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The Ubyssey Apr 13, 2015

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  // Page 2
EVENTS        II THISWEEK, CHECK!
MONDAY   ' 13
COMPOSERS' CONCERT
7:30 P.M. @ BARNETT HALL
Featuring some of U BC's best and brightest musical talent, take a chance to
relax before exams start by listening to performances by student musicians
and composers. Free
TUESDAY
TERM TWO EXAMS START
8:30 A.M.@ UBC
It's the most wonderful time ofthe year. Load up on your favourite caffeinated
beverages and get ready to hit the books to make up for that not-so-great
midterm grade you received. The cost of your tuition.
WEDNESDAY
' 15
m
SBSSSHf
?
|
1
■
\ t
VIRTUAL REALITY
12:00 -1:00 P.M. @ NEVILLE SCARFE
As part of the Technology in Transit series, the Faculty of Education will be
giving a demonstration of Google's Cardboard virtual reality technology. If it
lets us escape the grim reality of our basement office, we're on board. Free
ON
THE
COVER
I got so, so funky.
- Photo Cherihan Hassun
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*w
^^*f^  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
APRIL.13,2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEL
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OUR CAMPUS //
ONEONONEWITHTHEPEC
_E AND BUILDINGSTHAT MAKE UBC
=HOTOTIM HOGGAN/THE UBYSSEY
English literature and microbiology major AI Shaibani is one of the most involved people on campus.
Al-Hassan AI Shaibani is UBC's Renaissance Man
Leo Soh
Senior StaffWriter
A degree from UBC consolidates
years of study at the institution.
For Al-Hassan Al Shaibani, however, receiving his degree will
also signify the end of five years
of intense involvement with the
campus community.
Al Shaibani hails from Baghdad, Iraq, and is now completing
his final year of study at UBC.
However, he has spent time in
various countries around the
world, and considers himself a
truly global citizen.
"Growing up, I didn't spend
more than two years in one
country. I was always moving
around, and got to experience a
lot of international places. I also
picked up a few languages along
the way."
There were a few
things I needed to do
before I graduate in
/ order to feel complete."
Al-Hassan Al Shaibani
Fifth-year microbiology and
English literature student
Jordan, Panama, Switzerland,
South Africa and Dubai are
some ofthe places Al Shaibani
has spent time in. Having
completed high school in Dubai,
Al Shaibani spent a gap year in
Montreal and came to UBC.
"Before coming here, I had no
idea what I wanted to study, but
I did know I was interested in
biology. I entered the Faculty of
Land and Food Systems studying animal biology, and going
into vet school was my intention." But BIOL 112 influenced
Al Shaibani to such a degree
that he decided to change majors.
"I just realized that I love
viruses and bacteria."
However, Al Shaibani's
academic interests diversified
in second year, and he is now
graduating with a double-major degree in microbiology and
English literature.
For Al Shaibani, the 2014/15
academic year has been what
students affectionately refer to
as a 'victory lap', a year spent
studying at UBC for more than
purely academic reasons. "There
were a few things I needed to do
before I graduate in order to feel
complete."
That Al Shaibani felt certain
tasks were left unfulfilled at
the end of his fourth year is
quite ironic. During his time
at UBC, Al Shaibani has been
extremely involved.
I have 42 ties, but I
never wear ties, and I
have 13 bow-ties."
It all began in first year, when
Al Shaibani was a first year living on campus.
"Coming into Vancouver
not knowing anyone was sort
of scary. And so I found that
community a really helpful and
positive one."
Al Shaibani wanted to become
more involved with the residence
community and applied to be a
residence advisor. He spent his
second and third years as an RA
at Vanier, and his fourth year
as a senior residence advisor at
Walter Gage Residence.
"Through becoming involved
with residence, I became involved with a few other things
along the way. One ofthe things
was the Student Leadership
Conference." In his third year, Al
Shaibani was a part ofthe planning committee, and returned
in his fourth year to manage
the conference logistics. This
year, Al Shaibani served as the
co-chair, heading the planning
committee.
A recent involvement for Al
Shaibani has been the Collegia
program, the 'home of commuter
students.' "I thought that since
it's my fifth year and I wanted it to be a little different, I
decided to live off campus. And
so I thought, 'I'm a commuter
student, and I want to work with
commuters,' and so I became a
Collegia advisor."
Al Shaibani has also been
instrumental in turning the Bike
Rave into an annual tradition
at UBC. "It's a rave that moves
around campus on bikes with
lights and glowsticks and music.
It all ends at the Buchanan
courtyard where we have a dance
party." This year's Bike Rave 3.0,
delayed until April 9 due to rain,
was the biggest ever.
Although Al Shaibani greets
many people while walking
through the streets of UBC, not
all of them are acquaintances
acquired through involvements.
Instead, most of them stop to ask
Al Shaibani why he has donned a
bow tie on a seemingly innocuous
school day. The answer is simple:
Al Shaibani always wears a bow tie.
"It started as this random thing;
it became a sort of a signature. It's
one of those things that gets people
to start conversations [... and]
opens up so many more conversations." His closet now incorporates
many, many bow ties. "I have 42
ties, but I never wear ties, and I
have 13 bow-ties."
One ofthe most important
things that Al Shaibani has learned
at UBC is that the right balance
of school and life is integral to
success. "You cannot manage
your time, you can only manage
yourself. UBC as a university has
an equal focus on learning inside
the classroom and learning outside
the classroom. There are things
that I did outside the classroom
where I gained skills I would
have never otherwise learned.
... Public speaking, presentation
or how to plan an event... are
really key skills that will help
me later on that I don't think
memorizing microbes would
have helped."
Another factor that shaped
Al Shaibani's degree has been
the people he has encountered
at UBC. "I'm leaving with
this whole set of friends that I
wouldn't be able to imagine my
degree without. I think it would
have been very easy to go into
my faculty, do my major, get to
know my classmates, and leave.
But through doing involvements
and working on campus, you get
to know people who are so, so
weird and random and different
from you, and I love that."
Al Shaibani left this advice
to students looking to get as
involved as him.
"Apply for everything. Go put
your name out there. There are
a lot of people applying for different positions around campus,
so it does get competitive, but
if you apply for everything you
will end up with something." Xi // News
BUISNESS BLUES »
EDITOR VERONIKA BONDARENKO
MONDAY,APRIL13,2015
CRIME »
Schedule changes may cause Sauder
students to take Friday classes
starting in September
I'.Sl'.lL
FILE PHOTO NADYA RAHMANfTHE UBYSSEY
Sauder students might have to take Friday classes like everyone else.
Joshua Azizi
Senior StaffWriter
Some Sauder students will
soon have to give up their
no-class Fridays.
Previously, Sauder classes
were scheduled twice a week on
either Mondays and Wednesdays
or Tuesdays and Thursdays. Due
to scheduling changes, there
will now also be courses that
meet twice a week on either
Mondays and Fridays or Wednesdays and Fridays starting in
September 2015.
By adding classes on Fridays,
Sauder is aiming to optimize
classroom space within the
Henry Angus building, as well as
accommodate for the continuing
growth ofthe Commerce faculty.
"Our programs have been
growing over the years, and we
are essentially running out of
classroom space" said Pamela
Lin, Sauder Undergraduate Pro
gram assistant dean and director.
"By scheduling classes to include
Fridays, it allows us to increase
capacity by about 25 per cent."
Lin also said that the scheduling of Friday classes means that
fewer courses will be scheduled
on evenings and weekends.
Additionally, the new scheduling
doesn't restrict Sauder students
from taking certain electives and
arranging their schedules to not
have class on certain days.
"If students think 'oh I'm
just going to try to avoid taking
classes on Fridays,' then they'll
probably not look at any electives
that meet on Monday-Wednesday-Fridays," said Lin.
