UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Dec 1, 2011

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126238.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126238.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126238-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126238-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126238-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126238-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126238-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126238-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126238-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126238.ris

Full Text

Array __m*__ij__^W
Aw' U- -t     "* *T» * z zh,
Chuck Davis: 574 pages of Vancouver history L 21 Page 2112.012011
What's on
This week, may we suggest..
THU
WRITING»
Write for Rights: 10am-3pm @ the SUB
Contribute to Human Rights Day by stopping by the SUB and writing letters to help release people who have been wrongfully detained. The event
features music, food, good karma and great practice for speed writing
your upcoming exams.
poetry:
Student Poetry Reading: 7pm-
10pm @ Project Space, 222 E
Georgia Street
A night of poetry from UBC
students and professional writers, guaranteed to expand your
mind and soul. Admission is by
donation.
Canadian Gothic and Faust
is Dead: 7:30pm @ Dorothy
Somerset
Check out the closing night of
these two student-directed plays.
Themes include independence
and the prophesied death of
mankind.
Hiroshima: Photographs by
Miyako Ishiuchi: 10am-5pm
@MOA
An exhibition of 52 photographs of clothing and personal
items belonging to victims of
Hiroshima, all day at the MOA.
You know, that awesome museum on campus that you visit
every week.
The Music of Stan Kenton: A
Centennial Celebration: 8pm
@ UBC Recital Hall
An evening with the UBC Jazz
Ensemble and all that jazz, featuring the music of Stan Kenton.
Got an event you'd like to see on this page? Send your event
and your best pitch to printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
THEUBYSSEY
December 1,2011, Volume XCIII, Issue XXV
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Justin McElroy
coordinating@u bysseyca
Managing Editor, Print
Jonny Wakefield
onnteditor@ubys:eyca
Managing Editor, Web
Arshy Mann
webeditor@ubysseyca
News Editors
Kalyeena Makortoff
& Micki Cowan
news@u bysseyca
Art Director
Geoff Lister
a rt@u bysseyca
Culture Editor   4
Ginny Monaco
culture@u bysseyca
Senior Culture Writers
Taylor Loren &
Will Johnson   1
tloren@ubysseyca
wjohnson@u bysseyca
Sports Editor
Drake Fenton
sports@u bysseyca
Features Editor
Brian Piatt
featu res@u bysseyca
Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@ubysseyca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@ubysseyca
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
ousiness@u bysseyca
Ad Sales
Ben Chen
advertising@u bysseyca
Senior Web Writer Accounts
Andrew Bates S[fat Hasan
abates@ubysseyca a ceo unts@u bysseyca
Graphics Assistant
Indiana Joel
ijoel@u bysseyca
Webmaster
Jeff Blake
webmaster@u bysseyca
STAFF
Andrew Hood, Bryce Warnes,
Catherine Guan, David Elop
Jon Chiang Josh Curran, Wil
McDonald, Tara Martellaro
Virginie Menard,Scott
MacDonald, Anna Zoria,
Peter Wojnar, Tanner Bokor
Dominic Lai, Mark-Andre
Gessaroli, Natalya Kautz, Ka
un, RJ Reid
CONTACT
Business Office: Room 23
Editorial Office: Room 24
Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Blvd
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.llbyssey.ca
feedback@ubyssey.ca
Print Advertising:
604.822.1654
Business Office:
604.822.6681
advertising
@ubyssey.ca
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper ofthe University of
British Columbia. It is published every Monday and Thursday by The
Jbyssey Publications Society. We
are an autonomous democratically
"un student organization, and all stu-
Ire encouraged to participate,
torials are chesen and written
Jbyssey staff. They are the
sed opinion of the staff, and
necessarily reflect the views
Jbyssey Publications Society
University of British Columbia. All editorial content appearing
n The Ubyssey is the property of
The Ubyssey Publications Society.
Stories opinions, photographs and
artwork contained herein cannot be
reproduced without the expressed,
written permission of The Ubyssey
Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is afcunding member of Canadian University Press
(CUP) and adheres to CUPs guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 wc :   :,,t:-:t - Judeyour
jnstude
ler1"- are
itc
lythel
:xf >se
lo :n<
)fl Ut
>r ti ■  Ui
phone number, student number anc
signature (nctfor publication) as wel
asyouryear and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked wher
submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey. otherwise verification will be done by
phone. The Ubyssey reserves the
right to edit submissions for length
and clarity. All letters must be received by 12 noon the day before
intended publication. Letters received after this point will be published in the following issue unless
there is an urgent time restriction
or other matter deemed relevant
bythe Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising
that If the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or If an error In the ad occurs the liability of the I IPS will not be greater
than the pr'^e paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
Our Campus
One on one with
the people who
make UBC
>3
JOSH CURRAN^HE UBYSSEY
"When you see 800 people so stoked on something, seeing people so happy is basically why I do it."
Ski and Board's sober president
Mike Dickson
StaffWriter
UBC is a long way from Texas.
Texas is a long way from Norway.
Thus, Norway is pretty far from
UBC, but distance doesn't matter
to Charlott Johansen, the current
president ofthe infamous UBC Ski
and Board Club.
The fourth-year international
relations major was born and
raised just outside of Oslo before
moving to Texas, where she spent
her teenage years. Though she
has risen through the ranks from
deputy social coordinator to head
honcho of one of UBC's largest
student organizations, she ended
up at UBC as a matter of second
choice.
"My first choice was actually
McGill," said Johansen with a
sheepish grin. "I didn't get accepted there, but I'm really glad
I ended up at UBC. I found really
good friends here, great community and great people all around."
Taking this mantra to heart,
Johansen is also the director of
sponsorship and social events for
the UBC Model United Nations
Assembly taking place from
January 6-8 next semester. She
Prenare
was also drawn to UBC for its
proximity to two of her favourite
things, the slopes and the sea,
amenities which call her back to
her homeland every summer.
"I love being in nature, watching the eternal sunsets in Norway
during the summer, getting in the
boat or going for hikes. My house
in Norway is basically on a mountain, and the ocean is ten minutes
away," she said.
Despite chairing what is generally regarded as the hardest-partying and rowdiest club at UBC,
Johansen doesn't drink; instead,
she lets the outdoors—and the indoors—get her endorphins going.
"I actually like sitting in Irving K.
Barber late on Friday nights and
studying; it's what we're here to
do! I like to do the things which
make me happy, which doesn't
have to involve getting drunk. As
long as the club is happy, so am I.
"It's a bit stressful at times,
doing coursework [Johansen is
also minoring in economics], the
Model United Nations and working a lot with the Ski and Board
Club. But when you see 800 people
so stoked on something, like the
condo cram we had this past
weekend, seeing people so happy
is basically why I do it."
One of her great-grandfathers
was part ofthe resistance movement when Germany occupied
Norway during WWII. "He
defended the king during the occupation and now that I can comprehend the gravity of war and
what he went through, it would
be great to talk to him about his
experiences," she said.
