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The Ubyssey Jan 12, 2015

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 JANUARY 12,2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXXXI
SANCTIMONIOUS ASSHOLES SINCE 1918
SPERM LEGAL
BATTLE
Class action lawsuit alleging
UBC's negligence in damaged
sperm case continues.
P5
BAND:
COLLECT CALL
Primarily UBC-based band
to play show at Koerner's on
Tuesday.
P6
LAST WORDS
AND LETTERS
Indie film isn't dead in Vancouver
and the fight against fee
increases isn't over.
P8
MEN'S VOLLEYBALL Thunderbirds face off against Korean training partners.
P10
After speaking out about a series of offensive emails and
tweets, two UBC professors have been threatened with a
lawsuit from a prominent American philosopher. // Page 2
IWiMPrJMIMti'JMfcm
MONDAY    '    12
CHILDREN'S LITERATURE AND COMMUNISM
5:00P.M.-6:30 P.M. @6476NW MARINE DRIVE
This lecture will discuss the emergence and development of Soviet
children's literature. The lecture will be given by Princeton Anthropologist
Serguei Oushakine. Free
ALL WEEK
ARTS WEEK
VARIOUS TIMES AND LOCATIONS
The Arts Undergraduate Society is hosting their AUS Arts Week. Kicking off
on Monday with free breakfast in MASS and finishing the week off with their
Arts Week Finale Party in Koerner's Pub. Mostly free
ALL WEEK
REC SHOPPING WEEK
VARIOUS TIMES AND LOCATIONS
UBC Rec's shopping week is back! If you've always wanted to try out a Rec
class but weren't sure if it was worth your money, take a couple of classes this
week. Check out page 11 for a partial calendar. Free
ON
THE
COVER
It took 47 tries to get a shot without a nip slip.
-Photo Cherihan Hassun
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*«-
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
JANUARY 12,2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXXXI
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OUR CAMPUS//
ONEONONE1
Greenfield has set up shop in what was once The Outpost in the SUE
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Dave Greenfield is dressing up UBC in a new SUB space
Leo Soh
Senior StaffWriter
Some students may have noticed
that the post office red and white
have left the Student Union
Building. In its place, a pop-up
shop featuring several local
brands has opened its doors. Dave
Greenfield, Vancouver native and
owner of street wear label Nomad
Collective, has claimed a spot for
himself.
A retail opportunity at UBC
doesn't come around very often,
so when Greenfield and several
other local designers heard the
news that a room on the first
floor ofthe SUB was available,
they took full advantage ofthe
situation.
"The owner of Lucky Babe,
one of the other brands in the
store, contacted the campus
and found the space, and I came
on board with them. There are
a couple other brands in the
space, and we're all Vancouver
brands."
It was 2008, and the
recession was really
bad. So I ended up
getting an internship
with a construction
company, and ended
up with a job back in
Vancouver."
Dave Greenfield
Owner of Nomad Collective
They will be setting up
shop in the SUB until the end
of March.
Greenfield's brand, Nomad
Collective, specializes in design
ing streetwear and snowboards.
However, there are options for
everyone at this pop-up shop.
Lucky Babe is known as a ringleader in the Vancouver leggings
revolution and Lavish Tee is
reputed for street-smart shirt
designs. Pretty Girl Swag completes the boutique, bringing a
collection of unique accessories.
Up to now, [the
business's growth] has
been mainly online
and through word
of mouth, and we've
recently started doing
pop-up shops. The
goal is to get into five
different stores by the
end of 2015."
All of these labels possess a
distinctive West Coast aura, and
Nomad Collective is perhaps the
most Vancouver-esque of them
all. The brand's identity stems
from Greenfield's personal
experience.
Born and raised in Langley, a
township in the Greater Vancouver Area, Greenfield completed
his post-secondary studies at
Ferris State University, Michigan. Upon graduation, he
entered the job market as a new
automotive engineer, but was
hard-pressed to find any job
openings.
"It was 2008, and the recession was really bad. So I ended
up getting an internship with
a construction company, and
ended up with a job back in
Vancouver."
During his time as an intern,
Greenfield came up with an
idea to start his own brand and,
unlike many others with similar
ambitions, he turned his idea
into reality.
The inspiration for the name
'Nomad Collective' came from
his adventures, which include a
spending a season in Whistler
and a 10 month backpacking trip
across Europe.
"Travel, adventure and
snowboardingwere some of
the biggest influences for me,"
Greenfield said.
Greenfield created his label
with a focus on these three
things, and has stayed true to
them since.
Like any other business
owner, Greenfield has faith that
his label will continue to pick up
momentum.
"Up to now, [the business's
growth] has been mainly online
and through word of mouth, and
we've recently started doing
pop-up shops. The goal is to get
into five different stores by the
end of 2015."
Greenfield's aspiration is to
become a true fashion designer,
selling his products at wholesale
to retail shops around Vancouver.
Greenfield had these words of
advice for aspiring entrepreneurs:
"you have to be super passionate
about what you're doing; there
are a lot of hurdles, long hours,
and not much reward at the
beginning. But as long as you're
passionate, and really love what
you're doing, things will keep
moving forward." Xi
Know
somebody
interesting?
Do you have a brilliant prof or a fascinating friend at UBC? Send an email to
aerhardt@ubyssey.ca with some contact info and reasons why you think they
would be a good candidate to be profiled in The Ubyssey. // News
ACADEMICS »
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
Class action lawsuit alleging UBCs negligence continues
A group of men is suing the university over hundreds of damaged sperm samples
Dave Nixon
Senior StaffWriter
The class action lawsuit alleging
UBC's negligence led to the destruction of over 400 men's sperm, many
of whom were undergoing radiation
therapy that might affect their fertility, when a circuit breaker tripped
at a sperm bank in 2002 has won
another victory towards proving
UBC liable.
UBC placed an exclusion clause
in most contracts that would have
exempted them from liability in the
loss of frozen sperm, but a recent
court decision ruled that sperm
qualifies as property ofthe men
that produced it and a different set
of rules applies, making exclusion
clauses irrelevant.
"Because [sperm] was property,
it fell within the Warehouse Receipt
Act and therefore the exclusion
clause was found to be invalid," said
Art Grant, one ofthe lawyers representing the class-action suit.
The act overrules any exclusion
clauses by requiring the business
storing property to be liable.
"You can put all sorts of clauses in
your contracts but you can't exclude
your responsibility of a warehouser
ofthe materials," said Grant.
UBC had argued that they used
the standard of care necessary and
that all sperm donors signed agreements limiting liability. About 26
ofthe men said that they had never
signed any agreement but the recent
decision makes it irrelevant. The
exclusion clause, signed or not, is no
longer valid.
The class action is seeking damages between $20,000 to $100,000
for each ofthe donors.
MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 20
HOUSING »
Conditions in
Ponderosa residence
complex showing no
signs of improvement
The lawsuit against UBC over hundreds of destroyed sperm samples was first opened in 2002.
=ILE PHOTO WILL MCDONALDfTHE UBYSSEY
The lawsuit has been progressing since 2002, when a circuit
break tripped and cut off power
to the freezer holding the sperm
samples. The alarm system didn't
kick in, and the sperm were
damaged.
The freezer that failed had
been purchased in 1987 from Forma Scientific Inc.. A representative from the company recom
mended that freezers be replaced
around every 10 years.
The class action must now attempt to prove UBC's negligence —
the next court date is April 27.
"We'll be making a number of
arguments about UBC's negligence,"
said Grant. "The system they used
was inappropriate, the backup
system was non-existent, the checks
and balances non-existent."