By including Friday classes,
this can increase Commerce
student initiatives to take electives with Friday classes. That
said, the inclusion of Friday
classes could be disruptive for
students who could use the extra
day for schoolwork, projects,
extracurricular activities or
family time.
"Sauder students are very busy
and they have so many commitments, so Friday was just a really
great day to get things done,"
said second-year Sauder student
Tina Tsai. "In Sauder there are
group projects, and people have
different schedules. It's very
hard to find a time and a day to
meet up together to work on our
projects, so having the whole
Friday to work on our projects
together was really convenient."
Still, Tsai pointed out that
the revised schedules can be of
some benefit.
"I think they made the change
so that it fits people's schedules
better," she said. "There are a
lot of students and different conflicting schedules."
Accordingto second-year
Sauder student Kimberly Wong,
the addition of Friday classes
might also be problematic for
students who used the extra
Friday and Thursday nights to
attend networking events.
"There were conferences
where I would go to if it was on
Friday and that was kind of nice.
I didn't have to worry about
other courses being in the way,
or missing them," said Wong. "If
there's a big networking event
or something they wanted a lot
of students to go to, then they'd
know they're not crushing half
the student's dreams."
As a result ofthe scheduling
change, events such as conferences, networking events or
non-academic programming may
have to be pushed into the evenings or weekends.
Despite this, Wong pointed
out that the inclusion of Friday
classes may be beneficial for
students who had to take classes
from other faculties on Fridays
anyway. tJ
Dead body found on Norman
McKenzie House property
RCMP calls death suspicious
PHOTO KOSTAPRODANOVICfTHE UBYSSEY
A body was found on the property of UBC President Arvind Gupta.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
The RCMP have called the
death of a man found on
campus suspicious.
At 12:30 p.m. on April 9,
the RCMP found the body of
a dead man on the property of
the Norman McKenzie House,
which is the residence of UBC
president Arvind Gupta. The
name or age ofthe man have not
been released.
The Norman McKenzie House
is located on Northwest Marine
Drive, next to the UBC Museum
of Anthropology, and occupies a
fairly large part ofthe University
Endowment Lands.
Barry Eccleton, Director
of Campus Security, said that
the RCMP was continuing the
investigation to find out the de
tails surrounding the death and
directed all questions to them.
"The RCMP are on scene, are
investigating it," said Eccleton.
"A bit more info will come."
Accordingto RCMP Corporal
Brenda Winpenny, a release that
describes the details ofthe death
will be available once the investigators determine the cause
of death.
"The investigators have
deemed the death suspicious in
nature and have solicited the assistance ofthe Lower Mainland
Specialized Units to assist with
the investigation," said Win-
penny in a media release.
President Gupta is currently
on a trip to China that is meant
to attract more international
students to UBC. Winpenny said
that the death was not related to
the president's family. Xi
Want to cover the news? Senc
cin email. news@ubyssey.ca
THEFT»
Agora Cafe raising funds after break-in that caused $685 in stolen funds
Wei
HOURS   OF
^30-^00
Agora is a student-run, non-profit cafe located in the Macmillan building.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNTHE UBYSSEY
Agora Cafe is planning to increase
their security after a break-in that
occurred during Easter Weekend.
On Tuesday, April 7, Agora Cafe's
finance manager came in for her
shift after the long weekend. Upon
entering the organic cafe in the
basement of Macmillan Building,
she discovered that the all the doors
were unlocked and that the locks on
the lockers were missing. A total of
$685 was stolen from the restaurant.
Accordingto Katie Mack, general
manager of Agora Cafe, two out of
the four lockers contained money in
them. One had the daily cash flow of
$100 while the other had envelopes
with $500 of extra funds to which
only the finance manager has
access. The thief also took $60 from
the cash exchange, but did not touch
the cash register or the tip jar.
"The total money that was stolen
was $685, although, unusually, they
left our tip jar," said Mack. "We had
a bunch of change in it, I guess they
didn't want the change."
After the break-in was discovered, Agora's staff called Campus
Security and the RCMP. Mack also
said that the RCMP found evidence
of forced entry, with crowbar marks
on the latch ofthe door.
Upon recommendations from
the RCMP, the staff is considering
installing a deadbolt and security
cameras. They are also no longer
storing money in the lockers.
"That was the big thing that the
RCMP told us that they wanted
us to do, to make sure just to deter
people from trying this again and
making the cafe itself more safe for
our volunteers again," said Mack.
"Knowing that it can be easily
broken into is kind of scary."
Stephanie Goh, Agora's other
general manager, said that the cafe's
deficit budget will ensure that the
operational costs are covered, but
the loss has still been a setback for
the organic cafe.
"We're a non-for-profit, so all
ofthe workers are students and
volunteers, so all ofthe money we
make just goes towards things like
operations and the supplies that we
order for our function ofthe cafe,"
said Goh.
Both Mack and Goh suspect the
break-in to be an inside job, as someone would need to be very familiar
with the cafe's backroom and know
that the money was stored in the
lockers.
"We think that it was either
a volunteer with us or someone
that knew the cafe very well," said
Mack. "These are the only people
that could have broken in and
would have left the cash register
untouched."
Agora has a total of over 70
volunteers working at the cafe
throughout the year. During the
month before the break-in, $20
would also consistently go missing
from the daily revenue twice a
week and had stopped once the
staff changed the locks on the
finance locker.
Barry Eccleton, Director of
Campus Security, confirmed
that a break-in had occurred and
that the RCMP were looking into
the investigation.
"It was discovered on Tuesday morning when the staff
returned," said Eccleton. "There
were some lockers that were
broken into and an amount of
cash that went missing."
Mack also said that Agora's
staff have started a GoFundme
campaign to recuperate some
ofthe losses and have already
raised over $400 in funds, mostly
from members ofthe Agora community. Xi NEWS    I    MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015
ACTIVISM »
Students stage sit-in to draw attention to sexual assault, rape culture
Students sat out on the top floor of Koerner's Library to express their frustration with the university's response and education around sexual assault.
Mateo Ospina
Senior StaffWriter
A group of students organized a
sit-in protest to draw atttention
to the issue of sexual assault
on campus.
On Friday, April 8, the administration met with dozens of
students outside of UBC president Arvind Gupta's office on the
seventh floor of Koerner Library
for the "SIT IN AT UBC: Acknowledge Rape Happens" event.
Members ofthe Women's
Centre and other UBC activist
groups marched from the SUB to
the president's office in Koerner
Library in order to share their
grievances about how the university handles education around
sexual assault.
Leaders ofthe Women's Centre
collective began by explaining
their frustration at current campaigns around sexual assault such
as the Don't Walk Alone posters
that have been put up throughout
the university.
"We're sick and tired ofthe
same old trite rhetoric of don't
walk alone," said one ofthe collective's representatives.
In President Gupta's absence
due to a trip to China, the university sent UBC VP Students, Louise
Cowin, to address the students'
concerns.
"The university would like to
work with you in cooperation and
collaboration to ensure that your
needs are met," said Cowin. "We
have made significant efforts to
create, to identify and educate on
what sexual assault is."
Cowin's speech, focusing on
the unity between students with
a desire to bring change and the
university's willingness to act,
was met with criticism from
student leaders.
Kelly Gerlings, a fourth-year
Arts student, recalled her involvement with the IAmAStudent
movement, where the university
outwardly stated that they were
willing to work with students
while none ofthe needs were
actually met.
"They are not connected to the
student experience whatsoever.
They don't see us, they don't hear
us," Gerlings said. "I'm not convinced the university will actually
do anything."
