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The Ubyssey Feb 15, 2010

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Array Alexandre Bilodeau fan club charter members SINCE 1918
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CANADA MEDAL COUNT
© © ©
OLYMPICS BRIEFS
UBC STUDENTS AND STAFF
CREATE OLYMPIC PODIA
UBC built all 23 medal podia
for the Olympic and Paralympic
Winter Games.
According to UBC Reports,
the university's Centre for
Advanced Wood Processing
created the Olympic podia and
100 wooden metal trays.
The project used BC grown
trees donated from 23 community forests in the province. The
designs are meant to symbolize
the importance of forests to the
province.
"It is really interesting; it's really pushing the edge to see a
new, interesting design out of local wood species," said Andrew
Pershin, a graduate from UBC's
Wood Products Processing
program.
FIVE WINNERS FOR UBC'S
OLYMPICS DIGITAL CHALLENGE
Students from around the world
have won UBC's Global Minds
Challenge.
The competition allowed
students and teachers in
Kindergarten to Grade 12 to
use digital technology to promote the 2010 Olympic and
Paralympic Games.
The top two submissions
were awarded $2010. An example of a winning project was
an online wiki and blogs that a
group of students from Regina
created to share information
with students in countries such
as Argentina and China.
The contest is to become an
annual international competition.
HERITAGE MINISTER UPSET
WITH LACK OF BILINGUALISM
James Moore, Canada's
Heritage Minister, told The
Vancouver Sun that he was
"disappointed" with the lack
of French at Friday's Opening
Ceremonies.
"They were beautiful, they
were spectacular on television,
but there should have been
more French," Moore said. His
ministry put $20 million towards
paying for the ceremonies.
WOMEN PREDICTED TO LEAD
MEDAL COUNT
Bob Hindmarch, former Athletics
Director at UBC and General
Manager of the first national
Olympic hockey team, has predicted that the women will lead
the medal count at this year's
Games.
Hindmarch told UBC Reports
that "we'll win medals where
we don't think we will," and that
"women will win more medals
than men."
CAN'T WAIT FOR
OLYMPIC UPDATES?
FOLLOW US ON TWITTER!
©UBYSSEY 2/UBYSSEY.CA/BRIEFS/2010.02.15
FEBRUARY I 5, 2010
VOLUME XCI,   N°XLI
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Paul Bucci: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Samantha Jung: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sarah Chung: schung@ubyssey. ca
CULTURE EDITOR
Kate Barbaria : culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Jonny Wakefield: jwakefield@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Justin McElroy : sports@ubyssey.ca
IDEAS EDITOR
Trevor Record: ideas@ubyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
GeraldDeo :photos@ubyssey.ca
GRAPHICS ASSISTANT
Anthony Goertz: graphics@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production @ubyssey. ca
COPY EDITOR
Katarina Grgic: copy@ubyssey.ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : 7nulti7nedia@ubyssey.ca
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
Ashley Whillans : awhillans@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604.822.2301
fax: 604.822.9279
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
fax: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Chibwe Mweene
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey
Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and al
students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of
the staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property of The
Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions,
photographs and artwork contained herein cannot
be reproduced without the expressed, written
permission of The Ubyssey Publications Society
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's
guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student
number and signature (not for publication) as
well as your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are
dropped off at the editorial office of The Ubyssey;
otherwise verification will be done by phone.
"Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words
but under 750 words and are run according to
space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written by
Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to
letters and perspectives over freestyles unless
the latter is time sensitive. Opinion pieces wil
not be run until the identity of the writer has
been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right to
edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before
ntended publication. Letters received after this
point will be published in the following issue
unless there is an urgent time restriction or other
matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff
It is agreed by all persons placing display or
classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the
UPS will not be greater than the price paid for
the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not
lessen the value or the impact of the ad
CONTRIBUTORS
The Obyssey staff had another drunken party and
woke up in Thailand. Paul Bucci and Samantha Jung
rode off into the jungle on an elephant, though the
bumpy ride upset their stomachs. Andrew Bates, Lewis
Kelly and Tagh Sira had a bad bout of torn yum they
bought on the street. Virginie Menard wandered to her
old high school, gleefully dragging Gerald Deo, Justin
McElroy and Katarina Grgic with her. Michael Thibault,
Keegan Bursaw and Geoff Lister, went to take photos
ofthe famous Emerald Buddha nearthe Grand Palace
Tara Martellaro, Krittana Khurana and Chibwe Mweene
ended up in a music video being filmed outside of Paragon Mall. Kasha Chang and Austin Holm went to a bar
and were being served by pretty bar women who may
not have been actual women. Kate Barbaria decided to
test her Thai kickboxing skills on Jonny Wakefield, who
took it like a gentleman (his hospital room was very spacious). Trevor Becord spent his time relaxing on a beach
in Phuket while Alex Leckie served him drinks. Annika
Westphal had to bail Brendan Albano out of jail after
he tried to buy mushrooms from a motorbiker. Amrita
Parmar lost her passport and was stuck at the embassy,
and Joanna Chiu and Hannah Lorena got lost at the
weekend market and spent the rest of their lives selling
monkeys in cages and dried papaya.
V      Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
Canadian    printed on^0Q%
University     'reeycledpaper
Press \__]Q
EVENTS
CLASSIFIEDS
Price Reduced. 2005 Acura TL fully
loaded, 56,000 klm. 4 doors, standard, white exterior, leather interior
in good condition, $21,000. Contact
calvin. magic32@gmail. com.