UBC spokesperson Susan Danard
released the following statement
when asked for comment.
"UBC recognizes this was an
unfortunate situation and empathizes with those directly impacted. The
university takes this matter very
seriously and looks forward to an
early resolution. As the matter is before the courts, we cannot comment
any further at this time." Xi
ASTRONOMY »
UBC astronomer helps discover new planet
Ivana Litaveez
Contributor
UBC astronomy and physics professor Jaymie Matthews recently
contributed to the discovery of
a new planet light years beyond
our solar system.
Matthews, a principal mission scientist for Canada's first
space telescope, directed the
investigation which confirmed
the existence of a "Super-Earth"
planet 2.5 times the size of Earth
and 12 times its mass. The planet,
officially named HIP 116454 b, is
180 light years beyond Earth.
The Super-Earth could be "a
miniature version ofthe ice giant
Neptune," said Matthews, it
orbits close to its star.
The planet could alternatively be more Earth-like, made of
three-quarters water in high
moisture contents in its materials.
"This would be the more exciting
possibility," said Matthews, "giving more hope that if there are
other planets [in that solar system] they will have water ... one of
the criteria for potential life."
Accordingto Matthews, it's
highly likely for the team to find
more planets orbiting the Super-
Earth's star.
"Multiple planet systems are
very common, and if you find one
planet it's unlikely to be the only
one there," explains Dr. Matthews, "especially if it's something
comparable to Earth in size."
This discovery opens the possibility of finding life beyond Earth.
Even though the newly-discovered Super-Earth is not within
=hotocourtesyjaymiema™ews
The newly discovered planet is 2.5 times the size of Earth.
the habitable zone relative to its
star, meaning that it is not at the
optimal distance from the star
to be able to sustain liquid water,
"it would likely have planetary
neighbours and one does not have
to go much farther out to get into
the habitable zone [of that solar
system]," said Matthews.
Diana Dragomir, a research
scientist at Las Cumbres Observ
atory in Santa Barbara, adds that
the atypical clarity this planet
offers for observation places it
among the top six most conducive to research of almost 2,000
confirmed planets.
Matthews and his team
gathered data with MOST, the
Microvariability and Oscillations
of STars satellite from August 3
to October 5 to help American
researchers confirm inconclusive
hints from the Kepler telescope. Kepler serendipitously
gathered the data during an
engineering test in April, and
could not return to tracking the
exoplanet's part ofthe sky due to
technical constraints.
MOST detected the dimming
ofthe star's light as the exoplanet
passed between it and Earth. The
MOST telescope thus observed
two ofthe Super-Earth's transits
as it orbits through the satellite's
line of sight every 9.1 days — a
year's time in HIP 116454 b.
Dragomir will attempt to observe the planet again on Tuesday from a network of telescopes
on the ground to decrease the
margin of error on the exoplanet's transit period, as it will soon
be out of sight until next fall.
With over 5,000 stars under
the belt, this microsatellite the
size of a suitcase has helped Canada "punch above its weight class
in space science," said Matthews.
Federal funding cuts in September 2014 prevent the low-budget
satellite from continuing independent operations.
"If we could go back to our
autonomous operation of MOST
where the science team makes the
decisions on targeting we'd go back
to [this solar system] in September,"
said Matthews.
"Now that we know there is one
planet there we can concentrate
our efforts to detect additional
planets," said Matthews. There
is a high probability "one of them
might fall in the habitable zone." Xi
FILE PHOTO WILLMCDONALDfTHE UBYSSEY
Construction ofthe Ponderosa residence,
was rumoured to have been rushed, leading to many maintenance issues.
Kelley Lin
Senior StaffWriter
The Ponderosa Commons residence complex has been experiencing a series of maintenance
and service issues since the
completion of its construction in
September 2013.
Aside from minor reoccurring
cases of broken elevators and
electronic doors, recent problems reported by residents also
include occasional floods, leaks
and electrical fires.
"It starts from the ground
up because there's always been
whisperings that the original
construction ofthe place was
very rushed and shabby in general," said Jake Mullan, student
president of Ponderosa.
"There's never a quiet day in
Pond, is how I put it. There's always something broken or something being fixed or something
happening to the point where you
just need to laugh."
Many students, however, have
spoken out about the quality of
the service from the university's
Student Housing and Hospitality
Services (SHHS) that is expected
to come with the $816-$1071
monthly rent that Ponderosa
residents pay to live in a new
building on campus.
Accordingto Mullan, these
complaints ultimately lead to
students in residences criticizing SHHS for their tendency to
linger on maintenance issues
rather than acting to solve
them immediately.
"There's a sign in the lobby
on the elevator door that says
something like, 'The part's been
ordered; don't worry, we're fixing it,' but that sign's been there
for a month now," said Mullan.
"There's never much communication [from SHHS] about
certain issues like that."
As student complaints seem
to go unnoticed or are deferred
until a later date, it seems that
these obstacles to the residents'
routines are becoming more commonplace and expected.
"Random things like that
probably shouldn't happen in a
brand new building. I think it's
the accumulation of all these
issues that really bother me,"
said Mullan.
"There's a greater issue at
hand than a broken elevator."
Mullan also expressed concern
that many ofthe maintenance
problems that arise from faults
in the buildings' initial designs,
such as basic electric wiring and
pipe systems, may risk becoming greater dangers, especially
if not given the proper, timely
attention or care needed from
Student Housing.
Andrew Parr, Managing Director of SHHS, could not be reached
for comment by press time. Xi NEWS    I    MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2015
PSYCHOLOGY»
Study suggests checking email frequently is a major cause of stress
LLU^RATION JERRYYIN/THE UBYSSEY
UBC's Kosta Kushlevand Elizabeth Dunn suggest checking email only a few times a day.
Karolina Kapusta
StaffWriter
According to two UBC psychologists, checking emails less
frequently could leave students
less stressed this semester.
Kosta Kushlev, PhD Candidate
at the department of psychology
and a Vanier Scholar, and Elizabeth Dunn, associate professor
of psychology, have carried out
a study showing that checking
emails less frequently reduces
stress. Kushlev and Dunn wanted
to find out if there was a more
efficient and less stressful way to
handle email.
Kushlev and Dunn recruited
a diverse sample of 124 participants including undergraduates,
graduates and professionals.
The two-week field experiment
allowed the subjects to carry out
their lives normally except that
they were given instructions on
how to handle their email.
During the first week, half of
the sample was asked to check
their email three times a day,
close their mailboxes, and switch
off notifications, while the other
half was asked to do the opposite and check emails as often as
possible. The second week those
restrictions were reversed. Kushlev and Dunn looked at the stress
levels of each group during the
two weeks where everything was
kept constant except how they
handled their email.
Checking emails frequently
can cause stress because it "frag
ments our attention," Kushlev
said in the study.
Accordingto Kushlev, there is
previous research showing that
when people are multitasking they
might feel like they're getting a
lot of work done, but at the end of
the day they are less efficient in
their tasks and could be making
worse decisions and errors. Email
is a source of new tasks all the
time and what you end up with is a
paradox where you are constantly
checking your emails that provide
more things to do yet you are less
efficient at doing them.
"There's little we can do about
the number of emails we have to
handle but we can manage the
number of times we check them,"
said Kushlev.
"It's about reducing the
amount of times you check your
email overall and picking a number that suits you," said Kushlev.
The best way to reduce checking your emails is to turn off
email notifications on your phone
so that the sound or vibration
doesn't bother you when you are
working or relaxing, Kushlev
said. Another smart trick is to
move your email box app to the
last page on your phone so that
you only see it when you want to.