Future plans for the soon-to-
be-graduate include a master's
program in human security or terrorism, a return to Norway in July,
and working a job that challenges
her. She hopes to find something
within 100 miles of a ski hill. 13
Charlott Johansen
*>J
Occupation
President of the UBC Ski and
Board Club
Hometown
Oslo, Norway
Area of study
International relations major,
economics minor
biannual
humour
will be on
stands
next week
Need more sleep?
LIVE ON CAMPUS!
Residence rooms available
for immediate occupancy or
January 1, 2012.
Info and rates:
www.housing.ubc.ca
WINTER SESSION 604-822-2811
YEAR-ROUND 604-822-2812
STUDENT HOUSING AND
HOSPITALITY SERVICES News»
Editors: Kalyeena Makortoff & Micki Cowan
12.01.20111 3
STUDYING »
Students petition to keep Irving K. Barber open 24 hours all year
Asher Isbrucker
Contributor
Pulling all-nighters is a part of university life, but some students are
concerned that the university isn't
offering enough study space during
the wee hours ofthe night. And now
students have started a petition to
keep full libraries open.
Students Geoffrey Chu, Shane
Galway and Igor Opacic are starting
a petition to get the Irving K. Barber
Learning Centre (1KB) to extend its
hours to be open around the clock.
"We believe [the library] should
stay open an extra few hours into
the night," said Galway, a first-
year Arts student.
"We don't really think there's
anywhere on campus that allows
people to pull all-nighters.
"Midterms and papers are due
throughout the year, and a lot of
people find that the amount of
work we have to do throughout the
year means we need more study
hours," he said.
But there are challenges to
changing the library's schedule.
"From our experience with 24/7,
cleaning and proper maintenance
of spaces can be a major challenge," said Simon Neame, director
of 1KB. "[For example], washrooms
are also working over capacity,
which has created some issues."
But the largest obstacle is funding a 24 hour facility.
"There is a cost...we get our allocation, our funding, and we have
to work within those means," said
Corey Sue, director of finance and
facilities at 1KB.
Sue said the estimated cost of
increasing the operation to 24
hours for 32 weeks would be between $150,000 to $175,000 extra.
"This does not include longer
term, capital replacement costs
that are related to the accelerated
wear and tear on the building."
That would be on top ofthe current operating costs, which Neame
said are difficult to estimate.
But he said that security alone
has been costing 1KB $340,000
annually. Other services would be
affected as well, including attempts
to bring libraries up to speed.
"The library has its funding envelope and we have to work within
that," said Sue. "Do you want all
this technology, or do you want
the library to stay open?"
But petition creators said they
recognize the obstacles. "We know
there's a cost involved, but we
think that will be marginal.
"The benefit is it would provide
a place for students to study for
the night," said Galway.
Neame said the library is measuring traffic to see if the 24/7 option is viable. tH
TRANSIT »
UBC to reallocate U-Pass subsidy funds
Andrew Bates
Senior Web Writer
A $1.39 million subsidy from UBC
meant to help reduce student
U-Pass costs is being rerouted for
alternative use. While it's meant
to be used for transportation, the
money has yet to be locked in for
any particular project.
The subsidy was introduced in
2003 to reduce the U-Pass price by
$3 after the AMS capped student
payment at $20, accordingto a
2009 Ubyssey article.
The subsidy comes from fees collected through Parking Services.
But when the program was
replaced by a universal Lower
Mainland pass, the province began
providing their own subsidies to
ensure the U-Pass was the same
price at all institutions, explained
communications director of
Campus and Community Planning,
Kera McArthur.
"The province stepped in and
said, 'It's not fair for you, who can
afford this, and Emily Carr, who
can't. We want to have equality
in the program.' So that's where
we're at now," said AMS President
Jeremy McElroy.
Now, the money has been allocated to transportation spending
measures.
"These funds will be reinvested
in other university transportation
priorities that benefit students
through the annual university budget process," McArthur said.
Half of the money has been set
aside for the construction of a new
bus loop in Gage South, while 30
per cent will fund the increased administration ofthe U-Pass BC program. The rest will go towards data
collection and the Vancouver bike
share program, McArthur said.
News briefs
Riot photo by UBC alum is
Esquire's photo of the year
Esquire Magazine's photo of the
year is the "kissing couple" photo by
Vancouver photographer and former
Ubyssey editor Richard Lam.
The photo, taken by Lam while
he was on assignment for Getty
Images, occurred during the Game
Seven riots in June. But Lam told The
Ubyssey he didn't immediately realize
the photo would become the iconic
shot it is today.
"I gave [Getty] my cards and it
wasn't until [another photographer]
from Getty said. 'Oh. nice frame of
the couple kissing in the middle of
the street.'" he said. "So I ran back
and looked at it and my jaw kind of
dropped."
$1.39 MILLION
Where is the money from the old U-Pass subsidy going?
$695,000
Construction of a
diesel bus loop
$417,000
Administration of
the new U-Pass
program
$139,000
Data collection
$139,000
Bike share program
ANDREW BATES^HE UBYSSEY
This year the former U-Pass subsidy will be partly used to help fund bus loop construction and deal with new U-Pass administration
Accordingto McElroy, UBC
plans to purchase 200 bikes for a
bike share program
"We understand that the majority of this money has been spoken
for this year.
"But right now we're trying to
figure out what a more sustainable
future investment strategy would
look like," said McElroy.
"We do see [a new bus loop] as a
legitimate use if it means we get a
more functional, more efficient bus
loop, but again we have no timeline
when that's goingto be."
McElroy said there are pressing
concerns while the bus loop waits.
Albertans' grades boosted in
UBC applications
When evaluating grades from
Albertan high school applicants,
UBC is adding two per cent to their
averages.
A study in 2010 found Albertans
were graded harder in high school
but performed better at university
than BC students.
Numbers from recent years also
show that just under 30 per cent of
Albertan students manage a 75 per
cent average in grade 12. but over 40
per cent of BC graduates consistently
get a similar mark.
"An ineguity had developed and
we wanted to level the playing field."
said UBC registrar James Ridge to
The Montreal Gazette.
"We do know that the bus loop is
shitty right now," he said. "There's
not enough undercover area,
there's not enough drainage, there's
massive puddles, it's not very well
lit and super safe in terms of pedestrian crossing.
"And there's no reason why even
if it's for the short term we can't put
some investments into it."
He also suggested creating an
endowment fund, similar to how
rental revenue funds student housing endowments.
"Right now, with parking services revenue being a little bit
volatile," he said, "instead of just
Kwantlen students vote out
directors
Thirteen council members were
voted out of the Kwantlen Student
Association on Wednesday after a
petition called for their removal from
office.
The petition said that directors
"have brought the Kwantlen Student
Association into disrepute through
reckless decision-making and the irresponsible use of student fund."
