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The Ubyssey 1968-09-10

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 HARE TO REPORT ON  FAIR WEATHER'
UBC president Dr.  Kenneth Hare will publish
_ ?. brief within two weeks stating his position on the
': new approach to education demanded by the Alma
Mater Society.
Hare said Monday he is  currently writing the
report, which will define his views on central edu-
rf cational objectives at UBC.
He was replying to criticism from AMS president
Dave Zirnhelt, who charged Monday that Hare missed the point of the AMS brief, The Future of University Education — Fair Weather or Foul.
Zirnhelt said Hare has  concentrated too much
on explaining the technical aspect of how the university  works,  without  addressing himself  to  the
T problem of student demands for a new approach to
higher education.
" "-Efctrwyta-ne ^recognize*}) the necessity of a bureaucracy," Zirnhelt said. "The acute problem is one
of attitudes toward education, which we believe
must be changed."
The AMS brief said students are becoming dissatisfied with the traditional approach to education
and impatient with "dry, uninteresting lectures".
"If this type of instruction continues, we will not
continue to attend classes," the brief said.
Hare agreed in an interview Monday that the
problem of a new approach to education has been
neglected.
"But I hope the brief which I will be presenting
to the community will fill the gap as far as this problem is concerned." he said.
Zirnhelt said Monday that two articles in the
September issue of UBC Reports show that Hare
misconstrued the pleas for new attitudes toward
education contained in the AMS brief.
The issue of UBC Reports, a tabloid published
by the UBC information office, contained a backpage article by Hare entitled How Does a University Work and an open letter from Hare to Zirnhelt.
The articles were published as a reply to the
AMS brief.
The back-page article was a summary of the
relation of the UBC administration to the way the
physical plant and academic affairs of the university
are conducted.
"It may be that the whole liberal idea of a university needs re-examining," the article said. "It is
under heavy attack these days from people who
think that any large institution depersonalizes its
members."
Said Zirnhelt: "I think the president is wasting
time pointing out the fact that an impersonal administration is needed."
Zirnhelt also took issue with Hare's open letter
to him, which called for meetings between the
senators and the AMS to discuss the AMS brief.
The letter read in part: "You know, David, things
aren't all that bad at UBC.
"In spite of mud, hoardings, queues, overcrowded
buses and lobbies, most of the people I've met wouldn't want to go elsewhere."
Replied Zirnhelt Monday: "None of us are suffering physically.
"But there's a far more basic problem involved
than the existence of mud or lineups."
Zirnhelt said council has met with Hare three
times during the summer to decide where the problems raised in the AMS brief should be discussed.
He said Hare's advisory committee chaired by
inter-faculty and student affairs dean Walter Gage,
which included several deans and department heads,
reported to a senate meeting on Wednesday.
"The AMS is also setting up a 10-member committee to come up with position papers on the financing of higher education," he said.
He said this committee will report on bursaries,
grants to out-of-town students and other specific
areas of education financing.
"We think this approach will be more useful
than blanket statements about free tuition," he said.
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UBYSSEY
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Vol. L, No.l
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1968
224-3916
Council votes  yes'
to Hare's invitation
•"" ■****■■■■ uiwMy pnora
Jennifer Schiffer leers gleefully at the latest stock of dirty books added to the library over
the summer. Notice she's set up 20 encyclopaedias from the same set as a studious front
and she's only left enough desk space to fl atten out the pages at the yummy parts. Nice
try, dear.
Re-opening illegal suites
'only answer to shortage
By ALEX VOLKOFF
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Student council voted Monday to accept UBC president
Kenneth Hare's invitation to
discuss the Alma Mater Society
reform brief at a closed reception.
But after lengthy debate it
appeared not all the council
members would attend.
Those opposed to accepting
the invitation were executive
members Jill Cameron, Ruth
Dworkin, Carey Linde and
Tobin Robbins.
AMS president Dave Zirnhelt also opposed the motion
to accept the invitation, but as
council chairman could not
vote.
Co-ordinator Cameron said
after the motion was passed
that she would not attend the
reception and was sure other
council members would join
her in attempting to force the
meeting open.
All executive members said
they felt acceptance of the invitation to a closed meeting
would defeat the purpose of
the brief on student participation at the university.
The invitation was contained in an open letter from Hare
to Zirnhelt published Saturday
in the administration newspaper, UBC Reports.
See page
After internal affairs officer
Dworkin's motion to refuse the
invitation, (which was later defeated) student senator Mark
Waldman suggested that instead of refusing to meet the
senators, the council should invite them to discuss the same
issue at an open council meeting.
Said AMS vice-president
Linde: "This would be the easy
way out that senate would like.
We can't take the onus off
them. We actually do want
things that the senate doesn't
want to give us."
But senators Waldman and
Don Munton argued that time
was too important and it would
take too long if the council
waited for senate to meet on
the council's terms as senate
meets only once every month.
Later, Munton modified this
view by suggesting that council name a date for an open
meeting in Brock Hall to show
senate that the university committee is really concerned
about the problem.
"Even if the senators don't
want to come we'll get 150
ordinary faculty members so
that senate will realize whal
the faculty thinks on the matter. And if the senators really
are serious, they will come,"
Munton said.
3: COUNCIL
The only solution to UBC's housing crisis is
the re-opening of illegal suite in the Point Grey
areas, says housing director Leslie Rohringer.
In an interview Monday, Rohringer said the
f 400 women, 700 men and 450 families now looking for campus housing have no hope of finding
accommodation at UBC.
"The only group which has facilities available immediately with excessive cost to the
.owner, the student or the city is the group with
illegal suites," Rohringer said in an interview
Monday.
"Keeping Acadia Camp residence open
for the spring term is no solution. If the problem
is not solved by next September we will be in
big  trouble."
Four years ago Point  Grey area residents
were given three years to close down suites when
the area was rezoned for single family dwellings.
City council this summer rejected an Alma
Mater Society brief proposing re-opening of the
illegal suites.
Council claimed it was not their responsibility
to find accommodation for the student, most of
whom are from out of town.
Said AMS external affairs officer Tobins
Robbins: "City council is notorious for passing
the buck.
"But we have approached the provincial government and the situation is in the talking
stage."
AMS housing co-ordinator John Tilley said he
established a housing bureau to meet what he
To page 2, see: HOUSING
Tuum Est a disgrace
The Ubyssey editorial board wishes to announce it in
no way was connected with the "Special UBYSSEY Student
Guide Edition" called Tuum Est which has been distributed
on campus.
Tuum Est in fact was prepared and published on
orders from AMS council and decision to use The Ubyssey's
name was made without any consultation with us.
We consider this a gross violation of the autonomy of
The Ubyssey, and we shall demand assurance from student
council that it does not happen again.
Not only did council misuse the name of The Ubyssey,
it completely omitted from Tuum Est the names of the
individuals who worked on it.
Each edition of The Ubyssey carries a complete list
of editors and staff for the issue. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10, 1968
SUB opening Sept. 23
despite some setbacks
By IRENE WASILEWSKI
Ubyssey SUB Reporter
UBC's new student union building will open
on Sept. 23 after delays caused by fires and
construction difficulties.
"SUB will be opened to the students for sure
Sept. 23," said Peter Braund, chairman of the
SUB management committee.
"Clubs will be able to move in before then,
as soon as they get the building manager's okay."
However, parts of "the fort", as the building
has been dubbed by construction crews, will be
closed because the air conditioning system will
not be completely installed until Oct. 15.
Because of this, the area where a large number of people would normally congregate—such
as the basement games area, the ballroom and
the auditorium—will be closed.
A fire on Aug. 26 caused part of the delay in
opening, there were also problems in installing
the air conditioning system which was later
damaged by the fire.
"There was $20,000 to $40,000 damage, most
of it to chairs stored in the room where the fire
broke out," said Braund.
These will be replaced in about two weeks.
The official opening day, scheduled for Oct.
25-26, has been moved to some time in January
1969.
Said Braund: "This is because a lot of money
is going to be spent on the opening and the
people involved won't have enough time to be
ready for the October date.
Financially the line has been kept at the
estimated cost of $5 million, $3.5 million of
which is being paid by the students.
There have been some cutbacks in items
deemed less necessary and other extras such as
Master calendars and poster kiosks have been
substituted, said Braund.
When asked about SUB's yearly operating
budget Braund said: "I can't tell you how much
it is but I can tell you that we expect to break
even after the first two years."
A large SUB publicity campaign has been
launched, headed by the distribution of 10,000
brochures during registration week,at a cost of
32  cents  per brochure.
This will be followed by an eight-page tabloid advertisement which will appear on Sept.
22.     .
Brock Hall will be handed over to teaching
assistants and the faculties of arts and law.
The lounge and cafeteria will be converted
into study space for 300 undergraduates.
Braund also had a solution for dealing with
all the furniture in  Brock.
The new furniture will be stored for future
use in SUB and the old armchairs and sofas will
either be given away or sold, on Oct. 1.
Asked if he thought that students would use
SUB Braund said, "Sure but they'll sure sweat
for a while on the top and bottom floors."
New breed enters Arts I
'prepared for new ideas'
By NATE SMITH
St.udents entering Arts I this year are better
prepared for the program than were last year's
students, says co-chairman Brian Mayne.
"In a sense, we have a new breed of students
who have been prepared for an Arts I type of
program by changes in the grade 11 and grade
12 programs," Mayne said in an interview Monday.
Mayne said that because of changes in high
school courses, particularly English, this year's
students accept matter-of-factly what last year's
students considered as bold new concepts.
"We are also much surer of ourselves this
year," Mayne added. "Last year both students
and faculty had the sense of being in an experiment which could fail, now we have a degree
of confidence."
Mayne is one of four members of this year's
Arts I faculty who were associated with the
program last year.
In addition to the turnover, the faculty has
been increased by seven, to 18 professors, in
order to accommodate the 120 new students who
have been added, increasing the total number to
360.