As with UBC's response to student concerns about tuition and
residence fee increases, many of
the students felt neglected by how
the university attempts to combat
the issue of sexual assault on
campus. They wanted to be more
involved in the decision-making
and consultation processes when
it comes to policy changes.
This year the students assembled a list of specific goals they
wanted the administration to
address. These include funding
for an independent sexual assault
survivors group and increased
training for residence advisors
and Frosh leaders.
Emily Monaghan, a second-
year Arts student, believes that
the Women's Centre has learned
from their past experiences with
activism and communication with
the administration.
"Last year we wanted to
exert our rage collectively, we
wanted to create visibility," said
Monaghan, ofthe protests that
occurred following the string of
sexual assaults on campus in the
fall of 2013. "This is specifically
addressing the administration.
We narrowed our scope, our
reach was more direct and coming with a clear list of demands is
more productive that way."
Throughout the morning,
students met the administration's
rhetoric of meetings and working
together with requests for specific dates and promises from the
university.
Students also criticized UBC's
policies on the education around
sexual assault and their attempts
to claim a campus safety that does
not align with the experiences of
students.
Alexis Wolfe, a second-year
Arts student, said that the university's emphasis on how safe the
campus is does not line up with
the sexual assault statistics.
"The university is creating
a product to sell to women's
parents," said Wolfe. "It's very
clear that they're trying to sell
this package of safety, that sexual
assault is on the decline. It's not
true, women don't feel like they
can go anywhere."
Members ofthe Women's
Centre collective also pointed out
that during many first year orientations, there will be discussions
about safe sex and distribution of
condoms and lubricants, but less
emphasis placed on educating
students about what constitutes
sexual assault and where to
report it.
The Women's Centre hopes to
push the university to address
these issues by lobbying for
self-defence training for women
and LGBTQ students and providing education sessions.
Anne Kessler, the outgoing
AMS VP academic, came to the
=HOTO VICTOR HOGREFEfTHE UBYSSEY
event to observe the discussion.
She also mentioned that the AMS
supports student movements and
their right to address the administration.
"As a current exec on AMS
I think that [sexual assault] is
something we should be talking
about," said Kessler.
Student activists noted that
one difficulty in getting the
attention ofthe university lies
in the fact that the majority of
students rarely appeal to the administration for change. Though
some mentioned that the administration's will to listen should
not be based on the numbers of
students that appear at events,
many expressed their desire
to see a future where activist
groups collaborate in order to
create stronger coalitions.
Gerlings also said that student
activists hope to see greater
numbers and more support from
their campus in addressing student issues in the coming year,
with resource groups and student
activism networks assisting
one another.
"We need to get more people
together," said Gerlings. "Then,
we can bring everyone together
and keep that pressure on the
university." Xi
MEDICINE »
Pilot project for free, on-site oral cancer testing comes to select pharmacies
=HGTO KOSTAPRODANOVICfTHEUBYSSEY
UBC Dentistry and London Drugs are trying to bring oral cancer screening to pharmacies.
Emma Partridge
StaffWriter
Members of UBC Dentistry have
helped a unique cancer screening
pilot project become a reality.
London Drugs is launching a
project that will allow pharmacy
customers to be screened on site
for oral cancer. The program will
use visually enhanced lesion scope
(VELscope) technology to look for
possible abnormalities.
"The VELscope essentially is
used as a way, akin to enhancepng]
the vision," said Samson Ng, a
clinical assistant professor at UBC
Dentistry. "It's essentially just an
additional tool to highlight the
area of potential problems."
Ng has helped London Drugs
define the parameters ofthe
program in terms of what needs to
be done logistically and administratively. Other UBC Dentistry
students and hygienists will be
aiding with the screening itself.
"We're helping provide some
volunteers to assist with the
screening, so these are graduate
dental hygienists or dental hygiene
students from UBC," said Denise
Laronde, an assistant professor at
UBC Dentistry,
The VELscope technology emits
a bright light when inspecting the
mouth. Healthy tissue will appear
bright green while unhealthy
spots will appear darker and start
to glow when there is potential
problem. The screenings will be
available to all, but will mainly
target patients who are at higher
risk of developing oral cancer.
"They would target patients
who are at risk," said Ng. "Because,
in [a] pharmacy setting, they know
quite a bit about the patient's history, the medical history."
Laronde also said that, as
helpful as the technology is,
these on-site screenings are not
a comprehensive cancer assessment and VELscope alone is not
a diagnostic tool. In cases where
cancer is suspected, the patient
will be referred elsewhere for
further examination.
"It's by no means diagnostic,"
said Laronde. "In some cases
it'll help [clinicians] maybe with
their decision-making on whether that person has to be referred
forward for further follow up."
Accordingto Ng, one of
the main benefits of doing this type of screening is
increased awareness.
"Our hope is, through the activity, to enhance the public awareness of oral cancer and also as a
channel to explore or to discuss
about the risk factor reduction
with the patient," said Ng.
As with any cancer, early detection results in better outcomes
for the patients. Oral surgery to
remove the cancer once it has
progressed can be debilitating.
Awareness ofthe disease and its
symptoms is therefore key, given
that the Canadian Cancer Society
statistics estimate that that
around 4,300 Canadians will be
diagnosed with oral cancer this
year.
"Raising awareness is very
important because, you know,
not a lot of people know about
oral cancer," said Laronde. "I've
had people say, I didn't know you
could get cancer in the mouth."
If the pilot goes well, the
project will be expanded from
approximately 18 London Drugs
pharmacies in B.C. to the rest of
the country. Xi // Opinions
^
LAST WORDS//
THE END OF AN ERA
It's Wednesday night, you're already
tired of school and it's too far away
from Friday, it's exchange night for
the Greeks and you are really craving a cheap T-Bird lager. Perfectly
situated on campus, the Pit has
always seemed like such a perfect
place to wind down after a hard
Monday and Tuesday.
For the last two years I have
gone to the Pit almost every single
Wednesday. In all that time, there
have been certain things that I have
noticed remain pretty consistent:
- You can never have a beer at the
pit without spilling at least a little
bit of it.
- The closer you are to the pillar
on the dance floor, the closer you are
NATALIE MORRIS
Advice Columnist
"I keep getting emails about
course evaluations. Is this even
necessary? It doesn't make sense
that we can't fill them out after
final exams, so what's the point?"
If you have a TA, sessional instructor or new professor, these
course evaluations are actually extremely important to their career
at UBC. These course evaluations
are a good indication for their
department on how they are doing,
how the students feel about them
and if they should be hired on
again. Your reporting bad teachers
and classes really help the department decide what is working and
what (or who) isn't.
As for professors, if may seem like
the decision to keep them is already
made, but professors that are hired
for teaching rather than research
are more influenced by these evaluations than you think. There are
bonuses and raises that are heavily
dependent on their teaching evaluations. Research-focused professors
are subject to this as well. Even if
they are on contract, your input has
real effects on your professor.
That being said, even if you
don't have strong opinions about
your professors or TAs either way,
just filling out the evaluations says
something to the department. I've
heard before that the completion
rate for classes average at about 20
per cent. That's not great.
So fill out your evaluations, even
if you're pissed that you can't put
any information about the final
exam, which is understandable.
But let's be honest, would you
really fill the evaluation after you
finished your class? No — if you're
anything like me, you purge your
mind after finals. I try to never
think about how my classes went
after exams, so my evaluation
wouldn't be any use — if I managed to force myself to fill them
out. n
to hooking up with someone.
- The T-Bird lager makes you feel
like pit in the morning.
- DJ Good Spin playing the same
playlist EVERY GOD DAMN TIME
(this includes Ignition, Don't Stop
Believing and Get Low)
- Waiting just as long in the beer
line as you did to get in.
And that's just to name a few.