During a special general meeting on Wednesday, a fire alarm was
pulled and pepper spray was used
near attendees. After reentering the
building, students returned and voted
unanimously. 325 to 0. to remove the
13 council members and place them
in bad standing with the association.
spending it left, right and centre,
creating an endowment that could
ensure future investment would be
a good course of action."
The AMS is currently working
towards a formal proposal to recommend where the money should
be allocated.
"The most important thing is
that it still be directed at students.
It was a great show of force for the
program, a goodwill gesture at the
beginning," McElroy said.
"If the university is still committed to supporting student-oriented
transportation initiatives, that's
where the money should be." 13
NewsWatch lists the under-
reported stories for 2011
NewsWatch Canada released its
list of 25 stories that were under-
reported by media in 2011. The media
watchdog group is part of the School
of Communication at Simon Fraser
University.
Top under-reported stories included Canada's negotiations with the
European Union for a Comprehensive
Economic and Trade Agreement, and
the human rights and environmental
abuses committed by Canadian mining companies abroad.
NewsWatch Canada has conducted news-monitoring research for 15
years with a focus on identifying blind
spots and double standards in the
media. 13
CLUBS»
New AMS club
brings profs and
students together
<AITLYN TISSINGTON^HE UBYSSEY
Professor James Vercammen talks with
WeiYi Shen and Haoran Jiang, co-presidents of the Student Professor Association
Club.
Chloe Bocker
Contributor
A new club on campus hopes to
bridge the professor-student gap by
bringingthe two groups together.
Founded by third-year finance
students WeiYi Shen and Haoran
Jiang, the Prof-Student Association
Club connects students and faculty
by hosting monthly events where
professors talk about their research
and career path.
"We want it to have an open, relaxed atmosphere," explained Shen.
"They wouldn't need to prepare
a lot. They'd just need to talk about
their personal things and students
will raise their questions to the
professor."
The club wants to give students
a chance to make connections with
faculty, learn more about their
professors, hear about potential
research opportunities and expand
their knowledge of other faculties.
"The reason we want to have
professors from different faculties
is so that if I'm a commerce student, I can sit there and listen to a
science professor and his research,
because I feel that every subject is
linked in some way," said Shen.
Shen and Jiang were largely
inspired by Sauder professor James
Vercammen, who teaches strategy and business economics in the
Faculty of Land and Food Systems
and holds honourary membership
in the club.
"It's kind of awkward for a professor to just show up at the Gallery
and strike up a conversation with
a student...so it's a good middle
ground for students that want to
engage the professors more, and
for professors that want to engage
the students more," said AMS
President Jeremy McElroy.
The club also plans to hold debate nights each semester with a
panel of five to six professors.
"It's a big challenge to get all the
professors here together, but we
are definitely working on this," said
Shen. 13 41 News 112.01.2011
TRIMESTER SYSTEM »
Summer semester redesign takes shape
Changes less drastic than anticipated, not a trimester system
NatalyaKautz
StaffWriter
Even summer might soon be hectic
at UBC.
Though not switching to a trimester system, UBC will be restructur-
ingthe summer courses session,
with plans of keeping the university
open more throughout the year.
The new summer session will
standardize the dates courses are
scheduled, explained Sean Heisler,
a student representative on the UBC
Board of Governors.
"It's not goingto be one four-
month term, but there are goingto
be two or three times when courses
could start and they'll either run
over the four months or they'll
run the first two or the last two
months."
Heisler said that allowing some
courses to run over four months
will give students the option to
treat the new summer session as a
full term.
Currently, summer courses do not
have shared start or end dates. The
availability and timing of courses is
also determined on a yearly basis.
Heisler said the motivation to
restructure came from difficulties
with scheduling summer courses.
"[Students] can plan ahead and
know that classes will be ending
by this date. It also helps structure
tne exam periods a bit more, so you
don't get caught with an exam when
you have other courses going on and
have to really juggle."
Julyet Benbasat, a senior instructor in the chemistry department,
has taught summer courses for the
past seven years. She said the lack
of consistency in course scheduling complicates academic planning
for students. "The students need to
know ahead of time, because that's
how they plan their next year as
well."
The changes will also combat the
summer session's negative reputation. "Summer in the past has been
looked at as kind of a sub-par term,"
said Heisler.
"We don't believe that's a good
thing. So we're looking to give the
summer some more structure to
legitimize it as a term."
Samantha Tomicki, a fourth-
year Science student, took a course
this past summer. She agreed that
restructuring would boost the summer session's reputation. "It would
be a good thing to promote summer
school, because I think that if more
people took it, people might not
have that stigma about summer,"
she said.
Though courses are allowed to
run over the entire four months,
Heisler said that the university
decided against switching to a trimester system as it would hinder
international students.
"There was a reluctance to move
right away into a trimester system
A student kicks back on the beach, enjoying summer school. If only
GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
just because on the international
side, that takes away their ability
to go home and travel or go with
their family, because that two weeks
between summer and regular term
isn't enough time to make that
worthwhile when you're flying
across the world."
But Tomicki thought that restructuring summer school would have
a small impact on international students. "I think summer still mostly
applies to and attracts people that
already live in the area.
"People who leave for the summer would still end up leaving for
the summer."
Heisler said the two-term structure also allows students to build
up prerequisites more quickly. "We
didn't want to take fully away the
opportunity that exists to get two
courses done in a slightly more compressed time period to really focus
on them."
In the new summer structure,
three-week courses will no longer
be standard.
"We're not completely removing the opportunity for that," said
Heisler. "We're just saying that's not
a default, and that's not an easy option to take."
In summer of 2011, 111 ofthe
1000 summer courses were 3 week
courses, and nearly 10 per cent were
Japanese. Heisler said that language
programs who make a case for
needingthe condensed, immersion
experience will still have the option
of running three week courses.
Benbasat said the loss of three
week courses could result in difficulties recruiting professors.
"Especially people who are doing
research, a six week commitment
is very different from a three week
commitment, so it maybe an issue."
The changes to the summer
session are calculated to create a
different atmosphere on campus
duringthe summer. "After being on
the campus for a summer, anybody
will tell you that the place is pretty
empty," said Heisler.
Though the date for implementing the new schedule has yet to
be set, Heisler said that students
should expect more changes to the
summer term.
"We're really looking at beefing
up our offerings of those over the
summer to help people learn and
grow and the course structuring is
really just the first step." tH
AFRICAN STUDIES »
Students lobby for African studies major
Chloe Bocker
Contributor
Students and faculty are lobbying for an African studies major,
and while a minor program does
exist at UBC, advocates say it's not
enough for a world class university.
"Right now it is totally clear
that there is a demand from the
students. AAI [African Awareness
Initiative] has been proving this,"
said Bahador Moosavi, chair ofthe
AMS Education Committee.
"What would be interesting is
for them to show us that there is an
academic demand."