The program has been divided into three
groups of 120 students each, one group more
than last year.
Group A, headed by Mayne, will study the
general theme of Freedom and Authority, the
same theme use by one of last year's groups,
though with a greatly altered reading list.
"We have changed the emphasis somewhat
and have shortened the list to allow for more
intensive study," said Mayne.
Group B will study the theme of The Forest
and the City, replacing the group which last
year studied War, Love, Death, and Education.
Co-chairman Walter Young described the new
theme as one that allows an "unlimited scope"
for the study of man and his environment.
Group C, headed by Prof. Jim Dybikowski,
will examine the theme of Identity and Environment.
Arts I will be sharing their building this
year with the new Arts II program.
Arts II was initiated by the students and its
curriculum and readings were planned in close
cooperation between students and faculty.
Prof. Gerald McGuigan, last year's Arts I
co-chairman and now Arts II seminar leader,
said 20 students have been accepted from forty-
five applicants.
The theme chosen for Arts II is The City, and
the course will be accepted for nine units .
This marks a cnange from the original plan,
in which students were expected to run the risk
of the course not being accepted if the faculty
of arts was not satisfied with the program.
Arts II students are expected to do independent work in co-operation with the department
in which they wish to major. McGuigan reported
that several departments have already expressed
their willingness to co-operate.
Housing crisis
from page  1
called the most severe housing shortage ever on
the campus.
The bureau, located in south Brock basement,
is administered by Carel Howe, employed by the
AMS to compile housing lists and make contacts
with possible landlords.
"The situation is especially critical for married students," Miss Howe said Monday.
"Some have already sent their wives home
and others have been forced to drop out of the
university."
Miss Howe said she is now trying to obtain
the use of one of the Jericho Camp barracks for
student residences.
"Dean William Armstrong, the deputy vice-
president of UBC, is to speak to the board of
governors regarding support for our request,"
she said.
Ubyssey gets
new Editor
The Ubyssey obtained a new editor-in-chief
over the summer.
Rescued from Victoria was arts student Al
Birnie. He replaces Stuart Gray, who is not
returning to UBC.
Birnie, 22, starts his fourth year on The
Ubyssey, having served as reporter, news editor,
and associate editor.
This spring he was editor of the now-defunct
Western Gate, and has had some experience on
Vancouver and Victoria daily newspapers.
The Ubyssey, as always, will be the attempt
of 30 or 40 university students to describe the
forces at work in their environment," said Birnie.
"What the results will be no one can say.
The only thing we promise to be is interesting."
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
COUNCIL
from page One
External affairs officer Robbins was against the invitation
saying, "It would be ludicrous
to go to a closed meeting when
this is exactly what we don't
want. We're overturning decisions made last year, and council would be acting in a poor
manner if it accepted."
After Zirnhelt made it clear
that this was not a formal
meeting, but an informal reception, forestry representative
Frank Gregory moved that the
invitation be accepted.
He was supported by engineering president Fraser Hodge
who said: "Let's not shut the
door on this matter. Tell the
senate we want to come. All
we want to go for is to show
our interest, not to start discussing the brief in detail."
After the motion was passed,
Miss Cameron said that she
planned to send a letter to
council members explaining
why some of the council refused to accept the invitation.
"And we are going to put up
posters informing the students
of what is happening, and asking them to help open the
meeting," she said.
Study
space
lacking
By JOHN GIBBS
The constant lack of adequate
study space is now becoming
acute at UBC, head librarian
Basil Stuart-Stubbs said Monday.
In an interview Stuart-Stubbs
said he is concerned over the
great number of students who
are now spending between-
class time in the sun and who
will head for cover in the library as soon as the rain falls.
"The problem is a lack of
capital financing for the university as a whole and the library in particular," he said.
"There just isn't any money in
the building fund."
Stuart-Stubbs said he hoped
the new Student Union Building would alleviate part of the
crowding — with its lounge
facilities — as well as making
available 460 badly needed
study spaces in Brock Hall.
He said the operating funds
for the coming year were adequate with respect to the staff
and present buildings while
acquisitions of books and magazines would have to be cut
down.
"This deficiency, resulting
. from the depletion of the H. R.
MacMillan book fund, will be
in the area of research material," he said. "Undergrads will
not be affected."
— lawrence woodd photo
Everybody but everybody goes through the tiresome registration process. Hqnding your cards in at Brock was just about the
last step, which could be the reason nobody1 in  this picture is smiling. More than 20 thousand students registered at UBC.
Fair Weather priorities shift,
new deadlines for AMS demands
Alma Mater Society president DaVe Zirnhelt said Monday
some of the deadlines set in June for action on AMS demands
will not be met by UBC's administration.
"The priorities have shifted over the summer," Zirnhelt
said in an interview.
He said the controversial AMS report, The Future of University Education—Fair Weather or Foul, is now out of date
and the deadlines for action contained in it no longer apply.
The brief, written by Zirnhelt and adopted as policy by the
AMS council, said negotiations "must be initiated" toward giving
students a voice in seven areas of university administration.
It also requested what it called "minimum commitments"
of the university as a basis to begin these negotiations.
The first deadline is Thursday.
The brief demanded the university grant academic recognition to students who serve on AMS committees and other organs
of student government by that date.
But Zirnhelt said he is certain this deadline will not be met.
"The faculty just won't give it to us," he said. "The point
of that deadline was to bring into focus the whole question of
what education is all about.
"It could be that decision-making such a students learn in
AMS work is one aspect of education that the faculty is neglecting."
The next deadline falls on Sept. 23 and demands a commitment by the university that it will seek changes in the Universities Act to make that act subject to revision through negotiation with  faculty  and  students.
Zirnhelt said the question of the Universities Act will be
considered by senate Wednesday. "Hare has said he proposes to
take a stand on this question, but he won't say what it is,"
Zirnhelt said. "We'll have to wait and see about that deadline."
The third deadline—Oct. 7—concerns the right of professors
and students to determine what methods of evaluation will be
used in their courses.
At present, department or course heads approve evaluation
methods through the senate.
"The senate will discuss this request at its meeting Wednesday," Zirnhelt said. "I can't say whether or not it will be met."
He said the Oct. 21 deadline—by which time the brief demanded student representation on curriculum committees—no
longer applies because undergraduate society presidents are
negotiating with their faculties for representation on these committees.
Commerce undergraduate society president Russ Grierson
said his society will strike a committee to study the structure
of methods of education outside the commerce faculty.
"We'll be taking a close look at the Arts I program, for
instance," Grierson said. "We'll also be trying to get on curriculum committees.
"We want to talk to our profs, students and businessmen in
the community about the structure of our faculty, and then make
some really concrete recommendations."
Arts council president Ralph Stanton said he is confident
arts students will be represented on curriculum committees.
Stanton said acting arts dean John Young is "very anxious"
to have student on curriculum committees.
Gary Gumley, former education president and chairman
of the student committee on the future of the faculty of education
(SCOFFE)" said his committee is negotiationg directly with a
faculty committee.
"I think we're making the best progress of any faculty on
campus," Gumley said. "The communication with the faculty
committee couldn't be better."
Gumley said education students were offered representation
on 11 faculty sub-committees dealing with every facet of the
faculty  of education.
"We only accepted representation on five because we didn't
want to spread our efforts too thin," Gumley said.
He said the most important committees on which students
are represented are those for curriculum, student-faculty relations and undergraduate teacher preparation.
Applied science president Fraser Hodge said his faculty has
not acted on the AMS brief's recommendations because students
saw no need for action.
"We have had representation on curriculum committees for
eight years," Hodge said. "Whenever there's dissent, the dean
and department heads meet with us to find out what's wrong.
"There doesn't seem to be the discontent among engineers
that there is in other parts of the campus."
The final recommendation of the AMS brief called for
immediate admission of students to a committee now choosing
a successor to arts dean Dennis Healy, who resigned in May.
Arts council president Ralph Stanton said Monday there
are no students on that committee and he does not expect there
will be any.
"They want to have a dean chosen by January, but I don't
think there will be any students on it before then," he said. ■■   fr    v.   -S^*.*   ?</'V
THEWSSIY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242 editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, local 24; sports, local
23; advertising,  local 26. Telex 04-5224.
Yet this is also Canada, my friend,
Yours to absolve of ruin, or make an end.
—Malcolm Lowry
SEPTEMBER 10, 1968
'/r'.?i''
For the Frosh
If it is true, as Shakespeare says, that all the world's
a stage and all the men and women merely players, then
at least you should insist on writing your own script.
Finding Paths
Dr. F. Kenneth Hare's reply, in the latest issue of
UBC Reports, to AMS president Dave Zirnhelt's 'demands' on the university indicate Dr. Hare does not
take these demands very seriously.
With a paternalistic pat on the head, Dr. Hare says:
"You know, David, things at UBC aren't all that bad
... In spite of mud, hoarding, queues, overcrowded
buses and lobbies, most of the people I've met wouldn't
want to go elsewhere."
Perhaps this is because Zirnhelt's demands can't
be taken too seriously.
A significant number of students want more than
vague assurances that their problems will be considered
by vague committees at some future time.
And their concerns go far beyond the trivial issues
of buildings and grounds that Dr. Hare talks about.
Again, perhaps this is the fault of Zirnhelt's submission,
which does not outline clearly the questions that these
students feel important.
Perhaps this is because Zirnhelt and council do not
represent the students that feel the university system
must democratized first, NOW, before a start can be
made to deal effectively with the problems.
On page 5, Neil Burton gives an outline of some
questions that must be answered NOW, and clearjy, to
show students what the administration considers are
the ground rules under which student proposals will be
considered.
These questions and answers should be aired openly
in The Ubyssey, not at select, closed meetings between
Senate and student council, because these bodies are not
representative of the forces which are engaged in the
action.