Email is useful but can be even
more useful if you manage it correctly. "Breaking any habit is difficult," Kushlev said, "but putting
in the effort to reduce checking
your email could be beneficial in
the long term." Xi
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to write
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A Han ftryourawgn^r aniwflnt MONDAY, JANUARY 12,2015    |    NEWS    |    5
PHILOSOPHY »
UBC professors threatened with lawsuit
over blog post on professional goals
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Two popular UBC professors have been accused of defamation after speaking out about a series of insulting emails and tweets.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
Two UBC philosophy professors
have recently become the targets
of threatened litigation over a
blog post.
On July 2, 2014, Carrie
Ichikawa Jenkins, who had received tenure at UBC's philosophy department the day before,
wrote a blog post on her resolutions for her professional career.
The blog post, which does not
mention the names of any other
professors, says that Jenkins
pledges to "treat other philosophers with respect" and "not
treat other philosophers or their
work in ways that are belittling,
trivializing and/or exclusionary."
Brian Leiter, who is the director of University of Chicago's
Center for Law, Philosophy and
Human Values as well as the
editor ofthe prominent Philosophical Gourmet Report (PGR),
then sent Jenkins an email in
which he accuses Jenkins of
writing about him, threatens future litigation and accuses her of
coming across as a "sanctimonious asshole."
On September 24, 2014, a
group of 21 philosophers, many
of them from UBC, released The
September Statement, which is a
letter of solidarity with Jenkins
and a refusal to work with the
PGR until Leiter steps down as
editor. The statement was later
signed by 624 other philosophers
across North America, Asia
and Europe.
Leiter then agreed to step
down from his role as editor
following the publication ofthe
2014-2015 issue ofthe PGR. On
December 15, Paul B. Schabas,
Leiter's Toronto lawyer, sent Jenkins and her husband and other
popular UBC philosophy professor, Jonathan Jenkins Ichikawa,
a letter demanding that Jenkins
and Ichikawa post an apology,
for "misleading members ofthe
philosophical community and
other readers ofthe September
Statement about these issues," at
the top ofthe September State
ment for at least six months in
order to avoid his taking the
matter to court.
In the letter, Schablas said that
Leiter is "prepared to seek redress
in the courts in Canada for the
statements [Jenkins and Ichikawa]
have made about him, and to have
a full airing ofthe issues and the
cause or causes of Jenkins' medical
condition."
Ichikawa was not able to comment on details of situation because
ofthe possibility of a future lawsuit.
The message it
sends to young
philosophers is not to
speak against those
who are in positions
of power when you
disagree with their
behaviour and this is
exactly the opposite
of what we need in
philosophy right
now. It's extremely
counterproductive if
we want to continue
reforming the
discipline to be more
inclusive."
Madeleine Ransom
UBC doctoral student
Roger D. McConchie, a lawyer for Jenkins and Ichikawa,
said that while it is too early
to stipulate about a potential
response before an actual lawsuit
is filed, he has been advising his
clients about potential courses
of action if Leiter proceeds with
the matter.
"At this point, there are any
number of defences in the law of
defamation that would appear to
be available on the facts of this
case and it remains to be seen,
therefore, whether this fella sues
and if he sues, what he claims,"
said McConchie.
McConchie also said that
he has responded to Leiter's
letter on behalf of Jenkins
and Ichikawa.
"I have sent a letter back to
Leiter's lawyer saying that my
clients took the position that
anything they had posted on
the internet was lawful under
both the laws of Canada and the
United States," said McConchie.
A number of philosophy
graduate students have also
spoken out in support of Jenkins
and Ichikawa.
Madeleine Ransom, a doctoral
philosophy student, said that
seeing this situation unfold has
been particularly troubling for
her, as she respects and admires
Jenkins' success in a male-dominated profession. In particular,
Ransom was worried that this
type of situation might discourage other graduate students,
particularly females, to pursue
further studies in philosophy.
"The message it sends to
young philosophers is not to
speak against those who are in
positions of power when you
disagree with their behaviour
and this is exactly the opposite of
what we need in philosophy right
now," said Ransom. "It's extremely counterproductive if we
want to continue reforming the
discipline to be more inclusive."
Accordingto Jasper Heaton,
another doctoral philosophy student, Leiter's decision to proceed
with the lawsuit is an attack on
individual freedom of expression.
Heaton also said that threats of
litigation could discourage other
scholars, particularly those who
are new to academia, from speaking out against problematic behaviour among senior members.
"By displaying willingness
to sue, Leiter has immediately
created a culture of fear within
the profession: there is now an
exceedingly strong disincentive
for more junior members ofthe
profession to speak out against
what they may view as his, or
others, abhorrent behaviour,"
said Heaton. tJ
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JENICA MONTGOMERY
MONDAY, JANUARY
MUSIC »
UBC-based indie band to perform at Koerner s Pub
Collect Call is made up of two UBC students and one UVic student.
Miguel Santa Maria
StaffWriter
When Nick Babey helped form
Collect Call back during his time
at Elgin Park Secondary, the
initial intent ofthe band was not
particularly exciting.
"The original purpose ofthe
band... was that we were supposed
to just make a Christmas album,"
said Babey, a second-year Arts
student. "It was more of a side
thing.... We just played some covers at my house, just jamming."
Five years later, after incredulous
amounts of writing, busking,
playing in numerous venues and
releasing one album, it may be
safe to say the band has found
its feet.
THEATRE»
Co-founded with Babey's high
school friend and Engineering
student Tom Lee, along with
Lazar Todorovic who studies at
UVic, the band — performing
Tuesday night at Koerner's Pub
— has grown to become another
promising addition to UBC and
Vancouver's indie rock scene.
Similar bands like the Arkells and
Hey Rosetta have provided a major
influence on their sound, according to both Lee and Babey. It also
helps whenever influences start to
take notice of them.
"Dave Verseti (from the band
Hey Ocean) will be at our show
on Tuesday," said Babey. "He was
like 'send me your stuff,' I was like
'whaaa—?!' so that was really cool."
=HOTOCOURTESF COLLECT CALL
Sound in particular is always
a huge priority in regards to song
creation for the band, accordingto
co-founder Tom Lee, who contributes a good chunk ofthe writing. "I
feel like song writing is just spontaneous," said Lee.
"Sometimes what I actually do
is that every time I have an idea —
even if it's just a little snippet — I'd
record on my phone first so I can remember it.... It's usually the melody
and music that comes first... and if
I'm just walking to class or on the
bus, I'd just put on my headphones
and scroll through all the stuff."
Accordingto Lee, both he and
Babey would continuously experiment with these melodies using
whatever acoustics they had at
their disposal, and eventually add
lyrics later on. The downside to this
method is that it creates quite the
backlog for them.
"Some songs happen in a day
and other songs I've been writing
for years and still not finished,"
said Lee.
Backlogs are just part ofthe
plenty of speed bumps the band
encounters as they try to balance
their act with school and work. In
fact, evening hours after their full-
time work are frequently the only
times they can practice, according
to Babey.
"A lot of people, especially at our
age and you had a band from high
school, they give up on music at this
point in life and I feel like for us it
will always be something that we
keep up," said Babey. "If you take the
time to schedule and practice then
you can really work around it."
Having just released their first
album this past summer, the band is
currently focused more on sharing
their work than creating for now.
However, Babey said there will be
some new material ready for their
Tuesday performance. "Oh man, I'm
stoked for [this] one song that in the
middle of it breaks down into a pop
song cover. I'm not gonna say which
song, it's a surprise," said Babey.
More importantly, both band's
founders simply hope to just keep
having fun with their followers.
