the U.S.
Cuba surprised the crowds at the 1967 Pan American Games
in Winnipeg by winning three gold medals.
The top Cuban duo of Hector Ramierz and Jorge Rodriguez,
gold medal winners in floor exercises and vaulting respectively,
are favored to repeat in Vancouver.
A strong Mexican team is also training specifically for the
Vancouver challenge, headed by their spectacular Pan Am rings
champion, Armando Valles.
The top star of the strongest U.S. gymnastic team in history
is beautiful Linda Jo Metheny of the University of Illinois.
Miss Metheny won three individual gold medals and shared two
others at Winnipeg.
UBC'S BILL MACKIE TO COMPETE
Pan American Games gold medallist Susan McDonnell of
Toronto and UBC's brilliant Bill Mackie headline Canada's entry
in the gymnastic championships.
Miss McDonnell won the Pam Am parallel bars competition,
preventing Miss Metheny from sweeping the women's competition.
Canada's team is coached by Sgt. Willie Weiler of the Canadian Army, now based in Chilliwack.
Banno's  Birds-eye view
By BOB BANNO
Few people realized UBC's bush off-court
performances prior to Saturday's SFU-UBC
basketball game could be matched by Peter
Mullins' Birds on-court.
But it happened.
No doubt echoes about being tight, nervous
and ill will reverberate down UBC corridors
for weeks.
These factors undoubtedly did play a role
in the destruction of the Birds on Saturday.
But also, no doubt, SFU had the better team.
This statement may reverberate down UBC
corridors for years.
They have superior material, not only at
guard ■—■ everybody knows this — but also at
forward.
They have superior depth.
They have more inspirational coaching.
And, most important, they have a more
realistic athletic scholarship and recruiting
policy.
Many observers thought the Clansmen would
take the Birds. But most of them also thought
that fine outside shooting by Ian Dixon and
Neil Murray and the strong inside play of SFU
refugee Frank Rotering would keep things close.
KORETCHUK CAVORTS
AS   BIRDS  WIN,   TIE
Led by Tom Koretchuk, the UBC ice hockey Thunderbirds won one game and tied another in an exhibition
series with the University of Victoria Friday and Saturday.
Koretchuk scored three goals.
Friday night the teams drew 4-4 before a crowd of
2,100 in Victoria. Koretchuk, Miles Desharnais, Laurie Van-
zella and Jack James scored for UBC.
The Thunderbirds were no match for the UVic Vikings
on Saturday as the Birds won 5-1. Koretchuk with two, Don
Fiddler, Jack Littler and Blaine Pollock were the UBC goal
scorers.
ICE CHIPS
• Rookie sub-goalie Pat Crandell played a steady
series in place of regular Riok Bardal.
In retrospect, we can see how faulty this
analysis was.
For unless a player can drive around his
defender, he should never get the chance to cast
off long, pretty-looking jump-shots.
And none of the Birds are known for their
driving.
Rotering, improved as he is, is still no match
for the Clan's big man, Dave Murphy.
•        •        •
The blame for the UBC's inferior material
lies not on the broad shoulders of the hapless
Mullins, but squarely with the athletic bigwigs
and the administration.
Until UBC's senate and board of governors
allow our coaches to recruit with scholarships
and bursaries, we will remain bush league.
And this won't happen until the UBC student
body elects senators concerned with all aspects
of change in the university, including athletics.
Significantly, our student senators turned a
haughty thumbs down when offered a post on
the athletic committee.
■•        •        •
One  message  rang  loud  and  clear  at  War
Memorial  Gym  Saturday;   if  you  want to  see
the best college basketball in B.C., don't go to
the UBC gym, go to Burnaby Mountain.
Thorsen and JV's smash SFU
By JOHN TWIGG
While the Birds blundered,
the UBC Junior Varsity basketball team throttled the Simon
Fraser JV's 82-44, at least retaining some semblance of respectability for UBC in Saturday night's basketball action.
The first half of the game
was very dull, as both teams
played ball control. SFU set
up in a zone defence while
UBC was content to pass
around the zone until a good
shot was available.
The UBC tactics worked because the slow play along with
the usually effective press produced a strong 31-16 lead at
half-time.
The second half was an
abrupt change of style for UBC
as the team came out running.
Thunderbird swimmers
drowned by opposision
The UBC Thunderbird swim
team was drowned by their
competition over the weekend.
The Birds competed against
and lost to Washington State
University by a score of 84-22.
Only frosh Ken Campbell
and Phil Dockerill saved UBC
from utter humiliation by each
winning an event, Campbell
taking the 200 yd. freestyle
and Dockerill winning the 200
yd. breast stroke.
Campbell finished the meet
as the Birds highest scorer
when he combined his victory
with a second place finish in
the 500 yd. freestyle event.