Student unrest is springing from the situations confronting students in their everyday lives, situations which
they feel as they live from day to day in their university
community.
They are directed against the powers that direct
that community, like the Board of Governors, not the
organs whch carry out administrative detail, like the
Senate.
Students on a number of campuses have in France
and the U.S. taken very concrete action against governing bodies which have refused to open paths for students
to concretely affect the changes they desire in the
institutions.
Mr. Burton has forthrightly asked Dr. Hare whether
some of the major*** paths at UBC are open or closed.
We await Dr. Hare's reply.
EDITOR: Al Birnie
City Desk   Paul Knox, Mike Finlay
Newt   John Twlgg
Managing   Mike Jessen
Photo       Fred   Cawsey
Wire   Peter Ladner
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
Furthermore, pursuant to our discussion of an earlier date, we might go as
far as to paraphrase the immortal
Leonard Spink and say anonymity is
equivalent to the eternal bliss that
churns masmal in the bowels of the left
ear. However suffice it to say that we
forgot the list of all the diligent humans
who  deigned to work,  und  so  welter.
The
Ubyssey Editor
would appreciate
a visit from
anyone interested
in submitting
editorial cartoons.
. . . and we stood there without moving for* four hours and the) gjuy in front
of met kept asking, "Where's Godot?" and sobbing, and then I heard a voice,
tinkling like a bell, and it seemed like an omen;. . .
-p'z^-^wiwrr^>:m'~^i'y.
Reality is beyond
classroom sterility
By CAREY LINDE
Chicago: the generation gap is a spark,
and the old folks spilled gas all over
the city.
"You aint gonna keep no picture of
me punk," said the Chicago cop to the
NOBC news cameraman who had just filmed the cop taking off and hiding his serial
number, his identification. The pig took
his leaded nightstick and brutally smashed the lens of the portable TV camera.
And thus, One more in a series of
hundreds of individual violent and unprovoked attacks on the citizenry of the
United States had taken place. "Pig" we
yelled, where upon the blue helmeted pigs
turned on us with their truncheons mailing. I heard the black stick of fascism
miss the back of my head as I ran deeper
into Lincoln Park.
And now I am back in Canada, where
the RCMP go around in plain clothes,
and where we mistakenly think that it
could never happen here.
I went to Guelph, where UBC rejoined
the Canadian Union of Students with a
new felling that the students of the
country must act as a whole in preserving
what fractional measure of difference we
in fact have from the United States of
Chicago.
WHAT IS TO BE DONE
What are we on this campus going
to do this year ? Are we going to contemplate our navels and merely ponder
the validiity of student dissent? Are we
going to remain undecided about the war
in Asia ? Are we going to keep our mental
foot heavily on the backs of the French
in Canada by refusing to hear their pleas
for help ?
And what of the classroom? Are we
ready to accept ourselves, to liberate ourselves from the nigger mentality that we
have grown up with ? I say to you fellow
student that you and I are better able to
run this university, this country and this
world than those morally corrupt individuals who presently hold most of the
positions of power. And if you react to
this claim on my part by saying that I am
on some fantastic ego trip, then I reply
to you that you are chicken-shit and afraid
of your own potential to deal satisfactorily
with the world around you. I challenge
you to answer only one question: why
can't you believe in yourself and in your
capability to do those things you would
like to do or see done ?
How many hours a week are you go
ing to sit in classrooms with groovy girls
you would like to go to bed with, but
with whom you will never have the courage to even talk ? And how many irrrele-
vant subjects will you take ?
NIGGER MENTALITY
You must first liberate yourself from
the nigger mentality that the educational
system in this province has foisted upon
you. And then you must liberate your
fellow student from the same game. We
must all liberate the Alma Mater Society
from the political debutantes who cherish
their desk more than the people who gave
them the desk. And finally, we must liberate this campus and this province from
the boredom that comes through years of
deathly apathy. Loosen up, and then have
some fun.
Put each of your professors on notice
to the fact you will only accept the gospel
from their mouths if it strikes you as
meaningful, and that you are not prepared
to have hours and hours of trash rammed
down your throat just because the man up
in the front of the room has a PhD. after
his name.
This is going to be the year that the
sheep in the faculty will get more sheepish, and hopefully the professors with any
social and academic integrity left will
come forward in support of the reforms
put forward by the students.
Mark, in that Book of Books, said, "the
Kingdom of God is at hand." If this is the
case, why is the Senate, the Alumni, the
President and the AMS busily drafting up
committees on "what to do tomorrow"?
The time is NOW!
WHO ABE YOU?
Are you really You, or are you in fact
merely the registration number on your
library card ? Do you hide your emotion
and affection and decorate your small
walls with Playboy pin ups, or do you
groove in the sunshine and hold peoples
hands and tell someone you love them
when you do ?
This, I submit, is the question of student unrest. Machines are becoming more
and more like people, and people are becoming more and more like machines. It
has gotten so that you can't make a crack
about the machines without personally
insulting some of the senior administrators and professors. Let us turn the university into a festival of life and learning,
and never turn back to the drudgery of
apathy and stale complacency. Tuesday, September 10, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
OPEN LETTER TO DR. HARE
-*-    "You  can't  fool  all  of  the
students all of the time."
Dear Dr. Hare:
Upon reading the interview
and later the open letter to
Dave Zirnhelt which appeared
in the two most recent issues
of UBC Reports, I was
struck by the familiar ring of
.some of your statements. Since
the remaining time for rational
discussion of the issues involved
, in university unrest appears to
be somewhat limited, I hope
'that you will consider carefully the views of this student,
and I, for my part, shall attempt to put them as succinctly
and clearly as possible. Vague
generalities no longer seem
sufficient.
Many university students are
Y dissatisfied,   dissatisfied   with
the quality of their education;
dissatisfied with the university's relationship with the
larger community; dissatisfied
with the administrative bureaucracy; or, dissatisfied with
their inability to induce needed university reform. These
dissatisfactions, when coupled
with the realization that the
'system' provides for little or
no effective student voice, are
transformed into frustrations.
The frustrations become acute
when the well-meaning student
begins his search for some governing element to which he
may address his complaints. In
his quest for a 'centre of
power', the student is faced
with a dilemma: shall he turn
to the academic or to the administrative hierarchy? If his
dissatisfaction is concerned
with simple academic matters,
his choice seems easy — per-
6.
,8.
QUESTIONS:
In your open letter in UBC REPORTS you suggested that
things at the University of British Columbia weren't all that
bad, and that most students would prefer to stay here. Do
you believe that statement is relevant to the question of
university reform?
Do you accept the Alma Mater Society as the collective voice
of the students of UBC?
Do you personally believe that sufficient progress can be
made in actually implementing desired reforms to convince
the student body that the administration of this university is
sincerely responsive to the wishes of the majority of its
citizens?
Are the operating funds allotted to the university each year
by the provincial  government  free  of  all  strings?
If students were to desire a voice in the selection of the UBC
board of governors, to what agency should they make their
desire known?
If students were to wonder at the predominantly business/
legal composition of the UBC board of governors and the lack
of representation on that body of, the majority working-class,
to what agency should they direct their queries?
If students were to object to the presence on campus of war-
related industries' recruitment officers, to what agency or
administrative organ should they turn for satisfaction?
If students desired the establishment of auxiliary formal
courses not presently included in the curricula, and wished
to circumvent existing administrative delays in order that
these courses might deal with problems of immediate import,
to what administrative organ would they direct their requests?
To a question by UBC Reports concerning the selection
of the new dean of Arts, you said (in part) that a committee
set up by dean Gage was acting "within the established conventions for such committees" and that you found yourself
"bound by these conventions". You further stated that although the conventions weren't "in any way holy", that you
couldn't change them without consultation with your 'colleagues',
a)   What administrative functions at UBC are not bound by
conventions?
fo) Do you anticipate major changes (during the coming year)
in the conventions concerning such things as selections and
appointments?
c) Do you feel it is in the interests of the university to place
more emphasis on the 'rights and privileges' of your colleagues than on the desires of the student majority for
rational reform?
haps deceptively so. If, on the
other hand, his dissatisfaction
has to do with more funda-
metal issues (e.g. the relationship of his eduction to the
'needs' of society), he can only
throw up his hands in despair.
He knows that the president—
as titular head of the university
— must have fairly wide-ranging administrative power; unfortunately, seldom can the
student and the president agree
on just what is the nature of
that power. If the president
refers the hapless student to
the board of governors (the
mysterious group that sets
overall policy and somehow
ties the university sub-community to the community-at-
large), he finds that the board
has no machinery for dealing
with students directly, that it
consists of businessmen and
lawyers appointed by the provincial government, and that it
is governed, in turn.'by a document ominously entitled The
B.C. Universities Act. Small
wonder that if the dissatisfied
ever do locate the element in
the power structure which can
deal with their particular problems, it is some years after
they have been given their
diploma and have been sent
forth into the outside world.
For one reason or another,
students have slowly become
aware of the need to accurately
pin down the 'centres of
power'. They have become
aware, too, of the advantages
of collective negotiation of
common problems. In response
to these intellectual breakthroughs on the part of students, there has been a notable
increase over the past couple
of years in the number of committees set up to study 'student
problems' and 'student discontent'. <There is a common quip
among students about the creation of committees to study the
findings of previous committees.) Unfortunately, this commendable exercise in collective
buck-passing has not actually
managed to solve veryp many
of the specific student gripes.
In fact, on the contrary, more
students than ever before are
acquiring the realization that
one of the most difficult pieces
of knowledge to grasp in the
university is to know when to
cease intellectualizing, and how
to make the transition from
discussion to action.
Since, by some quirk of fate,
this seems to be the year for
this transition from discussion
to action, and since I, for one
dislike the tone of ultimata
(particularly 'flexible' ultimata), I would like to re-state
some of the student 'demands'
in a softer interrogative form,
and ask a few additional questions of my own.