AAI—a group of UBC students
and faculty members dedicated to
enhancing the UBC community's
understanding of Africa— currently
helps maintain the African studies
minor program, which it originally
helped create.
Now, AAI is at the forefront ofthe
campaign for the African studies
major, tryingto prove to the university that it would be an asset to
UBC's program offerings.
But enrolment might be telling; the African studies minor has
grown in size considerably since its
establishment in 2006. This year,
approximately 150 students are
enrolled in core African studies
courses, filling class capacities.
The African studies major is
not currently listed as one ofthe
faculty's initiatives on the Start an
Evolution campaign, a multimillion
dollar fundraising campaign to support UBC's academic initiatives.
However, several departments
in the Faculty of Arts as well as the
Museum of Anthropology have been
fundingthe African studies minor
program since its emergence. AAI
says that without a proper major/
minor program, it will be harder to
maintain financial aid.
Gloria Onyeoziri is the co-chair of the African studies program
COURTESY OF GLORIA ONYEOZIR
"It's really nice that we have
their support, but it's not sustainable," said Mehak Tejani, a fourth-
year student and the president of
AAI. "We need to have a department of African studies to ensure
commitment."
AAI co-chair Robert Miller said
a different approach will be needed
to convince the university to fund
the program. "I think that there's a
little bit of a danger in trying to convince the faculty or the university
that there's a need for more African
studies," he said.
"We could be working against
ourselves. If we insist on the present program being inadequate,
we are not doing much to attract
students to take our classes and the
minor."
Nonetheless, Moosavi said that
it shouldn't be too difficult to move
forward from here.
"The good thing with African
studies is that they already have
something tangible to work with:
the African studies minor.
"Building up on that is not going
to be hard." 13
Like you.
Whether you need to pick up a
prerequisite or fulfill a requirement,
Athabasca University has more than
8oo online courses that can transfer
to your degree at your home
univers ity. Talk with youradvisorto
find out if AU is an option for you.
Learn more at
explore.athabascau.ca.
Athabasca Universityifl »
Bill Reid's Raven anMe, ■
First Men, depicting the
• haida myth of human '•
creation; tddEfwayears* i
to* complete. It was de*di-,,
: seated in 1980ana cat) be/
seen in trie UBC ,V,L:seum   :
ofAnthropology.;   ::".;:
... ,.   "     ....    .
[IavrifayikV:tfi(Pfomk:
...       ...      ..
____j____j______f__i
November 20 Vancouver was  °Ver Westcrn 0ntari°- ™s team had
,   declared a "nuclear free zone" in a five flrst rounders selected in the CFL
plebiscite. Voters also okayed Sunday ** M players P,aced on the lei
k Wing. All-Star team," and 12 of its playt_„
-  P'ayed professionally in the CFL
Also November 20    *.
The UBC November 22 Firebombs went
Thunderbirds, ^^^v^^a
coached by Frank
Smith, won the
CIAU (Canadian
Interuniversity l*-**-
Athletic Union) / *■
football
championship, the /
■» the UBC Sports Hall of Fame, TSN      ^ H^£ , j'^
fcotball analysts called this team
"the greatest in CIAU history. It went
ra&feated in Canadian competition
112-0), often dominating by more
Hun 40 points, winning the Canadian
championship with a 39-14 victory
group calling itself the Wimmin's Fire
Brigade claimed responsibility. Five
people (who became known as the
Squamish Five) were arrested January
20,1983, and, for this and other acts
(including bombing a Litton Industries
plant in Toronto), were jailed for term;
ranging from six years to life.
Of. w,»l
veral distfon,^    mt° U asked
a"ad^Wfi0fl^^ereo
feaci,
revved i
^t it did.
^^imer'viZ'8,81^^
ace- Tie
a/7
efs'^sttaf'r!d^rec;5c
flakes
!POPo«oftte7/a^r
^^ed°^ep^TO^of
year-old e*,. „     uc-c«ono„J
If*^
and
aer3j
?J5s^etier      "^Stj
J'ears/.
ecajjjg
ater.
eCfl«
socce^^rese^eafs
tvon
*e5CAf;
■auiland
Ik         -A-                j
»tfz • *%_
__• ■      ' 'r&!
\
(t
■      1     /
h
- Feature 112.012011
What if everything y<
about sex came from
watching porn?
The Ubyssey's look at the Porn Generation
Georgia
Guest
Editor
Our generation is
inundated with sex
on glowing screens.
Whether it's Internet porn on your laptop or
the increasingly free standards of sex in the
cinema, there's no shortage of skin available
ifyou're looking for it—and even ifyou aren't,
you can hardly avoid it.
This year's sex supplement looks at how
porn has affected the way in which we "perform" in the bedroom, the rise of feminist
porn in the male-dominated porn industry,
and how the provincial film classification
board deals with explicit sexual imagery.
One common theme is present throughout
these stories: there's no inherent reason that
seeing more graphic sex should be a negative
factor in our culture.
But it means we need to work harder at
communicating with our partners about what
we want in bed, and educating our children
about what a healthy sex life means.
Enjoy! 13
NDIANAJOE^HE UBYSSEY
Enjoy porn
without
being
chauvinist
Feminist movements turn
their attention to adult
entertainment
Alexandra Downing &
Veronika Khvorostokhina
Contributors
Porn and feminism make odd bedfellows.
Mention pornography to feminists of previous generations, and they'll likely shudder.
Porn at its worst is demeaning and sometimes
even violent, which is in opposition to a movement that makes empowerment its goal.
But a new generation of feminists has transformed these anti-porn sentiments. Having
grown up in an increasingly sex-positive culture, third-wave feminists began reexamining
pornography in an effort to reform the industry. Thus, a feminist porn movement was born.
"The legacy of commercial straight
porn is one of racism, heterosexism and
phallocentrism—none of which carries a posi
tive, enriching sexual charge for female view
ers," says Becki Ross, the department chair
of women's and gender studies at UBC. "Men
have controlled pornscapes forever because
they've owned the means of production, as
Karl Marx would
say."
Feminist porn
tries to get
more women
involved in
the production
process. This in
itself is empowering. By upset-
tingthe gender   .
divide within
the industry,
feminist porn
can create better conditions
for sex industry
workers, and
depict women as
enjoying sex.
For five years,
Toronto-based
sex shop Good for
Her has organized the
Feminist Porn Awards.
The awards have celebrated works of feminist
pornographers such as Erika Lust, Tristan
Taormino and Anna Span. Men have been
honoured as well; male pornographers Carlos
Batts and James Avalon won in 2010 and 2011,
respectively.
"Sex and porn are not inherently bad,"
wrote Alison Lee, the organizer ofthe
Feminist Porn Awards, in a 2009 article for
This Magazine. "It's exploitation, unsafe working conditions, coercion and advocating violence that are never okay."
The artificiality of mainstream porn body
types are a big focus of feminist porn.