Last Wednesday as I walked up
the stairs to the smokers pit and left
the music fading behind me it finally
hit me that this might actually be
the real LAST last Pit Night in the
old sub. By atwist of fate, just a week
before I had met the AMS president
from the year 1962, the one responsible for the beginning ofthe Pit
era. Talking to him about how it all
started and in exchange me telling
ILLUSTRATIONJULIANYUfTHE UBYSSEY
i phones (pavement has a tendency       j
i to do that), there were no major          !
1  problems. The acts ranged from          j
1  adequate to outstanding. Though       j
1 people weren't thrilled about the
1  cold, it seemed that by the end ofthe   ]
1  night, the combination of dancing,      ]
; thousands of bodies packed together ]
; in front ofthe stage and the cheerful  ]
|  atmosphere meant that people came   j
l to embrace the drenched clothes as    j
1 part ofthe experience.                        j
We were particularly impressed     j
j  by Tokyo Police Club and Yukon         j
I  Blonde's performances, with the
i  latter proving more successful than    j
i  many of its counterparts from previ-   i
i  ous years in drawing people toward   |
i  the stage quite early on in the night,    j
All-in-all, despite being held in a     j
i  parking lot and having had pretty       j
|  awful luck with the weather, the 8th  j
1  Annual Block Party was a night to       1
| remember (though for a few, pos-       j
1  sibly a night they want to forget).
HE UBYSSEY EDITORIAL BOARD                          1
him how it was now showed me
just how much the Pit has shaped
the social lives of UBC students.
The Pit has offered many great
memories and horrible mornings,
but I'm not going to lie I am absurdly excited for a new Pit with
sky lights.
i OUR RESIDENT SAUDER
I STUDENT ON FRIDAY
! CLASSES
!  NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO     !
I  OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!    j
1  WHYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY?!"     j
BLOCK PARTY WAS WET,
BUT WILD
! COUNCIL SQUABBLES
j  If the last AMS Council meet-           j
|  ing showed us anything, it's that       j
i the society's entire executive            j
|  evaluation system is one hot and      j
1  unprofessional mess. After Presi-      1
1  dent Tanner Bokor was formally       j
1 reprimanded for an agitated phone  j
call he made to members ofthe
;  Oversight Committed, he forfeited   ]
; his share of the PAI allocation and   j
The weather for Friday's Block
Party was less-than-ideal, with grey
skies, chilling winds and frequent
showers marring an otherwise
cheerful occasion.
Overall, though, the event ran
smoothly — from what we could
see — and other than a higher-
than-usual incidence of shattered
asked to withdraw from the performance evaluation that comes
with it. Council denied his request
on grounds that executives should
not be able to just opt out ofthe
evaluation by refusing their bonus.
So many problems, so little space.
Despite what some ofthe Councillors have said, the current PAI allocation is meant strictly to distribute
bonus money by looking at how the
executives have reached their goals.
While we agree that people who
hold public office should not be able
to drop out of a performance review,
PAI should also not be the only way
to examine performance. If the
sole way that the AMS is holding its
executives accountable is through
this pot of $5,000, it's clear that
something needs to change. Here's a
particularly wild idea: independent
reviews at other times in the year.
But can we also talk about the
fact that members ofthe Oversight
Committee (as in, other Councillors)
will be evaluating the performance
ofthe execs and distributing PAI
allocations? Peer review is important, of course, but the fact that it is
the only type of evaluation the execs
go through only serves to hammer
home the need for professional
reviews that are independent of
bonuses. As has been seen in several past years, the risk of personal
politics and intra-Council pettiness
coming into play rises substantially
when you have students evaluating
other students and the possibility
of getting a larger share of $5,000
dangling over executive's heads.
We hope this is not what provincial and federal politics is like, but
we are also not holding our breath in
the expectation. tJ
2015 METRO VANCOUVER
TRANSPORTATION AND
TRANSIT PLEBISCITE
Elections BC is administering the vote-by-mail
plebiscite from March 16 to May 29, 2015.
You can vote if you are:
■ A Canadian citizen
■ 18 years of age or older, on or before May 29, 2015
■ A resident of B.C. for at least six months, on or before May 29, 2015
■ Registered to vote in B.C.
■ Living in Metro Vancouver
You can ask for a voting package to be mailed to you by calling
1-800-661-8683 or online at elections.be.ca/ovr. You can ask for
a voting package until midnight on Friday, May 15, 2015.
Elections BC must receive your completed ballot package before 8 p.m.
on Friday, May 29, 2015.
Visit elections.be.ca or call 1-800-661-8683 for more information.
elections.be.ca
1-800-661-8683
^ELECTIONS BC
^SSr   A non-partisan Office of the Legislature 6    I    FEATURE    I    MONDAY, APRIL 13,2015
AMS STUDENT NEST
An in-depth insight into what really contributed to the long delays in the building's construction.
CO
O m
xO
MICHAEL  KINGSMILL
AMS DESIGNER
"It was a combination
of functionality, cost
of renovation, and
what would happen
to the society during
the renovation."
THE QUESTION
Barring any new setbacks, the new
SUB, formally named the AMS
Student Nest, will be opening
before summer is upon us. So, how
has the AMS financed the project,
what were the setbacks really all
about and is the Nest going to live
up to expectations?
FINANCES
With the building lifespan ofthe
current SUB drawing to a close,
the AMS had three options moving
forwards: full renovation ofthe
existing SUB; part renovation
and part expansion into University Square; or the construction
of a new building on University
Square. The cost for each option
was roughly the same, and the
AMS Council unanimously agreed
upon the third option in 2008. According to AMS Designer Michael
Kingsmill, "It was a combination
of functionality, cost of renovation
and what would happen to the
society during the renovation."
THE PLAN
The passing of a student referendum in April 2008 allowed for an
incremental increase in student
fees to raise the $80 million
needed for the project. The AMS
was then able to move forward and
develop the detailed program and
design for the new SUB project,
and complete a set of legal documents with UBC.
THE BUDGET
$80 mil from student fees - given to UBC Properties Trust
- Protected pools of money for AMS use - AMS Cost Centres
- $80 yearly fee per student starting in 2008
- Increments start when building opens (+$10/yr) and cap at $100
L Money initially loaned from UBC at 5.75 per cent interest
$25-26 million in donations from UBC
- Any additional donations do not increase the total budget; goes
- towards repaying the university's donation MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015    |    FEATURE
.OOKING FORWARD
Inspired by Build Simon Fraser
University's implementation of
external funding, the AMS is
exploring options that will decrease overall costs of building the
new SUB.
According to AMS VP Admin
Ava Nasiri, transferring the AMS's
loan from UBC to an external
bank, such as BMO or TD could
decrease the interest on the $80
million loan from the current 5.75
per cent to 3-4 per cent, which
over the decades could save the
AMS anywhere from $6-26 million. Nothing has been confirmed,
but the AMS is striving to improve
funding options.
DELAYS
With so much custom design,
minor changes have a huge impact
on the overall momentum ofthe
project. The construction teams
are working at full capacity, but
there is a shortage of specialized teams and several setbacks
with potentially high costs have
limited progress.
Although there has been comprehensive coverage ofthe delays
themselves, the public has not
been offered a narrative of what's
been going on behind the scenes.
CONSTRUCTION STRUCTURE
Many students blame the AMS for
the delays, but the internal structure ofthe project team is much
more complicated.
The AMS are in conversation
with the UBC Properties Trust
(UBC PT), who maintains direct
contact with DIALOG (design &
coordination) and BIRD Construction, who are responsible for
the management ofthe dry wall,
electrical, and construction
teams.
