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The Ubyssey Nov 7, 2011

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1 News»
Editors: Kalyeena Makortoff & Micki Cowan
11.07.20111 3
DEVELOPMENT »
South campus residents express outrage at UBC's land use plan
Brian Piatt
Features Editor
Wesbrook residents voiced strong
opposition to additional residential development in south campus
last week, as UBC held their last
open house for the South Campus
Neighbourhood Plan.
On November 1, Joe Stott, director for Campus and Community
Planning (CCP), stood at the front of
the commons room in MBA House
for 90 minutes while campus residents lambasted him.
Residents addressed the "unsafe" traffic circle at 16th Avenue and
Wesbrook Mall, but the touchiest
issue was the updated land use plan
that will expand the south campus
population to 12,000. Residents who
moved there in 2005 were told to
expect less than 5000.
The amendments to the Wesbrook
neighbourhood came after the university cancelled plans to put housing on the UBC Farm in 2008. The
Board of Governors then instructed
CCP to transfer that planned housing
density to a different area of campus.
Kathy Griffiths was one resident
who attended the meeting. "I just
came more as an observer, but I
found it so offensive in some ways,
that I had to speak up," she said. "I
think these people who have bought
in here, it's a bait and switch."
Stott clarified that the amendments do not actually increase
the density of Wesbrook Place, as
they have expanded the amount of
land being built on. But that wasn't
enough to satisfy the residents.
"Well, I'm not surprised,"
Stott said when asked about the
unfriendly crowd. "I've faced angry
rooms in the past."
The session was meant to be a
question and answer format, but the
residents were outraged when they
learned that nobody from the Board
of Governors—the governingbody
that makes UBC's land use decisions
in conjunction with the province-
was present.
Stott tried to reassure them that
the process would ensure their concerns would be heard.
"We're undertaking a process
that was requested by the Board
of Governors, and we're going
to report back to them on what
happened."
"I was surprised at the anger of
the audience, I hadn't quite expected that," said Thomas Beyer, a newly-elected director ofthe University
Neighbourhood Association.
"But a lot of people really see it
as too dense and too hasty a development," said Beyer.
"I think we are taking too fast an
approach to rush things through.
We've got to take a little more time
here." 13
SUB OUTLETS))
New SUB venues get name makeover
AMS reveals rebranding plans for food outlets
NatalyaKautz
StaffWriter
Enjoy saying "Blue Chip" and
"Honour Roll" while you can, because in three years those names
won't mean much.
Glasfurd & Walker, a local conceptual design company, presented
the new names and concepts for
the food and beverage venues in
the new SUB to AMS Council on
Wednesday.
Replacing the Honour Roll, the
new sushi eatery will be dubbed
Peko Peko, named after "a Japanese
colloquialism that means hungry,"
said designer Phoebe Glasfurd.
Glasfurd described Peko Peko
as a quiet space, to balance out
the atmosphere ofthe other Asian
cuisine venue, the Grand Noodle
Emporium.
Also on the main floor will be
BoomlPizza, a re-imagining of Pie R
Squared. The new name was chosen
to reflect the "casual, slightly irreverent, indulgent, confident [and]
social" concept presented bythe
designers to council.
AMS VP Administration Mike
Silley said the decision to let go of
the current names was made early
on.
Naming decisions took place over
four workshop sessions between
designers and the AMS.
One venue whose name will
remain unchanged is the Pit. "We
went through a whole range of
names, but ultimately thought there
was a lot of heritage in the name
ofthe Pit. I didn't go to UBC and I
know the name," said Glasfurd.
In concept, however, "the new Pit
will be quite different...a space that
News briefs
Federal funding slashed for
University of Arctic
The University of the Arctic (UArctic)
has seen its funding slashed by three
quarters, scaling back initiatives such
as its circumpolar studies program
and north2north. which provides
exchanges between member
institutions.
"The recent decision by the
Government of Canada to dramatically cut funding to the University of
the Arctic will have an impact on not
only the ability of Canadian students
to participate in UArctic programs,
but also thousands of other students
around the circumpolar world who
benefited from them." said UArctic
President Lars Kullerud in a press
release.