John Ince is a Vancouver-based author, lawyer and politician. In his 2005 book
The Politics of Lust,
he worried that "the
only porn available to ayoung
person [depicts]
a narrow range
of bodytypes,
such as only slim
women with big
breasts and no
stretch marks,
pimples, or cel-
lulite... constant
exposure to such
a narrow range
of porn could
produce a sexual
appetite only for
few body types."
Feminist porn
rebels against
this narrow range,
to the point of having a
"Most Deliriously Diverse Cast" at
the Feminist Porn Awards. Their films show
straight, queer, transgender and transsexual
men and women of various races and body
types.
"We need new kinds of porn that will allow
everyone to have a healthy experience instead
of restricting fantasies to a few stereotypes,"
says Erika Lust, a pioneering writer, director
and producer in feminist porn.
Ross agrees. "It's time for lesbians, disabled
women, fat women, trans women, elders and
women of colour to seize opportunities to
imagine sexual representation on our own
terms—juicy, messy, hot and liberatory."
"Traditional, male-dominated porn...shows
a categorization of women into two groups:
virgins or whores," says Lust, "and in both
cases it says that the role of women in society
is sexual and tied to men. It denies women's
pleasure in sex and shows an artificial vision
of sex based only on old stereotyped and sexist
fantasies.
"Many men don't feel they can identify to
this porn either, since it has nothingto do with
the women they know, the situations they're in
every day."
"What's been missing in male-dominated
porn is the evidence of arousal of women, and
they're not particularly aroused often," says
Ince. "So much ofthe female response is not
real and we can detect that. Really concrete
stuff like an engorged vulva, an engorged clitoris, a flush on the chest. When women are really turned on they're more likely to turn men
on, and the failure of traditional male-dominated porn to give a lot of attention to female
pleasure undermines its effectiveness."
For those involved in the feminist porn
industry, this adds up to a simple conclusion:
traditional mainstream porn can be unhealthy.
"Most of us saw our first porn film when we
were teenagers," says Lust. "The lack of quality
sex ed and the easy access to mainstream porn
results in us havingto learn about sex from
adult entertainment.
"It's completely normal to watch porn, but if
traditional porn is the only kind of porn, there
is nothing that shows another vision of sex, a
healthier, modern vision." <U We're watching
more porn than
ever. Is it replacing
communication in
our sex lives?
Who
film?
decides how much sex we see on Sports»
B Editor-Drake Fenton
12.01.20111 8
The Sports
Panel
With the end of term approaching,
The Ubyssey felt they had an
obligation to answer the most
pressing questions about this past 11*
semester in UBC sports. ^~
Who was great, who wasn't?
Our esteemed panel of scotch-
drinking, chew-spitting intellectuals
has the answers.
£
11 make:
noise in the Canada West next
semester?
Janine Frazao is to scoring
goals as you are to...
rBilly Greene is to football as
you are to....
This semester proved it was a
good idea that we didn't move
to the NCAA because...
■Drake
(Sr^^SFenton
Ubyssey Sports Editor I
Sports Knowledge: Washed up
athlete
■■■ ■■
There really is no debate here.
The women's field hockey team
absolutely beasted this season.
CIS gold=UBCs best.
Other than the UBC Quidditch
team? Unfortunately a winless
season puts you in this category.
Women's rugby.
Of any story published in any
section this term, our profile of e-
sports and the Starcaft Club is our
most read article online...
but
vvomens volleyball is a given
men's volleyball has gotten off to
a strong start and could end up
surpri:
Continuing my path to one day
becoming a contestant on The
Biggest Toser.
When was the last time you heard
anything about an SFU sports
team? That's right. You haven't.
Ubyssey Stallion
Sports Knowledge: Ignorant
whelp
UBC Fight Club. I'd go on. bu
know the rules.
Team Edward. That's like a Harry
Potter thing, right?
The entire AMS exec has a thing
for Miami coke and boundary-
pushing S&M. The story's out
there, but no one is picking it up.
vhere. and
Construction. Its everywhere, anc
loud as shit. What the hell. UBC.
Just finish building yourself.
jenerating and accumulating
regrets.
Remaining stationary for lori'
periods of time.
'
DEATH TO AMERICA.
■■■
Ubyssey Coordinating Editor
Sports Knowledge: Former sports
editor and general man of knowledge
I'm going to go out on a limb and
declare the women's field hockey
team-the only UBC team to win
a national championship this se-
mester-thebest
I would mention a certain rugby
team that has no males on it. but
then they would probably write
more angry comments on our
website.
■
..blindly..give it...to...Bi
Greene....Must....not...ah, screw it
UBC's first football MVP in over a
decade, and richly deserved.
This was the first semester where
UBC's athletic program wasn't in a
state of limbo over whether they
were joining the NCAA.
The women's basketball team is
first in their division and have a
number of veteran stars. They
have a better chance of hosting
layoff games than the men do.
P
sneezing. I do it often, and usually
in streaks of two or three.
Playing Mario Kart after a few
beers: Operating at a level few
can match, and successfully evading linebackers/banana peels.
The football team didn't
disintegrate due to massive turnover, allowing a banner year for
the program.
Sports Knowledge: Midway
through season 3 of Friday Night Lights
I recall running something lik
2300 words on the women's volleyball team. For some reason I
agreed to that length, so I assume
Oh. why would we want to say
that? It seems like everyone had a
pretty good time, right?
an we talk about Billy
Greene? I'd love to have his season cast in bronze and placed in
front of City Hall. One word: hero.
Billy Greene. Serge Kaminsky
and Jordan Grieve drink The
Ubyssey's editorial staff under the
table.
seriousl
are the only team that hangs theii
hat on their ability to make persuasive noises.
Why is this guestion here?
can probably kick a soccer ball
through a steel plate. I have
trouble waking up before 11am.
There's really no comparisoi
wake up every morning, look
the poster of Greene hanging
my fridge and remind myself
I will never possess his raw pc
Pedophilia scandals? I think the
answer is pedophilia scandals. 12 oi 20111 Sports 19
Term one round-up: how did the Thunderbirds fare?
Drake Fenton
Sports Editor
GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
MEN'S FOOTBALL
The football team was reborn this
season.
After a 2-6 record in 2010, there
weren't high expectations for the
Shawn Olson-coached T-Birds. Yet
the team defied preseason predictions and bought into Olson's coaching philosophy.
Behind the big play capability of
star quarterback Billy Greene, UBC
finished the season with a 6-2 record,
won their first home game in two
and a half years, hosted and won a
playoff game—the last time that happened was 1999—and made it to the
Canada West final.
While the T-Birds got blown out in
that game 62-13 by Calgary, the loss
does little to diminish the success the
program had this year. Greene win-
ningthe Hec Crighton Award [CIS
MVP] doesn't hurt either.
<r
GEOFF LISTERmE UBYSSEY
MEN'S SOCCER
UBC's season was articulated
in terms of a single goal: win at
nationals.