Due to the unique nature ofthe
Student Nest, many of DIALOG'S
designs cannot be implemented
directly, and the construction
team constantly finds themselves
needing to make minor changes
to the design. The problem, then,
is that every one of these changes
needs to be approved by the AMS
and the UBC PT, and this causes
huge delays in construction. To
quote VP Admin Nasiri, "It is a
cancer that won't go away."
The construction team is now
getting ready for the occupancy
walkthrough, planned for end of
April. AMS Designer Kingsmill
likens the preparation to studying
for an exam. Pre-walkthroughs
include testing the smoke evacuation system by setting off a smoke
bomb in the Agora. If the occupancy walkthrough is successful,
the AMS will acquire a certificate
of occupancy and they will be able
to finally open the Student Nest.
The AMS Student Nest features
a significant amount of wood
finishing, and several construction
delays have occurred due to the
complexity of implementing them.
>
WE'VE WAITED AND
WAITED; IT HAD BETTER
BE GOOD.
Despite the numerous disappointments, the building itself
is truly exciting. The AMS Student Nest hopes to deliver a fresh
SUB experience for students with
five floors, each with a distinct
identity. The lower floors provide
public space for general use, and
the upper floors feature spaces
for more exclusive use.
BASEMENT — CONCOURSE
AND THE PIT
The Nest's design allows for so
much natural light that students
many not even notice that this is
the basement floor, but it is definitely below ground level. This
level has the Agora, the main
concourse, and is a place to chill,
eat and mingle.
The new Pit, which has been
completely revamped into a
lounge/nightclub and given
skylights, will also be located
here. With TV's in every stall and
a large media wall, or a mural-
sized TV, the Pit has been given
a definite upgrade. Skylights
provide natural lighting to the
new Pit, and will contribute to
the fresh atmosphere.
The basement and level one
host the food outlets. The variety
of foods has improved, and the
businesses have transformed into
avant-garde fast-casual dining
experiences. Furthermore, all of
them, including the Perch, will
be accepting the UBC Card as a
form of payment.
Another cool feature will
be Timber the tree, which will
interact with its environment by,
for example, drooping its branches during quiet times and spreading its arms during busier hours.
This floor will also house the
Clubs Resource and Sustainability Centre, which will be the
pinnacle of sustainability in the
Student Nest.
By teaching students and clubs
more sustainable practices and
through programs such as equipment rentals for clubs, the CRSC
will hopefully raise the already
high standards for sustainability
at UBC.
LEVEL ONE — SPY ON THE
BASEMENT OR LOOK UP AT
THE NEST
This floor offers a view down into
the Agora, and also features some
concourse space, where students
will be able to hang out, eat
and study.
Level One will also be the new
home of AMS services Speakeasy
and Safewalk, as well as the campus radio, CiTR.
As the Basement and Level One
host the food outlets, expect heavy
traffic on these floors during
lunchtime. But don't fret; live
music will be playing, so waiting
in line for lunch should be more
enjoyable in the Student Nest.
LEVEL TWO - REVAMPED
MULTI-PURPOSE SPACE
With large bookable rooms, the
Great Hall, the AMS Performance Centre and various other
multi-purpose spaces, this floor
will serve as the main level for
events of all sizes.
The Art Gallery will be renamed
the Hatch and moved to this level
inthenewSUB.
Fins on the Nest (October 2014-)
The fins on the outer surface ofthe AMS Performance Centre have
contributed significantly to delays. According to Nasiri, the construction
team faced a potential $500,000 overage in implementing these, and were
forced to change their approach. The fins are now being machine-built and
finished by hand. Each fin requires three to four lifts to install, which only
adds to the difficulty. Kingsmill described the issues further, "the height of
the ceiling made it impossible to work on ladders, so we've had to work on
scissor lifts and on boom cranes." Due to these complexities, construction
has been moving ata snail's pace.
Wood Inset Stairs (December 2014-)
The stairs in the basement ofthe Student Nest were initially designed to
have wooden tips, but this led to complications. Extra effort would be necessary in molding the cement portions ofthe stairs in order to fit the wood
inset design, and this could have led to an additional cost of $60,000.
The main contribution to delays was the sheer amount of coordination
required to implement changes. As Kingsmill describes, "Every change
order has a flow, and that flow takes it across many people's desks."
After much consultation, the AMS and UBC Properties Trust decided
to use plywood. Accordingto Kingsmill, "It'll be much more expedient in
terms ofthe hours involved and the amount and type of materials."
Fire Safety Consultation (March 2015)
Due to a discrepancy between the plans that had previously been laid
out for fire sprinklers and the consultant's interpretation of the fire code
during a recentwalkthrough ofthe building, a late-April/early-May opening
of the AMS Student Nest has been jeopardized. A small issue like this is
more harmful than it seems as it inhibits the management from resolving
largerissues.
The delays have been extremely frustrating notonlyfor students, but
for all parties involved, especially the AMS. The first delay in construction
pushed the opening date to January 5, a date the construction teams were
fully confident would work. When they received a notice of delay in October, the AMS were extremely disappointed. Nasiri said, "we were crushed; it
was a lot to digest for the AMS."
The earliest possible opening date, accordingto Nasiri, is sometime in
mid-May. However, the AMS is hoping to give students the opportunity to
tour the Student Nest during and after finals and the construction teams are
prioritizing the completion of public spaces over areas for more exclusive
use, such as the AMS Council Chambers and the Perch. Exactly when the
Student Nest will be ready to open its doors is unclear, but it may finally be
time to put away our cynicism and get excited for the new SUB.
The Ubyssey's new office will
also be on this floor, meaning
the editors will finally be able to
intake Vitamin D at work.
Students will be happy to find
seven pocket lounges dispersed
throughout the building on levels
two to three. Each pocket lounge
features a unique theme (e.g.
music/hi-tech) and has a sink,
couches and other useful utilities.
LEVEL 3 - AMS AND CLUBS
Lots of current club offices are
dismal places, and many clubs are
looking forward to an upgrade.
This floor is exactly that. With
several clusters of club offices,
each connected with a common
lounge space, this floor will definitely improve the quality of life for
many club executives. The addition of what Kingsmill describes as
"a truckload of new club lockers"
will help as well. Level 3 also houses the AMS governance offices.
LEVEL4-FINE DINING,
LONG MEETINGS AND A
ROOFTOP GARDEN
The only drawback to the design
of this floor is that, to get to the
beautiful rooftop garden and
Perch restaurant, you have to
climb up five flights of stairs. Or, if
you detest walking, take one ofthe
three beautiful glass elevators.
In case you missed it, yes, there
is a stunning rooftop garden.
Kingsmill said, "It was almost like
how could we not come up with the
idea. Rooftop gardens are the soup
de soir of sustainable buildings."
Students may want to join the
Rooftop Garden Club and supply the Perch with (very) locally
grown ingredients.
Many students will likely find
themselves on this floor enjoying
the view, possibly dropping in on
meetings held in the Forum, the
AMS's new council chambers, or
relaxing in the Grad Student Society lounge. Xi II Culture I
JENICA MONTGOMERY
Being alone at Block Party doesn't suck
Keagan Perlette
StaffWriter
Sometimes friends cancel on you.
Sometimes you're just awkward.
Sometimes you get a last minute
media pass and the event sold out
weeks ago and no one can get time
off work, so you have to go it alone.
I wasn't even planning on going
to Block Party, but there I was
watching the rain come down hard
on the bus windows as I rode to the
parking lot on Agronomy road, one
beer and one cooler in. I felt a vague
sense of dread: I would be alone, but
it was also raining, which meant
that perhaps everyone would leave
and there I would be, standing in
front of a huge stage, soaking wet,
tipsy and all by my tiny self.