Men's Rugby Calendar. 12
months. 12 pictures. SIS/calendar. All proceeds go to the UBC's
men's program. Contact ben-
jones.eng@gmail.com or call at
604-8386400.
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby!
Learn about layout and editing. Expect to be fed. • Every
Sunday and Wednesday, 2pm.
BRIGHT LIGHT TO SHOWCASE ART
AND EVENTS DURING THE 2010
WINTER GAMES • A series of temporary public art works and
events during the Vancouver
2010 Olympics and Paralympics
will feature a collection of 14
commissioned projects during
the 2010 Winter Games. The
project is a joint effort of artists
and arts organizations based in
the Downtown Eastside, who
are collaborating to produce installations and events that will
light up the neighbourhood
and showcase the community's cultural vitality. • Runs until
Sunday, Feb. 28, all day, Carrall
Street Greenway
TANTRAMAR GOTHIC ART EXHIBIT •
Regent College Lookout Gallery
presents Tantramar Gothic,
a collection of work by Dan
Steeves. • Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-
5pm, Sat. 12pm-4pm, Regent
College, 5800 University Blvd.,
runs until Monday, Mar. 1.
CHEER ON CANADA CIRCLE • Follow
the athletes on our 72" projection
screen in our special Cheer On
Canada Circle. Come with your
colleagues, bring your lunch, meet
new friends, trade pins and watch
Canada win! • Feb. 15-26, 12pm-
1:30pm, UBC Bookstore, 6200
University Blvd.
EXTENDEDUBCBOOKSTORE HOURS* UBC
Bookstore will have extended hours for
the Olympics. • Feb. 11-26, 9:30am-
6pm, 6200 University Blvd.
MONDAY, FEB. 15
OLYMPIC ICE HOCKEY • WOMEN'S
PRELIMINARY—SWITZERLAND VS.
CANADA • Cheer on Canada's female hockey team as they face
off Switzerland in the women's
preliminaries. • 2:30pm-5pm,
Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports
Centre (formerly UBC Thunderbird
Arena), gates open two hours before the scheduled start time.
SUNDAY, FEB. 28
BIG SCREEN VIEWING OF MEN'S
HOCKEY AND CLOSING CEREMONY* Part of the More Than Gold
Westside Events, we are inviting you to watch the Men's
Hockey final and the closing ceremony to the 2010 Olympics on
the big screen. All are welcome.
• Hockey 12:15pm, ceremony
5:30pm, Regent College, 5800
University Blvd.
Youth leaders welcomed for Truce
Indigenous youth leaders from
across Canada were welcomed
to the Vancouver Public Library
this Thursday by Governor
General Michaelle Jean as part
ofthe 2010 Olympic Truce.
Joined by Prince Albert of
Monaco and Assembly of First
Nations National Chief Shawn
Atleo, the youth shared their
stories as part of a dialogue
with the Governor General,
who was welcomed by the host
nation with both a traditional dance and a modern one.
In turn, her speech affirmed
the necessity of Native youth
empowerment for their communities and for the entire
nation.
The Governor General is the
patron of the Vancouver 2010
Olympic Truce, which has attempted to take a grassroots approach to encouraging peace,
mutual understanding and cooperation among youth leaders
to create a more compassionate
world.
—Gerald Deo
NEWS BRIEFS
CANADA HOUSE OPENS TO
THE PUBLIC
Canada House is a location
at every Olympics that houses the friends and families of
Canadian Athletes.
This is no different for the
2010 Games. Athletes' families from across the country have converged to take
up residence on the upper
floor of The Bay, this year's
Canada House.
Canada House is a sanctuary that allows Canadian
athletes to spend time with
their loved ones who are
not allowed into the Athletes
Village.
The opening of Canada
House began with an angelic performance from The
Canadian Tenors who serenaded the crowd with our national anthem.
Their rousing performance was followed by the
unveiling of the Canadian podium jacket. This is the jacket that any Canadian medallist will wear when they take
the podium.
The podium jackets will
be signed by the athletes
and auctioned off over the
next few months. According
to Chris Rudge, CEO of the
Canadian Olympic Committee
at the opening of the House on
Thursday, "they will help raise
funds for all our Canadian
athletes."
Rudge commented on how
Canada House has been seen
as the "drunk house" at previous Olympic Games, but
that it will be different in
Vancouver. "We were the
drunk house, now we've
passed that over to the Dutch
at the Heineken House, and
Sochi [House]," he said.
—Tagh Sira
THIS IS WHAT YOUR
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documenting 4 or more months of full-time attendance at a college or university during 2009 or (ii) a valid
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Got a sweet event
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All events are free
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events@ubyssey. ca. 2010.0 2.15/UBYSSEY.CA/OLYMPICS/3
Le Guellec impresses in biathlon
Olympian Jean-Philippe Le Guellec is the only male Canadian competing in the biathlon—but he's not worried. COURTESY OF TIM HIPPS
TAGH SIRA
o lymp icsedi to r@u byssey. ca
Jean-Philippe Le Guellec is the
only Canadian male biathlete
competing in all of the biathlon
events in this Olympics—and he
has not disappointed yet.
When asked about why he
was the only Canadian in the
field he said, "I'm not sure how
the politics worked, but it's definitely frustrating that there
weren't more of us out there."
Le Guellec started in eighth
position Sunday morning.
After his first lap he shot all
five of his targets successfully,
placing him in the lead with a
total time of 8:04.1.
All of the other competitors were chasing him for the
rest of the course. Le Guellec
cleared his second round of targets, missing only one shot but
starting to fall behind.