I am assured that The Ubyssey
will be most happy to print
your replies.
Yours, for a better university,
Neil G. Burton.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10, 1968
Nation-wide austerity
hits student loan rate
By  NORMAN   GIDNEY
With Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's election dictum of
"no more free stuff' still bouncing off the cancelled winter works
program and the $27 million Mt. Kobau telescope near Kere-
meos, the two-per-cent increase in interest rates on student
loans has gone almost unnoticed.
As part of Trudeau's austerity program, the loan rates were
raised to 7% per cent from 5% per cent just when students—
who were unable to get summer jobs—needed them most.
The new rates mean you'll have to pay almost $320 annually on a $4,000 loan after graduation.
It's hard to explain, since the Bank of Canada has dropped
its prime lending rate to six per cent an the NHA housing mortgage rate has also dropped one quarter of one per cent.
A UBC Bank of Montreal official said Monday it's too early
to tell if the tougher restrictions have affected loan applications
— few of the forms have been signed by the registrar and
returned to students.
Dean Walter Gage, the man who has to approve all UBC
student loan applications, couldn't be reached for comment
Monday.
Officials in the financial aid office at Simon Fraser University say the number of applications for loans is up—more than
half of the students have applied, mainly because of the poor
summer job situation—but loans are just as easy to get. The
raise in interest rates hasn't affected the number of applications
either.
TIGHTENING REQUIREMENTS
The Bank of Montreal here said the government is "tightening requirements, too many students were using them last year
to buy cars."
Nels Granewall, financial aid officer at the University of
Victoria, said last week students are facing a severe cutback
in loans.
Demand is up and supply is down, he said.
"There are some very alarmed students. And there are
more students than ever before who are applying because of
the tight job situation during the summer holidays."
Granewall said few students are being refused outright but
the average value of loans had decreased significantly.
"I've been going up the wall trying to help them," he added.
He estimates close to a third of UVic students need federal
government loans, but Ottawa has allocated only slightly more
loan money this year—$61.5 million compared with $57 million
in 1967.
STUDENTS   ON   WELFARE
"We had some students on welfare last winter and I'm sure
we'll have some on welfare this year too."
Also in question is whether student loans aid the middle
class or the underprivileged student who really needs them.
"The emphasis in the student financial aid program now is
given to the group that's already in—the group that gets far as
high school matriculation.
Aid can't do much for people who don't get that far," says
Dr. Robert Pike, who is conducting a study on accessibility to
higher education for the Association of Universities and Colleges
in Canada.
He says the solution to the Grade 10 dropout is "a slow
percolating of ideas down through society".
School must be made as pleasant as possible—"perhaps even
give people in high school financial aid," he said.
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AMS veep says Chicago
like Hollywood 1984
"Sure, it can't happen here now, but how
long is it going to be before it can?"
In these words, Alma Mater Society vice-
president Carey Linde described the scene he
saw while in Chicago during the Democratic
convention Aug. 25-30.
"It was as if every studio in Hollywood had
got together to try and show
us what 1984 is going to be,"
Linde  said Monday in an interview.
"It was really indescribable, what with the national
guard bivouacked in the park,
helicopters over the city and
groups of five or 10 cops at
every street corner."
Linde spent six days in
Chicago prior to the 32nd an- LINDE
nual Canadian Union of  Students congress at
Guelph, Ont.
He said the events surrounding the convention were good in every way but for the personal injury suffered by onlookers and representatives of the news media.
"For one thing, the militarism of Mayor
Daley's regime was shown up to the people," he
said.
"And the actions of the police resulted in
the politicizing of thousands of mid-western students who have been relatively inactive in the
past."
The news media were the prime targets of
the police but still failed to show the full brutality of Daley's forces, Linde said.
"I saw police first removing film from individuals'  cameras,  then  later they were simply
smashing the cameras," he said.
PRESS ENEMIES
"The cops realized that the press were their
main enemies because they were recording the
fascist  and  brutal  tactics."
Lnde said he also saw police officers removing identification tags in an effort to   remain
anonymous.
GUARDS GET STONED
"The ludicrous thing about it was the young
people being busted for having pot while all the
national guard guys were getting stoned in their
tents," he said.
He said the demonstrations in Chicago lacked
the sophistication and planning implied by news
reports during tjne convention.
YIPPIES CREATIVE
"The   Yippies    (Youth   International   Party ,-
members)  were   the  most  creative   group,  but
most of the people there came on their own like
I did," Linde said.
He said he was attracted to Chicago simply
because it was the place to be at that time.
"I left when I finally discovered that my real
enemy is the entire institution.
"I knew it was time to go when I started to
look for a brick to throw at the cops."
Senate election
comes October 9
UBC students get their first chance to vote
this year on Oct. 9 when three student senators ^
and an Alma Mater Society secretary will be
elected.
Nominations for senators will be accepted
from Sept. 12 to Oct. 3.
Senator Don Munton announced Monday he ■
will stand for re-election to his senate seat.
The senator who receives the most student
votes will serve a two-year term. The others will .
serve terms of one year each.
Following previous AMS secretary Sally Coleman's resignation, council Monday decided to
hold the election for secretary at the same time
as the senate elections.
Secretary nominations will be accepted from
Sept. 25 to Oct. 3.
Council elected nursing representative Jennifer Johnson acting secretary until the new
secretary is chosen.
4517 W. 10th Ave.
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THE     UBYSSEY.
Page 7
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Barnstorming through UBC
yields same old eateries
By HANSON LAU
I'd heard rumors that there was something
new this year in campus eateries.
So, armed with my stuffed lunch bag I
trotted round the campus in search of it.
I found the Bus Stop Cafe overcrowded as
usual, and the Ponderosa Cafeteria filled. Nothing
new.
I sneaked down to the cafeteria in the auditorium basement. Two formidable line-ups of
hungry students inched to the range of vending
machines, recently installed. These betallic boxes
are really friendly sometimes. One girl fed in
one dime and got a feedback of five nickels. The
place was packed to capacity, but there were
no complaints. My bag sagged a bit as I stepped
over to Buchanan Lounge.
Last year I got free team and rice here, but
now I have to pay for coffee and donuts at the
coffee centre set up by food services. It seems
acting arts dean John Young wanted this to be
set up so that profs and students may chat
together instead of having to trek all the way
to the student union building.
So I went to see Ruth Blair, top lady in the
food services empire. She told me about the
Barn. I galloped to the main mall, turned my
back to the mountains and charged into the Aggies' territory. The Barn is beside the B.C. Re
search Council which is next to the Education
Building which is next to Henry Angus Building
and so forth. It's a long way out.
It's also the only place on campus where you
can get a bite of pseudo -Italian pizza and sham
shandy—just 2 per cent alcohol. You can't get
a full course meal here but you can get enough
to satisfy your girl friend.
Actually, it's quite a cool place—psychedelic
colored wall, lamps and sweet smiles. There's a
scramble system in which you stand behind
short multiple line-up and get your food and
drink faster. If you want to book the place for
a party in the evening, it will cost you fifty
bucks.
But by the time the Barn becomes a novelty
SUB will be open and I can get lost among the
thousands who will use the new SUB Cafeteria
and Snack Bay—the Yellow SUBmarine. The
SUBmarine will be launched Sept. 23.
At any rate lunch-baggers like me need no
gripes until the rain comes. Lunch-bagging is
still the best. Who cares for good taste? As long
as we get it cheap and run the Food Services
out of business we would be on the right left
side.
And I can always go down to Chinatown if
you talk about food and services. Right?
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THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10, 1968
IF WE CUD BE ALIVE TOGETHER HERE
here we register in summ slaughter house
ourselves, our green hopes, led
down  the  I.B.M.   drain
as we are drained
of learning, of quest, running as we do
from class to class, answering only
man's greatest fear, that he is late,
running, to the buzzer, the clock
we run here
from ourselves, our dream of love
sorry sir
yu cant have yur bursary now until yu pay
yur fees, but I've stood in this line 3 hours
and I can't pay my fees till I get my loan
well sir if yu cud write a cheque for the money
my superior sz yu cant have yur bursary otherwise
others waiting—behind you
look ther are others,
of your own blood and posture, humans they cud be,
let the buzzer shatter yur dream, the dangerous
examinations, how they cut at yur spirit, ask
of yu no longer your best, but yur life
in what cause, for what horror, why are books
so expensive, how can minds with the most light
glowing, be mowed under, their painful cries
of broken lung and tongue absolvd only by
the burocrat's machinery, the upper class mystique
thes buildings that only a time under the bomb
cud bring forth, without grace, color, or
love, how that is so surely gone, departed
as the ghosts we become here, gardens transformed
to concrete, blacktop, the whole world will soon
look like Berkeley, my philosophy prof once sd.,
and how far away is the sea, ju-st
on the other side of the Faculty Club.
BILL BISSETT,
reprinted from Consensus.
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Free Speech Movement
Protests Straight lawsuit
The Vancouver Emergency
Free Speech Movement will
protest the libel prosecution of
the Georgia Straight in front
of the city jail Wednesday
while the newspaper's trial is
conducted inside.
Protestors will march in
front of the jail at 312 Main,
starting at 10 a.m. The demon
stration will also feature street
theatre and folk singing.
Georgia Straight editor Dan
McLeod and reporter Bob
Cummings will appear in court
charged with libelling Magistrate Lawrence Eckhardt in a
July 26 story.
The Georgia Straight's case
will be handled by city lawyer
Judicial pressures
force retirement
John Laxton, a member of the
B.C. Civil Liberties Union, although McLeod sail the union
is not directly involved in the
case.
McLeod said appeals have
been made to city newspapers
to publish the article to back
the Georgia Straight in its
fight.
"If they believe they should
have the right to criticize
courts they should publish the
article," McLeod said.
By  ROSEMARY   POGUE
A new board of governors
chairman will be appointed to
replace former chairman Nathan Nemetz at the next meeting of the board on Oct. 1, a
UBC information official said
Monday.
