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UBC Publications

Pow Mar 23, 1993

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 Ybl.75, No. 45
A UBC READER'S PAPER
INSIDE
Liberals
Quadra Race
Tonight, 3
UBYSSEY SPECIAL
Vancouver, British Columbia, March 23,1993
QUOTE OF THE DAY
u
My goodness we're
living high.
Sophia Leung, on Mulroney's
$11 million travel cost-
page 3
UBC-AMS may pay off fired manager accused of harassment
BY GORSHARN TOOR AND
CHUNG WONG
The Aquatic Centre manager who
was fired after four students accused
him of sexual harassment may be
paid off by his former boss.
"There may be compensation
for his termination," said AMS
president Bill Dobie.
The UBC-AMS management
committee which operates the
Aquatic Centre offered former
manager Jim Bremner a chance to
negotiate for a possible severance
package soon after they fired him
March 4.
The committee conducted a
two-month investigation after four
sexual harassment complaints
against Bremner were filed last
December.
The committee hopes that
negotiations will lead to a trade off
Tor a waiver that would prevent
Bremner from going to court for
wrongful dismissal. He has yet to
respond.
"We are acting out of concern for
the complainants and the centre—to
potentially avoid legal battles that
may be unnecessary," Dobie said.
"We want to close the issue."
However, a UBC applied ethics
professor said the offer may imply
an admission of fault by the
committee.
"It might mean they think the
misconduct wasn't as wrong as they
first thought," said Louis Marinoff
of UBC'sCentre for Applied Ethics.
"Why bribe him to shut up?"
"You can assume [the
committee] has no ethics. Any
political body has one ethic and that
is self-preservation," Marinoff said.
"It could mean they made
a...blunder."
But he said, that if Bremner is
offered a severance package it does
not necessarily "infer if [Bremner]
was guilty or not"
"Only a court of law can
determine that," said Marinoff. "The
complainants should go to the
police."
The complaints against
Bremner, who is also an auxilliary
RCMP officer, were filed at UBC's
Sexual Harassment Policy Office..
But the office has washed its hands
on the matter.
"It's now in the hands of the
management committee," saidoffice
advisor Ian Smith.
Pow/Perspectives reporters Angela Tsang and Phyllis Kwan and Perspectives copy editor Natasha Hung will help lead next year's league
iK-uri
IPHOTO BY ROSA TSENG
Writers on the storm: rac^*f
Paper spawned by UBC's
racial segregation
UBC students have been bombarded
this year by a record number of
newpapers circulating on campus.
Each is vying for a market that appears to
have been fragmented into several mini-
pockets. But one of these newspapers stands
apart from all of the others—it has no office.
The 30-plus students running
Perspectives may not have an office, but they
don't have to work out of their knapsacks
either—like one legendary university student
did in the mid-west.
They survive over the wire;.
They simply fax their articles to an editor
who, in turn, relays the: stories to a dozen copy
editors. After a month's work, out comes
5,000 copies of a 12-page newspaper.
"It was tough," said Perspectives editor
and founder Dennis Chung, a fourth-year
UBC mechanical engineering student "It sure
helps to have an office."
His new monthly invades yet another tile
See page 5
Readers show more taste
BY BRENDA WONG, HAO LI,
PHYLLIS KWAN, ANGELA TSANG,
MICHELLE WONG, KAREN GO
 AND LILLIAN AU	
STEREOTYPES of "Asians" are
grossly   overstated by Vancouver
daily newspapers, a Pow study shows.
The study, which targeted a mix of both
Chinese and non-Chinese, revealed that local
papers have amplified misperceptions of
Asians in Vancouver and have bred racial
disharmony. Participants in the study also felt
that city reporters have consistently failed to
interview enough Asian sources.
Vancouver Sun and Province reporters
"think there is only one 'Asian' in Vancouver,"
said William Lee, a marketing analyst
The recognized spokesperson for all Asians,
according to Lee, is Victor Yukman Wong.
"They all interview Victor Yukman
Wong."
Wong, president of the recentiy-formed
Vancouver Association of Chinese-
Canadians, has been the media's consummate
Asian. Somehow reporters have chosen only
him to represent the Chinese-Canadian
community on almost every issue.
Well, at least on their favorite issues: gangs,
mega-housing and immigrant invasions.
See page 7 Tuesday, March 23 1993
POW
Vfol. 75 No. 45
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STILL LOOKING FOR that summer job?
Make $6000 this summer and gain excellent
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students. Make $6500 and gain valuable
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Call 325-8859.
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experienced only. $8-$15perhr,caUMauiice
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ARE YOU COMPETITIVE ENOUGH
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Work 10 boon a day to start, study
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If you're success oriented, financial
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Mar. 22 @ 2*00/4:00/-:00 in SUB 205 and
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EARN EXTRA part-time $$$
Sell Avon to friends, family
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Bright, independent person req'd by
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communication A organization skills a must
Fluent EngL A Japn. req'd (spoken A written).
Resumes to: 375-2600 Granville St., Van.
V6H 3 V3 or fax to 734-0888.	
70-SERVICES
GAYS, LESBIANS A Bisexuals of UBC
infoimation office (SUB 237B). 822-4638.