Then the weather came in.
Just after Le Guellec completed
his race it started raining and
then snowing on the track-
making it even harder for the
other biathletes to catch up to
his time.
It gets a lot harder to shoot
in snowy conditions since
it is hard to see the target,
and that is exactly the problem athletes ran into Sunday,
when almost all of them
missed at least one shot.
As well, skis can't be
changed during competition,
and the changing conditions made it harder to ski
since they were using ski
wax designed for warmer
conditions.
In the end, Vincent Jay
from France took the top spot
with a total time of 24:07.8,
and LeGuellec finished sixth
with a total time of 24:57.6.
Le Guellec qualified for the
Sprint and will be starting
50 seconds back from Jay on
Tuesday, tl
IOC opens
investigation
on luge track in
wake of tragedy
TAGH SIRA
o lymp icsedi to r@u byssey. ca
After the death of Georgian
luger Nodar Kumaritashvili on
Friday in a tragic training accident on the final turn (Turn 16)
of the course, the IOC immediately opened an investigation.
After interviewing a former course technician from
the Lake Placid Luge site, The
Ubyssey learned that the safety precautions taken in the
construction of this track were
very minimal compared to the
American site.
The wall on the final turn was
only three feet high compared
to almost five feet at Placid,
which is also a slower course.
Georgian President Mikheil
Saakashvili said that the decision of Georgian athletes to
continue in the Games was
"the [right] one because the
Olympic movement is all about
perseverance."
When asked if he believed
that this accident could have
been prevented, Saakashvili
said, "it's precisely up to the
inquiry to determine what has
happened, but I heard this on
television, that this [accident]
was because of human error,
and I believe that any human
error should not lead to the
death of an athlete."
The investigation has not yet
concluded, but changes have
been made to the competition,
including lowering the start positions to reduce the total speed
and raising the wall on Turn
16. til
Weekend wrap-up
TAGH SIRA
olympicseditor@ubysseyca
Working alongside all the other media outlets, I have seen
the extremely hard work that
goes into professional sports
writing. There's a constant barrage of press conferences, and
an endless scramble to make
it to the media buses to attend
competitions, all the while trying to photograph and write
what is going on. It makes for
a steep learning curve.
Many countries have athletes competing in only a few
events, which makes it a lot
easier to focus on the latest developments. The Chinese will
focus on speed skating and figure skating, the Norwegians
will focus on biathlon, the
Jamaicans will focus on bobsled—scratch that, the bobsled team failed to qualify this
year. But The Ubyssey only has
yours truly, and I don't need
to tell you how many athletes
Canada has at the Games.
The death of Georgian luger
Nodar Kumaritashvili on Friday
is on everyone's minds. But at
the events themselves, spirits
have been high with records
poised to be broken.
Canada saw its first medal on Saturday with Jenn Heil
picking up the silver medal for
momen's moguls. At a press
conference Saturday night,
Heil said that "Canadians can
be assured that the gold medal
is coming on home soil. [We]
have such a strong team."
Heil was right in her prediction. Mogul skier Alex
Bilodeau won gold in his event
with a score of 26.75, beating
out Dale Begg-Smith, a former
Canadian turned Australian,
by 0.17 points. Canadians
Vincent Marquis and Pierre-
Alexandre Rousseau finished
fourth and fifth, respectively,
in the same event.
Canada saw its first
medal on Saturday.
Jean-Phillippe Le Guellec
came in sixth place in the biathlon sprint on Sunday—a
Canadian best. And Sam Edney
tied an old Canadian record by
placing seventh in the men' singles luge.
Sunday evening, Canada
picking up two more medals in
women's 3000m speed skating. Kristina Groves pulled in
the bronze medal for Canada
with a time of 4:04.84—only
two seconds back from the top
spot. And our first home-turf
gold medal came when Alex
Bilodeau won men's moguls.
As of Sunday night, Canada
has three medals, leaving us
in third place for total medal
count. With many more medal contenders yet to compete in
the upcoming week, we can expect to see that total climb higher each day. tl
Despite disappointment, Heil pleased with silver
ANDREW BATES
western.bureau@cup.ca
Over the last 24 hours, anyone who can get close enough
has asked Olympic moguls
skier Jennifer Heil asked how
she feels about winning silver when everyone had hoped
for Canada's first gold medal
at the 2010 Winter Olympics.
"I really don't see the difference in value of an Olympic
medal, whether it's won on
Day 1 or Day 10. We're going to
have our medal," she said in a
press conference. "I had gold in
my sights... but I do really feel
like I won silver."
She has echoed those sentiments in many interviews,
but the expression on her face
when asked if she wished people would talk about the medal she did win, rather than
the one she didn't, betrayed
a sense of fatigue about the
topic.
"Absolutely," she said. "We're
gonna win lots of medals, I
think it's important that we celebrate absolutely every day of
the Games."
Heil had been identified as a
hopeful to win Canada's first
Olympic gold medal on home
soil; the country's athletes
did not win gold at previous
Games in Montreal or Calgary.
Second-last in the skiing order, her score of 25.69 looked
to be enough to clinch the top
spot—until Hannah Kearney of
the US closed the competition
with a score of 26.63.
"I laid down a great run...
[then Kearney] came down and
laid down the run of her life.
That's sport," Heil said. "I think
we saw the best of sport last
night."
Her teammates also experienced some frustration. "It was
a bit of a bittersweet Olympics
for me," said Kristi Richards
from Summerland, BC. Richards
crashed halfway through the
course, only to get back up and
execute an impressive final flip.