GEOFF LISTEmHE UBYSSEY
Students line up to grab a slice of pizza at AMS-owned food outlet Pie R Squared, to be renamed Boom! Pizza
you can quite easily go and have a
burger at lunch, but it has that ability to transform," Glasfurd said.
With no replacement for the
Gallery planned, the Pit will be taking over most of its late-night duties, like Tuesday night karaoke.
The decision to keep the Pit's
name was well received. AMS Arts
rep Kyle Warwick said it was a
smart idea. "I think the name has
huge recognition all across campus
and even beyond...I think it makes
complete sense; it's in the basement.
It's got identity that dates back to
David Suzuki."
Other new eateries include the
new salad bar Palate, and Flipside, a
burger joint that will have a related
Tuberculosis identified on
Greyhound bus
The British Columbia Centre for
Disease Control is issuing a public
health advisory to identify passengers who traveled on Greyhound
bus #5098 on Oct 11 and were
exposed to an active case of
tuberculosis.
The ill person took Greyhound
bus #5098 from Vancouver at 5:45
pm. arrived in Chilliwack at 7:45pm.
left Chilliwack at 8:05pm and arrived
in Kelowna at 11:55pm. during the
infectious stage of the disease. The
individual is currently receiving treatment in Kelowna.
Those who were on this bus may
call HealthLink BC at 8-1-1 for more
information,
summertime venue named Flip(Out)
Side, situated just outside the SUB.
The new SUB will also feature
two cafes. One, the Lowercase, will
be express-style. The other, the
Uppercase, will have an "old world
academic feeling," the designers
explained, who assured students
that while the look might change,
the cafes would still be serving Blue
Chip-style cookies.
Replacing the Pendulum will be a
fifth-floor restaurant the Perch. The
designers explained that the 200-
seat restaurant will be "one ofthe
more mature places...in the building." This is thanks to the Perch
having a licensed 40-seat lounge, as
well as a fireplace.
UBC prof to launch tuition-free
university
A new online tuition-free university
called NextGenU.org is preparing for
launch.
NextGenU.org emphasizes health
sciences education, and was created
by Erica Frank, a UBC professor at
the School of Population and Public
Health, with the ambition of being
more sustainable.
"NextGenU enables people to advance their knowledge, their skills,
their careers, without any additiona
burden on the planet or students'
finances." said Frank.
NextGenU plans to have about
20 courses and one certificate program ready for its launch, expected
in the next couple of months.
But a few UBC students didn't
seem as excited about the name
changes.
Responses to The Ubyssey
Twitter account ranged from
amusement at names like "Boom!
Pizza," to utter surprise and
outrage.
Though the current designs are
moving forward, Silley said that
the AMS is still open to revisions.
"Nothing's really set ever.
We can change the name of The
Honour Roll and Pie R Squared today if we wanted to at Council.
"Until the signs are put in and
the building is built, we can change
things such as naming and branding if we so choose." tH
more 25 and 84 buses from
December
TransLink plans to add 25 and 84
routes in the morning peak period,
starting in December 2011.
Increased government fund-
ing-recently approved by the
Mayor's Council on Regiona
Transportation as part of the
"Moving Forward" Supplementa
Plan for 2012-2014-is allowing
TransLink to enact the upgrades.
Aside from the 25 and 84 routes,
TransLink is currently still in the
planning stage for most improvements, to be enacted 2012 or later.
Overcrowded routes, such as the
4. 41 and 49. are examples of bus
routes which could see upcoming
service increases. 13
SKATEPARK»
Skate park to be
considered at UBC
=ETER WOJNAR/THE UBYSSEY
StepanSoroka
Contributor
Skateboarders on campus might
soon have an alternative to dodging
traffic and Campus Security when
skating at UBC.
UBC and the University
Neighbourhood Association (UNA)
are taking steps towards constructing a skate park next to the outdoor
basketball courts near Thunderbird
Stadium. Both bodies are assessing
the feasibility ofthe project.
Jan Fialkowski, chair ofthe
UNA, explained that one ofthe
goals of this study would be to determine the necessity and importance ofthe skate park.