"What we always look for is that we
obviously have a lot of fun playing
and we want the audience to feel the
same way," said Lee.
Babey immediately shared the
sentiment. "For me the reason I love
playing live music... is not always
about the band really, it's really
about the atmosphere — everyone's
there to experience the same thing
and I feel like that's what we always
want to deliver." tJ
Theatre and politics collide in Kayak
Abigail Palaez
Contributor
A kayak and climate change. Bat-
tlestar Galactica's Susan Hogan
paddling through a vast stretch
of water, screwball comedies and
cherished perspectives.
It's seemingly random pairings
like these that remind us of
Thomas Mann's observation centuries ago: everything is political.
Playwright and UBC alum
Jordan Hall proves the truth of
this observation with her first
full-length play Kayak, a clever
and witty exploration of people's
attitudes about climate change.
Though Kayak has only been
showing since January 7 it has
already won Samuel French's
Canadian Playwrights Competition and has reached critical
acclaim across Canada.
The play will be showing at
Firehall Arts Centre until January 17 and includes a discussion
panel with Hall herself following
the 3 p.m. January 11 show.
"I'm in the Thomas Mann
school," said Hall ofthe influence of politics on art. "I actually
believe that everything is political. If you think you're creating
something and it doesn't have
political implications then you're
not looking at it close enough."
The play opens with Annie
(Susan Hogan), a BMW-driving mother journeying out by
kayak to save her son from the
ideas of his radical environmental activist girlfriend. She
then encounters a path of events
"larger than she could ever have
imagined," a size suggesting the
magnitude of climate change's
inevitable impact on people of all
political interests.
"The actual facts about climate
change are pretty much a foregone conclusion," said Hall ofthe
issues Kayak addresses. "For me,
what was sort of troubling and
funny was that most of us know
that this is happening. But since
we have to get on with our daily
lives we end up contesting the
facts about climate change. And
that's really where the conflict of
the play sits."
Hall isn't alone in fusing literary
works with environmental politics. She belongs to The EnPipe
Line Collective, a group of roughly
16 playwrights who are working
together in a "play relay" as a live
act of creative protest against the
Northern Gateway Pipeline.
For an entire year ending on
June 20, 2015, every 48 hours
one participant will write a play
responding to the proposed pipelines, and then pass that play onto
the next participant as inspiration
for the following day.
This separate project reflects
Hall's personal politics and reminds her of how sustained a protest has to be since current events
have short news cycles if nobody
gives them attention.
But Kayak isn't a piece of
propaganda. Hall's challenge was
to make sure both sides had their
humanity.
=HOTOCOURTESYCHENASANMARTIK
Kayak is about a mother who wants to save her son from his environmentalist girlfriend.
"I think we end up writing
propaganda when we write either
side ofthe conflict as not having
their virtues and their psychological complexity. It was a big
deal for me to write the character of Annie. [Some people may
think of] Annie, 'Oh my gosh she's
gonna be making a lot of excuses
since she doesn't engage more in
climate change activism'. Which
she doesn't. It did become very
important to me that we could
feel where her heart was, that she
loves her son. That both she and
Julie [the activist figure] want to
do the right thing. Her reason was
human and sound and felt real."
Hall has some good advice for
those who want to fuse art and
politics.
"If you're making a political
statement no matter what you
do, it's probably good to take
responsibility for it. I think one
ofthe marvellous things about
art is you can do different things:
you can engage with politics in
form, you can engage with it obliquely — the field is wide open.
That's awesome."
Kayak will be playing at the
Firehall Arts Centre until January
17. Xi
NETFLIX »
Bottom of
the Queue:
Hard Ticket to
Hawaii
Sam Fruitman
StaffWriter
As you know, The Ubyssey strives to
find the best ofthe worst that Netflix has to offer to you. However, for
this week's review, we wanted to extend our essential service to include
those who for some reason still don't
have Netflix (or aren't mooching
off of your friend's account yet).
This week's film, Hard Ticket to
Hawaii, can be found in all its glory
on YouTube. So now you really have
no reason not to see it. And trust me
you're going to want to see it.
This might very well be the
crowning jewel of terrible cinema. Written and directed by the
legendary Andy Sidaris, the film
follows two operatives ofthe aptly-
named "Agency" who accidentally
intercept a delivery of diamonds to a
drug lord. The drug lord is not at all
pleased about this, and goes to great
lengths to retrieve the diamonds.
More agents are called into help,
and a no-holds-barred battle royale
for the diamonds ensues. Need any
more convincing? The tagline for
this film is "This Ain't No Hula!"
Right from the impressively
cringe-worthy intro music, this film
delivers on all accounts. It's filled
with tons of quotable dialogue,
rad 80's hairstyles and a superbly
ludicrous chase scene. This film
epitomizes the lost art of practical
special effects. No excessive overuse
of CGI blood here. Just good old
fashioned blood squibs. There is a
great flow to the story, and a definite
feeling of mounting tension towards
the climax, and equation for an
instant classic.
The bottom line: Stop reading
this and go and revel in the eternal
greatness that is Hard Ticket to
Hawaii. Xi
CULTURE VULTURE
PUNKSINGER
A screening of THE PUNK SINGER
will take place on January 12.
followed by a panel discussion
on punk feminism in connection
to third wave feminism and the
21st century. THE PUNK SINGER
is about famous girl punk vocalist
Kathleen Hanna and her influence on punk feminism and the
riot grrrl movement but when
Hanna stopped her feminism
rallying many wondered why. The
film uses archival footage and
intimate interviews with Hanna
to explore her changing role in
punk feminism in the 21st century.
The screening of the film and the
following panel discussion will take
place in the AMS Art Gallery.
BARtalk
The next installment in the popular BARtalk series will focus on
Feminism in the Media. This past
year has brought about some
insightful dialogue on current
events, feminism and the role of
the media. This BARtalk will be
an informal Q&Asession preceded by a brief remarks from the
panelists. The panelists include
philosophy assistant professor
Scott Anderson, Gender-Focus,
com author Jarrah Hodge and
fifth-year PhD candidate Lucia
Lorenzi. BARtalk #14 will take
place on January 15 in the SUB
Gallery.^ GREAT VOICE
Nominate candidates by filling out the form found at:
WWW.AMS.UBC.CA/ELECTIONS
Get Nominated
ELECTIONS // Opinions
LAST WORDS »
LAST WORDS//
PONDEROSA RESIDENTS
STILL PLAGUED BY
PROBLEMS
Another week, another UBC
rez problem — once again,
in Ponderosa.
The problems plaguing UBC's
newest rez were, at least to some
small extent, understandable in
the first year of its operation.
The construction was quite rapid
and kinks have to be ironed out.
Though still frustrating, it's common enough in any new building.
But to have major problems like a
broken elevator (in a tall building!) continuing for months on
end is unacceptable.
We understand, of course,
that some problems take longer
than others to remedy. One of
our editors lived in an off-campus building where the elevator
broke and the part took two
months to arrive. The problem
lies in that the issues with the rez
are far from limited to the elevator. Since the building opened,
we've been hearing and receiving
a near-endless onslaught of complaints about Ponderosa.
Ponderosa residents are being
forced to wait up to 20 minutes
I AM A STUDENT »
for an elevator — making what
should be a short commute to
class as bad as living off campus.
We're tired of talking about
the university not being subject to the Residential Tenancy
Act, but at times their skirting
of convention — if not law — is
so blatant it's hard to ignore it.
If UBC is going to charge at- or
above-market fees for residence, they should provide at- or
above-market service.