SPECIAL STORAGE RATES
far itwJnttff M
KITSILANO MINI STORAGE
Two locations: 2034 W. 11th
between Arbutus and Maple
736-2729
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We rent Ryder Tracks A sell boxes
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25% OFF STORAGE RATES Student
summer special discount U-Lock, heated,
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6683.
JOBLINK EMPLOYMENT INFO -
looking for work? Attend the ACCIS Job
Fair on Saturday, April 3 from 10 AM - 4 PM
at SFU Harbour Centre on 515 W. Hastings.
Tickets $2 at AMS Box Office.
ASK JOBLINK - we answer questions
regarding resume writing, preparing for
interviews, marketing yourself and human
right issues. Drop by the Outreach Desk in
SUB main concourse Mon-Fri, 11:30-12:30.
75-WANTED
NORTH AMERICA'S LEADER in
student vacations is currently seeking
motivated students to act as campus
representatives to help promote end of year
holiday packages to sunny Mexico. Free
travel and generous cash incentives are
offered! CaU Bin st 1-800-265-1799 for
more information.
SUBJECTS FOR STRESS REDUCTION
study. View a video on drinking A driving.
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PROFESSIONAL typist, 30 years exp.,
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Two-thirds of the career opportunities In
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— ON CAMPUS —
Busy busy — Book now!
AMS WORD PROCESS-ZING
Room 60, SUB
Mon-Thurs 9-6 — Fri 9-5
Drop in or call: 822-5640
BETWEEN CLASSES
CANCELLED DUE TO
LACK OF SPACE
r^UBC
flTitramiircil
Sports
UBC Intramural Sports, the largest intramural program in
Canada, is now hiring students for the 1993/94 academic
year. Detailed job descriptions are available at the
Intramurals registration desk between 9am and 4pm,
Monday to Friday. Remuneration is by honorarium.
Those interested should pick up applications from the
Intramural registration desk in room 66 of SUB or call
822-6000 for more information.
Intramurals offers students at UBC the chance to try their
hand at a variety of administrative positions that involve but
do not necessarily revolve around the intramural sport
program on campus.
The opportunity to develop leadership skills are immense
as you have the chance to try anything from putting on
Storm the Wall to working in our Public Relations department to handling a six figure budget in our Finance department. Experience like this cannot always be found in the
classroom.
There are still approximately 40 positions left for the 1993/
94 school year and the next round of hiring interviews is
Saturday, March 27 and Sunday, March 28. The application deadline is Friday, March 27 at 4:00pm.
info: 822-6688
tel: 822-6000
fax: 822-6086
WIN!
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Booking
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plus an Apple11 Macintosh1" PowerBook™ 145
plus a 31 day Contiki European Tour
One entry per person only. No purchase is necessary. Please Print.
Name    School	
Home Address
1-
Deadlina 5:00 p.m. March 31,  1993
Full contrast rulss ara avallabls In your local Traval Cuts/
Voyagas Campus office, or by mall from Tha Stud-ant Traveller,
243 Collage Straart, 9th Roor, Toronto, Ontario, M9T 2Y1.
Appla la a registered trada mark of Appla Computer, Inc.
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Entrlaa can ba malls, to: Conttkl/Appt* Swaapatakas
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School Address
(il dillerenl)
Phone
Faculty_
Graduating year_
Age.
Please drop this entry into the ballot box at
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228-808G   584-8080    362-3188 \bl. 75, No. 45
POW
Tuesday, March 23,1993
'J   1^ ■" WW _-_9   L -
A tale of two architectural city dreams
nvniivriTcc < _-= 1
 BY BIANCA ZEE
WHEN architect intern
Sylvia Fong designed her
first men's bathroom in Hongkong,
she fudged. A honest mistake, she
laughs.
She drew parallel rows of
urinals for visual effects. But the
urinals were placed so close that
when men peed into opposite urinals,
their bums would touch.
Those days of humourous
mistakes are over for Fong, 29, who
landed a job in Vancouver with
James Cheng's architecture firm, a
favourite among Asian investors,
whose projects have included 888
Beach Ave., the Cambie Gardens
and the Chinese Cultural Centre.
At a Nova Scotia school, Fong
had studied and admired James
Cheng, who modelled the the
downtown Albemi Towers after the
Trump Towers in New York City.
At James Cheng, Fong said she
could realize her architectural dream
of building Chinese-style in a
Canadian setting.
In her thesis, the Vancouver-
resident focussed on the relationship
of buildings to the social ethics.
The Technical university grad
likes to point to one tale of two
cultures.
"An extended family lives in
the Chinese courtyard house
embodying the strong family
relationships within the society. The
nuclear Western family, however,
lives in a house anchored with a
front and back yard symbolizing the
dominant social value of
independence.''
She     started     designing
•Architect interns Sylvia Fong (left) and Mamie Tamaki
PHOTOS BY CHUNG WONG AND MM CHBMC
residential homes.buthasexpanded   legs and the futon itself seems to
into institutional projects like the
Burnaby Firehall and Port Moody
City Hall Library theater.
In her spare time she likes to
sketch and design furniture as a
hobby.
"Designing furniture is so
immediate and you can design and
build it within a week," said Fong.
In Halifax, she made iron
restaurant signs, and a small wooden
table based on the pattern of a
Chinese courtyard house.
"My fiancee helped me make a
long, thin, and black base for white
futon sofa with chunky blocks of
float on top," said Fong.