Most courageous story of the
meet was Dave Goodman's performance in the 200 yd. butterfly event where he finished
third, in his third-ever attempt
at the event.
Sports shorts
The 101 Regatta held in Victoria was won by UBC's sailing crew over University of
Washington, Victoria, Royal
Roads and SFU. UBC's wrestling team defeated Royal Roads
in a dual meet in Victoria, 32-2.
The quote of the week came
from Vancouver Sun slotman
Ron Loftus — You could have
got a ticket for a nickel at
half-time Saturday night.
Former SFU guard Ken House
appeared to spark the team as
he came off the bench and
made several key passes.
The JV's put on tremendous
pressure and completely stymied SFU. Ron Thorsen, who has
been having a little trouble in
past games, put on an amazing
display of basketball in the
second half scoring all of his
15 points as well as making
some brilliant passes.
He led the team in assists
with five while Gary Best was
high scorer with 16 points,
mostly on opportunist shots in
the first half.
After UBC had lengthened
their lead to 25 points, coach
Norm Watt mercifully had his
team slow down again. Terry
MacKay, the six foot-seven-
inch JV centre, controlled the
backboards while scoring 12
points.
UBC almost made their mar
gin of victory 40 points as
Terry Brine picked up the ball
deep in his own zone with only
three seconds left. He dribbled
past the foul line and then,
realizing the bell was about to
go, threw the ball football
style three-quarters of the floor
at the basket. He was the most
surprised of all when the ball
went directly through the hoop.
Unfortunately, the basket
was disallowed as the buzzer
had gone but it was a fitting
end to a good game.
FEB.   13-18
My   Indole   Ring
at   VILLAGE   BISTRO
2081   W.   4th
Tues.,   Thursday, admission   $1.00
ZELDA
is cordially invited
to  be the
VALENTINE
of
Milt
on  February  14th,
1968
TRAVEL
ON  A  SHOE  STRING
The Youth Hostel organization is well established
in over 400 countries. Youth Hostels exist in Asia,
Europe, North and South America and Africa. In
all 4000 well-equipped Youth Hostels are ready
and at your disposal when travelling. Travel the
economic   hostel  way.
WITH THE
YOUTH HOSTELS
1406 West Broadway, Vancouver 9
738-0918 Days
738-9838 Evenings Page   12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February  13,   1968
Basketball  Birds  play
worst  game  in  history
—  derreck webb photo
THE SIMON FRASER CLANSMEN are a foul team as this
picture shows. SFU's Dave Murphy (10) puts the arm on
UBC's Dave Rice (32). The Clansmen blocked the Birds'
attempts to score all night with such tenacious checking.
SFU accumulated 23 personal fouls.
Two new positions
give team pleasure
By  JOHN   TWIGG
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds woke up Monday morning
and found themselves in two new positions. They are the new
unofficial Canadian universities champion and they are also
back in contention for the Pacific Coast League title.
Friday afternoon in Thunderbird Stadium the Birds easily
beat the University of Manitoba Bisons, who had claimed they
were the eastern universities champion.
It was a rather one-sided 10-0 victory, but the Bisons had
a reasonable excuse in that they had not played since November
and were a little out of shape, despite indoor practices.
Still, the lack of conditioning was only good for about five
UBC goals and UBC would have won under any conditions.
UBC is undoubtly the best in the west and their victory
over the Bisons establishes their Canadian supremacy.
Outstanding for Manitoba was their goalie, O. Bailey, who
held UBC to three goals in the first half before he was moved
out of the net in the second half, presumably to add scoring
punch to the offense.
Jim Briggs led UBC with three goals.
Unfortunately, there is no Canadian university competition
to determine a champion but UBC coach Joe Johnson hopes that
the Bird-Bison game will set a precedent for future Canadian
titles.
UBC insulted Manitoba even further when the Tomahawks,
UBC's second team, beat them 2-1 on Saturday.
Sunday the Birds played a league game against Firefighters
and won 2-1 on goals by Keith Brookes and Russ Hillman.
The win put UBC in third place, only one point behind New
Westminster and Columbus.
The Birds have five games left
in their season and stand a
good chance of winning the
league.
The team is currently
playing quite well as it holds
the best goals for and against
record in their league.
The Thunderbirds face a big weekend as they play North
Shore Luckies Wednesday night and New Westminster Labatts
Saturday in Thunderbird Stadium.
By BOB BANNO
It was strictly no contest.
SFU Clansmen taught UBC basketball Thunderbirds a lesson in defence and poise Saturday
at War Memorial Gym destroying the Birds
64-39.
It was the first time in living memory the
Birds were held to less than 40 points.
It was the first time in living memory the
Birds hit on such a low (22.9) percentage of their
field goal attempts.
And it was the first time in living memory
they connected on less than 50 per cent of their
free throw attempts.