"I couldn't have been more prepared. The course was amazing,"
she said. "When I crashed, I actually got a second start..! got to get
the crowd excited once again and
do the trick that I had been training to do and do my dream run, really, with a little bit of a mistake."
The focus among the whole
team was  about being  able
KEEGAN BURSAW PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
to be there and to do their
best, and teenage skier Chloe
Dufour-Lapointe had a lot to
celebrate after placing fifth.
"I'm living on a cloud," she
said in French. "First games,
fifth place is extraordinary for
me as an eighteen-year-old."
Heil said that the goal for
everyone now was just to celebrate and enjoy tie Games.
"This moment in time, it's
such an exciting time for
sport in Canada. Our team is
so strong, we're going to win
so many medals, and we just
have to go out and celebrate...
what competition is all about,"
she said.
"I feel so honoured and
privileged to chase my passion." vl 4/UBYSSEY.CA/OLYMPICS/2010.02.15
Torch leaves lasting impression on UBC
SAMANTHAJUNG
news@ubysseyca
Students, staff and faculty
alike braved the cold and rain
as the Olympic Torch passed
through campus Friday night.
Thousands packed the
streets—and buildings with
good views—for hours across
campus dressed in red and
white, waiting for the arrival of
the flame.
"It's a once in a lifetime thing,
you don't see it on your campus
that often," said first-year Arts
student Jaidev Subaiah.
The torch started at West
Mall and Thunderbird
Boulevard just before 6pm,
and traveled north along Main
Mall to University Boulevard
where spectators were lined
up on both sides of the street
to catch a piece of Vancouver
history.
Cheers emanated through
the crowd as torchbearer and
UBC alumna Lena Ling passed
the torch to Scott Tabachnick on
University Boulevard.
It was a festive scene for hours
at the muddy and newly beautified
centre of campus. Bands, cheerleaders and troubadours entertained
the crowd of dose to 2000 that had
congregated at the main celebration
zone, but most stayed close to the
road angling for the perfect position
to see the flame pass.
"It was really amazing just
seeing it," said Matthew Paine,
a third-year Applied Sciences
student. "I can't believe it's actually here."
Not everyone was pleased
with the torch coming to
campus.
"I feel [the Olympics have]
been hijacked by the athletes," said Bryce Beckett, who
was visiting campus to see
the torch relay. "[I'm] pretty pissed off about the freedom of speech shit going on,
where people are not allowed
to speak down against the
Olympics."
A group of protesters,
including outgoing AMS
President Blake Frederick
in his final full day in office,
marched around the torch
route carrying signs and
shouting. While their protest
was peaceful and their impact minimal, some were not
pleased with their presence.
"When they say UBC students
don't want the torch, that's not
true," said Christine Johnson,
a first-year student in Human
Kinetics.
UBC estimated the total attendance at 10,000 for the relay
at UBC. The torch continued to
10th and Sasamat, where a celebration site was set up, before
heading Downtown. Students
on University Boulevard stayed
to watch performances by indie band Said the Whale and
the UBC Symphonic Wind
Ensemble, vl
Lena Ling runs the torch towards Scott Tabachnick along Main Mall. GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
Students take their protest around campus
MICHAEL THIBAULT PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
Protesters wore a variety of signs.
MICHAEL THIBAULT PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY 2010.02.15/UBYSSEY.CA/OLYMPICS/5
Thousands turn out to Opening Ceremonies protest
Friday's anti-Olympic demonstration makes its way to BC Place to protest the opening ceremonies. MICHAEL THIBAULT
PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
JONNY WAKEFIELD
jwakefield@ubysseyca
Several thousand people gathered in front of the Vancouver
Art Gallery Friday to protest
the opening ofthe 2010 Winter
Olympic Games. Organized by
a variety of anti-Olympic coalitions, the demonstration,
called "Take Back Our City,"
reached a peak attendance of
about 5000, according to some
estimates.
After speeches and music, the protesters marched towards BC Place Stadium chanting "Homes not Games," "No
Olympics on stolen Native
land," and "This is what democracy looks like." The march
was stopped by VPD officers
at Robson and Beatty, with BC
Place less than a block away.
The protest was mostly a
tense standoff, but at 6pm police and protesters began pushing against one another. A
large group of the protesters
returned to the VAG about an
hour afterwards, while others
stayed by BC Place. The protest
dispersed peacefully at around
8:30pm. There were no arrests.
Protesters felt that their voices were being heard.
"If we don't agree with these
Games, it's important for us
to say it. The most important
thing is we are here, and the
government of Canada is taking notice of that," said Nora
Jameson, Vancouver resident
and attendee, tl
Police hold assault rifles, make seven arrests as protest gets ugly
Protesters and police face off on West Georgia. MICHAEL THIBAULT PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
ANDREW BATES
western.bureau@cup.ca
As many as seven people were arrested after violence in Vancouver during
the 2010 Heart Attack protests on Saturday, according to
Constable Janna McGuinness
of the VPD.
The BC Civil Liberties
Association claims that there
were at least 13 arrests, but
McGuinness said she is only
aware of protesters who have
been charged, not any that were
detained but then released.
"There could have easily been
[more arrests], I have no idea,"
she said. "This was a large, dynamic situation."
She mentioned that the response was led by the same
crowd control unit that covers many different types of
events per year, but many officers wore helmets and carried shields and assault rifles
this time.