She advises architecture
students not to limit their designing
talents to buildings andchannel them
into creative works.
Fong says the tunnel into local
architecture firms has caved-in, and
not completely due to recession
woes.
"I really feel sorry for students,"
she said. "With their busy schedules,
firms basically don't have time to
train people."
Fong has also run a design
consulting firm since November
1992 in addition to her 9-to-5.
BY KAREN GO
AND BRENDA WONG
THE door bangs loud behind
you as you climb up dark
and narrow stairs to architect Graeme
Bristol's office in a turn-of-the
century Powell Street building with
many skylights beaming above its
Southern Chinese-style balcony.
Walking past the ominous
dragon mask, architecture intern
Mamie Tamaki works on a blueprint
image on her lap top computer.
Tamaki, 42, traces the
building'slongandnotorious history
to 1914 asamahjong social club and
a Japanese internment cento*.
Today Tamaki is determined to
build her stake in Vancouver in a
field that has been built around men
and unkind to women especially if
they bear children.
In order to hang out her own
shingle as a registered architect, the
Regina-bom Tamaki was required
to finish an unbroken three-year
internship within five years. This
condition excludes women who
want to start a family and work part-
time.
The catch for females is that the
typical graduate will be in their late
20s, a prime child-bearing period.
Once you have children after
graduation you risk delaying gaining
your architecture credentials.
This may explain why only
seven per cent of all registered
architects are women, yet one third
of UBC architecture graduates are
women.
Although Tamaki started her
family earlier, she is lobbying to
change the strict internship process.
After graduating in from UBC
in 1983, she was sidetracked into
site decoration which ensures the
physical surrounding is harmonious
with the buildings. Expo 86 was her
most memorable project
Now she has her sights on social
housing as the focus of her career.
"Architecture is a great
combination of art and science,"
Tamaki said.
Aboard memberforEntreNous
Femmes, a housing developer for
single-parent families, Tamaki
believes housing should be a right
for everyone.
Although not a co-op, Entre
Nous Femmes encourages
prospective tenants to partake in
decision-making.
"Then you have the user
participating in their destiny and
this usually does not happen in
architecture," Tamaki said.
It's a far cry from commercial
architecture where an architect is
squeezed between competing
interests of contractors, client,
esthetics and building codes.
Liberal "turtle and hare"
race tonight at Eric Hamber
BY CHUNG WONG
A-
_rv
STONE'S THROW away from former John
Turner's childhood Belmont Avenue residence,
Sophia Leung sits at her Point Grey home pondering the
possiblity of replacing the former Liberal prime minister
in Vancouver Quadra.
Though she prefers to hide it, Leung is a woman of
many firsts.
She and her late husband—UBC dentistry faculty
founder S. Wah Leung—were the first Chinese to own
property on the University Endowment Lands.
Tonight after a final 8pm Liberal nomination
showdown atEric Hamber school, Leung may also become
the first woman to lead the Liberals in Quadra.
Although she is favoured to win, Leung is not counting
on it.
"Remember the hare and the turtle. I want to be
humble. I have good competition—highly intelligent"
One of her competitors is a former Lester B. Pearson
aide and constitution expert Ed McWhinney who
complained that Leung had too many Chinese people in
The Vancouver Sun yesterday. The others are UVic
Veteran Point Grey resident Sophie Leung was first Chinese economics professor Elmer Wien and Liberal old-guard
to own property on Univeristy Endowment Lands. She favourite Craig Hemer,, a high school counsellor.
competes tonight in a final Liberal showdown for •n.efederalUberals-nottobeconfusedwithGoidon
Vancouver Quadra
PHOTO IV CHUNG WONG
Wilson's BC liberals—view Quadra as their political
epicentre in Vancouver.
It stretches around UBC, is bordered by 16th
and41st Avenues and stretches asfar east as Nanaimo
Street The neighbouring riding of VancouverCentre
is led by Kim Campbell, a former Ubyssey reporter,
who is favoured to lead the Tories into the next
federal elections. One in five residents is Chinese.
But Leung is also being supported by Liberal
heavyweights such as former Vancouver mayor Art
Phillips, former BC Liberal party president Doreen
Braverman, former UBC president Doug Kenney
and Kilby Gibson, president of the Liberal party
national women's commission.
Her campaign committee includes former UBC
Young Liberals president Norman Au and James
Lee, the architect of President Place in Richmond.
She began her campaign three months ago
without any political experience and says her lack of
political baggage has helped her significantly—
shielding her from political party darts.
Leung, a family counsellor and financial
consultant, moved to Point Grey 30 years ago when
her husband became UBC's first dentistry dean.
Together they helped found the Chinese Cultural
Centre, which, in the 70s, was the political centre for
the Chinese community. And in 1988 they helped to
establish Vancouver's sister-city ties with
Guangzhou, the capital of Canton province.
SEE PAGE 6 Tuesday, March 23 1993
POW
M>l. 75 No. 45
CLIP & SAVE
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WORLD E
Tibet still a "Shangri-La"
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THE CHINESE government
have been waging a
genocidal campaign against the
people of Tibet since 1949, and the
world does not seem to be aware of
it
So says to Cythnia Hunt of the
Canada-Tibet Committee, a UBC
grad student who recendy spoke on
campus about current political,
environmental, and spiritual
conditions in Tibet
Hunt's lecture, cntitiedAtrocities
on theRoofol the Wi_ Wd, highlighted
the brutal nature of events in Tibet
She deliberately chose not to hide
behind euphemsitic words like
"occupation" or "ethnic cleansing."