When I got past the fence, I
wove my way into the VIP section,
furiously texting a friend who said
that she might be there. This is
nearly impossible at Block Party
because you can say "the tent" but
do you mean the first aid tent? The
beer tent? The sound board tent? I
couldn't get ahold of her, the other
impediment being borderline inebriation on both our parts. I grabbed
another beer and stood shyly with
some people I recognized and made
small talk.
A disgruntled acquaintance
poured his beer into mine and went
home. Suddenly, Tokyo Police Club
struck the first few chords of their
opening song and everyone crashed
towards the stage, hands in the air.
It wasn't hard for me to squeeze
my way in to the very, very front,
pressed tight against the barrier,
a whole sea of people pressing on
my back.
I've been waiting to see Tokyo
Police Club since I was 13 and I
was not disappointed. The two
girls next to me were clearly just as
enthralled. They sang every song
to each other at the top of their
lungs even though they were at the
mercy ofthe heaving crowd. TPC
didn't hold back. As the drizzle
continued to pour, their passionate performance kept everyone
dancing and singing along. David
Monks, lead singer and bassist
called out a guy in the front row
on his tank top. He was bringing
us the sun, we should all try to
be more like him, and the crowd
erupted in an impromptu chant
"TANK TOP GUY."
I watched a girl lose her shoe
as she was lifted into the hands
of a waiting security guard, and a
dude in a safari hat float over the
crowd. I hated to hear Monks say
that they only had one more song
for us, I wasn't ready to leave my
cozy spot at the front ofthe stage,
I wanted to feel the energy ofthe
crowd forever.
I pushed my way back out of
the crowd just in time to get a
FaceTime call from my friend who
I was supposed to meet. I couldn't
hear a word she was saying, but
just behind her was the purple
Super Thai food truck. Once we'd
hugged it out and purchased some
food, we wandered back over to
the stage. That Thai food was so
delicious that when a random girl
passed me in the crowd and asked
for a bite I was obligated to say yes.
Everyone should have tried that
Thai food.
The sky was turning to peachy
sunset and suddenly it was dark
and it was raining hard and
Chromeo was on and everyone was
dancing in one rain-soaked wave.
Plastic ponchos didn't stop people
from tangling themselves up in
one another. My glasses fogged up
and I couldn't see anything but the
coloured stage lights reflecting off
ofthe raindrops as they drenched
the crowd. I quickly lost my friend
in the frenzy and, of course, my
phone died. It wasn't hard to find
other people to dance with, everyone was all smiles and shouts and
open arms. Chromeo even played
their hit "Jealous" twice, although
don't quote me on that because by
that time I was too wrapped up
in dancing as hard as I could and
screaming lyrics to the blue and
red illuminated sky.
I was genuinely sad when the
crowd dissipated, the way home
was the worst part ofthe night.
"Jealous" was stuck in my head for
the rest ofthe night. As the streetlights passed on the bus ride back,
I realized that this was the only
time I felt alone all evening. Xi
Bowen and the Uproar performed
their biggest show yet
PHOTO COURTESY PATRICK GILLIN
Rain or shine, Bowen and the Uproar sought to bring great music to students.
Gabriel Germaix
Senior StaffWriter
"If the crowd is having a good
time, we are having the best time
on the planet," said Chris Goodwill, third-year English major and
guitarist of Bowen and the Uproar.
He made it clear that the collective
was a "live" band. Fortunately for
him and his fellow musicians, that
is exactly what was asked of them
when they performed at Block
Party.
Bowen and the Uproar got its
ticket to perform at Block Party
by winning this year's Last Band
Standing competition.
"On the final night, we ended
up winning the competition by
one vote, so it was very very
close," said Goodwill. The band
was created in the fall by merging musicians from two former
bands, Rebel on a Mountain and
Young Pacific.
The merger united two experiences of live music and the new
band quickly established its taste
for interactivity with the crowd.
"We like to include everyone, we
like to talk, we like to introduce
ourselves to the crowd," said
Goodwill. "I have never been in
a band like this before, where it
has been so much communication
with the people who are coming
to see the show."
The band's signature style has
to do with clap-along rhythms
and sing-along lyrics. "I would
definitely say it is quite "pop-y."
Of course we do not stick to the
standard pop song," he said. "We
include a lot of very melodic, catchy
vocals and lyrics." The six-piece
band includes a trumpet and a
keyboard to boost the traditional
"drummer, bassist, guitar, singer" formation, and hopes to make
people cheer no matter how early
they play or how bad the weather is.
The looming clouds could remind
people ofthe 2013 Block Party. But
in the eye of Goodwill, even the rain
can't stop students from having a
good time. He was in the crowd that
year, for his first Block Party.
"It was an example of very good
UBC school spirit. Everyone, despite
the bad weather, showed up, had
a great time.... To me it was the
launching point for the rest of my
UBC career." Xi
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=HOTOSCHERIHAN HASSUNfTHE UBYSSEY MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015    |    CULTURE
COMEDY »
THEATRE»
White Noise brings satire to CiTR
White Noise is on Saturdays from 8 p.m.-9 p.m.
Chole Lai
StaffWriter
After an intense debate, a Norwegian heavy-metal rocker turns into
a demon and devours his opponent.
The Chinese national soccer team
improves its game by allowing child
labourers to practice with the soccer balls they're manufacturing. An
Olympic team of corporate CEOs
goes for gold in the ultimate Union
Crushing event.
Confused? You need to tune in to
CiTR's satirical comedy show, White
Noise.
Hosted by the eccentric, fictitious
Richard Blackmore, voiced by UBC
undergrad and show creator Simon
Welton, White Noise features
"intentionally absurdist" sketches
designed to provoke conversations
about the real-world issues behind
the tropes it employs.
Welton, originally from England,
was drawn to Vancouver by its
thriving comedy community and
calls stand-up comedy "the greatest
drug you'll ever try."
But it wasn't enough. Chafing
against the limitations ofthe form
and determined to build a more
meaningful framework for his incisive sense of humour, Welton came
to UBC and enrolled in philosophy,
with a minor in psychology.
"The idea being that it covers the
human condition," he said, "so that
when I write, I have something to
say."
White Noise is built on Welton's
original content, and performed by
himself and his cast: Victoria Bass,
Marianna Mattes, Connor Nechelput and Sierra Wylie.
It is an unexpectedly diverse
group. Bass, for example, is a graduate of The Juilliard School and was
once a professional cellist. She now
conducts research in UBC's chemistry department while fulfilling the
prerequisites for her application to
medical school.
"I just decided to stop doing the
thing I happened to be good at, and
try to do the thing I actually wanted
to do," she said.
While Bass may be serious about
becoming a doctor, her love of
comedy is equally undeniable. She
and local improv actress Raquel
Belmonte host a podcast called
The Bacheloreats, in which local
improvisers and stand-up comics
are invited to dinner parties featuring unconventional food items.
Bass will also be performing in The
Imaginary Invalid, Moliere's famous
comedy, at the Jericho Arts Centre
this summer.
Mattes, who identifies herself
as "Aquarius sun, Libra moon,"
writes her own comics, and names
Louis CK as her favourite comedian, seems destined for a similarly
unpredictable career path. Although
her admission to UBC's BFA acting
program initially felt like the natural
choice for someone who had long
FILEPHOTOGEOFFLCTER
dreamed of being an actor, she finds
herself increasingly drawn to other
art forms.
"The more I make myself work at
theatre, the more I love visual arts,
music and film," she said. In a dubious British accent, she continued,
"White Noise has become a core
part of not only my shed-jool, but my
heart."
The show is divided into two
parts: the first half hour is filled
with sketches in the form of debates,
interviews with fictional characters
and sporting events. The second
half is billed as an after show, and
features interviews with cast members or local comedians. Anyone
considering a career in comedy will
find this portion particularly valuable, as it offers insider advice from
professionals and up-and-comers
on breaking into the scene, finding
good venues, personal philosophies
and anecdotes about life on tour.