NOT CHECKING
YOUR EMAIL CAN BE
STRESSFUL, TOO
A pair of UBC psychologists
conducted a study finding that
checking your email too frequently could lead to elevated
levels of stress. The researchers
recommend turning off email
notifications so you're not
bothered by them while working
or relaxing. We editors at The
Ubyssey can understand the importance of this study, as we get
hundreds of emails every week
— but that's exactly why we can
also pick out its flaws.
Section editors rely on many
ofthe newsletters and press
LLUSTRATION JULIAN YU/THE UBYSSEY
releases in our inboxes as sources
for story ideas. When working on
stories, we have to stay in touch
with multiple sources. We all
manage dozens of volunteers. On
days when news is slow, we often
have no choice but to check our
emails as frequently as possible,
regardless of how frustrating it can be to see an empty
unread folder.
If we were to only check our
emails about three or so times
per day, as the study suggests, we
could miss important breaking
news, miss out on interview
opportunities, and be unable to
help volunteers scrambling with
deadlines. So much of our work
depends on timeliness that stress
will always be an obvious factor
of our jobs, regardless of how frequently we check our emails.
We can certainly understand
how worrying less about work in
general may lead to less stress —
for some jobs. But in journalism
and many other industries, if you
don't stay on top of things and
remain aware of what's going
on, you not only won't be more
stressed — you might not have
a job to worry about for much
longer. Xi
The fight against student fee increases is far from over
I AM A STUDENT
Letter
Despite the fact that we have
time and time again voiced our
vehement opposition to increased
tuition — recall the AGM achieving quorum for the first time to
oppose the proposed increase
and the 2014 referendum that
voted 91 per cent in favour of
reducing tuition — the Board
of Governors (BoG) passed the
motion to increase international
tuition by 10 per cent for incoming students next year.
Even though we didn't stop the
proposal, in the past few months
we have collectively achieved
something amazing. We cannot
forget that together we held some
ofthe largest political rallies at
UBC in the past decade; we met
quorum at the AMS AGM for the
first time in 40 years; we created
a student space for resistance and
mobilized, mobilized, mobilized.
"We made history", said the
Ubyssey. This is no small feat,
and we are proud of this. And
'this'? It sure as hell would never
have happened without you.
But you've seen the hashtag.
You know. #IAMUBC. #WeAreU-
BC. We, the students, are this
university and UBC is nothing
without us. Everyday they tell us
tuum est, it is yours. So why did
an unelected, unrepresentative
body make this decision for us?
How can all ofthe students at the
BoG meeting have opposed this
proposal, and still they passed
it? How can UBC claim they care
about students and the "student
voice" when the student voice
was blatantly ignored and voted
against?
Tuition increases did not pass
because what we did was insignificant; they passed because
what we did was simply not
enough.
In less than a month from
now, the BoG will vote on an
unwarranted, illogical and oppressive 20 per cent increase to
eight-month housing contracts.
These increases are not
inevitable. Far from it. We can
stop them, but it means showing
up. It means being louder. We
need to be louder. We need to be
more. We need to be more than
enough. We need to be everywhere, all the time. We need to
be talking to each other, talking
to our classmates, our professors,
our roommates, friends, lovers,
brothers, sisters, chosen kin. We
need to resist.
On January 29, we are going to
protest. We are going to show up.
We must show up. We must show
UBC that we oppose.
We are students.
We are this university.
Tuum est.
We know it is not easy to
show up.
But it is all we have.
I Am A Student is a UBC student
movement opposed to proposed tuition and housing fee increases. 13
FILM »
JzPHuluCARIbR
Re: The death of one-screen cinemas
LAWRENCE NEAL GARCIA
Op-ed
Gabriel Germaix recently wrote
about the decline of one-screen
cinemas in Vancouver, an article I
largely agree with (except perhaps
the notion that artistic films are
"less visual"); but the piece also gave
the impression that foreign, indie
and arthouse films largely don't play
in Vancouver, which is simply not
true. The problem isn't that these
films aren't screened at all, it's that
they don't screen for very long.
The two major sources for such
films in Vancouver are Vancity
Theatre (associated with Vancouver
International Film Festival) and
The Cinematheque. The latter plays
a few new releases a month, but is
more of a go-to for retrospectives on
notable auteur directors (there's an
upcoming one on Hou Hsiao-Hsien)
and older restored classics than it is
for new releases. Similarly, Vancity
Theatre plays a number of older
films, but also has a wider selection
of recent indie, foreign and arthouse
films (it also has large, plush red
seats with tons of leg room).
Just counting 2014 submissions
(not nominees) for the Best Foreign
Language Film Oscar alone, Vancity
Theatre played, or will play, at least
five: Ruben Ostlund's Force Majeure
(Sweden), Lav Diaz's Norte, the End
of History (Philippines), Nuri Bilge
Ceylan's Winter Sleep (Turkey), Xa-
vier Dolan's Mommy (Canada), and
Pawel Pawlikowski's Ida (Poland)—
not a great number, but certainly not
as dire as one might be led to think.
The rest of their programming
is also extremely varied, ranging
from the acclaimed Australian
horror film The Babadook, to the
low-budget mindbender Coherence,
to animated films such as Studio
Ghibli's The Tale ofthe Princess
Kaguya and the Irish Song ofthe Sea,
not to mention wide-ranging documentaries such as Particle Fever,
Nick Cave:20,000 Days on Earth and
Finding Vivian Maier.
All this is to say that they show
a lot of films, especially ones of
the type that don't play in larger
theaters. The problem is that, since
these films largely screen over a
short period of time (sometimes one
week, often even less), by the time
you're aware ofthe film, it's come
and gone; or because there are so
few screenings, it's hard to fit one
in to your schedule. It isn't that they
aren't there, it's that they aren't
there long enough for people to be
aware of them.
Even at Fifth Avenue Cinemas
and Cineplex Odeon International
Village, which can typically be
counted on to play such films for
longer periods of time, less marketable films like Jonathan Glazer's
audacious, borderline avant-garde
Under the Skin, James Gray's sideline period piece The Immigrant,
Laura Poitras' Snowden documentary Citizenfour face the same
problem, and even more unexpected
films like Ann Hui's The Golden Era
(Hong Kong), playing for at most
two weeks before they are gone. The
problem is compounded at places
like the Rio Theatre, which screens
new films even more sporadically, as
it mixes live shows and older films
into its programming (notably, it
is currently screening The Interview, though only three times this
month), but was — for a few weeks
— the only screen in Vancouver to
play Frank (the film where Michael
Fassbender wears a giant fake head).
The larger point is that alternative film programming does
exist, however rarefied; and while
Vancouver certainly can't match
New York or Los Angeles or even
Toronto for sheer diversity of new
(and timely) releases, it's definitely
not a cinematic dead zone. One just
has to look a little harder, otherwise
it could very well be.
Neal Garcia is a senior staff writer at
The Ubyssey. U
'£€&*<?
JC p£SS»rt£. MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2015    |    OPINIONS
LANGUAGE »
ADVICE »
"I can't understand my prof": Linguistic diversity at UBC
VICTORIA SURTEES
Letter
Around this time last semester, I
stumbled upon a Ubyssey article
listing reasons to drop a course.
One reason in particular, "I can't
understand my prof," evoked the
many challenges of linguistic
diversity at UBC.
As a student here, I have heard
many hurtful comments about
the way instructors, profs and
TAs speak, particularly about
those who were not born in
Canada. With the drop deadline
approaching, I decided to see
what the research said about why
people sometimes react negatively to different ways of speaking.
What I found was both interesting and practical. I share a
condensed version ofthe findings
here in the hope that students
will take a step back and think
next time they can't understand
a prof.