Nemetz has stated he is resigning because of increasing
pressure as a result of his recent elevation from supreme
court to appeal court, the
spokesman said.
Nemetz has been a member
of the board since 1957 and its
chairman for the last three
years.
UBC president Dr. Kenneth
Hare said that a clause in the
Board of Governors Act makes
it impossible for a member to
leave the board until the government has appointed someone to take his place.
It is not known when a new
member will be appointed.
Dr. Hare said this is the first
time since 1912 that UBC does
not have a judge on its board.
"In general   the board wel
comes a broad representation.
It is a pity not to have a representative of the judiciary.
"Judges find it difficult to
serve on the board because of
the pressing nature of their
job," Hare said. "It puts a
judge in an embarrassing position if a conflict arises."
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VANCOUVER 8# B. C. Tuesday, September 10, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
VILLAGE  & UNIVERSITY
SHOPPING PLAZA
New Building Provides Increased
Services to Student Shoppers
The Village has expanded
into a town-sized shopping
centre.
The number of shops at the
centre — a short five-minute
walk from the new SUB—has
practically doubled through
construction of a new shopping arcade.
The newcomers occupy both
levels of the University
Square, a two-storey building
situated on Western Parkway,
just off University Boulevard.
The shops join with established tenants such as World
Wide Travel, the Village
Restaurant, University Pharmacy, the Lucky Dollar and
Village Books to provide a
variety of goods and services
for UBC students.
Occupants of the new building's ground level include the
He and She shop, with clothes,
aimed at all ages, Franco's
Restaurant, offering a number
of Italian specialities, and the
Unique barbershop.
The second level — up a
short flight of stairs—features
the      charmingly - different
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L'Alise Tea Room and Leo's
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The Village shopping centre,
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caters to car-driving students.
There are plenty of parking
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\ Page  10
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10, 1968
South African students
blast Apartheid bills
From News Features
In South Africa, every timid
step toward racial harmony
seems to be met with increased
government repression. Apartheid was recently imposed on
buses in Durban where it had
not existed before.
Now, sweeping new legislation threatens to separate the
races even further. Speaking
out against the Separate Representation of Voters Amendment Bill and the Improper
Interference Bill, the Acting
President of the National Union of South African Students
(NUSAS), John Daniel, said
that even though the Bill did
not affect students or NUSAS
directly, it would radically
change political life in South
Africa and thus necessarily
concern today's generation in
the near future.
"We regard these Bills as
detrimental ot the future of all
South African citizens," Daniel
stated in a public comment.
"The Improper Interference
Bill is an authoritarian measure, a curtailment of the right
of free association and a fur
ther violation of the right of
citizens to put into practice
nonracial political principles."
In a phrase that might be interpreted as a veiled warning,
Daniel then said, "History has
shown that when constructive
channels of dissent are denied,
destructive methods are employed. This is something we
would not like to see occur in
South Africa."
Earlier this year, Daniel had
protested that the "political
climate" in South Africa was
causing a serious emigration of
leading scholars and some of
the most promising students at
English-speaking universities.
He pointed out that at least 40
per cent of former presidents
of the Students Representative
Councils at Cape Town, Witwatersrand, Natal and Rhodes
universities in the last 10 years
have gone overseas to live or
continue their studies with no
intention of returning.
The reason is the "lack of
academic freedom in our universities" and "the atmosphere
of intimidation and uncertain-
Simon Fraser promised
beef a la luxurious
BURNABY (CUP)—The Simon Fraser University board of
governors has announced plans to improve food and lounge
facilities to cope with the university's increasing enrolment.
Acting on a special report by an independent firm of food
consultants,   plans   have   been   approved  for:
• a permanent 500-seat cafeteria to be ready for May,
1969, to be located on the east side of the academic quadrangle.
• an immediate start on a 3,600 square foot temporary
student lounge.
• changes by early October in South Court Lounge and
the Mall Coffee shop to provide full meal services.
SFU Chancellor Dr. Gordon Shrum said all efforts are being
made to make the eating facilities adequate.
"Some people want us to skimp on some of the furnishings,
like sound-proofing, but the board wouldn't do that to the
students,"  Shrum said.
Tom Brose, chairman of the food investigation committee,
said: "I am pleased with what they have promised, if they fulfill their promises."
"We'll get changes in the kinds of foods served," Brose said.
"There will be hot roast beef with the carver right there for you
and daily menu postings."
"The caterers have agreed to most of this."
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ty created by banning and deportations." Daniel then urged
students not to give in to such
pressures and anxieties.
"As students we must determine to keep alive the spirit of
dissent and, in so doing, speak
out when injustices are done.
This will involve participation
in protest," Daniel declared.
"Even though it may seem
hopeless to protest, students
should never forget that it is
their duty and that thousands
are heartened everytime they
speak out.'
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page  11
A  LETTER  FROM A  CAMPUS  BANKER -jy-
Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10, 1968
EDUCATION - OR TRAINING?
Carleton graduate student asks if we can get an education despite the university
By HENRY MILNER
Our typical student has just
finished high school and, due
mainly to the motivation instilled in him by his mother,
has made it to college.
He arrives unclear why he
should be there but convinced
that he should be.
The university situation
overtakes him immediately;
but instead of aiding the student to understand the relevance of learning to him, it
merely, subtly, works to have
him sidestep the entire question.
First he is expected to pay
the registrar, then for his
books, and then to support
himself.
Thus before he is even given
a chance to consider what he
is as a student, he is already,
consciously or unconsciously,
compelled to label himself a
parasite, if he lives at home, a
debtor, if he receives government or other loans, or a creditor to himself, if he has to earn
the money while his peers did
not.
UNRELATED COURSES
Then he is assigned a diversified work load, five or six
usually unrelated courses, so
that he never gets to delve
deeply enough into any material to see what it means to him
as a person, but only what it
means in terms of passing the
course.
His intellectual passion
usually becomes dissipated in
the frustrating experience of
chasing books in a library that
is, of necessity, hopelessly inadequate.
And his "peers" become
competitors in the struggle for
marks and notes and books,
and not colleagues in the quest
for knowledge.
ENERGY DRAINED
Remaining energy, if such
does remain, is drained in
cheering the football team or
selling science sweatshirts or
distributing the literature of
political parties.
And its all one phenomenon;
shouting -"Yea Carleton" and
"Drown Ottawa U." or singing
"Bob Stanfield is the man with
the winning way"; it's the
phenomenon of the acquiescent receptacle of slogans and.
assumptions, much like the soldier who, of necessity, must
adopt the slogan "My country,
righ or wrong" and all that it
entails.
f"   Finally the student, if somehow   he   senses!   the   situation
and tries to  express his feel-
I ings, is constantly reminded to
I be   "mature and  responsible",
1 the effect of which is to stifle
all such possibilities until it is
\too late.
This then is  the university
context,  into which the "student" is placed to "learn".
FOOLISHNESS
Yet if we see the university
merely as an institution for
supplying the society with
technicians, and for adjusting
the young individual to fit into
it, then we cannot object to
this system. However this
means that when "educators"
talk about "learning" or
"knowledge" in relation to a
university, they are merely
fooling their listeners and
probably  themselves.
Obviously then this must
not and cannot be the purpose
of a university.
At least some of the members of a society must be capable of questioning the very
assumptions on which the society is based, otherwise no
possibility exists of opposition
to injustice.
This is what intellectuals
must do; yet to be an intellectual, one must be capable of
self-analysis and total originality of thought.
INHIBITS EFFORTS
The university as described
above inhibits intellectual efforts rather than stimulate
them. Yet obviously if intellectuals are not to come from
the university, they are not to
come from anywhere.
And, as recent events in the
industrial giant nations testify,
it is now terrifyingly crucial
for a large and influential community to rise and to draw attention to' the incidents of the
ever increasing tendency for
our society tfo be bureaucrat-
ized and structured.
Otherwise the individual
man may become in fact the
slave rather than the master of
the system he has created.
Evidently the individual student is powerless.
WORRIED
Worried by the "debt" he
owes to his parents and/or
government, harried to find
books, prepare for tests in unrelated fields, alienated from
learning by being made a note-
taker and a lab-copier, and
pressured to show school spirit
and act maturely, the individual student is fortunate to be
capable of even formulation of
some kind of thoughts that are
his own.
One cannot simply blame
administrators for this situation since their position requires that they worry about
building up the school's image.
They must, if they wish to
compete for funds in the game
of donations, concentrate on
what the university looks like,
rather than what it is.
But what it looks like is a
loaded   term,   for   they   must
make the university appear to
be what they want it to be.
And they, the corporate
rich, don't like to see "beards"
or "weirdos" or any other
vestiges of independent and
therefore dangerous  thought.
They want to see nice clean-
cut young men and women
fashioned in their own image.
Faculty, although it is difficult to generalize, can be said
to be more responsible.
In their demands for academic freedom they seem to
have forgotten what academic
is for, not for professors to be
more comfortable or secure as
professors per se, but to be in
a position to be truly involved
and concerned with education
for the students.
Professors should constantly
be questioning and re-evaluat-
B.C. journal seeks articles
Publication of the first issue of B.C. Studies, a scholarly
journal devoted to the understanding of British Columbia, past
and present, is scheduled for this fall.
Dr. Parzival Copes, head of UBC department of economics
and commerce, is a member of the editorial board.
The periodical is being established in the belief that a great
deal of worthwhile research is done on a variety of aspects of
life in B.C., but at present never reaches scholars and those
members of the general public who would be interested in it.
The journal is unable to pay contributors. Articles of up to
10,000 words in length will be considered for publication.
Deadline for the submission of articles for the first issue
is Oct. 1, and for the second issue Dec. 1. Manuscripts should be
addressed to Dr. Margaret Prang, department of history, UBC.
ing the education being offered.