"We do see a lot of skateboarders
in the neighbourhood," Fialkowski
explained, "and the basketball
courts on Thunderbird Boulevard,
which were a joint project between
UBC and the UNA, have shown
great success."
Fialkowski explained that the
park funding would be split between the university and the UNA,
but that the exact cost ofthe project
would not be determined until after
the feasibility study is complete.
Other elements such as design,
features and size would likewise be
determined bythe study.
Carole Jolly, director of transportation planning at UBC said
construction could start as early as
next spring.
Pieter and Robyn Beyers, aged
14 and 17, have no doubts about the
necessity or importance ofthe park.
"Us and several others have been
involved in pushing for this for two
or three years now," said Robyn
Beyers.
"There has been a lot of support
from the UNA community, not just
from skaters," he said.
His brother Pieter said that
currently skateboarders living in
the neighbourhood travel as far as
Richmond or the North Shore to
ride skate parks. He sees a facility
on campus as convenient, but also
as providing an important service
to UNA youth.
"It would be a lot safer," said
Pieter Beyers. "A nice open space
away from traffic would provide us
with a place to gather." 13 41 News I ii.o7.2oii
TRADES))
COURTESY BCIT
Shipping
out naval
architects
at UBC
Expanding
shipbuilding
contracts increases
demand for skilled
labourers
Arshy Mann
Managing Editor, Web
With the announcement of $8 billion in
shipbuilding contracts comingto British
Columbia, schools are gearing up to fill the
skills gap.
Technical colleges—such as the Burnaby's
British Columbia Institute of Technology and
Camosun College in Victoria—are expecting
an increased demand for workers in fields
as varied as welding, millwrighting, project management and occupational health
therapy.
Seaspan Marine's Vancouver Yard won
the smaller of two contracts, with Irving
Shipbuilding's Halifax Yard taking the right
to bid on $25 billion worth of military vessels.
"The government estimates that there
will be 4000 spin-off jobs. And that means
these people will have to be trained and most
likely they're goingto be trained at places
like Camosun, places like BCIT," said Dave
Pinton, media relations manager for BCIT.
"We have apprentices that are training
here now. In fact, a couple of them happen
to be with Seaspan, and I heard one of them
say the other day, T think I can buy a house
soon.' So they're pretty excited about it and
it means there's goingto be opportunities for
literally the next 20 to 30 years."
Accordingto Pinton, all six of BCIT's
schools, including business, transportation
and health sciences, will be affected by the
shipbuilding contracts.
"I think people lose sight ofthe fact that
it's definitely goingto affect a lot of different
sectors, probably in ways that we don't think
about yet."
Tom Roemer, VP strategic development
for Camosun College, said graduates will be
impacted heavily given that these 30-year
contracts will mean lifetime employment for
many students.
Roemer said that Camosun is planningto
expand capacity by up to 50 percent in many
of their trade programs, while also looking
at tailoring some of their current programs-
like the one for industrial electricians—towards marine expertise.
He added that business programs, such as
supply chain management, will also likely
require expansion.
Roemer believes that the shipbuilding jobs
will pay wages that are competitive with
those doled out in places like Fort McMurrary
Alberta or northeastern BC, with many being
paid in the six figures after a few years.
Camosun will be meeting in early
December with the Department of National
Defence to discuss what types oftrainingthe
college should focus on.
Naval Architecture
Alongside a huge boom in the trades, engineers studying the field of marine architecture will also likely see a boost to job
prospects.
"There will be a significant amount of design work to be done on these vessels and on
the production of them as well, so there will
be a need for engineers," said Jon Mikkelsen,
a senior instructor in UBC's faculty of applied
sciences.
"I'll forecast it'll at least triple or quadruple
from what it is now."
UBC offers a few courses in naval architecture as part ofthe mechanical engineering
program. He said these courses usually have
six to eight students in them.
The only full naval architecture program
in all of Canada is at Memorial University in
St John's, Newfoundland. And although many
elite American universities, such as MIT and
UC Berkeley, once offered naval architecture
degrees, these have largely disappeared as the
industry moved from North America to Asia.
A handful of UBC students everyyear who
take these courses end up working in marine
design at local companies such as Robert Allen
Ltd and STX Marine. Others end up designing yachts in California, working for Canada
Steamships in Ontario or else go overseas to
places such as the UK and Norway.