By that measure, the season was
disappointing, not least for the players and staff of the men's soccer
team. Although it came down to the
shocking 89th minute goal by Alberta
in the Canada West final, the second half of the season was weighed
down by an inability to secure results
away. A2-2-5 road record prevented
them from seizing home advantage
in the Canada West.
Still, UBC had a very strong season—undefeated for nine games, two
deserving All-Canadians and a 6-0-1
record at home. But for a program
as focused on silverware as this one,
there's one goal left. They'll have to
keep searching for it.
—Andrew Bates
titi
<AI JACOBSON/THE UBYSSEY
WOMEN'S SOCCER
If success was judged by the regular
season alone, UBC would have garnered a five-star ranking.
The team finished second in the
Canada West with a 11-1-2 record.
They had 11 clean sheets in 14
games. To cap it off, Janine Frazao
scored an outstanding 16 goals en
route to capturing the Canada West
player ofthe year award.
But when things counted most,
UBC couldn't produce. In the first
round ofthe Canada West playoffs,
Alberta upset UBC 4-2 in penalty
kicks. The T-Birds couldn't score in
regulation, disappointing for a team
that averaged 2.28 goals per game.
On the positive side, the 'Birds
did manage to beat Victoria in the
bronze medal game and Frazao
and Kelly Cook were named
All-Canadians.
ir#
DAVID MOLUUCATHLCTICS
WOMEN'S FIELD HOCKEY
When you are the best team in the
country, there is no way you don't
receive a five star ranking.
After finishing first in the Canada
West with a 8-2-2 record, UBC traveled to nationals as the top ranked
team in the country.
They went undefeated in round
robin action, including a 2-1 victory
over the University of Toronto—the
team that defeated them by the
same score in the 2010 CIS final.
In the CIS final they easily
handled the University of Calgary,
winning 3-1. It was the 'Birds 13th
national championship victory, and
their 2nd in 2 years.
To sweeten the pot, Robyn
Pendleton won the Canada West
MVP award and won her second
CIS tournament MVP. She previously won the award in 2009.
JON CHIANG^HE UBYSSEY
WOMENS RUGBY
Unfortunately for UBC, they were
the worst team in the Canada West
this year.
In a very short, four game season,
the Thunderbirds failed to win a
single game. They were the only
team on campus that failed to make
the Canada West playoffs, and by
the end ofthe season they were out-
scored 147-20.
To make matters worse, Calgary
beat them 34-10. It was Calgary's
first ever CIS women's rugby
victory.
While the team had little success
this year, they are still a very young
team with not one true senior on
the roster. UBC does have talent on
their roster—scrum half Meghan
Hamm was last year's Canada West
rookie ofthe year—and they have
something to build on for next year. Opinion »
B Editor- Rrian Piatt
12.01.20111 IQ
UTS All
just emu out
A -Joint.
NDIANAJOEL/THE UBYSSEY
The Last Word
Parting shots and snap judgments on today's issues
Good on the mayors for
supporting legalized pot
The open letter by four former
Vancouver mayors advocating ending
the prohibition on marijuana hasn't
been greeted with giant fanfare in
this city. Most people in Vancouver,
either from direct or second-hand
experience, know the effects of
marijuana are in line with those of
cigarettes and alcohol, not cocaine
or heroin.
So public opinion on the matter
may be essentially settled in favour
of decriminalization. But it's still illegal, carries heavy penalties and all
it takes is a cop in a bad mood for a
person to receive a punishment that
definitely does not fit the crime.
Itwas a mere decade ago that
Canada was seemingly turning a
corner on marijuana laws. Dr Keith
Martin, a longtime Reform/Alliance/
Conservative MP from Vancouver
Island, championed decriminalizing
pot for years. Jean Chretien indicated that a private member's bill could
pass. It was even debated on the floor
ofthe House of Commons.
But parliamentary turnover
prevented passage ofthe law. The
Conservatives were elected, and
since then the laws surrounding marijuana have become more
draconian.
Marijuana laws won't change until
public officials of high esteem are
leadingthe charge, not Jodie Emery.
The letter from the mayors is a good
start.
True flexibility conies from a
trimester system
A trimester system at UBC would
mean there are three equal terms
throughout the year. SFU uses this
system. But it won't be happening
here anytime soon, accordingto the
Board of Governors.
There are good and bad reasons
for not moving to a trimester system.
Yet what we're hearing right now is
mostly ofthe bad variety.
Arguments premised on the notion that short summer courses give
students more flexibility are badly
flawed. The choice of courses is very
limited, and the intense workload of
a condensed course makes it impossible to keep a decent job at the same
time. Furthermore, most employers
won't hire summer students for anything less than four months.
A trimester system would allow
students to complete degrees in far
less time, and would also allow students to take a vacation term at any
time of year, not just the summer.
Which brings us to another bad
argument: the idea that international
students would suffer from a trimester system because they would n't be
able to visit their families during the
summer.
In a trimester system, not only
could international students still take
the summer term off if they wanted,
they could also take a different term
off if that was easier for them.
The only convincing argument
we've heard about why a move to
a trimester system can't happen
soon is because ofthe labour contract with faculty and staff. That
contract would obviously have to
be completely re-opened if the university moved to having three full
terms, and a whole can of worms
would be opened along with it. Any
disputes that arise would almost
certainly not be in the best interest
of students.
What UBC really needs to do
is implement a long term plan for
switching over to a trimester system.
Everyone would benefit: students
would have a wide variety of options
of when and how to complete their
degree, faculty would have the ability
to do research in fall or winter terms,
and the university administration
would make significant progress
toward having a year-round sustainable community.
It's a no-brainer, isn't it?
UBCshouldhave more options
for all-nighters on campus
A group of students have started
a petition to have the Irving K.
Barber Learning Centre (1KB) be
open 24/7 all term. The management of 1KB estimates this could
cost $150,000 annually, which
is admittedly a hefty price for a
service that, outside of exam season, will likely serve a fairly small
subset of students.
Yet it does seem necessary that a
university of UBC's size should have
more options available for late night
studying than the relatively uncomfortable foyer of Woodward. As more
study spaces are built in the coming
years, UBC should plan from the be-
ginningto have some space available
for all-nighters.
Somebody mahea good
Christmas movie, please
It's December 1, which means that
it's now Official Holiday Time, the
time of year where we celebrate
Togetherness and Family and
Presents and definitely not the birth
of Jesus Christ.
Christmas is now very much an inclusive holiday, where consumerism
has replaced religion as the universal
principle behind everything. And
while our staff doesn't have much
opinion one way or the other on that
change, we do have one pet complaint—the decline in pop culture
offerings.
Christmas is a time where we
have nothing to do for days and
days, so we listen to carols that date
back centuries and watch A Charlie
Brown Christmas along with whatever other Christmas specials are
on TV.