Professors leading a movement
for academic reform is something we rarely hear of; but
rather they are often dragged
behind it.
At a university like Carleton this tendency is probably
even stronger since professors
take the role of "experts" attributed to them by the various governmental commissions back into the classrooms,
and act as storehouses of
knowledge rather than participants in the dialogue of learning.
STUDENT REFORMS
We are back, therefore, to
the student himself, as the primary basis for reform. Yet we
have already eliminated the individual student as being capable of confronting the system.
Only through a group situation and through proper use of ,
those facilities in the structure
available to them  as students
can this be done.
Only through a coneretiza-
tion of the individual's doubts *
and a reinforcement of his integrity as a thinking person in
a democratic group situation
can a start be made. r-
Only through a student leadership (i.e. the students' council)   which   is   aware   of   this
problem    and   is    courageous
enough to synthesize them in"
terms   of   issues   raised;   only
through a student press which
serves as a focal point for the -
confrontations   of  the   student^
and  the  system  instead of  a
mere   reflector   of   the   given
situation and thus a party to
it, can there be any real hope?
Missing
someone
far away?
She's lonely like you
- phone her tonight!
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CLARKE & STUART. Dir. of
WILLSON STATIONERS
550 Seymour Street 682-6688 Tuesday, September 10, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 13
. IDEAS
By ANDREW HORVAT
While students at UBC complain of complicated registra-
- tion procedures, and a lack of
- sufficient human contract with
professors, American students
face an added inhumanity, the
military draft.
Not only are they processed
-* by the school, they are also
tagged, harrassed and, If deemed necessary, fined and imprisoned by the state.
_, No American youth of college age can move, quit school,
leave the country or engage in
any activity resulting in a
change of status without notl-
- fying his local draft board
within ten days of such change.
In other words, the military
induction services of the Un-
J^ited States have a file on the
residence, occupation and
health of all youths in the
country. The power this organization has to classify these
males in order of eligibility for
induction, gives it control over
the country's youth in a manner unlike any other country
that calls itself democratic.
A first and obvious result of
the above situation in the context of American political
structure is that a president
can conscript a standing army
... in peace time, an deploy that
army of over a million men
throughout the world.
But this aspect of the draft
problem may be understood by
"any outsider from Viet Nam to
the Dominican Republic. The
mysterious aspect of the military draft is how it can turn
- relatively peaceful young citizens into armed marauders
ready to kill for a cause about
which they have not been consulted.
The key lies in the complicity of American youth who:
a) serve in the armed services
on   a   compulsory   basis,   and
_ b) allow induction  into  these
services to be^ maintained by
men and criteria they cannot
control.
The military creeps into the
' lives of Americans when they
are eighteen in a most discreet
manner — with the presentation of draft cards. These cards
_ must be accepted, and there
are few at the age of eighteen
who have the. maturity or the
moral strength to refuse compliance with militarism.
From that age on, all young
*men are classified inductable,
deferrable or non-inductable,
through   a  method   of  letters
_ and numbers, which, by giving
them places in a hierarchy,
seem to justify the legitimacy
• of the classification.
(Any resemblance to college
registration procedures is probably coincidental.)
American students who do
not wish to participate in the
military, i.e. go to Viet Nam,
Korea, etc., usually find themselves in a bureaucratic jungle.
The first thing they try to do
is get a deferrment — a reclassification such as those given
* to students, clergy, government
employees if they are high
enough, or the mentally or
physically disabled.
Such deferrments, as well as
•* the classification of conscientious objectors, allow some
young men to delay participation in the military, while
others, who cannot go to
school, or cannot get govern-
,ment jobs or a mental break-
"      To page 14—SILENCED
"Well, bless my) sole" said Ann Arky as she looked at all
the tired feet wearing down UBC's beautifully paved streets.
"It leaves me tongue-tied I"
WELCOME STUDENTS -
From Your UBC Bookstore
You can get all your Books and Supplies
with ease and at a saving at the
UNIVERSITY-OPERATED BOOKSTORE
Buy All Text Books except -
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at THE ARMOURIES
Monday - Friday
Until Friday, September 20th
HOURS: 8:45 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
STATIONERY - ART MATERIALS - PAPERBACKS
Engineering and Gym Supplies, etc.
At the Regular Store on the Main Mall
REBATE PDUCY
University of British Columbia students get a 5% rebate on all items purchased at the Bookstore.
All registered students, including GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE students in regular attendance at the winter and summer sessions, will be eligible for the rebate.
To obtain the rebate, students should save their cash register receipt slips — which are not transferable — and present them at the close of the winter session. Rebates will be given up to the 31st
of May for Winter Session Students. Summer Session Students will present their receipts at the close
of the Summer Session.
Students presenting their Alma Mater Society card or Summer Session Association card with their
accumulated CASH REGISTER RECEIPT SLIPS will receive their 5% rebate in cash.
Students are reminded that POSITIVELY NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES
will be made without presenting the cash register receipt slips. Page 14
THE     UBYSSEY
Dissidents out,
CUSforges action
GUELPH (CUP)—The Canadian Union of Students shrugged
off a flurry of campus withdrawals during its 1968 congress to
mount an attack on society at large in its analysis of the problems
of the modern university.
The congress opened Aug. 28 with 40 member universities.
Before it wrapped things up with an 18-hour plenary session
that dragged on until 7:45 a.m. Sept. 4, the roll call dropped to
27, climbed to 30, then hit 34 with hopes for more.
UBC, University of Manitoba and University of Brandon
dropped out before the commitment deadline, but by congress
end they were back in on the condition they be exempted from a
proposed fee raise.
The per capital fee levy was later raise from 750 to $1.
In between disavowals and commitments to the union, delegates worked out an anti-capitalist and anti-imperialist critique
Of society—although they balked at a four-square stand for
socialism.
They labelled corporate capitalism as the cause of repression
in Canadian universities and demanded that student unions have
control over the learning process and university decision-making.
They also came out 3 to 1 behind a statement condemning
U.S. war efforts in Viet Nam and endorsing the Vietnamese
National Liberation Front in its "struggle for national liberation."
And they acclaimed as president-elect Martin Loney, key
figure in Simon Fraser University's battle for democratization
who called in his acceptance speech for a mass action-oriented
movement for Canadian students.
The withdrawals came on the third day of the congress as
the deadline for signing a 1968-69 commitment to CUS drew
nearer.
Other withdrawals, mainly involving small campuses, stuck
however, and the only bright light for incoming CUS president
Peter Warrian lay in scattered promises of campus referendums
among vanishing members.
Besides major policy statements and structural changes outlined elsewhere on this page, congress business included:
• Approval of a communications resolution calling for
publication of pamphlets on education and student affairs, establishment of student action journals and publication of a list of
films and tapes of interest to students.
• Scrapping of the Interregional Scholarship Exchange
Program which involved about 50 students.
• Continuation of CUS summer travel plans.
• Regular publication of Issue, the national student magazine of CUS.
• Condemnation of the faculty at Simon Fraser University for "dishonesty, inconsistency, and a demonstrable inability
to participate in democratic decision-making" during the summer uprising at SFU.
• Continuation of the CUS life plan which provides students
with low-cost term insurance.
• Rejection of a proposal to investigate the establishment
of a CUS car insurance program.
• Defeat of a resolution calling for a nation-wide confrontation day in October when all classes would be cancelled
and replaced by student debates concerning the quality of
education.
• Establishment of a research program to examine the
financing, governing, and philosophy of university athletics.
• Withdrawal from the CIA-dominated International Student Conference with* a promise to work for "national liberation
from U.S. imperialism."
• Condemnation of the Russian invasion of Czechoslovakia.
• Mandating Glendon College, York University to hold a
conference of world radical student leaders.
• Approval of a resolution to legalize the use of marijuana
and release of all persons now held on marijuana offences. .
Indoctrination Needed
at high school level'
GUELPH (CUP)—CUS decided to work more extensively
with high school students because of the "need for university
students to become more aware of the present repressive secondary and post-secondary education system".
Member campuses were urged to "work in their communities toward the enlightment and organization of high school
students". One recommendation particularly stressed "high school
students be stimulated and encouraged" to form their own union
of students, "created and directed by the high school students".
The Guelph delegation emphasized the importance of university students' role being solely that of providing stimulation and
encouragement so high school students would do their own
organizing and would confront issues themselves. University
students would participated through seminars, discussions, films
and community projects.
A second resolution urged members "to encourage the setting of experimental educational situations that will bring into
practice the ideals of student-centred teaching". This included
CUS support of the free high school of Rochdale College "Super-
school", with a $1,000 grant.
Superschool is an independent high school started under the
Rochdale umbrella in June of this year, with twenty high school
and ten public school students.
Delegates urged
to build up union
GUELPH (CUP) — "Out of confrontation comes consciousness and out of consciousness comes action."
Speaking at the congress, Martin Loney, 24, presidentelect of the Canadian Union of Students, told of his plans
to build CUS into a mass movement for Canadian- students
— the only way, he says, that students can "effect real
change in the university."
"But the things that will bring change will not be
determined by our resolutions, but by what people do with
these resolutions.on their campuses."
Loney, acclaimed amidst thunderous applaise, urged
delegates to go back to their campuses and "turn people
on to social change — then begin working to improve.
Only then will we be able to return to future congresses
as true representatives of the Canadian student movement
and be able\to talk of student changes."
"Student power is our constituency but, we can never
forget our wider constituency is the world," said Loney.
"I'm talking about liberating the people of the world. We
must liberate those in Asia starving physically as well as
those suffering from mental starvation.
Reflecting on the future of CUS, Loney spoke of increasing radicalism stemming from the congress.
Tuesday, September 10, 1968
SILENCED {from page 13)
down, have to fight and die.