Mikkelsen said that UBC is currently working with Seaspan on the possibility of creating
a Master's of Engineering degree in marine
system design, although this is far from being
finalized.
He went on to say that his students were
very excited about the contracts.
"It's a real shot in the arm for the whole
west coast marine industry, so everyone's excited about that." 13
amS Insider weekly   ( n
student society     a weekly look at what's new at your student society                              Jr
 ■:'.. www.ams.ubc.ca	
Keep up to date with the AMS
Facebook:
UBC Alma Mater Society
Twitter:
AMSExecutive
AMS Events presents
mu
—tard//
pirn
| November 17th
RIGHT
Paper Mate pens 35( each
Highlighters $1.69
Glue sticks 99(
Paperclips $1/box
Located in the lower Level - Student Union Building
Tickets $12 at the Outpost
Located on the main floor of
the Student Union Building »
If you go.
>>1 »
Game notes
>>1  81 Games & Comics 111072011
Slitherlink by Jfrazi/dad
3
3
3
2
3      1
0
1
2
1
2              2
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How it works:
SkiNinjasby Kyle Lees (Lakehead University)
Slitherlink is an addictive logic puzzle that was first published by Nikoli in
Japan The puzzle consists of a grid of dots, with some clue cells containing
numbers. You connect horizontally or vertically adjacent dots to form a meandering path that forms a single loop or "Slitherlink"
The loop must not have any branches and must not cross itself The clue
numbers indicate how many lines surround the cell. Empty cells may be surrounded by any number of lines (from 0 to 3).
There is one unigue solution, and you should be able to find it without
guessing. You may find it helpful to make Xs between dots that cannot be
connected.
-from krazydad.com
X DID  IT/
X FINALLY CAUGHT
THE RAREST ft>KEW)W
OF all!
KOD'KE WHoMfe! THE
RAREST POUErtOK/
Or ALL... ISLOVE.
Send your comics to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
i
i
OR, COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
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3700 Willingdon Avenue
bcit.ca/infosessions
It's your career.
Get it right.
UBC
Sp ii .07.2011 Games&Comicsl9
Blundergradsby Phil Flickenger
Sudoku by Krazydad
YOUR COLLEGIATE YEARS ARE
FORMATIVE;  WHAT You  GLEAN
over the next four. short
Years will influence your
path in life for pecapes.
ARE HoU TALKINfr
AFOUT KNOWLEPfrE"
OR STUDENT LOAlO
PERT?
Comicsmasterby Maria Cirstea
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B Editor- Rrian Piatt
11.07.20111 IQ
NDIANAJOEL/THE UBYSSEY
Taking their inspiration from the AMS' rebranding efforts, the university comes up with a few new names
The Last Word
Parting shots and snap judgments on today's issues
It's officially time to jump on the
T-Bird football bandwagon
As a rule, sports stadiums on campus
are only full when there isn't a UBC
game being played.
And yet, there was Thunderbird
Stadium on Saturday afternoon,
filled to the brim with 4000
screaming fans as UBC played
their first home playoff game in 12
years. Up against the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies, the T-Birds
pulled away in the third quarter,
withheld a furious rally in the
fourth and advanced to the Canada
West championship next week in
Calgary.
The jubilation in the crowd was
enough to make us think about how
this school would react if the equivalent happened in the US. We'd
never advocate a full-blown NCAA
culture, where grown men would
give up their first-born to hang out
with star quarterback Billy Greene.
But a little bit of school spirit never
hurt anyone.
Our T-Birds are up against those
safety-school retreads from Calgary
next Friday and it'll be broadcast on
TSN. With UBC just two wins away
from the Vanier Cup for the national
championship (which will be held at
BC Place), media attention for this
team will only grow, so you might as
well jump on the bandwagon now.
Govemanceshouldbeapriority
for Electoral Area A candidates
UBC has an awkward governance
structure. Thousands of people live
here with no municipal government,
and campus land use oversight now
resides with the province instead of
the regional board of directors for
Metro Vancouver. It's no surprise
that problems arise.