But how many great Christmas
songs—that's original songs, not
covers—have been written in the
last 30 years? What about movies
or TV shows that aren't remakes or
homages to It's a Wonderful Life or
Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer?
There's really nothing to speak
of. Don't try to argue that The Polar
Express stands up to the classics, or
that it ever will. Even Festivus jokes
stopped being funny a couple of years
ago.
And the problem isn't that recent
Christmas movies and songs are just
new and we'll grow to like them over
time; the problem is that they objectively suck—or, at the very least, are
boring and underwhelming.
So, to all the visual arts students
and musicians who read this paper,
make it your duty to spread some
original Christmas cheer this year.
We'd all be in your debt. 13
Students will lose the
Gage South battle
Editor's
Notebook
Arshy
Mann
Gage South is the argument that
doesn't go away.
Like a niggling itch in the part of
your back that you can't quite reach,
the question over what to do with the
land around the bus loop has been
driving UBC crazy for what seems
like an eternity.
And in many ways, the debate
about the future of this parcel of
land is really a debate about the
future ofthe university writ small.
Do the opinions of students, who
are numerous but temporary, matter more than the concerns of those
more permanently attached to the
university—namely faculty, staff and
residents?
The decisions on the Gage South
area will shape the identity of UBC
for decades to come. And the proposals on the table appear, at least to
this humble observer, to have left
students on the losing end.
All four ofthe options presented
bythe university include possible
space for non-student housing, despite a petition that thousands have
signed demandingthe area be for
student use. So it's worth askingthe
question honestly: if faculty and staff
housing were built in the direct vicinity ofthe Student Union Building,
would that be such a terrible thing?
The big concern is that this is the
area students will want to regularly
use to hold events, and it will seriously hamper our ability to do that if
there are families literally livingbe-
side a proposed outdoor beer garden.
But, as some will argue, faculty
and staff are associated with UBC
and know that the heart of campus
can sometimes be a noisy place,
right? And the university is assuring
us that students will also be allowed
to rent, so shouldn't that help?
It's true that faculty and staff will
not be duped into believing that UBC
is a quiet, serene place where students are seen and not heard, like so
many residents who now live in market housing. But that doesn't mean
you aren't goingto get some families
moving there with young kids. Once
that happens, nothing can be done
in that area without UBC demanding, "Won't somebody think ofthe
children?"
If the housing is meant to accommodate students as well, that
will help. But unless it's priced low
enough that students can actually
afford it—which means comparable
to what it costs to live in residence—
this new housing will be available to
students in name only.
With pressure from faculty and
staff who are in dire need of on-
campus housing, the university will
almost certainly decide to prioritize
these groups for Gage South. Zoning
the area as "academic"—which
would mean that only students could
live there—is by far the best option
for keeping the heart of campus a
student-centred environment. But
it's looking more and more unlikely
that UBC will give up on putting faculty and staff housing here.
The student-led petition hasn't
moved the university off their position yet, so why would they suddenly
change their mind now?
The battle for Gage South is likely
lost. Students are just fighting for the
scraps. 13
Reforming the UNA
Letters
The University Neighbourhoods
Association (UNA) is a quasi-municipal council for the residents livingon
campus. A group of residents is calling
for changes in how the UNA represents them.
For thepreamble to this tenpoint
agenda, see the full letter posted on
our website.
1. UNA has an opportunity to
create a community unlike all others. But first, it must abandon its
slow-moving, inflexible bureaucracy seemingly set up for control,
power and the convenience of hired
staff and board members. It should
respond more quickly to residents'
concerns and encourage discourse,
not muzzle dissent by censorship of
critical articles in its newsletter.
2. The number of elected UNA
directors must increase commensurate to UTown's population growth.
In fairness to voters, elected directors should step down if unable to
perform their duties and not pass on
their responsibilities to hired staff.
3. UBC reps in the UNA Board
should not have voting rights and
serve only two-year terms like the
directors.
4. UNA needs to hold more town
hall meetings where residents are
heard on key issues. Expenditures
of $100,000 and up should be announced for residents' comments and
not approved in camera.
6. UNA should lobby UBC vigorously to get the authority to pass
bylaws on noise, animal control and
parking.
7. UNA should lobby Campus
and Community Planning (CCP) to
mail notices for public hearings 21
days in advance; not just posted in
websites, email blasts or newspapers. Furthermore, consultations
should start at the conceptual stage
of a development in cases where
developments are within 30 metres
from the boundary of a residential
neighborhood.
8. UNA should strive to have residents represented in CCP Advisory
Planning and Technical Advisory
Committees, the Urban Design Panel
and the Development Permit Board.
9. The Campus Resident must stop
candy-coating UNA activities and
window-dressing UBC's feudal malpractices and focus more on public
affairs. It should have an editorial
board with an elected director and
a resident rep and not be controlled
by hired staff interested only in
makingthe UNA look good with PR
gimmickry.
10. Lastly, the UNA should negotiate with UBC to have authority and
power to govern. It cannot function as a democratic local unit when
major decisions are made bythe UBC
Board of Governors where the residents are NOT represented.
-Eleanor R. Laquian, on behalf of
Residents for Change Scene»
Pictures and words on your university experience
12.01.20111 11
LIVING »
you next Tuesday: elevating the cursing discourse
--     . ■. these davs includes a liberal : %\K.'3Z?.\ir.^
Melodramatic
Musings
Will
Johnson
I love swear words.
While I was growing up, my parents called them "jail" words, a vast
category that included such innocuous insults as "stupid," "shut up" and
"dumb-dumb." Basically anything I
could potentially say when one of my
little sisters stole my Ninja Turtles.
When I was eight years old I got
grounded for two weeks for test-
driving a new word I heard on the
playground. When my Mom put
me to bed early I mumbled "bitch"
meekly under my breath as she left
the room, barely loud enough for
her to hear. She stormed back to my
bedside and demanded I repeat the
word.
Understandably, she threw a fit.
She even called my father, who was
always the real disciplinarian of
the household. This wasn't a word
I would repeat in her presence any
time soon.
But it was also my first experience with the power of vulgarity. If
you wanted to elicit an emotional
response from someone, there were
certain choice words that really
delivered. At school we would toss
them back and forth casually, taste
them in our mouths, giggle after pro-
nouncingthem.
But in the post-Pulp Fiction era,
swear words have been robbed of
their power to shock. My vocabulary
these days includes a liberal
sprinkling of profanity. Like most
Canadians, my favourite is "fuck,"
followed closely by "goddamn" and
"shit." But I'm entirely comfortable using all of these in almost any
situation. Nobody gasps or cringes.
Nobody is offended anymore.
Racial slurs and homophobic
slang still have the power to shock
(and rightfully so), but it's the hatred
behind these words that gives them
power—not the words themselves.
A year or two ago, Dr Laura
Schlessinger, a famous American
radio broadcaster who's been on
the air longer than I've been alive,
ended her talk show career after a
controversy surrounding her use of
the N-word multiple times.