Several big names have already
joined Welton in the booth, notably
Kelly Dyer and Ed Hill, the latter "
recently named "Best Vancouver
Comedian of 2015" by the West
Ender magazine. Byron Bertram,
another critically-acclaimed comic,
will be on the show in May.
With six gleefully irreverent and
surprisingly informative episodes
under its belt, and so much more
to come, White Noise may be just
the thing to keep you sane and silly
during the end ofthe semester. tJ
Love, Lust S Lace to
be performed to raise
funds for theatre trip
Jamie Dee
Contributor
Love, Lust £t Lace debuted back
in October with an astonishing
wave of positive feedback from
the audience. Now, the 2016 BFA
acting class is bringing the show
to Axis Theatre to raise funds for
the shows' performance at the
Edinburgh fringe Festival.
On stage April 24 and 25,
UBC's 2016 BFA acting class,
in collaboration with the Axis
Theatre's artistic director, Chris
McGregor, returns the heartening stories of love and friendship
for two very different sisters.
What started out as a mere
class project turned into one of
the greatest joys for the cast and
a memorable experience for the
audience. The performances are
heavily improvised allowing for
audience participation.
Elizabeth Willow, who portrays Columbina, conveys the
story came to life from "stalk
characters with set characteristics, movements and vocal
types," to characters with unique
personalities and relatable
experiences for the audience.
The story centres on two sisters,
Columbina dreaming of love
and family while the naughty
Smeraldina dreams of adventure and promiscuity. It tells the
story of ll Capitano's (Francis
Winter) struggle to win the heart
of Columbina and how Smeraldina (Selene Rose) and the
girls' father Pantalone (Meegin
Pye) have schemes to foil this
growing relationship.
"Two different desires that
anyone could have," said Willow
as she further explained how the
play touches on issues of sexuality and gender, with underlying
aspects of female liberation and
empowerment. This Commedia
dell'Arte performance is sure to
keep the audience laughing from
the clowned cast's performance
and "make people question on
judgments and why society assigns the label naughty and nice,"
said Willow. The performance
ends with a Burlesque number, choreographed by Kelsey
Ranshaw and Elizabeth Willow,
you're sure to enjoy.
The performance has been admitted to the Edinburgh Fringe
Festival for the summer of 2016
in Scotland. The April 24 and
25 performances will be held in
order to fundraise for that event
and to fund the cast's planned
Fringe tour across Canada, specifically in Victoria, Vancouver,
Edmonton and Montreal.
"Our arts are well-renowned
and very important and it's more
of getting UBC's name out there
as a theatre school," said Willow
when asked how this fundraiser
and the possibility of an across
Canada tour was important for
UBC's theatre department.
The fundraiser will host musical
performances by DJ Laz3rd, solo act
Baron Vaughn Swenson and the Car
Alarm Party band, featuring Nathan
Cottell. There will also be a 50/50
draw and a silent auction with awesome prizes, such as tickets to different theatre companies, art works
by Canadian artists, unlimited yoga
passes for a month and many more
the audience can bid on.
"It's one of those stories that is, as
much as it is a comedy and ridiculous, it's also very heartfelt," said
Willow. "People can just expect a
lot of laughs and genuine enjoyment
in two nights of music, theatre and
arts."
Love, Lust & Lace will be
performed at UBC Theatre's April
fundraiser at Dorothy Somerset
Studio April24 and 25 at 7:30 p.m.
Tickets can be purchased at the door
or online at $15. Xi
Like movies?
We do too.
Join the force.
culture@ubyssey.ca
MUSIC »
Rappers Without Borders, the hub for hip-hop culture on campus
=HOTOCOURTESF RAPPERS WFTHOUT BORDERS
The club's name was inpsired by the organization Doctors Without Borders.
Mariam Baldeh
Contributor
UBC AMS club Rappers Without
Borders is the club for students
who are fuelled by a love of hip-
hop, passionate about spitting
rhymes and driven by a desire to
make a difference.
The club was formed in
September 2013 by two friends:
Dylan Perdue, currently a fifth
year integrated Engineering
student and Barnabas Caro, now a
political science graduate. It aims
to bringtogether UBC's hip-hop
community and provides a platform
for students and local performers to
showcase their skills and have fun
sharing the art they love.
"There's never really been a
centre for rap or hip-hop here on
campus. There's no UBC rap club,"
said Perdue, who is the current
president and teaching coordinator
ofthe club. As teaching coordinator,
Perdue is responsible for running
the hip-hop workshops that take
place on Wednesdays in the SUB.
"We have freestyle tutorials
and go over basic elements of
rhythm, rhyme schemes and
vocalization and so on. Anyone
can drop in for the workshops,"
he said.
On Freestyle Fridays, members reconvene for a fun night of
freestyling and recording tracks,
which are then posted onto
SoundCloud.
Accordingto Perdue, Rappers
Without Borders' mission is to
raise funds for the Doctors Without Borders organization, which
was also the inspiration behind
the club name.
"We wanted to take the focus
away from the personal, material
gain that is a common trend within rap," said Perdue. "We wanted
to put the spotlight on the art
itself. The reason that I'm so into
it is because I think it's a really
cool art — the way that language
is used and manipulated to evoke
certain feelings and allow you to
express certain things."
On April 2, the club collaborated with the UBC EDM (Electronic Dance Music club) to host a
hiphop night at the Pit with entry
by donation, where they raised
approximately $250. The event
repertoire included seven short
rap sets and one slam poetry set,
and had an overall great turnout.
Perdue said that the club will
be planning more events in the
near future in order to raise more
money for a strong end ofthe year
donation to the organization. He
also said that the club's website
has recently been finished and
anyone can go to rapperswithout-
borders.org for more information
about the club, or just to listen to
some ofthe cool freestyle tracks.
"The site's going to be a hub for
anything hip-hop related happening in Vancouver, with a focus on
UBC," said Perdue. "Music made
by student artists, events happening in Vancouver and anything
interesting related to the world of
hiphop will be posted." Xi // Sports + Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
MONDA1
LIVE AT THE
MEET THE REAL'PIPER CHAPMAN     ^        liveatthe
PIPER KERMAN ™=
AUTHOROFiftDAMgCft,   D|   J\rU 1866 4498118
\.Jri \r\* ^tv^l— new LJ5»^\v/f \ www.uniauehves.conn
AUTHOR OF:
ORANGEY BLACK
FOR TICKETS
1-866-449-8118
www.uniquelives.com
UNIQUE   LIVES
55
EXPERIENCES
pand6ra"   The Vancouver Sun
CKNW
urmno
AM980
WATERFRONT * J-2
EFry MONDAY, APRIL 13,2015    I    SPORTS    I   11
THUNDERBIRDS »
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
TENACIOUS THIRTEENS
LIAM
FANNIN
Field Hockey
LAURA
MACTAGGART
Volleyball
VICTORY
1 don't really know howl
1 ate 13 chicken nuggets
Brian O'Driscoll, one of
Because it is seemingly
1 lost a betthatl could
1. Why did you choose jersey number 13?
landed on 13, definitely
and hita walk off home
the greatest Irish rugby
unluckyformost people,
stand in the cattle pen
not because of A-Rod.l
run in the 13th inning
players of all time, wore
but 1 thought 1 could
for30 seconds when
just saw it and thought to
when 1 was 13 years old.
13 and he was one
make it lucky for me.
1 was 10, and 1 stuck
myself "hmm, that's not
Itwasasign.
of my herosasa kid.
with it.
bad," sol took it.
That's why 1 chose the
number.