In a sense the outcome was decided in the
opening minutes when UBC's Frank Rotering
grabbed a pass under the basket, pivoted for a
jump-shot and was promptly blocked by Dave
Murphy.
And when UBC team leader Ian Dixon dribbled the ball off his foot.
And when Dixon dropped an easy pass out
of bounds.
SFU jumped to a quick nine-zero lead and
never trailed. They led 32-18 at the half and
out-scored UBC 16-4 in the final 10 minutes.
Gunnar Kuehn, a lightning-quick guard from
obscure South Okanagan (Oliver) High School
paced SFU scoring 20 points on the Birds' defensive specialist Bob Molinski.
Kuehn connected on 10 of 16 field goal
attempts, a creditable 62.5 per cent.
Clansmen coach John Kootnekoff started forward Bob Wright for the first time this season
and the New Westminster product responded
with ten points and numerous rebounds.
Murphy, a fine leaper from Kamloops High
School controlled the boards for the Clan and
intimidated UBC shooters a la Bill Russell.
SFU's tight man-to-man defence did the rest.
Only Neil Murray scored in double-figures
for UBC. He scored on five of ten tries for 13
points.
"They (SFU) played a fine game; they deserved to win," moaned UBC coach Peter Mullins after the game. "Kuehn played an excellent
game."
A jubilant Kootnekoff credited the SFU win
to tight defence and the shooting of Kuehn.
"We played a tough defence," he said.
The Birds Dixon had a bad shooting night
missing on 13 of 14 attempts. SFU's ace Brian
Mackenzie also had a poor night hitting on only
three of 19 tries.
A crowd of approximately 4,000 witnessed
the contest.
Cal Bears cop cup
The UBC rugby Thunderbirds have lost the
World Cup.
Saturday, the Birds lost to the University of
California Golden Bears 19-9 before a large
crowd on the Berkeley campus.
UBC was forced to play one man short due
to a jaw dislocation to prop Walt De Boni and
couldn't fight back from an 11-9 half-time deficit. Don Crompton scored three penalty kicks
for all of UBC's points.
UBC took their ten point deficit into the
second game with Cal in their battle for the
World Cup, signifying dominance of either Cal
or UBC in a two game series which was started
by the now-defunct Vancouver newspaper, the
World, in the 1920's.
UBC lost the second game on Monday 23-12
to the heavier Cal squad. It was their seventh
straight loss to Cal in World Cup competition.
Scoring tries for UBC were Lee Hiller and
Jim Crow while Don Crompton added two
penalty kicks.
The Birds will play UCLA Bruins Wednesday in another intercollegiate exhibition  game.
BRA VES WIN ANOTHER
The UBC ice hockey Braves continued to put
the axe to their opposition Monday with a 6-2
victory over the Richmond Flyers in the Winter
Sports Center.
Goalie Don Cram was outstanding for the
Braves as he stopped 31 shots including four
breakaways. UBC peppered the Flyers' net-
minder with 47 shots.
Dwayne Biagioni scored two goals to lead
the Braves. Wes Borkowski, Frank Lanzarotta,
Ernie Lawson and Bob Berrie got singles.
Pacific   Coast
League
Standings
W   D
L
F
A
Pts
Columbus
7      1
3
22
15
15
West'r Labs
5      3
4
18
18
15
UBC T'Birds
5      4
3
24
14
14
Firefighters
6       1
6
18
18
13
Victoria
5       1
6
20
17
13
Burnaby  V
4      4
7
22
33
12
North  Shore
2      2
8
12
22
6
Thunderettes
top skaters
and gymnasts
The UBC Thunderettes hosted the Western Canadian Intercollegiate gymnastic and figure
skating championships on the
weekend and won top honors
in both competitions.
Teams from the University
of Alberta and Saskatchewan
also competed.
In gymnastics, U of S placed
second and U of A third after
the Thunderettes. Linda Mc-
Nab from UBC won the all
round title, accumulating 31.20
Cathy Lane, new to the UBC
points in four events. Barb
Becker (U of S) was second and
team this year, placed third.
At the Winter Sports Center,
the UBC figure skaters put on
dazzling performances. UBC's
Shirra Ken worthy, former
World and Olympic figure
skating competitor won the
senior ladies event. Pat Mc-
Ghee of UBC came second. The
U of A team placed second and
U of S third.
FILMSOC PRESENTS
DIRTY FLICKS
IN AUDITORIUM
TODAY-12:30, 2:30
50c
RUSSIA - SCANDINAVIA
ESCORTED TOUR C$699.00
Special All-Inclusive Holiday
visit
STOCKHOLM, TURKU
HELSINKI, LENINGRAD
NOVGOROD, MOSCOW
WARSAW, BERLIN, BRUSSELS
DEPARTS JULY 6
Call for brochure and details
WORM.D-WMD1
ON CAMPUS
5700 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD — 224-4391

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