The protest made its way
across town, marked by sporadic violence such as defacement of newspaper boxes and
broken glass. Police attempted to contain the protest rather than to stop individual acts
of vandalism.
Protesters were surrounded at the intersection of West
Georgia and Bute, and the demonstration was held in place
until a police line opened. A
group split off, only to be contained again a few blocks away.
The activists accused Canada of
becoming a police state. There
was some tension, but participants and observers alike dispersed after some sort of agreement had been reached between protesters and police.
"They also said that that they
have us on camera, we have
them on camera," a protester
yelled in a call and response
at the crowd, "and if we meet
again, they may make arrests,
but we have the right." tl
WHAT'S ART
G0TT0D0 '
The
First
Annual
Dean of
Arts Prize
for the Best
Essay in Visual
Literacy
$1
,000
for the best essay
EVERY UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT AT UBC
is invited to participate in an essay contest considering the
relationship of the aesthetic and the political.
The exhibition Backstory poses the question, you provide some answers.
For more information visit http://www.belkin.ubc.ca
MORRIS AND HELEN BELKIN ART GALLERY
The University of British Columbia I 1825 Main Mall I Vancouver I BC V6T 1Z2
Phone: 604 822 2759 I Fax: 604 822 6689 I Web address: www.belkin.ubc.ca
Open Tuesday to FridaylOto 5 Saturdayand Sunday 12 to 5  I  Closed holidays
..X
COME SHOOT PICTURES FOR THE
UBYSSEY. CONTACT US AT
PHOTOS@UBYSSEY.CA 6/UBYSSEY.CA/CAMPUS/2010.02.15
CAMPUS
COMPILED BY SAMANTHA JUNG »news@ubysse
WEEKEND
UBC
SCORES
B-BALL
AND JUSTIN McELROY »sports@ubys
WOMEN VS TWU: WIN, 66-58
PLAYOFFS: QUARTERFINALS
IN VICTORIA
MEN VS TWU: WIN, 90-83
PLAYOFFS: QUARTERFINALS
VS LETHBRIDGE
VOLLEYBALL
WOMEN® SFU: WIN, 3-0
PLAYOFFS: BYE WEEKEND
MEN: SEASON ALREADY OVER.
DID NOT MAKE PLAYOFFS
HOCKEY
WOMEN VS CALGARY:
1 WIN, 1 LOSS
PLAYOFFS: DID NOT QUALIFY
MEN VS ALBERTA:
1 WIN, 1 LOSS
PLAYOFFS: DID NOT QUALIFY
ATHLETES OF THE WEEK
JOSH WHYTE BASKETBALL | This
week's first Athlete of the Week
is Josh Whyte of men's basketball.
The fourth -year guard was a huge
part of the team's two wins over
the rival Vikes from the University
of Victoria last week. After getting into foul trouble in the first
half of Friday's game, Whyte terrorized the Vikes for 13 second-
half points, ultimately leading the
T-Birds' charge in a 78-72 comeback   victory.   Whyte   continued
his scoring touch into Saturday's
game where he dropped 28
points with 3 assists on a Vikes
team that had no answer for the
Thunderbird offence. The win was
especially significant for the team
as they clinched first place in both
the Pacific Division and Canada
West Conference, ensuring that
they have home court advantage
throughout the playoffs.
BLAIR BANN VOLLEYBALL | Our
other athlete of the week, Blair
Bann, is one of the co-captains
of the men's volleyball team. A
fourth-year Human Kinetics student, Blair has been a spark plug
all year long for the T-Birds squad,
providing an unparalleled statistical defence for the team. Although
the team has been knocked out
of playoff contention, that has
not stopped the Senior B National
Team Member from obtaining a
CIS high 252 digs and 3.76 digs
per set, leading all competition in
those categories, proving that he
is a dominating force as a libera.
Expect another exceptional showing from this outstanding player in
the 2010/2011 season, tl
NEWS BRIEFS
UBCESCAPES PAYING $4
MILLION PARKING FINE
UBC does not have to pay for
the $4 million that they doled out
in parking fines, reported The
Province.
This means that motorists
cannot get a refund for the parking fines that the university collected. The BC Court of Appeal
ruled that it is legal for the provincial legislature to enact a retroactive law that strikes down
the Supreme Court's original ruling that the fines were unlawfully collected.
The lawsuit began in 2006
when Vancouver chartered
accountant Daniel Barbour
filed a class-action lawsuit
against UBC after his car was
impounded and was ordered
to pay for alleged parking
violations.
STUDENT NAMED NOTABLE BC
ENTREPRENEUR
Maryanne Mathias, a MBA
student at UBC and local fashion designer, was named the
BC Student Entrepreneur for
2010 by Advancing Canadian
Partnership (ACE), reported
The Vancouver Sun.
On March 5, she will represent BC in a regional business
competition. Her clothing line
can be found in Gastown at Two
of a Kind.
UBC RAISES $3700 FOR HAITI
UBC Food Services, with the
help of students, has managed
to raise $3738 for Haiti relief.
Donations were collected
in the form of tips at food outlets inside the SUB over four
weeks.
The money will go to the
"Humanitarian Coalition," which
is comprised of Oxfam Canada,
Canadians Save the Children
Fund and Care Canada.
FREDERICK FAILS TO SHOW FOR
FINAL MEETING
Outgoing AMS President Blake
Frederick chose not to show
up for Friday's AMS Annual
General Meeting (AGM).
Frederick said that he was
attending an Olympic protest
instead.