2. Do you have any lucky charms or superstitions?
My main lucky charm is
this necklace that I got
formysecond grade
communion. I can't
rememberthe last time
took it off.
Clearly I gotta eat 13
nugs before a game so
can popthe chain on
my home run trot.
don't have any charms
orsuperstitions. I just
make sure I have a
good warm up and fee
good before a game.
My good luck charm is a
stuffed dragonberry (the
fruit) dressed in a lion
costume. My team has
seen that one out many
times.
always get dressed in
the same order before
a game, leftside goes
on first. But no lucky
charms.
3. What's the most unlucky thing that's happened to you?
1 ended up breaking my
wrist during my hockey
Thisone time where 1
don't get asenioryear
1 don't really consider
myself unlucky. Every
1 would saythatit was
prettyunluckywhen
Having a DB actually
catch a pass 1 threw.
game, which forced me
'cause my team got
thing hasa causeand
my "mild ankle sprain"
to miss the majority of
cut...
an effect.
turned into three rup
[a] Team Canada game
tured ligaments and a
(laterthatday).
dislocated tendon.
4. What is something you are embarrassingly
bad at?
5. What would you like to have 13 of?
Let's just put itthis way,
love to sing, but people
don't love when I'm
singing aroundthem.
I'm pretty broke, so I
wouldn't mind having 13
dollars.
Riding my bike through
Main Mall. There have
been 13 casualties.
I would like to have (at
least) 13 more softball
seasons at UBC.
I'm pretty tone-deaf
so my singing is pretty
terrible.
I would like to have 13
pounds of chocolate
digestive cookies. I love
those things.
can't twerk. No matter
how hard I wish, how it
looks in my mind just
doesn'ttranslateinto
results. I'd be so much
coolerif I could twerk.
I want 13 trips to Disneyland.'Nuff said.
Driving with my eyes
closed.
Logs.
SOCCER»
Chris Serban is on track to WFC2 success
Thunderbird Serban will play this summer for the Whitecaps' USL development team.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Soren Elsay
Staff Writer
For years there was a link missing
in the local soccer scene between
promising youngsters and the
full-blown MLS, the highest level
of soccer in North America. When
the creation ofthe Whitecaps FC2
team was announced last fall,
there was a hope that it would
work as a developmental springboard for promising young players
and their careers. For Thunderbirds right back Chris Serban, this
is exactly the case. The reigning
CIS Rookie ofthe Year was away
at U-20 World Cup Qualifying
with the Canadian U-20 National
team in January when he was
approached by Whitecaps FC2
assistant coach Steve Meadley
about signing with the newly
created club.
"When I got back [from the
U-20 qualifying] I got a call
informing me that they wanted
to sign me," said the 19 year-old
Calgary native. "Obviously, I was
very excited, and I immediately
took the offer and just jumped
to it."
Before joining WFC2, Serban
was an integral part ofthe UBC
Thunderbirds team as a freshman. The right back started 11
ofthe 12 regular season games
and played all but 16 minutes
during those starts. He was part
of a back line that surrendered
a league low seven goals during
those 12 matches on route to being named the best rookie in the
country. Serban attributes much
of his recent success to Thunderbird head coach Mike Mosher,
who pushed the youngster every
step of the way.
"He's always encouraged me
and kept pushing me forward to
become the best player I could
be," said Serban. "I remember
I was going away for the U-20
national team camp during the
exam break, and [Mosher] set
up special training times just
for me even though our season
was done.
This strong bond will only
grow as Serban is eligible to
return to the Thunderbirds this
fall, even though he has signed
a pro contract. With the White-
caps FC2 season ending in early
September, things line up nicely
for both Serban and the 'Birds,
who will benefit greatly from
the return of one of their most
dynamic players.
In the mean time, Serban will
continue his quest of cracking the
Whitecaps first team MLS roster
by continuing to put in work with
the WFC2. A natural right back,
Serban has seen time at left back
with his new team, which has
forced some adjustments.
"I think just improving so I'm
completely comfortable being
able to use any foot at any time,"
said Serban.
"And of course working on
my physicality and being able to
match the strong guys that they
have in the MLS."
Serban's development is a
strong sign for all the programs
involved. Whitecaps FC2 has a
poster child for its plan to develop promising local prospects,
and Mike Mosher's Thunderbirds
have yet another success story
to add to their impressive run as
a program. For the youngsters
hoping to follow in Serban's footsteps, he has a simple message:
"Work your hardest, always be
focused, don't take any training
lightly."
After years of following this
mantra, Serban has himself a pro
contract, and finds himself on a
path that most 19 year olds can
only dream about. Xi
2015 Big
Block Award
Winners
'Bus' Phillips Memorial Trophy
Winners: Coleman Allen,
Conor Lillis-White
Marilyn Pomfret Trophy
Winner: Maria Bernard
Team of the Year Award
Winners: Women's cross
country, men's swimming
Bobby Gaul Memorial Trophy
Winner: Luc Bruchet
May Brown Trophy
Winners: Savannah King,
Kris Young
Rookies of the Year
Winners: Marcus Davis,
Lauren Logush
Thunderbird Athletes Council
Performance Award
Winner: Coleman Allen
Arthur W. Delamont Award
Winner: Steve Tuckwood
Carolyn Dobie-Smith Award
Winners: Nathan Wong,
Beth Rizzardo
Kay Brearley Service Award
Winner: Jennifer Schutz
Thunderbird Athletes Council
Buzz Moore Leadership Award
Winners: Ian Perry, Colleen
Nesbitt
Congratulations! 12    I    GAMES    I    MONDAY, APRIL 13,2015
Long exp
osuresan
d reflective water on carr
pus combine for great visuals
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PHOTO NAVREETSINGH DHALIWAL/THE UBYSSEY
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OURTESYKR
AZYDAD.COIV
ACROSS
1- "Hard !" (sailor's yell)
5-Numbers game
10- Aromatic fragrance
14-Group
15- Fencing blades
16- "The Time Machine" people
17- Person skilled in accounting
19-Colleen
20- Nowyou ...
21-Most strange
23-Equinox mo.
25- Grows in Brooklyn
26-Guitarist Atkins
29- Records
31-Halt, salt!
35-_ _ Tafari (Haile Selassie)
36-Unclothed
37-Syrian city
38-End result
40-Oakland outfit
41-Tempestuous
42-Gillette brand
43-Rocker Ocasek
44- Photographic tone
45- Nabisco cookie
46- Nick and Nora's pooch
47- Sleight of hand
49-ABobbseytwin
51-Proceeding by tens
54-Playfortime
58- 007'salma mater
59-Free from errors
63- Humorist Bombeck
64-Civil rights org.
65-Motherofthe Valkyries
66-Bargain
67- Facial expression used by Elvis
Presley
68-20th letter of the Hebrew
alphabet
DOWN
1-Turkish titles
2-Ornamental fabric
3-Suffix with exist
4-Self-centered person
5-AuthorDeighton
6- Decide
7-Leaves in a bag
8-Principles
9-Blender brand
10-Had faith
11-Winglike parts
12- A pitcher may take one
13- Fog
18-Salt Lake City player
22- Objects from everyday life
24-Feathery
25- Period of human life
26-Crucifix
27- High-toned
28-Bar, legally
30-Lyric poem
32-Copycats
33- Nautical pole
34- Puccini classic
36-Polite refusa
37- Brother of Moses
39-Felon
40- Road with a no.
42-Circle segment
45- Person in the petroleum
industry
46- Deer horn
48-Profits
50-Sun Devils'sch.
51- Act
52-French 101 verb
53-Deep sleep
55- Bern's river
56-Former Fords
57-Jacob's first wife
60-Fannie_
61-Very skilled person
62-EMT's skill

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