Hunt said Tibet is still an earthly
paradise like the "Shangri-La" image
described in James Hilton's novel,
Lost Horizons. Tibetans are very
spiritual people, she said, who coexist harmoniously with their natural
environment
They practice spiritual
ecology—a philosophy which is
reflected in the way they use the
natural resources that surround
them. They would never use a living
thing wastefully because, as Hunt
explained, they would be showing
disrespect for all life, on the one
hand, and damaging their own lives,
on the other.
Among the many slides shown
during the lecture, one of an elderly
man whose legs had been amputated
struggling up a hill to a monastery,
illustrated that religious devotion
and a strong attachment to the land
are part and parcel of most Tibetans'
daily lives.
In many ways the People's
Republic of China's invasion and
subsequent occupation has
irrevocably change Tibet.
But the Tibetan spirit has
remained undimmed and many have
resisted the illegal occupation.
Repression reached an apex in
Tibetfollowing the national uprising
against the Chinese on March 10,
1959. But Chinese troops brutally
crushed the revolt, killing over
87,000 people in Central Tibet over
an 18 month period, according to
Chinese sources.
Located in the Himalayas
northeast of Nepal and southwest of
Mongolia, Tibet is still an
independent state under illegal
occupation. The spiritual leader and
head of state, the Dalai Lama, a firm
believer in non-violence, fought for
eight years to reach a peaceful
resolution to the sutuation.
Over 100,000 Tibetans, including
the Dalai Lama, are exiled across
the globe.
Hunt said that one in 10 Tibetans
have been held by the Chinese
government in prisons or forced
labour camps for periods of up to 20
years. Today about 10,000 religious
and political prisoners face torture,
forced labour and possible
execution.
The occupation of Tibet said
Hunt is the destruction of not only
a place, but of a people who have
learned how to live in harmony with
nature.
Hunt said that unless Tibetans
regain control over their own country
in the very near future, they may be
wiped off the face of the earth.
The same thing has been going on
for hundreds of years to the world's
aboriginal peoples—from the
Australian Maori, to the Moi of Irian
Jaya in New Guinnea, to Canada's
First Nations, to Nepal's Gurung
people.
And the list goes on and on.
Hunt said she considers Tibet to
be her second home and plans to
return next June.
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BY ANTHONY DERRICK BAKER
Just about every international
criminal law expert has come to town.
But not because Boris and Bill
will be here.
The group is grappling with
stumbling blocks facing the
establishment of an international court
that would be empowered to investigate
and prosecute international offenses
including war crimes and crimes
against humanity.
"The idea of establishing an
international criminal court is not
new," said external affairs minister
Barbara McDougall, keynote
speaker to the conference which
opened yesterday.
"There have been war crimes
trials dating back to the Middle Ages,
when military leaders who allowed
their soldiers to commit inhumane
acts against innocent civilians were
tried for violating the laws of God
and man.''
After the International
Meeting of Experts on the
Establishment of an International
Criminal Tribunal ends its week-
long conference, it will report back
to the United Nations which may set
up legislation for the court
When planned 18 months ago,
the experts were to help design a
general court However, since the
outbreak of civil war in the former
See page 6
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SAVE a further $100 per hour for very SUBSTANTIAL
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For every membership that comes in with your name
on it YOU receive $19. THEY SELL THEMSELVES. 6 per
day is good bucks. ONLY 10 per day is almost $200 per
day. Call J.A. (Jim) MacDonald at C-TOW 947-2875. Vfol. 75, No. 45
POW
Tuesday, March 23,1993
W^lT"'"''V'"""yV'V"
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COVER
New paper to aims to bridge gap
Editor Dennis Chung started upPerspectiveswhich should
make waves with advertisers next year   photo by rosa tseng
of space in the SUB, which already
housesUBCReports(Circ: 48,000),
The Ubyssey (Circ: 15,000), The
Campus Times (Circ: 16,000), Pow
(Circ: 15,000), The Point (Circ:
10,000), Discorder (Circ: 15,000)
and countless pirate distributors.
What a mess.
Perspectives, a bilingual
Chinese-English paper, is poised to
emerge as the leading advertising
anchor at UBC, with the Campus
Times suffering recession woes and
74-year-old Ubyssey attracting
advertising boycotts.
In early January, Chung
convinced advertisers to drum up
several hundred dollars for a paper
which didn't yet exist, during a time
when most businesses' purses were
empty.
Surprisingly, he almost broke
even with his first issue, and
absorbed smaller losses than both
The Ubyssey and The Campus
Times.
"There will be lots of
advertisings the Asian community,
come September," Chung said. "I'm
confident we'll make lotsof money."
He anticipates Perspectives'
circulation to double next fall and to
expand off-campus like the CiTR
music tabloid Discorder. The paper
aims to bridge Chinese and English
social circles.
Being bilingual, almost every
story requires at least two editors
and two writers, Chung said.
"I realized that there were so
many Chineseon campus to warrant
a billingual paper," he said.
He recruited several UBC
student volunteers who helped
operate the famed Songs of the Heart
student fund-raiser which drummed
up $10,000 last year for charity.