He passed along his president's report, which was critical of this year's Council and the
new executive. Those present
at the AGM voted to reject it. ^J
ams Insider weekly
student society
a weekly look at what's new at your student society
15.02.10
Minr'vniHi'HiDiT'Hiii
May. 9th, Vogue Theatre
FINAL
FANTASY
(OWEN PALLET)'
ziay.y   , vogue meaire ■   ^^n m    m   ^^h »  ■       m  mb^
zz^'f THE SUB
.       .  % J IS OPEN FOR BUSINESS
il ll! III DURING THE OLYLMPICS!
N
E
o
BASIA
BULAT
with KATIE
STELMANIS
For a detailed list of outlet hours and closur
www.ams.ubc.ca
KNOW
YOUR RIGHTS!
As a UBC student, how are the
Olympics going to affect you?
Knowledge is power: if you know what your legal
rights are and how they work, you can better
understand and protect them, and protect and
respect the rights of others.
Pick up your "Know Your Rights" information card at
the AMS Speakeasy desk, available now through
March 2010.
Brought to you by the Alma Mater Society,
your student union at UBC.
For more information: www.ams.ubc.ca
Have a dispute with the university?
We can help. The AMS Ombuds Office provides
assistance in dispute resolution to students and
AMS staff. We operate independently, neutrally,
and confidentially. Call, email or click today.
604.822.4846
assist@ams.ubc.ca
http://www2.ams.ubc.ca/index.php
/student_government/category/
ams ombuds office
JOINtlS
in the Pit Pub for all the
2010 Winter Olympic Coverage.
Cheer Team Canada on as they go for Olympic Gold for the
first time on Canadian soil. With SIX HD Flat Screen TVs and
one massive HD Projector, you can be sure that the events that
you want to watch will be on when you want to watch them.
For full hours visit www.ams.ubc.ca
The Gallery Lounge will be closed
from Feb. 13th to Feb. 28th
^m _\t t\m _\m 100 free tickets/week
B       fm K K for any UBC Athletic
m^m_mam_r_m^m_m Event at the Outpos
TICKETS First come, first serve
VOLUNTEERS
AMS Safety Office is looking for volunteers to be part of
"Safe-Team." Successful applicant will be provided with First Aid
training. For further info or to apply, email safety@ams.ubc.ca
STAY  UP TO  DATE WITH THE  AMS
Facebook:
UBC Alma Mater Society
y Twitter:
AMSExecutive 2010.02.15/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/7
D
EAS
YOU SAID IT
IN RESPONSE TO "TRAFFIC DISRUPTED, TORCHES LIT AT ANTI-OLYMPIC PROTEST [FEB. 23, 2010]":
DO YOU CARE?
WRITE US A LETTER
feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»ideas@ubyssey.ca
I sincerely hope the VPD and any other security
personnel teach these lawless idiots a lesson on
not disrupting others' lives.
—Timmy Wong
Hey Tommy, your comment comes off as a bit ignorant in that one of the grounds for organizing the
rally was a call for security personnel and VPD to
"not disrupt others' lives."
—janet
Our new hero. GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
PROTESTERS LOSE THE UPPER HAND
Good job to the protesters who were at the 2010 Heart Attack demonstration. Your display yesterday killed any chance for peaceful and
and productive protests to matter for the remainder ofthe Olympics.
Chanting "Fuck the police," breaking windows, scaring bystanders and generally doing your best to get arrested doesn't endear
you to anyone except those who already fully support you. For those
there for the Olympics, it comes off as stupid. For those who held
contempt for the anti-Olympics groups, it will justify any sort of dra-
conian reactions the police take against protesters from now on.
There's also those who are against the Olympics but want to express that peacefully and without destruction. They were the real
losers yesterday because their message will now be clouded for the
rest of the Games.
Many of us were at Friday's "Welcoming Committee" protest,
which was—for the most part—fun and peaceful. It got a number of
points across, from the high Olympics costs and the money that has
been funneled from important social programs to the poor practices of the planning committee.
These are valuable messages that could have been communicated to the world again and again during the Games. Now, the narrative has changed. It's all about thugs with no respect for the rest
of the city, and police on constant guard, patrolling the street like
legionaries.
Two protests scheduled for Saturday were called off, and doubtless many more will be curtailed as well. No doubt the Olympic
Resistance Network and many of their supporters will use this as
proof that the police are fascist, the Games are corporate, Olympics
fans are conformists and all that wonderful rhetoric. But that sort of
language only works for the public if you remain peaceful. Thanks
to Friday protesters of all stripes have lost the upper hand in public
opinion, and they won't regain it for the rest of the Games, tl
THANKS, TO ALL THE HARDWORKING BUS DRIVERS
As students whose primary mode of conveyance is public transportation, when we heard TransLink's initial estimate of two-hour
waits to catch a ride during the Olympics, we were pissed.
So far though, it hasn't been nearly as bad as expected. Sure, you
couldn't say taking the bus has been a pleasant experience. Buses
are crammed and riders are bound to get all sorts of international
sweat on them as they move about the city. But we've been getting
to where we need to be in a fairly reasonable amount of time, with
minimal wait periods.
We would like to salute the bus drivers, who have been consistently packing their buses far over capacity trying to get everyone
on board, even when this is clearly in defiance of company policy.
Yesterday one of us saw a TransLink supervisor kick several people out that the driver had managed to cram onto an already full
bus. Sure, it may not be comfortable to ride squeezed against the
front windshield while having to keep your head tilted to the side so
that the driver can see the rear view mirror. It's still better than the
blinking "Sorry bus full," announcing you missed your last chance
to get to where you need to be.