Thus once a young man who.
does  not   wish  to fight is  reclassified in any of the above
niches,   he   has   been   conveniently silenced.. He still has a
draft card, he is still   induct--
able, (unless he is a conscien-*
tious  objector,  in which  case
he has to do national service)
and by being classified he has
still accepted the right of his
government   to   use   him   any1
time and anywhere its leaders
feel themselves, their interests,
pocketbooks,    possessions,     or "
beliefs threatened. „
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Sixteen 16-year-old clean-cut,
crew-cut blorgs who were under the influence of brylcreem,
declared tomorrow morning an
international day of solidarity
with muther violaters to protest what they called "pigs
leading pearls". They were
arrested for violating their
muthers.
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UBC ARMOURIES
September 9,10,11, 12, 13 Tuesday, September 10, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page. 15
4 CUS fieldworkers
aid democratization
GUELPH (CUP) — The Canadian Union of Students
will put four fieldworkers on the road this year to help
campuses organize for democratization of their universities
and improvement in the quality of education.
The fieldworkers, one each for British Columbia, the
Atlantic provinces, Ontario, aijd the Prairies, are to "provide adequate support for program work" on member campuses, help make CUS "relevant at the campus level" and,
by their presence, help decentralize what many congress
delegates felt was a too remote national organization.
The field work program arose from complaints that
the national office was too remote and its policies irrelevant at campus level. Individual unions wanted to help with
the education and organization of their campuses. £
CUS votes down
authoritarianism
GUELPH (CUP) — CUS has rejected the "authoritarianism
and repression" of Canadian Society and begun a fight for a
"democratic, non-exploitative" alternative.
The policy statement, arising from a commission discussing
The Student in Society was approved 20-4 with five abstentions
by full plenary.
The statement pointed at American corporations, charging:
"Canadian society is not self-determined; our cultural, political
and economic livtes are dominated by giant American corpora-
tons." This question is fundamental because "self-determination
in education will be possible only in a society which is self-
determined."
Claiming "American imperialism is not the sole obstacle to
Canadian self-determination", CUS pledged itself to "struggle
not only against imperialism but also against the capitalist, corporate organization of society". And since "repression and authoritarianism are not limited to capitalism", the student union
pledged to fight "all forms of authoritarianism and repression
in any system."
Student power takes congress
GUELPH (CUP) — Student power fervor
swept the CUS congress last week and was
turned toward direct action by a chronicle of
demands and set of realistic tactics.
In a resolution resulting from three days of
study, revision, argument and commission
wrangling, CUS called for student control over
the learning process and university decisionmaking processes at all levels.
"The operating principles of our approach to
bargaining must be those of parity, mass participation (instead of representative models of democratization) in open structures and parallel
decision-making with a veto vested in autonomous student unions," said the statement.
The resolution labelled the contemporary
Canadian university an "imperialistic institution."
Delegates pointed out the education system
they proposed could only be effected when each
Canadian student moved to "actively confront
his situation in the university."
Universal accessibility was redefined in a
section designed "to open the university and its
resources to non-students ... to make the university a true institution of the people."
Eleswhere, the union came out strongly behind a capital gains tax to support university
financing, and called for eventual abolition of
tuition fees.
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On the departmental and classroom level, a
resolution demanded the establishment of student departmental union locals with veto power
and of student committees parallel to all departmental faculty committees.
CUS recommends the abolition of boards of
governors as presently constituted, with two
alternatives suggested:
• parallel student-faculty decision-making
bodies which would meet separately, but both
bodies ratifying legislation.
' • a reconstituted senate with an equal
number of students and faculty, student senators
directly responsible to the student union.
Another resolution urged member councils
to oppose financial gifts to their -universities on
conditions contradicting CUS policy.
To democratize education, the congress
ruled," control of curriculum must rest exclusively with the students and faculty concerned."
And a section looking outside the university
proper called on member unions to "ensure that
employees at their universities are unionized . . .
in order that their right to participate in the
governing structures of the university be recognized and implemented."
Scabbing — and control of boards of governors over land surrounding universities — was
also condemned.
THIS   IS   A   HOLDUP!
Don't make a move for Fall until you've seen
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548 Granville, Vancouver 2
MU 2-1022 Page 16
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10, 1968
?**?£ Union supports NLF
— lawrence woodd photo
Why am I here, wonders tired and bewildered student as he takes a rest for the mind flying
sessions in registration' lineups. Students are lucky the weather remained sunny last week.
But as soon as the weather sours, the space p inch will  be felt again.
Faculty wants clarity
on AMS brief demands
GUELPH (CUP) — The Canadian Union of Students voted
three to one to support the
Vietnamese National Liberation
Front in its "struggle for national liberation".
In the resolution, CUS condemned the "imperialist and
genocidal war currently being
waged against Viet Nam by the
United States of America and
its allies", and demanded the
withdrawal of all U.S. and
allied troops.
Earlier Gerald Pout-Macdon-
ald of Regina had moved the
clause supporting the NLF be
deleted, but the amendment
was resoundedly defeated.
In opposing the amendment,
Martin Loney, president of Simon Fraser and president-elect
of CUS,  said the NLF repre
sents the majority of the Vietnamese people.
Pout-Mfcdonald said he believed the congress should not
endorse any group which engaged in "terrorest activities
which do not accomplish anything".
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UBC's faculty association
Thursday declined to state its
position on Alma Mater Society proposals for student participation in university administration and academic affairs.
The association passed a
statement welcoming the concern the AMS has expressed
for the quality of education at
Revisionists face
education changes
by order of Mao
Institute for International
Youth Affairs, New York —
China's Communist Party chairman Mao-Tse-tung has issued a
directive on educational reform
that aims to "counter and prevent revisionism" and "prepare
China's industrial revolution."
One proposal says secondary
school graduates, instead of
proceeding to higher education,
must first work as ordinary
laborers until they merit qualification certificates for higher
study from workers and peasants.
Those who fail to earn such
certificates are to remain laborers for life.
The directive, accompanied
by all the fanfare and publicity
reserved for major declarations
of national policy was printed
in all newspapers in China late
in July.
Mao proposes less emphasis
on formal class study and an
upgrading of practical experience.
"Establishments of higher
education are still needed —
I have in mind mainly institutions of science and engineering — but the time spent in
them should be reduced," the
directive says.
As the "official Peking party
daily explained, "Graduates of
colleges and ' universities are
cocksure although they are
lacking in practical experience.
They look down upon the workers and peasants and chase
after bourgeois fame and
wealth and achieve nothing."
Mao's directive clearly aims
for a humbler breed of elite.
Meanwhile, formal education
in China remains at a virtual
standstill. Some of the country's primary schools are open
for two hours each morning
and afternoon but their only
subject is "the thought of Mao-
Tse-tung."
UBC, but refused to name specific areas where it supported
AMS demands for greater student participation.
The association held a special closed meeting, attended
by more than 400 faculty to,
consider the AMS brief, The
Future of Education — Fair
Weather or Foul?
President Dr. William Webber said faculty members expressed the fear that an endorsement of some of the AMS
proposals would imply rejection of the rest.
PINNED DOWN
"I got the impression that
faculty members don't wish to
be pinned down yet," he said.
"But our executive has been
instructed to continue meeting
with the AMS executive with a
view to clarifying what is
meant by some of the AMS
proposals.
"I hope our concern is indicated by the fact that we held
a special meeting to consider
the students' demands."
The statement passed by the
faculty reads: "The Association welcomes the AMS council brief as an indication of
student concern for the quality of education at this university.
"We agree to consider all
matters in the brief. There
will be issues on which there
is agreement with the students
and others on which there is
not agreement. Where we support the students' proposals we
will work with them to promote implementation.
FRANK  DISCUSSION
"Where we disagree with
the student proposals we
would welcome frank discussion with the students so that
the arguments for and against
their proposals may be fully
considered and understood."
The faculty statement was
presented to the association by
its executive   for discussion.
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But the membership voted
to delete clauses endorsing student participation in matters
concerning rules of conduct,
development of student housing and curriculum planning,
Webber said.
Members also rejected a
clause expressing disagreement with AMS views on the
student's role in academic and
administrative appointments
and on the granting of academic credit for extracurricular activities.
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IMPORTANT   NOTICE
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The Bookstore and
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Will Be Open Evenings
until 8:00 p.m.
Monday through Thursday — Sept. 9-t2 inclusive Tuesday, September 10, 1968
THE     UBYSS-EY
Page 17
Lack of building funds
hampers UBC expansion
A lack of capital construction
funds is holding up development of university expansion
in buildings, a UBC administration official said Monday.
"The plans for many buildings are being held up by a
lack of capital construction
funds," said information officer
Jim Banham.
Planned buildings include a
complex of engineering buildings, some of which are already
completed. The complex will
cover about 15 acres at the
south end of the campus.
Opened Aug. 26 was the $2.5
million Frank A. Forwad
metallurgy building at the corner of Stores Rd. and main
mall.
A new structural testing laboratory is under construction
in  the  same  complex,  which
will be incorporated into a
larger civil engineering building.
About $29 million will be
spent on the applied science
buildings.
Under construction now is
the new general services administration building on the
corner of University Boulevard
and Wesbrook Crescent.
The clock and bell tower in
front of the library is complete
except for the clock and carillon mechanism.
When finished, the chimes
will strike on the hour.
Also under construction is
the health sciences centre.
Stages one and two of the psychiatric unit at Wesbrook and
Agronomy, first wing of a 410*-
bed teaching and referral hoS1-
pital have been started.
Sometime   this   winter   the
Delayed SUB opening
harms orientation
See these ? Now that summer's gone you won't see too
many hanging around like this any more.
Strand asks SFU
for white papers
BURNABY ( Staff) — Simon
Fraser University president Dr.
"Kenneth Strand has asked SFU
students to submit white papers
on university problems to him.
Strand made the appeal in an
address to students who packed
SFU's main mall Monday to
hear what he billed a "state of
the university" address.
WELCOMES IDEAS
Strand told the students be
-welcomes their ideas.