What is surprising is how little the
five candidates applying for Electoral
Area A representative have to say
about dealing with the university's
governance situation. This is UBC's
only elected director on the Metro
Vancouver board, yet the candidates
talk about the lack of local democracy as if it's just an abstract, theoretical concern.
When The Ubyssey interviewed
all the candidates, Scott Andrews
was the only one to lay out a specific
idea for municipal government and
planned to make governance a priority in the near future, saying "I
would be acting on it as soon as I am
elected." The other candidates were
very vague in their comments on
the matter and less urgent about the
need for change.
Incumbent Maria Harris said that
the changes will be "organic" if the
public decides they want it—which
begs the question: if the change will
be organic, why should we elect
anyone in the first place? Sarcasm
aside, directors are elected to actively
advocate for issues, not to sit aside
and let constituents do all the work
themselves.
This is one ofthe most important
issues that campus residents face,
and it's a disappointment that no one
who will have the power to address it
seems prepared to.
Want a job? Start looking in the
trades after you graduate
So ifyou're like many UBC students,
including most of us at The Ubyssey,
you have a crippling fear of not being
able to find a job upon graduation.
But even in this time of economic
hardship, there are some sectors that
are booming. Trades like welding
and millwrighting are in demand
more than ever, especially with the
large shipbuilding contract com-
ingto BC. The University of Fraser
Valley, meanwhile, is reporting a
large shortfall of students from
what's needed in their commercial
pilots program.
As student journalists, we constantly hear the doom and gloom
about what these hard economic
times mean for students—particularly those graduating with an arts
degree. But it's important for all of
us to remember that a university
degree shouldn't keep you from considering a change in direction after
graduation.
Okay, these aren't the types of jobs
your high school career counsellor
may have pointed you to. But they're
waiting out there if you just know
whereto look.
Nicely formed puns make
students happy
We understand that the rebranding
for businesses in the new Student
Union Building were going to create a spirited reaction no matter
what—such a response is inevitable
whenever a change comes to something we're all used to. (Though a
name like Boom! Pizza is rather, well,
indefensible.)
But what we're mostly disappointed about is the move away from
the intellectual puns that the current business names are based on.
We liked the inspired names for the
Honour Roll, Pi R2, Bernoulli's Bagels
(named after a mathematician) and
the Pit and the Pendulum (an Edgar
Allan Poe short story, ifyou never
figured that out).
And now we have the Flipside, the
Grand Noodle Emporium and Peko
Peko—and, of course, Boom! Pizza.
As you can see in the student comments elsewhere on this page, we're
not the only ones feeling underwhelmed. The good news is that it's
not too late to make a few changes,
should the AMS decide to. Give us
some fresh new puns to use over the
next few decades.
In the November 3,2011 issue of The
Ubyssey, the caption under the "Our
Campus" profile of Ingrid Nilson
read "Police in riot equipment
charge against the crowd at Georgia
and Homer in the CBC plaza."
The photograph was taken in the
south plaza ofthe Student Union
Building.
Ingrid Nilson, who is co-president of The UBC Player's Club, has
not, in fact, been involved with riot
control for the Vancouver Police
Department.
The Ubyssey developed its graphic
templates during the summer; this
particular template was created following the Game 7 riots.
Due to an editorial oversight, this
caption was not changed, no doubt
resulting in a rather confusing situation for the reader, and Ms Nilson
herself.
The Ubyssey regrets the error. 13
South Campus a hard
cause to get behind
Editor's
Notebook
Kalyeena
Makortoff
Campus and Community Planning
(CCP) representatives took a
verbal beating at last Tuesday's
open house on the South Campus
Neighbourhood amendments.
Almost 100 residents filled the
room, upset at the plan to increase
the residential development in
Wesbrook Place.
The whole scene gave me a sense
of deja vu. The last time I saw this
kind of anger aimed at the university was during the fight to save the
UBC Farm, a movement I reported
heavily on for The Ubyssey.
For those of you who don't remember, the university was making
plans about where to put additional
housing. Back then, they were suggesting putting it on farm land—
which would have decreased the
size ofthe farm dramatically.
But the crowd last Tuesday was
very different from the one in 2008.