We all make assumptions
about those that speak differently. Researchers refer to
this phenomenon as linguistic
MINIMUM WAGE »
profiling, or the identification
of a person's social characteristics, such as level of intelligence,
based on aspects of their speech.
In the university context, linguistic profiling often surfaces
in the form of negative attitudes
towards instructors who speak
non-standard varieties of English
(think Texan English or Chinese English). Raisler (1976), for
example, found that 730 students
rated lectures delivered by a prof
with noticeable accents as less
convincing than the same lecture
delivered by a standard speaker.
In a similar study, students
rated exactly the same science
lecture as more difficult to
understand when played beside
a photograph of an Asian man as
opposed to a white man (Kang
& Rubin, 2009). What this tells
us is that when we don't understand, it's not always about the
prof— our unconscious expectations and attitudes about what
"good language" sounds like and
who normally speaks it also play
a role.
Recently, Kang, Rubin,
Lindemann (2014) found that
students' ability to understand
different accents was improved
through critical discussion and
exposure. With that in mind,
here are a couple of practical
tips to take away with you as you
consider which courses to keep
this semester.
Put your assumptions on hold:
when you first saw your instructor, what did you expect? When
they spoke, what did you think?
Now put your ideas aside for a
moment. Give you and your instructor the benefit ofthe doubt:
they work at UBC because they
are leaders in their field. You
attend UBC because you're an
amazing student.
Remind yourself that it's useful to understand other ways of
speaking: learning to communicate effectively with a variety of
English speakers is one way to
tap into a vast transnational network. Viewed this way, linguistic
diversity is not a burden, it is an
additional opportunity that UBC
provides. Take advantage!
Victoria Surtees is a UBC doctoral
student in the language and literacy education department. 13
Ask Natalie: On over-the-
break breakups and sleeping
with too much sound
"Dear Natalie,
I was kind of seeing this guy last
year, but after the break he hasn't
been answering my texts and I
think he's ignoring me. I'm really
confused, but I don't want to seem
clingy. What should I do?
Proposed minimum wage hike would solve nothing  suddenly Atone*
LOUIS FOK
Letter
The logic behind the B.C. Federation of Labour's minimum
wage argument sounds straightforward: raising the minimum
wage leads to more money in the
hands of lower income earners,
which then lifts them out of
poverty. It sounds like it should
work, right? Unfortunately, the
unions' simple-minded logic isn't
grounded in reality.
Contrary to what unions may
say, the majority of minimum
wage jobs are held by those —
usually young people — who live
in non-poverty households (e.g.
teenagers working as waiters).
Raising the minimum wage would
do little to help struggling families make ends meet, nor would
it help those who actually live in
poverty, like homeless people,
because they don't have jobs in
the first place. In fact, working
people who live in poverty are
usually poor not because their
wages are low, but because they
don't have enough hours.
Moreover, by analyzing
minimum wage hikes that have
occurred in various jurisdictions
around the world, it's evident
that raising the minimum wage
has almost no positive effect
on poverty rates. Take British
Columbia for instance. In 2011,
when Christy Clark raised the
minimum wage from $8/hour to
$10.25/hour, there was actually an increase in the provincial
child poverty rate. In addition,
shortly after the wage came into
effect, grocery stores like Safeway
and Superstore began replacing
cashiers with machines. With this
in mind, it's clear that minimum
wage hikes lead to labour substitution, thereby making it more
difficult for young people to get
work experience.
If policymakers want to
truly lift people out of poverty,
they can begin by growing the
economy and creating more
private-sector employment
opportunities. This has to start
by enabling businesses to grow
and invest; lowering corporate
tax rates, raising the earned
income tax credits and allowing
for more infrastructure development are good starting points.
Only then can people have access
to well-paying, viable jobs that
come with economic growth.
The minimum wage debate
has, once again, been stirred up
primarily as a political talking
point ahead of October's federal
election campaign. This has more
to do with the unions' public
image than it does with actually
helping people.
Louis Fok is a second-year student. 13
Dear Suddenly Alone,
To be blunt, he's not into
you anymore.
Okay, maybe he broke his phone,
computer and forgot his email password, or maybe he knocked his head
and is now wandering around Main
Mall wondering where he is.
But more likely, contrary to the
saying, absence did not make the
heart grow fonder. The time over
the break when he didn't spend time
with you made him realize that he
wasn't feeling it.
This isn't your fault, clearly you
just had different ideas of what you
wanted. Think of it this way: this
relationship is a shoe that doesn't fit
quite right. It's a little too small to fit
properly, but it's a nice enough pair
and you've been wearing them for a
while despite that. Getting out now
saves you from really sore feet in the
future, even if all you can see now is
a pair of shoes you still want.
Let it go. If he texts you in a
week, great. If he doesn't, his loss,
I'm sure you're a catch.
"Dear Natalie,
When I sleep over at my boyfriend's house, he always stays
up much later than me watching
videos and it's really annoying. I
need my sleep and he doesn't use
headphones. Is he being rude?"
It's all depends on a number
of things.
How early do you go to sleep? As
someone who loves their sleep, I
understand going to bed early, but
if you're trying to catch your zzz's
at eight, it's understandable that
your boyfriend would stay up. Are
you going to bed much later, past
midnight? Maybe your boyfriend
is being inconsiderate.
Are you a light sleeper? I
personally am a heavy sleeper
and someone could be playing the
drums in my room and I could
sleep. I wouldn't mind someone
watching videos. But if you're a
light sleeper, then it's different. If
you need silence to sleep (and he
knows that), then yes watching
videos isn't a nice thing to do.
And finally, have you talked
to him about this? Never ever
assume your partner knows something if you haven't told them. If
you're sitting there fuming silently then he may actually think you
don't mind or even that you are
sleeping. Talk to him, explain you
can't sleep when he plays his videos and ask if he can cut back on
the loud ones or use headphones.
Communicate.
And if everything fails and
you're at your last straw, stop
sleeping over. Yeah it will suck,
but sleep is very important, especially when you have an assignment, midterm or paper due. Put
your needs before your wants and
sleep alone.
Good luck!
Need advice? Write to Natalie at
asknatalie@ubyssey.ca and have
your questions answered in an
upcoming issue. Xi
UBYSSEY FILE PHOTC
GRADING »
The merits of grade inflation and why UBC should do it
GARY LAI
Letter
I'm making a case against having
grades that are entirely truthful in
a student's transcript. It — grade
inflation — is fibbing, and as we
all know, fibbing isn't an entirely
bad thing.
Employers don't like to see really
bad grades on a transcript.
As Lewis Black's character in
Accepted — a fictitious university
principal — said, the point of going
to university is to get a job. Sure,
"ultimately, grades are supposed to
be educational. They tell you what
you're good at, what you're not,
what you need to work on and how
far you have to go," according to
Dartmouth College student Brian
Solomon in 2011. But that education
should not impede one from getting
a job or moving onto the next stage
of one's adulthood.
Harvard seems to have grade
inflation — its median grade is an A-.
Grade inflation is allegedly rampant
in the Ivy League, home to the most
selective universities in the world.
But these are schools that we look
to for academic leadership. Why
not follow their practice of giving
out higher grades than students
sometimes deserve?
No one makes blatant mistakes
that would land them an F in
adulthood. A philosophy professor,
who was Ivy League educated, once
alerted me to a mistake that I made,
which I corrected, that could've
given me a F on a paper, instead of
giving me the F without warning. A
professor should rarely give C's and
never an F.
Looking to the practicality
of Ivy League professors, educators should be mindful of how
their grades impede progress in
a student's academic program.