So thank you, drivers. Your extra effort is making this ordeal
much more bearable than we expected. And to all you fellow transit users: Ifyou're standing near the door and someone behind you
is trying to get out, just get off the bus, let them out and get back on.
And please, take your backpacks off and make new friends with the
person from a far-off land you're forced into close quarters with, va
TOO SEXY
AUSTIN HOLM
& KASHA CHANG
toosexy@ubyssey.ca
Athletic Readership,
The Olympics have arrived,
and with them, a horde of tourists. Having our fair city occupied by a combination of corporate interests and foreign
sports fans has annoyed some,
titillated others and confounded many more.
Regardless of your stance on
blowing an insane sum of money in a base display of nationalism and greed when this city
has been slashing funding for
social programs*, I think we
can all agree that the discussion
has grown somewhat tiresome.
We've been forced to listen to
repetitive, non-constructive dialogue, yet key issues of how the
Games will affect UBC students
have gone not only unanswered
but almost totally undiscussed.
Thus, Too Sexy has decided not to run a letter today, but
rather to tackle this issue head
on: what's the best way to sleep
with as many hot foreigners as
possible during this brief boom
in tourism? We're going to need
a game plan.
PREPARE YOURSELF
Preparation will take more
than getting your hair styled
or wearing your lucky underwear. This is the Olympics, the
best from all over the world
are here and they're all trying to get laid. You'll have to be
at the top of your game if you
want to get up on that podium.
The main advantage that
UBC students should be able
to claim over the Olympic athletes we'll be competing against
will be our knowledge of the
terrain. No matter how many
hot Swedish skeleton athletes
you're competing with, remember that this is your home track.
You may wish to wear a tiny
Canadian flag to let tourists
know that you're from around
here and start conversations.
Nothing ostentatious though.
Face paint ranks up with sweater vests and pocket protectors
in terms of salting game.
CHOOSE YOUR TARGET
Lost tourists are easy to start
conversation with, but don't
forget that almost anyone on
vacation wants to meet some
fun locals who can show them
around. We're a country known
for our politeness, so it's not
inappropriate to say hello or
have some fun with our guests.
Once you've found someone
who really fires your starter pistol, don't let the chance get away.
Too many international relations have fallen apart over a moment's hesitation. Carpe diem
and finish what you set out to do.
INVITATION TO ADVENTURE
Having made contact, it's time
to put your environmental
knowledge to use. Vancouver
is such a beautiful city, we're
sure you all have your own
ideas about how to showcase
it to your lover from across the
sea. But just in case you don't,
we'll give you ours:
Watching the sunset from the
stairs behind the Museum of
Anthropology? BAM. You just
got laid.
Going to the Jupiter Cafe to
drink and sing karaoke, then
stumble down to the beach to
party all night? BAM. You just
got laid.
Displaying your taste and
culture with a night of poetry
at Cafe Deux Soleils? BAM. You
just got laid.
Watching the sunlight play
through the early morning mist
as the sun rises over a panoramic city scape from that unnamed
park near Collingwood and 16th?
BAM. You just got laid.
And failing these: Going to
the New Amsterdam Cafe to get
stoned? BAM. You just stopped
caring about getting laid.
SEX
At this point, your foreign
fling's underthings should be
either soaked through with regulation Olympic-sized passion
or mysteriously missing. Get in
there and make Canada proud.
And for the sake of international diplomacy, play safe, tl
That's it for this week. Send questions and liquor to toosexy®
ubyssey.ca or our webform at
ubyssey.ca/ideas.
* Can you guess our stance?
PERSPECTIVE
PROTESTS HAVE NOT BEEN
JUST ABOUT FREE SPEECH
ALEX LECKIE
Contributor
In June 2003, John Furlong,
then CEO of the 2010 Olympic
Bid Corporation for Vancouver,
described the Olympics as a
"powerful platform for building a better world through
sport." Furlong was echoing
the International Olympic
Committee's (IOC) official philosophy, Olympism, which
hopes to "place sport at the service ofthe harmonious development of man [sic], with a view
to promoting a peaceful society
concerned with the preservation of human dignity."
Furlong's comments may
sound a bit inconsistent for
those who have been living in
Vancouver. It's hard to see the
universal good of the human
race being promoted. With the
illustration of a few examples,
it becomes clear that these contradictions now define these
Games.
The brand of the Olympics
and its multinational sponsors
is to be consumed on every
street corner and bus ride. The
walls of the Granville Skytrain
station are covered with ads
in which the red and white of
Coca-Cola's brand is indistinguishable from that of Canada's
hockey team. We are intended
to ignore, presumably, the illog-
ic of companies like Coca-Cola
and McDonald's having anything to do with the pinnacle of
athletic performance. One begins to wonder whether the fans
behind the boards are cheering for a country's brand or a
soft drink's. The real question
is where the difference lies between the two—consumption of
the Olympic brand has become
a characteristic of citizenship.
In September, VANOC and
the provincial government
tried to introduce this notion
into the BC elementary and secondary curriculum, having already secured post-secondary
with the inclusion of UBC as
an Olympic venue site. While
slashing $130,000 from the
provincial school sports budget, the province introduced the
2010 Spirit School program.
At a cost of $500,000, the program was designed to encourage classrooms to embrace the
Olympics. This program was
criticized for its obvious political overtones, and the accompanying cuts made it seem like a
failed bribe attempt.