Perspectives, which costs about
$750 for a print run and $200 for
Chinese typesetting, focuses on two
cultures in an attempt to bridge
misunderstandings between Chinese
immigrants and Caucasians at UBC.
"I seem to see a lot of white
people who don't like that the
Chinese are segregated," Chung
said. "In doing the paper I wanted to
present both sides."
Chung attributes the
segregation to variance in social
interests. His paper attempts to
attract Chinese immigrants to
hockey and English popular culture,
while featuring Chinese rituals such
as midnight snacks, bowling, tea
and palm reading.
Almost every article is printed
in both English and Chinese—
especially "serious issues."
Chung said the paper should
help lead local Chinese out of their
club-oriented social nests and into
campus political life. He insisted
that the paper not be heavily
infuenced by Chinese club mandates
which he called "party-oriented."
Though the existence of at least
a half dozen papers has created both
a waste and distribution mayhem,
the competition may have improved
individual style and journalism
standards. UBC students don't have
to go to journalism school. They can
learn how to report and write through
direct hands-on experience, without
exams—and for free.
Ifs a
matter
Ul
taste
PIZZA CO.
1937 Cornwall
732-8840
1175 Robson
681-1233
Are you looking
for an excuse
to procrastinate?
Timsi
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It's not too late to get Involved!
Reasons why you should )oln an AMS Committee:
* experience to add to your resume
• meet other active members of the AMS.
• see If what the Ubyssey says about Student Council Is true
* have something more useful to do than clean your room the day
before an exam
Applications for student-at-large positions on the following AMS Committees for 1993/94 are being accepted by the Administrative Assistant In SUB
238 until 4:30pm on Monday. March 29th:
Budget Committee: aids the Director of Finance In preparing the budget of the AMS
Code and Bylaws Committee: recommends changes to the regulations governing
the AMS
Drug and Alcohol Awareness Committee (DRAAC): coordinates DRAAC Week and
the Alcohol Awareness Campaigns
External Affairs Committee: aids the Coordinator of External Affairs In preparing
submissions with respect to higher education issues to the federal and/or provincial
governments
First Year Student's Committee: aids the First Year Student s Coordinator In
organizing Frosh week, and organizes the First Year Student's Retreat
Renovations Committee: recommends renovations to SUB and the AMS Whlstlei
Cabin
Student Leadership Conference Committee: organizes the Student Leadership
Conference In the fall
Please refer any questions about the above committees to Janice Boyle.
Vice President In SUB 248
LSAT
INFO SEMINAR
MARCH 25- 11:30 AM
ANGUS 321
FOR MORE INFO CALL
734 - 8378
KAPLAN
The answer to the test question.
FIRST YEAR ORIENTATION
COORDINATOR
In early September, the AMS administers an orientation programme for
first year students. We are looking to improve and to expand it for the
upcoming academic year.
The successful applicant will:
• chair and work with a
committee of first year
students:
• solicit suggestions from both
AMS and UBC student service
organizations;
• solicit ideas from other
Canadian universities; and
• with the suggestions of the
above, organize a programme
that will make first year
students feel welcome.
We are looking for applicants
who are:
• knowledgable about both the
AMS and UBC;
• creative in providing
information;
• outgoing, enthusiastic and
energetic; and
• able to make anyone feel
welcome.
Applicants must be available from Monday, May 31 to Friday, September
10. The wage is $9.73 per hour based on a 37.5 hour work week. Preference
will be given to those applicants that are returning for the 1993/94
academic year.
For further information call Janice Boyle, Vice President, in SUB 248 at 822-
3092.
Please deliver applications and resumes to Terri Folsom, Administrative
Assistant, in SUB 238. Previous applicants need not apply.
KITTO
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662-3333 I 687-6622 Tuesday, March 23 1993
POW
Vol. 75 No. 45
Kari-ya Kali
Art* Edher
EffltlVw Karaa Young
Eater New* Editor
Q-ace Ka
Wong    Cheryl Mamath      lata Tteng
EdHar        Photo Editor       Photo Editor
Lillian Aa
New* Editor
Stan Pad
Photo
Zaa       Wanda Chow      Charte* Nho
Colunmht        Sport* EdHor
PwcWera Hao 11
Newt Editor
PiagnanSM ^^
Gonhaia Toor
"MaiaToor      Owig Wang       Steve Chow Cathy Lo
Cohtambt _3iar Columnist New* Edlta
Editor
Vanbacfcot
New* Editor
KareaGa       Michelle Wong    Phyllis Kwaa '   Angela T*ang
Pow police beat Morgan Maenling
Advertising: Lyanne Evans, 822-3978
Newspaper Design: S.J. Ahn 822-6681
Arts Editor Yukie Kurahashi
POW A*Mtf£
■     V-r WW       Tel: 122-2301        I
Mtkm, piMMwd
winter icttlofi*
rfu.(2_-9-7.
COLLEGE HOOPS
BY CHARLES NHO
THE "March to the Final Four" is in full swing with
the sweet sixteen already determined. Upset central
is the WestemRegion where Steve Nash^onnerlytrfVicttMia's
Saint Michael's University School, and the Santa Clara
Bronco's took out the two seed Arizona Wildcats. Also, the
four seed, the Georgia Tech Yellowjackets failed to reach the
round of sixteen. Some observations on the tournament to
date:
Finest Performance by a Individual Player Wake
Forests' Rodney Rogers' work in the paint is so far the
definition of power basketball. The 6'7" junior dreamed of
attending U of North Carolina but poor SAT scores scared
coach Dean Smith away and Rogers was gladly accepted at
Wake.