Saying "I don't care" or "it's the
student's problem" is irresponsible,
regressive (to the mannerisms of
an elementary schoolteacher) or
even vindictive.
In law school at UBC, I received
the second-highest grade in one
of my classes' midterm — an 89 —
showing that academically I belong
with the best in the class. Yet I
failed my Real Property class in
not one but two exams. These were
essay questions where an F could
easily be upped to a C or higher at
the discretion ofthe professor.
I left UBC after the first year - I
couldn't continue taking courses
in law school without passing all of
my required classes, of which Real
Property was one. I was accepted
to Columbia University to study
premedical sciences, and I moved to
New York City.
Grade inflation was alive and
well there. I received a few C's,
which were all magically converted
to B's by presumably my advisor,
who was a linguist with three
Columbia degrees. But the question
is, if a triple-Columbia degreed academic isn't above changing his advisee's grades to more academically
and socially acceptable ones, then
why couldn't my UBC Law professor give me a C so that I would have
been herded along with the others
to 2L and wouldn't have wasted
$10,000 in law school tuition?
The professor's probable retort
that I didn't learn the material well
enough isn't a good reason anymore, looking at our counterparts
at Harvard and in the Ivy League.
Grade inflation in elite academic
institutions is the norm and giving
no grades lower than a passing
grade is expected, even at UBC.
Gary Lai is a UBC alumnus. 13 EDITOR JACKHAUEN
MONDA1
// Sports + Rec
VOLLEYBALL »
UBC faces off in friendly but formidable Korean matchup
Middle Alex Russell spikes the ball toward his Sungkyunkwan University counterpart.
Olamide Olaniyan
StaffWriter
The sound of numerous volleyballs
making contact with the wooden
floor echoed loudly across the
War Memorial Gymnasium. The
University of British Columbia
men's volleyball team arrived at
10 a.m. on Friday morning to work
through drills and practice a little
before the game later that evening.
Their visitors, from Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea,
came in half an hour later for the
very same reason. But rather than
antagonism and hostility on either
side ofthe court, UBC and SKKU
had an entirely different dynamic,
mainly owed to the 30-year old
relationship that exists between the
two schools.
Sungkyunkwan University is
based in Suwon, South Korea, about
30 km from Seoul, and is ranked 17
in the QS Asia ranking. The school
alsoboastsa very strong volleyball
athletics program. This was something that former UBC head coach
Dale Ohman was quick to capitalize
on more than 30 years ago.
In the summer of 1983, the SKKU
basketball team arrived with their
head coach, Han, unannounced
and unprepared for, and a hastily
organized exhibition match was
played against UBC. While the then
basketball head coach Bruce Enns
was not interested in any extensive
sports exchange program, Ohman
saw a real opportunity for both
schools.
"So I heard Bruce talking with
him," said Ohman. "A little light
went on in my pea-brain and after
they finished I went over to Han
and asked whether their school
had a men's volleyball team."
So blossomed the beginning of a
beautiful relationship. An agreement was set up in which there
would not only be the exchange
ofthe sports teams on a four year
cycle but also the exchange of faculty and graduate students. After
that the schedule was adjusted
a few times, in 1985 when the
Thunderbirds spent their Christmas in Korea and also quite recently when a Korean sports team
registration scandal threatened to
end the partnership.
Individuals such as Ohman,
Han-joo Eom, an alumni of both
UBC and SKKU, dean ofthe
college of sport science at SKKU
and member ofthe board ofthe
international federation of volleyball, and current UBC head coach
Richard Schick, who have devoted
years to the exchange, have continuously seen its importance for
both sports programs.
"Volleyball is one ofthe most
international games where it is not
uncommon to have relationships
like this and to play these types
of international matches," said
Schick, who is in his 12th season as
UBC head coach.
"It's two very different cultures
and it is really neat to be able to
experience those things — it opens
your eyes to a whole new way of
thinking and playing and training."
That doesn't mean that the games
are not at all competitive. In fact,
it is quite the opposite. While it is
a time of mutual advising, practising and learning, it is also a time
for some ofthe best competitive
plays seen all year. It does not help
that SKKU has defeated UBC the
majority ofthe times the teams have
faced off.
"Traditionally, SKK has kicked
our butts. These are both competitive matches. Its good for us that
we have a bye week and we can go
into something like this with some
quality competition," said Schick.
The T-Birds took the game
on Friday, winning 3-0 with set
scores 25-14, 25-23 and 25-18. UBC
powered through the evening, and
took no prisoners. Milan Nikic
made the most assists ofthe game
(32) and outside hitters Ben Chow
and Jarrid Ireland shared the top
slot for most kills with 12 each.
SKKU responded likewise the
following evening, coming back
with a vengeance to defeat UBC
in three straight sets (25-16, 25-22
and 25-21).
The two teams went hard at
each other from the first point in
the first set, but it wasn't long before SKKU started increasing the
gap, eventually winning the set.
SKKU defender Jun Heuk Jung
proved to be a hard wall to get by
with five total blocks in the game,
only contested by Irvan Brar (four)
who was brought in at the middle
ofthe first set. Even though the
final two sets were closer, SKKU
managed to keep the 'Birds at
bay to take the second game of
the weekend.
"We bailed them out a couple
of times by missing serves but
these guys don't shy away from a
challenge. They go up and they bang
the ball every single situation. They
are super aggressive and they ran a
lot of combos," said Chow, who also
won player ofthe game on Saturday.
Both Chow and third-year Mac
McNicol, who trained with SKKU
over the summer, agreed that consistency was one thing the Korean
visitors had that they did not. The
T-Birds were largely unsuccessful limiting the SKKU multiple
point runs and faltered in aggressive servicing at moments when
it mattered.
"We didn't respond to being
pushed, it's as simple as that. SKK
played a lot better today and were
very aggressive," said Schick.
"When one team pushes you
around and you don't fight back
that's what happens. Similar to
what we did last night. I am sure
they were motivated to come in
today and prove their worth."
The last time UBC faced SKKU
was in October 2008, and that en-
=HOTO SOFYTSAIffHE UBYSSEY
counter left the T-Birds in the dust
with three straight set losses at
25-15, 25-17, 25-17, Each with more
than an eight point lead. The total
kills for SKKU was 47 compared to
UBC's meagre 29. Sung Ryul Park
made 16 total kills while the highest scorer for UBC Steve Gotch got
only nine kills.
However, looking at UBC's Friday game, and some parts of Saturday's game it can be said that both
teams are more or less on equal
terms. In the first game the 'Birds
made 41 total kills in the game and
SKKU made 35. The following day,
SKKU beat UBC with 45 total kills
to the 'Birds' 31.
"Unfortunately, you're always
left with that taste in your mouth
but there were definitely some
good things that we can take and
learn from as we move into our
league," said Schick.
With this game behind them,
the Thunderbirds can now focus
on getting back into the groove
of the Canada West. UBC has the
most kills and assists overall in the
conference so far, and are currently fifth in the standings with 20
points. Over the next few weeks
they will be facing formidable
teams like the Trinity Western
Spartans and the University of
Calgary Dinos. Hopefully, this bye
weekend and set of friendly matches against an old rival allowed the
'Birds to prepare well for the final
stretch ofthe season. Xi
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Don't miss your opportunity to learn more about this fresh approach to better health. MONDAY, JANUARY 12,2015    I    SPORTS    I   11
Free Rec Classes!    »
UBC Rec is offering a week of free drop-in
classes from January 12-18. Only classes at the
SRC are shown here — check the Rec website
for the full list, including those at Ponderosa.