But as she pointed out, this word
is used multiple times in every episode ofthe HBO show The Wire. So
it's not the word itself that offends
people, it's the person who is saying
it.
The same goes for words like
"fag" or "homo," which queer people
say freely these days to describe
themselves. These words have been
reclaimed.
But there's one word that still
makes people blush—"cunt."
I should clarify: it makes North
Americans blush. Maybe it's leftover baggage from our Sexual
Revolution, but the C-word still carries heavy connotations of misogyny. Elsewhere in the world, most
notably in the UK, it has become a
favourite play-word.
"Will, you, sir, are the biggest cunt
mmmmmmmmmmmm
%*VV.'.-'.v'
"Will, you, sir, are the biggest cunt of all the cunts I know,' a friendly Brit named Mike told me while we were
>v#AV»V£v£VvAVAV'V#
MU''.'.".*
DAVID MARINO^HE UBYSSEY
traveling through Thailand."
of all the cunts I know," a friendly
Brit named Mike told me while we
were travelingthrough Thailand
together. Mike used the word interchangeably for everything from
"friend" to "dude" to "jerk." And in
this particular instance, he was using it as a compliment.
I watched one of my other British
friends embarrass himself while
he attempted to hit on a girl from
Seattle. She said something inane
and he laughed, threw his arm
around her and said, "Fuck off, ye
daft cunt."
She reared up like he'd slapped
her. The poor guy had no idea what
he'd done wrong.
I think, as a society, we need to
give up this particular hang-up. The
male equivalent ofthe word "cunt"
is "dick," a word no one hesitates to
use.
I'm not suggesting it should be
used to hurt or offend anyone. I'm
merely saying it's a delicious word to
pronounce, and will further add to
our powers of expression.
And come on, the word describes
a beloved piece of female anatomy.
Why should that be vulgar? tH
This column originally appeared in
the October 28,2010 issue of The
Martlet, the student newspaper at the
University of Victoria.
Sudoku by Krazydad
9
6
7
4
1
5
2
8
9
4
3
4
5
2
1
2
3
4
5
5
1
7
6
2
1
5
8
3
Comicsmasterby Maria Cirstea
V
E
8
9
6
V
Z
L
9
L
9
6
z
P
8
e
I
S
z
I-
s
L
e
9
8
P
6
9
V
L
e
5
6
i-
Z
8
8
6
e
\.
L
z
9
9
P
I
s
z
8
9
V
6
e
L
e
L
9
6
Z
9
t>
8
V
6
9
V
9
V
e
L
9
z
9
z
I
p
8
L
9
6
e
BUT  I Ut-PT ^OU-(Vfe
T0£   fe.&wtf
Mkdr
. AND TH€ £^Z
SPARTAN HEALTH <ReaRzerour (Dreams
SCIENCES UNIVERSITY
Over 30 years of training medical doctors
4 years MD program
Low affordable tuition
Long standing rotation programs in US and
Canada
2000+ practicing physicians in CANADA, US, and across
the globe.
Same curriculum as US medical programs and universities
Located in the beautiful Caribbean island of St. Lucia
Direct flights from Toronto, New York, Miami, Atlanta,
London
High acceptance rate into residency programs at major US
hospitals
Low rate credit lines from reputable Canadian banks.
Call RBC at 416 974 8124
1*1
Spartan University
St. Lucia
Tel: (718) 841 7660
[m\  www.spartanmed.org
New York Office
Tel: (718) 456 6446 121 Games 12.01.2011
Crossword
Across
1
2
3
'
1
S
G
7
'
1
"
10
11
12
13
14
'S
"
17
"
"
20
21
1
■
23
■ 24
"
26
27
28
■ 23
30
31
■ 32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
■ 43
44
■ 45
46
■ '
43
49
50
*
GO
51
52
54
1
55
5G
57
58
'
"
G2
-
"
65
G6
"
(CUP) - Puzzles provided by BestCrosswords.com. Used with
permission.
1- Fissure
5- Reveal indiscreetly
9- Pursue
14- Hebrew month
15- Receiver Jerry
16-la vista
17- Richard of CA icago
18- Draft classification
19- Mary of The Maltese Falcon
20- Small bud-like unit grows
apart from parent plant
22- Act of anointing
24-OPEC units
25- Recompense
26-Hire
29- Kyoto's country
31-Chick of jazz
32- Whimper
33-RR stop
36-Spy org.
37- Hawaii's largest industry
40-Baseball stat
41- "Slippery" tree
42- Dies
43-Freeze over
45-Meat option
47- Slithery beasts
48-Salty
51- Collar fastener
52-Calamity
54- Collection of weaponry
58- Picture puzzle
59- Author Seton
61-Pith helmet
62- Pitchers
63- Resembling a red, say
64-Not kosher
65- Martinique volcano
66- Neighbor of Cambodia
67-3:00
Down
I- Sturdy wool fiber
2-Nice notion
3- Grange
4- Quiver
5-Umbrella
6- Queues
7- " Ventura" was played by Jim
Carrey
8- Boyfriend
9- Brownish gray baboon
10- Hurry
II- John of The AddamsFamily
12-Got up
13- Makes
21- Das Boot setting
23-Scruffs
26- Behold, to Brutus
27-Drudge
28- Baby carriage
29- Magistrate
30-That's!
32- Free from contamination
33-Go after
34-Authentic
35-Sleeps briefly
38- Greased
39- Less
44- Member of the Girl Scouts
45- Numerical symbol
46 - Actually existing
47- Wanders away
48- Throat problem
49- having fun yet?
50-Trademark
51- Decline
53- Ship's small boat
55-A Doll's House heroine
56- Galoots
57-Hoist
60- Actress Long
1
S
v
!,
|
S
0
V
3
3
3
3
3
d
d
3
a
i.
-
N
1
AS
S
a
3
M
3
1
d
0
\,
*
A
N
V
S
n
3
3
a
3
y
N
3
s
H
y
1 A
a
3
0
»
a
1
1 a
n
1
s
3
N
1
3
y
s
S
3
>
\t
N
'-:. H l
3
3
1
d ■
d
n
3
3
lH 3
V
a
1   ■
n
1
3
V
a
3
1AI 1  S
1
a
n
0    1
V
1
D
N
1
s
1  U
3
n
d __ V
3
a
0
D
■ N
V
d
y
r __a
0
3
d
w
3
S
a
N
3
kM
y
n^|
s
3
a
T  H
N
0
1
1
3
N
3
3
n
mi
n
3
0
*
0
1
S
y
V
3
N
9.
1
3
a
3
D
V
1
s
V
H
3
3
1
\
*
»
a
V
3
s
y
H
3
3
»
3
a=
K
d
1
a
{ sitka }
1864West4thAve.
Bring in your student card to get 15% off Sitka clothing
Available online and at fine retailers across the universe

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126238/manifest

Comment

Related Items