For another example of
Olympic contradiction, we
can look at the security for the
Games. An event meant to bring
people together from across
the world for the enjoyment of
sport now has a security budget
which may go over $1 billion,
one-sixth of the total cost of the
Games. To provide some context, this is the amount initially estimated for the total cost
of the Games when Vancouver
won the bid in 2003. Passing
through airport-like security is required to get into certain parts of the city, including Granville Island and parts
of downtown. This may all be
standard order for a post-9/11
world, but it begs the question
of what exactly we are bringing
together for the next few weeks.
If the Olympics have brought
anything together, it is political
groups in opposition to it. This
is the most inconvenient discrepancy for VANOC and the City of
Vancouver. The BC Civil Liberties
Association, No One is Illegal, the
Impact on Community Coalition,
the Olympic Resistance Network
and even a union or two have
collaborated in an onslaught of
critiques against the Olympics.
However, the dominant anti-
Olympic message being peddled
by newspaper and television media is that regarding free-speech.
Many of these anti-Olympic
groups have taken to political
analyses against larger issues
surrounding the Olympics such
as colonialism, corporatization
and poverty in Vancouver. The
Olympics-sponsored media outlets paint these groups as merely defenders of liberal rights of
free speech. However, there is
a broader question that I identify within these groups: if states
and corporations can so callously choose how and when
citizens' rights are exercised,
then why should we rely on
these powers to grant them in
the first place? tl 8/UBYSSEY.CA/POLL/2010.02.15
100%
44.2 %
WERE IN FAVOUR
OFTHE OLYMPICS
Yes
No
I'm not sure
50%
BUT 9.7%
THOUGHT THAT"
WOULD HAVE A NEG^
ECONOMIC IMF
(AND WERE STILL IN FAVi
„o|o*ougJ,ffA
"°Uood^
23.1°/
WERE IN FAVOUR AND
THOUGHT THAT THEY
WOULD HAVE A
POSITIVE
ECONOMIC
IMPACT
15.2%
WERE IN FAVOUR AND
THOUGHT THAT THEY
WOULD HAVE A
POSITIVE ECONOMIC AND
SOCIAL IMPACT
THOUGHT THE
GAMES WOULD
HAVE A POSITIVE
IMPACT IN ALL
AREAS, EVEN FOR
THE ENVIRONMENT
0%
h
■+-J-*'
0?
ri/ ^>v   ^V   ^V* >^tV
*#
**
\cr
**
o\*
What are you doing
for the Games?
Students have mixed feelings and low
engagement for the 2010 Olympics
TREVOR RECORD
deas@ubyssey.ca
The Olympics have begun, but most students don't plan on getting out to see
much of them.
The Ubyssey conducted a poll to gauge
student opinion of and engagement in
the Olympics over the last two weeks.
Although students have a wide range
of thoughts regarding the Games, few
planned on seeing them in person.
ENGAGEMENT IS LOW
It seems that most students will not be
seeing the Games, as only 17.9 per cent of
the students that responded had a ticket for
an event. Only a slim majority of students
(57.7 per cent) said they had definite plans
to watch the games on television. Less than
half of students said that they have plans to
attend the free events, concerts and other
celebrations in town, although a reasonably
high number had yet to make a decision.
A fifth of the respondents said they had
plans to leave Vancouver for the Olympics,
however. These students did not hold tickets to events and were less likely to watch
the Games on TV or have plans to attend
any Olympic celebrations before leaving.
Few who are displeased with the
Games seem to be planning to get off
their couches. Only 12.2 per cent of students said that they planned on attending a protest or engaging in any other anti-Olympics activities. Some of these had
said they were in favour of or ambivalent
towards the Olympics, but interested in
checking out the scene or using the protests as a way for promoting other causes.
MIXED OPINIONS
Although more students were in favour
of the Olympics than were against or
conflicted by them, they still made up
less than half of the respondents, since
some students said they were simply uninterested. Opinion of what effects the
Olympics will have on Vancouver was
also fairly mixed.
Despite the efforts by VANOC to brand
the Games as being environmentally progressive, the majority of students had a
pessimistic view of what the environmental impact of the Olympics would be.
Opinion about what outcome the Games
will have for Vancouver economically was
more mixed, but the largest number of
students expected the effects would be
negative. Students were similarly split on
what they thought the social impact of
the Olympics would be, although more
thought the effects would be positive.
Graduate students generally had a
more favourable disposition and optimistic opinion regarding the Games, although
since the sample size was much smaller
than that of undergrads their results can
not be considered as reliable. They were
also more likely to have tickets to events.
MANY STUDENTS IN THE DARK
The Ubyssey also asked students if they
had been sufficiently informed about bus
changes, road closures, event and celebration locations and times and their rights.
The majority of students thought they had
received a reasonable or high quantity of
information about the Games. But 41.6 per
cent were left in the dark, saying they had
received little or no infomation. "w
The Ubyssey's poll consisted of 14 questions and was applied to 156 student respondents from locations across campus.
—with Paul Bucci Graphics and files from
Celestian Rince, Amrita Parmar, Hannah
Lorena and Joanna Chiu
LSAT MCAT
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• Personal Tutoring Available
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminars.ca
Exploring the Quaker Way.
Come to an introductory
meeting.
Every Tuesday, 7:00-8:00 pm, 1090
West 70th Ave, Vancouver.
Information: Inessa, 604-435-3112
Send us letters about
your concerns, your
opinions, your cat and
whatever else you can
think of.
feedback@ubyssey. ca

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