This time there were hardly any
students present, aside from AMS
executives and our own reporters.
Nor were there any activists, or at
least none who were very vocal.
At the farm hearings, the people
there had organized under a banner of environmental and food
security concerns, and were able
to draw a diverse and passionate
crowd from all over Vancouver. But
in the Wesbrook hearing, the rallying cry was one of NIMBYism.
It's much harder to sympathize
with this cause. Most of these
people moved to a university without having any affiliation with
it. They were were able to afford
condominiums and property on one
ofthe most expensive pieces of land
in North America. And now we're
supposed to feel sorry for them?
The petition that was circulating
at the open house and Q&A session
was signed by over 60 residents
who said they would be asking
UBC for financial compensation for
residents being "forced" to move
from their neighbourhoods. But
"forced" in this case means deciding that they don't want to stay in
a neighbourhood that will reach a
population of 12,000. True, they
originally thought they were getting a smaller community—but it's
absurd to claim they have no choice
now but to leave.
Yet I do see similarities between
the two situations. Like the farm
activists, the Wesbrook residents
are letting out bottled-up frustration because they haven't been
listened to by UBC's decisionmakers. They feel the university is
going forward with plans for their
neighbouhood without any regard
for residents who invested heavily
into what they thought would be a
quiet neighbourhood. It's not unreasonable for them to ask UBC to
halt South Campus Neighbourhood
developments until they have more
input into the process.
Those of us who fought to save
the farm can should claim some
solidarity with Wesbrook residents
in their call for meaningful consultation on development and more
democratic representation at UBC.
If the university wants to calm
this situation, it needs to start
sending members of its Board of
Governors to meet with residents.
In this case, Joe Stott, CCP's director, was sent out there as a punching bag. Stott doesn't make the
university's land use decisions, he
only implements them.
As for the residents, for all my
reservations about their cause, I
do encourage them to stay hopeful. Remember that we eventually
emerged victorious and saved the
UBC Farm. Though the university
isn't listening to you now, keep trying. It's not over until the condos
are built. 13
Students respond to
new SUB names
On Wednesday, AMS Council heard
a presentation on proposed names
for businesses in the new SUB. The
names were worked on by a group
of design consultants and will still
have to be approved by the AMS
before being implemented.
If the presentation is implemented, students will soon be getting
their snacks from such establishments as Boom! Pizza, the Grand
Noodle Emporium, Flipside, Peko
Peko and many other places. (See
our news story for the rest.)
We asked students on Twitter
to give us their thoughts about the
new names. Here's a sampling of
some ofthe responses, all of which
can be found on our website:
@pattymh: Keep the old names!
Boom! Pizza? Serious? Peko Peko??
Pi R and Honour Roll are already
known. Why change?
@cdnbcnll: "Boom! Pizza" is
growing on me. Not booming,
though. Somehow I like the idea of
obnoxiously abrupt appearance of
pizza.
@rappindad: Here's a thought.
Rename the SUB "Whatever,
Dude!" and transform the building into a jumbo replica of Bart
Simpson's skateboard.
@celipliz: Can't we just leave the
names alone?
@magnuszieglerl9: those are
some ofthe worst rebranding
names possible.
@Montana_Hunter: I have to
admit I'm not big on the Pi R Sqrd
name change, I loved all the puns
we had in the SUB!
@Govsthef low: why are they
changing the names? Honour Roll
is a good name for a sushi place.
@curranjosh: incredibly awful.
Did no one notice when the bookstore changed their name? 13 Scene»
Pictures and words on your university experience
11.07.20111 11
HUMOUR »
tit       I
IS
Query the first: where the free f<
UBC's furry-tailed denizens offer a sustainable source of inexpensive protein
FREr Food oj Ubc c^nvus
The 25 queries
ofStudentD
Bryce
Warnes
The 25 Queries of Student Disan
attempt to answer 25pressing questions posted anonymously by a com-
menter on The Ubyssey's website.
For the introduction to this column,
and to read the original comment,
visit ubyssey.ca/opinion/the-twen-
ty-five-queries-of-st432udent-d/
L Where the free food is
Ifyou want a free meal, you can
line up at Sprouts on Friday at
noon. The downside to this option
is that all the food is vegan. To get
some free meat, you'll need to be
creative.