Studio
Camp
7:00-7:55
Pump Be Fit
11:00-11:45
Butts & Guts BO/50 Yoga
Be Fit Pilates
12:05-12:50
2:30-3:55
Youth Self
Lyrical      : :0-4:30
Jazz        KravMaga
4:00-5:25  p~.<~<----
CoopCombo
Boot Cam|
5:30-6:20
Zumba
6:30-7:25
BarreFitness        Judo
7:30-8:25       7:30-8:55
Tae Kwon
Do
8:30-9:45
Studio
Dojo
Cycle
Boot
Camp
7:00-7:55
Thai
Kickbox
7:45-8:45
Total Body
50/50
Conditioning
Yoga Pilates
11:00-11:45
11:00-11:55
Lunch
Power
Crunch
Yoga
Boot Camp
12:05-12:50
12:05-12:50
Cycle Yoga
Boot Camp
Boot Camp
4:00-4:55
4:20-5:20
50/50
Yoga Pilates
Hip Hop
5:00-5:55
5:30-6:25
Hatha Yoga
Burlesque
6:00-6:55
6:30-7:25
laido
6:30-7:55
Hapkido
""
Studio
Dojo
Early
Bird Boot
Camp
7:00-7:55
Aikido
7:00-8:55
50/50
Arms,
Strength &
Stretch
12:05-12:50
Pilates
Reformer
1:00-1:55
Youth Hip Hop
3:30-4:30
ThinkYou
Can Dance?
4:30-5:25
CoopCombo
Boot Camp
5:30-6:20
Zumba
6:30-7:25
Shotokan
Karate
7:30-9:30
Cycle
Boot
Camp
7:00-7:55
Butts &
Guts Be Fit
11:00-11:45
Lunch
Crunch
Boot Camp
12:05-12:50
Mat
ilates
0-1:25
Cycle Yoga
Boot Camp
Max Out     4:00-4:55
Boot Camp"   ■■
4:30-5:20
Hip Hop
5:30-6:25
Hip Hop
Advanced
6:30-7:25
7:30-8:25
Tae Kwon
Do
8:30-9:45
Studio
Dojo
Aikido
7:00-8:55
Arms,
Strength
& Stretch
11:00-11:45
Cardio Kick,
TaiChi
Strength SCore
Chuan
12:05-12:50
12:05-12:50
Pilates
Reformer
2:00-2:55
Zumba
3:30-4:25
Acroyoga
50/50 Yoga
4:00-4:55
Pilates
Shadow
4:30-5:25
Boxing
Tabata
5:00-5:55
Workout
Muay
5:30-6:20
Thai
6:00-6:55
laido
9:30-11:30
Shotokan
Karate
11:30-1:30
Pilates
Reformer
10:30-11:30
50/50 Yoga
Pilates
10:30-11:30
Nihon
Goju
Karate
11:30-1:30
Intro to
Ballet
3:00-4:30
Intermediate
Ballet
4:30-6:00
Intro to
MMA
3:30-4:30
Yoga for
Relaxation
8:00-9:00
HOCKEY»
Thunderbirds snap five-game losing skid against Cougars
UBC's top scorer Tatiana Rafter pulls a toe drag in the Mount Royal zone.
=HOTO JACK HAUEN/THE UBYSSEY
Jenny Tang
StaffWriter
The UBC Thunderbirds have rung
in the New Year in style. The team
finally broke their long-term losing
skid (dating back to November 15)
on Friday night after dominating
the Mount Royal University Cougars in a 3-1 win, followed by a 4-0
shutout the next afternoon to seal
the deal.
The 'Birds dominated Friday's game. It took some serious
goaltending skills from Mount
Royal goalie Jessica Ross to
keep the score from escalating
any further.
But even her skills weren't
enough to stop T-Bird Nicole
Saxvik from chipping in her
seventh goal ofthe season. The
1-0 lead was not kept for long, as
46 seconds later the score evened
out with a goal from Mount Royal's Sydney Laurin to become 1-1.
Thunderbird Nikola Brown-
John managed to break the tie
later on in the second period,
banging in a rebound shot from
Devon Morrison. The 'Birds
were unstoppable after that;
the Cougars only managed two
shots on net for the remainder of
the period.
UBC closed things off with
another goal in the third period.
Tatiana Rafter, the team's top
scorer, tipped in another shot off
of Morrison to add an insurance
goal, and the 'Birds emerged
victorious with the score ending
at 3-1.
UBC goalie Danielle Dube
stopped 13 ofthe 14 shots fired
at the net during her first game
in just under a year, while her
Cougar counterpart Ross stopped
39 of 42.
Head coach Graham Thomas
was happy to snap his team's
losing streak, something to
which this talented UBC squad is
not accustomed.
"It was a bit worrying to go
without a W for such a long time,"
he said. "It was nice to see that
we took a lot of their speed and
opportunities away early on before they could try anything."
The 'Birds were also happy to
welcome home a familiar face.
Joining the bench was former
captain Christi Capozzi, who had
finished her time in Sweden with
the Goteborg Hockey Club and
is now back at UBC as assistant
coach with the team for the rest of
the season.
"I'm super excited to be back,"
Capozzi said after the game. "The
team's looking great and it's going
to be a good stretch. I'd rather be
out playing for sure, but it's fun to
be around the rink, even if it's just
on the bench with all the girls."
UBC went on to sweep the
weekend with a 4-0 win on
Saturday. They will be taking a
trip to Saskatchewan to face the
Huskies next weekend, followed
by a trip to Regina to play the
other Cougars. Their next home
game will be on January 30
against the University of Lethbridge Pronghorns. Xi 12    I    GAMES    I    MONDAY, JANUARY 12,2015
A misty mountain on Highway 95 between Raidum and Golden. The Kootenays are worth exploring.
ACROSS
1-Effable
10-Atoll unit
15- Enduring
16- Figure of speech
17- Pharmacy
18- Convocation of witches
19-Joan of , French heroine
20- Designer Mizrahi
22-Wherelt.'sat
23- Polynesian carved image
25-Verdi opera
28-Intertwine
31-On the payroll
33-Judged
65-Horneand Olin
11-Grads-to-be
40-CD forerunners
34- Follow very closely
66-Inanimate
12- Genus of herbaceous plants
42-Altar in the sky
35-Proceed in rays
37-Owner of a tavern
13- Ornamental shoulder piece
43-East African nation
44-Snob
     14-Vacuum tube type
41-Momentarily
DOWN
21-Inflammation of the colon
45-Club-shaped
46- Passing
24- Descartes s conclusion
52-The King
47-Ramble
1-Modernised
26-Aptitude
53-Bereft
48-Light brown
2-Casserole dish
27-Unit of energy
54-Greek vowels
49-What       mind reader?
3-Submit tamely
29-Cherry red
55- Identical
50-Last:Abbr.
4- Hosp. readout
30-Appetite
58- Kind of fingerprint
51-Some locks
5- "ER" extras
31- Undercover operation
59-LosertoDDE
56- Off-road wheels, for short
6-Opponent
32-Battery size
61-Prohibit
57-You        mouthful!
7- Life stories
36- Rockers Steely
62-T.G.I.F. part
60- Events worthy of note
8-Dr. Zhivago's love
37-Scrutiny
63- Do penance
9-Zeno's home
38-Wail
64- Playwright
10-Mineral suffix
39- Fortified place
i
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GARBAGE WE SENT TO LANDFILL IN 2013:
3000 TONNES y^feV^fey^fe
OR 19 BLUE
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COURTESYBESTCROSSWORDS.COM
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You can make a difference
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USE RECYCLING STATIONS TO |    |
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JAN8ANSWERS
JAN 8 ANSWERS

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