Smoothest Baseline Operator Darnell Mee of the
Western Kentucky Hilltoppers was the key in their upset win
over Seton Hall. The 6'5" senior averaged 19.8 ppg, 6.3 rpg,
3.3 steal per game in the regular season and virtually shut
down the Hall's All-American Terry Dehere.
The coming of Age performer Ray Jackson of Michigan.
He scored his season high of 19 against Coastal Carolina in
the first round and contributed greatly in their win over
UCLA—this while 6'8" guard Jalen Rose had possibly his
two worst games of the season.
The Watch-out in year or two award: Clifford Rozier of
Louisville. The former Mr. Basketball of Florida transfered
out of UNC and is showing signs of greatness during this
tournament The athletic 6'9" sophomore averaged 15.6 ppg
and 11.5 rpg this year.
SPORTS
<4
U-^-U-H-U-^-a-t-^-U-U-^-UMa-Uaaa-Ua-b**-**
SHARKS DIVISION SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT
Pow sluggers swing into finals
THEY gave opponent's the Pow-er line. And their hits
lacked no Pow.
The Pow newspaper co-ed Softball team battled hardily
against the hard-hitting Purple Punishers this month in a final
showdown between the Intramural Sharks Divisions' two
best teams.
"I was quite surprised at how well we did," said power
hitting center fielder Harold Park, "We only had two short
practices and didn't even know who was going to play until
the last minute."
Pow and the Purple Punishers entered the finals each with
3-0 record. Pow had just rung off 10-9,17-9 and 15-6 wins
during the March 13 tournament and the Punishers, though
short a female player, were even more impressive.
The Pow team put reporter Hao Li at the hot comer at
third, news editor Brenda Wong behind the plate, photographer
Don Mah at second with his longtime journalism tag-team
mate Chung Wong at first and sports editor Charles Nho in
right field.
The rest of the Pow team featured Harold Paik, the Fong
sibling crew of Vince and Quentin at shortstop and second,
UBC tennis club president Sean Godel in left, and the
dynamic outfield golden glove trio of Deanna Ho, Tomoko
Kimura and Roanne Suen.
"It was fun for me," said Li, "If we took it too seriously
then I don't think I would have enjoyed it as much."
With Pow playing deep, the heavy-hitting Punishers,
mostly from UBC's FIJI fraternity, were held mostly to base
hits and long outs in a tense tight match that went into the final
inning with the game tied 6-6.
In the top of the 7th, The Punishers pushed two runs
across to go -ahead 8-6. Pow quickly scored a run and had a
runner in scoring position with only one out But two straight
first pitch outs ended the game 8-7.
The Punisher's game-winning run scored after a
contentious incident at first base. Pow was punished.
A Punisher over ran first and then cut toward second,
charging toward Chung Wong who stood 20 feet behind the
base path. Wong ducked during the collision and emerged
with a shiner from an accidental kick in the face as the player
toppled. The player accused Wong of interference and was
awarded second base. It was, after all, the Sharks division.
It was only a game— A game filled with bloodied knees,
diving stabs, and home runs taken away by shoe lace catches.
"We'll be back," said Pow captain Don Mah.
Hao Li was miffed over a coaching miscue by Charles
Nho who butted into the line up when Li should've hit. His
eyes set on glory, Nho popped out on the first offering to dash
Pow's hopes.
"So, we'll be back," said Pow goat Nho.
Vancouver Quadra races heats up
FROM PAGE 3
Leung said the demographics of Quadra can be tricky to
straddle.
"Quadra is a very complex riding. People are well-
informed and well-educated, with higher income. And we
have a hard-working population covering the east side,
grassroots people. It's a challenge to be able to relate to both
groups, but I have as a social worker."
The Liberal winner will go head to head against the
NDP's Tommy Kao during the next federal elections.
Leung said that if she wins the nomination she will
maintain her committment to social programs and stimulating
income.
"I feel we must protect our social programs such as old
age pension and health care," Leung said in the wake of the
Shaugnessy Hospital closure.
Leung also has her sights on reducing the $40 billion
annual interest collected from the $419 billion national debt
"We have to reduce government expenditures," she said.
"I took a look at it there sure are things we have to review."
"They [the Tories] gave so much to the corporations.
Some corporations may require it but some of it was just
simply thrown down the drain."
She also pointed to Brian Mulroney's $11 million travel
expenses this year. "My goodness—we are living high."
Leung believes Canada has sold itself shot on international
economic opportunities.
"We have to get ourselves re-oriented," said Leung. "We
have to expand on our goods and services. We can't just live
on our natural resources. We have a lot of exports which are
high quality.
INTERNATIONAL COURT FROM PAGE 4
Leung wants to stimulate global employment whereby
Canadians would be players on the world market
"Home is not Canada, home is the world," she said. "We
are excellent in waste management and transportation but
Canadians are reserved We have to be aggressive."
Leung called past Canadian trade missions "wasted
energy."