The human population of UBC is
in a constant struggle for survival
against the squirrels. They hide
in the trees and emerge to feast
on our precious garbage reserves;
they hoard nuts that could be used
to feed homeless people; they stare
at us with beady little eyes that see
into our souls, reading our deepest
fears. And they taste like chicken.
To make a squirrel trap, you'll
need a stick, a toilet paper roll, a
bucket and some peanut butter.
Fill the bucket up with enough
water that your average squirrel,
when immersed, won't be able to
touch bottom. Smear the toilet
paper roll in peanut butter—lots
of peanut butter, make sure to
completely cover it—and thread
the stick through the roll. Then
place the stick so that it crosses
the bucket, suspending the roll in
the middle. The stick needs to be
stable, so you may want to use wire
or duct tape to hold it down.
Place your trap near a tree frequented by squirrels. Your prey will
creep along the stick, and when it
stands upon the delicious peanut
butter tube you've created, the roll
will rotate and drop them into the
water, from which they will be unable to escape. The squirrel may
drown. This is okay, because it will
save you having to snap its neck.
Three healthy squirrels are
enough for a stew. After you've
skinned and gutted them, make
sure to cook them a long time, to
kill any parasites. The flavour of
the squirrel will depend on its
diet. Ifyou become an advanced
squirrel-catcher, you may wish to
set trays of pecans and almonds
outside your house, so you can fatten up the local population before
you eat them. Fruit will also lend a
pleasant flavour to the meat.
Squirrel flesh is similar to dark
meat on chickens. Assuming you're
not using any bizarre seasonings, it
should pair nicely with a shiraz or a
sparkling rose. 13
For instructions on how to field
dress a squirrel, watch youtube.
com/6ErldKcHwaE.
ROLL
Bucket
' Snom m&t in Serrsm op <w      ~>
' ^f?LAfZ£r Pa'r *> s&fc/rtide/HHisKfy
SQUMEL MUtfrs
\TR&T/ires +xhb
3RYCEWARNES/THE UBYSSEY
This stratagem can be employed to acquire cheap and meaty game. Then, it's simply a matter of cooking a delicious burgoo or fricassee
PHOTOGRAPHY:
YES, IT'S FREUDIAN
r
'ifcJLl
tos for The Ubyssey
Geoff Lister I art@ubyssey.ca
<S
www
^-0
SaS Beauty
com                       1
Cosmetics ■
> Footwear • Swimwear •
Accessories
rancouver
Chamber Choir
JON  WASHBURN, CONDUCTOR
v   STUDENTS ONLY Sim
™SXX_7
REQUIEM FOR PEACE
Reflections of Hiroshima
8 pm | Saturday, November 19,2011
Chan Centre for the Performing Arts (UBC)
Vancouver Chamber Choir I Vancouver Chamber Ensemble I Jon Washburn, conductor
Jon Washburn leads the Vancouver Chamber Choir, soloists and ensemble in Vancouver composer Larry Nickel's
inspiring Requiem for Peace, presented in cooperation with the UBC Museum of Anthropology's powerfully moving
photographic exhibition Hiroshimaby Miyako Ishiuchi. An evening of inspiring music and poetry in 11 languages.
Join John William Trotter for a pre-concert talk at 7:00pm.
1.855.985.ARTS (2787) ticketmaster.ca
www.vancouverchamberchoir.com
At.
jQj
IBt MOA THEViWCOnVERSUN Simons
"^        .„.-..-...... scmomywEsrcMsr Foundation 121 Scene 111.07.2011
Artist's
rendition
ofthe
AMS's 90s
inspired
food
outlet
rebranding
(see page 3 for full
story)
NDIANAJOEL/THE UBYSSEY
A note concerning
Thursday's issue
Due to Remembrance Day creating a
three-day long weekend, The Ubyssey will
not be publishing an issue on Thursday,
i T _   _ »_ <*•%       /I  _    ___■_____■___  _•!!   »_     _      _    __•   _T   _     _T     _   _   _
 —        _   A 	
www.ubyssey.ca throughout the week.
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