"I was there [in Asia] and I realized the competition—
this is global competition. To Canadians, they say, * You come
here, you see the opportunity, you go home and don't do a
follow-up.'"
"We have not moved fast enough and tend not to be
innovative, it just doesn't really work. They say Canadians
are wonderful but not aggressive."
About 90 UBC students from mainland China joined the
Liberal party within the past month to show their support for
Leung adding on to hundreds of her new recruits.
One of the students, Pingnan Shi, said, "When people are
talking about Chinese new immigrants, the first image is
wealthy rich Chinese from Taiwan and Hong Kong. As a
matter of fact there have been more and more new immigrants
from China with high education, better language skills.
However, they have been largely ignored by the society."
"No politicans have ever showed their interest to this
community," he said.
According to Hao Li, a UBC graduate student "They [the
students] also hope their participation will change the image
that Chinese immigrants do not know or are not interested in
Canadian politics. This time we showed our support to Sophia
Leung because she is the first one to ask for our support and
showed her interest to our concerns."
Yugoslavia, the group will design a court specifically for ongoing crimes in the Balkans. The proposed court may be used
later as a stepping stone for a permanent international court
"Theevents in Yugoslavia, probably the mostaggrievious
that have taken place in Europe since the Second World War,
clearly breaches of the Geneva conventions," said UBC law
professor Peter Burns, a member of the UN Committee
against torture.
"The creation of such an ad hoc tribunal is very clearly,
assuming it is successful, a step towards the creation of the
permanent tribunal. This is a goal to which each of us in the
international centre subscribe."
The group will have a tricky task. The report to the UN
will decide which crimes should be investigated, what the
evidence needed for conviction will be, and how judges are to
be selected. And this policy reached by consensus must attain
the signature of almost every nation in the world for ratification.
Bums said Canada has a vanguard role in the conference
pressing for the creation of such an ad hoc tribunal.
"Canada has taken a lead role on the international
political stage," said Burns.
Other UBC participants include professor Maurice
Copithorne, a former Canadian ambassador and international
law professor, and law professor Vince Del Buono, president
of the International Society for the Reform of the Criminal
Law.
The conference is being driven by the International Centre
for Criminal Law Reform And Criminal Justice Policy, a
tripartite initiative between UBC's law faculty, SFU's
criminology department and the two-year-old International
Society for the Reform of Criminal Law.
The centre is attempting to recruit international scholars
and set up a local graduate program in international criminal
law and criminal justice policy which would involve Max
Plank University at Freiberg, Germany.
Instructors in this satellite graduate program would
lecture and interact with students around the world via
electronic media beamed from Vancouver. \bl. 75, No. 45
POW
Tuesday, March 23,1993
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FROM FRONT PAGE
Readers say local press
lacking diversity
This kind of reporting has
helped to create negative images of
Asians and has overlooked the
diversity of the Asian communities
in the city. The Asian—if you
believe local English media giants—
is either a big home or land owner,
a bad driver, a violent criminal, or
all of the above.
And while images of wealthy
immigrants and Asian gangs leap
off of die news pages, thousands of
Chinese, even third-generation
Canadians, do not appear anywhere
in the local mainstream press.
Defining the average Asian can
be a difficult task. At UBC two new
papers this year, Pow and
Perspectives, are attempting to
expose what The Sun and Province
ignored, and are trying to draw a
more realistic portrait of Asian
peoples.
Pow conducted a study this past
week to investigate actual and
perceived habits of Asians. The
results showed, among other things,
that recent Asian immigrants speak
English almost as often as those
who have lived in Vancouver more
than ten years.
Most people, like college
professor Anthony Zhou, said they
do not know what an ideal Asian is
while others, like Helena Wong,
deny that such an ideal even exists.
Several respondents, like civil
servant David Cowie, said they
perceive the typical Asian as
adaptable to their social and business
surroundings, law abiding, and
strongly-tied to their culture.
Diverse responses were also
given when people were questioned
about their reading habits. Housing
project manager Jason Li, 29, said
that reading in bed far an hour is his
nightly ritual. But graphic designer
Lesley Burns, 23, said she devours
written words on her lunch breaks.
Our respondents said they read
a variety of magazines and
newspapers from die Economist to
Vogue. Both magazines and
newspapers were, in fact the reading
material of choice for most of our
respondents.
The average amount of time
spent reading each day was
approximately 45 minutes.
These findings contradict a
previous study which showed that
18 to 25-year olds were reading less
than previous generations.
Sometimes a newspaper reader
will develop a habit in unusual
circumstances. UBC student
Natasha Hung, 21, started reading
the Financial Post as a part of her
required course material. Then she
developed a real taste for it and
continued to subscribe to it
For others, convenience drives
them to read newspapers, like
William Lee, who only picks up
the Vancouver Province on
Sunday because the other daily
doesn't publish on that day.
And although most
respondents said they are avid
readers of the local mainstream
press, they have reservations
about their coverage of Asians.
Many would like to see the
coverage expand, yet recognize
that the stories should depend on
who is newsworthy. Others want
to read more stories about Asian
scientific and financial
professionals.
On a related note, many
respondents also said they want
to see more Asians in politics and
volunteering in community
groups. Recognizing that many
Asians already participate in
community life through volunteer
work in a variety of social
agencies, many respondents felt
that these people were not getting
enough attention for their efforts.
At the same time many
respondents were critical of some
Asians who flaunt their wealth
and are too vain. Because many
of our respondents were
mortgage-bound middle class
types, cash-strapped students and
entry level workers, tiiey seemed
to embody strong work ethics.
Therefore, the fabulously wealthy
immigrant label did not apply to
them.
lV
A
WI
%U^
THUNDERBIRD SHOP AT UBC
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YEAR END,
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SALE ENDS MARCH 31
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CONGRATULATIONS
FUTURE GRADUATES!
You are about to reach an important milestone. Now it
is time to start thinking about your next one — your
career.
If you are considering a business career, BCIT's one-year
post-graduate program in Business Administration
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For further information and application materials
contact Program Advising at (604) 434-3304 or toll-free
1-800-667-0676.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Application Deadlines
Winter Session 1993-1994
UBC students intending to transfer for the Winter Session
1993-94 to one of the undergraduate degree programs
listed below must submit a completed "Change of
Faculty" form to Undergraduate Admissions in the
Registrar's Office by the given deadline. Please note there
is a processing fee of $17.00.
DEGREE PROGRAM
DEADLINE
Fine Arts — Studio
March 31
Fine Arts - Theatre
April 01
Music
April 15'
Applied Science
April 30
Agricultural Sciences
April 30'
Arts
April 30
Dietetics
April 30 *
Fine Arts — Creative Writing
April 30'
Forestry
April 30 *
Home Economics
April 30*
Landscape Architecture
April 30
Physical Education
April 30
Commerce
May 31
Nursing (Four Year)
May 31
Pharmacy
May 31
* Please note new deadline date for these programs.
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Tuesday
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Pasta Night    *
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Piano Nightly
Reservations Recommended
3307 Dunbar ,cxxroi
Great Atmosphere
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tar      222-4033 8 Tuesday, March 23 1993
POW
Vfol. 75 No. 45
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When the clock struck 12
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Anita Mui
BY CHUNG WONG
BANG.
That was perhaps the most
memorable subtitle ever to cross a
screen in Vancouver.
The time was when
hundreds of Cantonese speakers
filled the city's Chinese theatres as
part of their weekend ritual.
In the crowd at East
Broadway's Golden Princess
Theatre William Yeung, a Viet
Ching gang member, had
simultaneously shot Tony Hong
then 18 years old in the eye. A true
life situational irony of life
imitating art. The audience at first
believed the gunshot was in dolby
stereo.
Was the kill planned for that
point of the film. Only the shooter
knows.
Tony Leung
Miraculously the boy survived.
Today Hong, 24, wears a glass eye
and still performs his midnight
movie ritual.
This uniquely Chinese midnight
phenomenon draws full houses in
Greater Vancouver's four Chinese
theatres every weekend, and
surprisingly, English cinemas have
yet to follow suit
At Aberdeen Centre's 361-seat
Sun Bo or New Treasure,
moviegoers flock to buy numbered
seat tickets in advance and then
perhaps relax at Rhino's Cafe with
a mango shake.
The films with favourites such as
Maggie Cheung, Anita Mui, Aaron
Kwok and Andy Lau changeover
weekly despite their success to
compete against video pirates. The
midnight show usually premieres
new films in town.
Hongkong film watchers are
Maggie Cheung
next expecting the reclusive
Leslie Cheung to return on
screen after an absence of
several years. Cheung moved
from Hongkong to West
Vancouver where he has lived in
reclusion reportedly to escape
Triads.
For those unfamiliar with
others popular in the line up:
• Maggie Cheung is
considered Hongkong's Meryl
Streep. She recently won the
best actress award at the Berlin
Film Festival for her portrayal of
the tragic death of China's most
famous actress Ruan Lin Yu.
• Anita Mui has been
dubbed Hongkong's Madonna
for her wild antics on stage in
her music career. Mui's producer
was sliced up at a karaoke bar in
Hongkong in a Triad-related
Aaron Kwok
assasination attempt. The
producer was later fatally stabbed
at the hospital.
• Tong Leung, voted as
Hongkong's best dress man, was
recently featured in The Lover.
• Aaron Kwok is the latest
target of Hongkong's tabloid
photo frenzy. He played the
villainous Grey Fox which co-
starred Anita Mui and Andy Lau
in Saviour of the Soul, a midnight
feature at the Vancouver
International Film Festival that
drew a full-house.
• Andy Lau has been a
favourite for surprisingly more
than a decade. Hongkong stars
seldom last beyond that period.
• Fay Fay or Fat Fat is
Hongkong's most recognizable
comedian, a Roseanne Barr type.
• And of course, Jackie
Chan, that martial arts expert.
Andy Lau
Nowadays he produces more films
than acts. But recently he starred
in City Hunter a parody of a
Japanese cartoon.
And that's a key word for
Hongkong films. Almost every
successful script in America has
been parodied in Chinese: Basic
Instinct, Pretty Woman etc. etc.
etc.
The results are usually
hilarious.
Despite the full house, there
are no queues. You can buy your
numbered ticket.
Other theatres include:
• The Far East which tookover
the Vancouver East theatre on
Commercial Drive but mainly
shows Hongkong adult films.
• Chinatown's Sun Sing or
New Voice which opened up
when The Golden Harvest theatre
was shut down due to gang fears.
Now you can be all over the map. Cheap
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