"Tiie confrontations at this
*»
university have been those of
power, not ideas," he said.
"Power confrontations are corrosive.
"I would prefer those of
4deas."
"SPEECH RHETORIC"
Student council president
Martin Loney charged that
Strand's speech was rhetoric.
- "It did not meet the problems of tbe university, and
it's what we heard before from
MacPherson," he said glumly.
Before Strand's speech, the
SFU student council gave him
lend open letter demanding action on seven issues.
These included resignation
of the board of governors, a
ban on recruitment of students
by war industries, and abolition of all advisory committees
to the president.
"These issues are not new —
they do not require white
papers or extended negotiations," the letter stated.
"They simply require honest
commitment   and   forthright
action."
A meeting to discuss Strand's
speech will be held on the main
mall at 12:30 today.
Like everyone else, the frosh
orientation committee is still
waiting for the student union
building to open.
Committee chairman Freddy
Lowe, ed. 3, said Monday
that much of the orientation
program is centered around
the opening of SUB which has
been repeatedly delayed.
"We are disappointed and
disillusioned with the delays,"
she said. "These and a shortage of resource people have
been our greatest problems."
Frosh can look forward to a
student-president rally and the
annual frosh retreat.
The rally will feature UBC
president Dr. Kenneth Hare
and student president Dave
Zirnhelt.
Frosh retreat will be held at
Camp Potlach on Howe Sound
from Sept. 20-22.
The rally is yet to be scheduled.
first phychiatric patient should
move into this building.
The centre will comprise
around 30 acres and will eventually train all medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy and
physiotherapy students.
Stage two will house the university's neurological research
unit. This is also near completion, along with stage one, Banham said.
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SEPTEMBER 20-28
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STUDENT SEASON'S TICKETS (4 Ploys for $3.00)
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& Page  18
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10, 1968
Once-proud rowing Birds
bomb at Ontario meet
By BRIAN McDANIEL
UBC rowing is dead. The end of an illustrious
era came at the Canadian Olympic Rowing
Trials at St. Catharines, Ontario, on July 31.
Thunderbird crews which once competed for the
right to represent Canada as a mere formality
fell victim to crews with less experience and
inferior conditioning.
The performance at St. Catharines was a disgrace; the eight struggled down the course like
a poor freshman crew and finished a faltering
third to St. Catharines Rowing Club and the University of Western Ontario.
The four tacked its way from lane to lane
unitl it eventually rammed the Western shell
and was disqualified. The pair crossed the finish
line in second place and almost immediately hit
the judges stand.
Shortly afterwards, the members of this crew
were chosen as official substitutes for the Canadian team. They will be the only UBC oarsmen
competing at Mexico City in October.
TRIAL RESULTS FARCICAL
Trial results were farcical. The logic and behavior which produced such a farce were simply
unbelievable.
In a sport which depends on the ultimate in
teamwork, crews which represented UBC were
a hodge-podge. Three months rowing together
with the same personalities is a minimum for a
championship crew. UBC's crews were together
for just three days.
Their architect was Frank Read, the man
who in his own free time has made UBC's rowing world class. As the university's director of
rowing he has presided over the hiring, firing,
and retiring of five coaches in the past six
years. He is the grey eminence who has ruled
over almost all the successes and failures of the
sport at UBC.
This summer the Oarsmen were forced to
abandon their traditional training grounds in
Coal Harbour and seek conditions more conducive to the production of championship crews.
At Shawnigan Lake on Vancouver Island, they
found lodgings at Strathcona Lodge Girls' School
and pleaded, sometimes successfully, for jobs in
the area.
Water   conditions   were   ideal,   and   within
three and a half months, coach Wayne Pritty
had molded together three relatively good
crews; which undoubtedly would have been
more respectable at the trails.
TEAMWORK DESTROYED
On July 23, Read was asked by the rowers
themselves to lend his experienced eye to the
crews in their final preparation for the trials.
The oarsmen received not only the eye, but also
the mouth, the mind, and apparently irrational
logic of coach Read.
For most of the rowers, two years filled with
countless hours of exercising and 3,000 miles of
rowing were destroyed in three days. Read
promptly reshuffled the crews, destroying all
traces of teamwork.
The forthcoming results at St. Catharines
were so obvious that many did not make the trip
to the east.
Of the eighteen oarsmen who stayed with the
program in the summer of 1968 not one will be
rowing this season. It is simply too disappointing and too humiliating to sacrifice so much
time, effort, and money with no apparent success.
If the university is to resume production of
world class oarsmen it must be prepared to
accept the financial and athletic risks involved.
The fame UBC has derived from rowing — and
rowing is one of the few claims to athletic fame
this institution has — has been for the most
part, free.
'SUGAR DADDY' NO MORE
It began in 1954 when Victor Spencer was
the "sugar daddy" who was willing to spend
money on shells and training programs and
when Read was a remarkable coach who was
willing to devote his time, free of charge, to the,
university. It was Read who fostered the tradition amongst UBC oarsmen that the physical,
financial and social hardships suffered in training were an excellent and worthwhile preparation for later life.
UBC no longer haa a "sugar daddy", nor one
of the best coaches in the world or the oarsmen
who are willing to sacrifice their time, effort,
and money.
If changes are not forthcoming the tragicomedy at St. Catharines this summer may well
be the final memory Canada has of this University's rowing program.
*"* dick button photo
AN UNIDENTIFIED FRESHETTE takes the compulsory physical fitness tests in War Memorial Gym. Our photographer
was sure he heard her say "Umm, that's nice!"
VARSITY SKI SHOP
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Volleyball
still has
openings
The University of British
Columbia volleyball team begins training this week for the
1969 Universiade Games to be
held in Madrid in late August.
The Thunderbirds, Canadian
representatives to the Tokyo
Universiade in 1'967, have the
nucleus of that team returning
for the coming season and fully
expected to be selected to the
1969 team.
However there are still many
openings on the varsity as well
as the junior varsity teams.
Any student with even passing interest in volleyball is invited to attend the first practice in War Memorial Gymnasium today at 6:30 p.m. If
you are willing to work, we'll
get you to Spain.
UBYSSEY SPORTS
BREED CELEBRITIES
The Ubyssey sports department is in dire straits this year.
The staff has been severely
depleted by promotions to last
year's stalwart reporters leaving large gaps to fill with new
reporters.
Therefore, if you're at all
interested in writing sports,
show your beautiful face in the
Ubyssey office downstairs in
north Brock as soon as possible.
This year a rarity in the
sports department has occurred, we have our own photographer !
Also a final note of encouragement; sports editors have
an enviable penchant for becoming successful. For example, Danny Stoffman, last
year's editor, and Al Birnie,
this year's editor, are both
former sports editors.
You too can be famous!
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681-4931
PURE VIRGIN WOOL
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Soft shoulder is a tradition. It should
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OSS-5-68 Tuesday, September 10, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 19
.;*•£'"* ^V
• ffWSIglf:.,.'
did      HP"*""'
w • 1»
If t
  _   _  satis
Head soccei* coach Joe Johnson watches his Birds going through their paces on the field
behind War Memoriaf Gymnasium. The Birds won their first league game of the season
last Saturday.
Soccer Birds victorious
in first league game
The UBC Soccer Thunderbirds won a game
- against   Victoria,   2-1,   on  Saturday.   But   they
could hardly have won any accuracy test when
it came to shooting the ball.
Making amends with two second half goals,
I however, the Birds captured the opening Pacific
Coast League game before 604 capital city fans.
Facing a revamped Victoria eleven, the Birds
opened slowly in the first 20  minutes as  the
-I young O'Keefe team moved into Bird territory
time after time to test goalie Bruce Ballam with
hard drives.
Victoria scored first midway into the first
; half when Peter Brett let go a quick hard drive
•'from 35 yards out, which caught the net high.
Ballam appeared to be screened on the play.
But the UBC squad caught fire and had some
excellent scoring opportunities on a somewhat
nervous Victoria goalie, Ken Cook, though they
did not score before the half ended.
In the second half, UBC completely took over
the play. The Victoria defense did heroics until
a shot from a scramble ricocheted past three defenders, and into the low right corner. Briggs
got that first UBC goal and it tied the game, 1-1.
With 12 minutes remaining, and UBC pressing continuously, Briggs caught Ash Valdai in
the clear on the left side, passed, and Valdai
moved in to score the winner cleanly from 10
yards. Both Briggs and Valdai played a good
game.
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TO GNUP'S GNOMES
This is the season to follow football. For full-time fans there
are trips to Edmonton, Honolulu, Tacoma, and Caldwell, Idaho.
At home the season kicks off with Williamette University
on September 28, with Pacific Lutheran coming on October 26,
Oregon College on November 9, and ... I almost forgot . . .
Simon Fraser University on the hill meet in the BIG ONE at
Empire Stadium, October 21 . . . Mark that one on your calendar.
STILL LOOKING
Coach Frank Gnup is still looking for players. "There are,"
he says, "no spots filled on the club as of now. Every spot is
open and players who figure it's too late still have a chance to
get a good shot. New players can draw strip any time, practice
time is 4:30."
Coach Gnup has a solid complement of assistants, with: Bill
Reeske, line coach; Joe Carver, offensive backs; Norm Thomas,
ends; Ken Danchuck, defensive backs; Nestor Korchinsky, head
Junior Varsity coach; Jack Christopher, J.V. line; and Bob Sweet,
J.V. backs.
NO SPOT TIED DOWN <*
When asked what players to watch for this year, Coach
Gnup reiterated the fact that no spot was yet tied down. He has
quarterbacks Roger Gregory and Kent Yaniw fighting it out
with Murphy Costello not far behind.
Some names that might be handling the ball this year are
Bernie Fandrich, Dave Corcoran and Paul Danyliu coming out
of the backfield and McDonell and Tom Ellison off the ends. The
offensive line will probably be anchored by Captain Bob Fitzpatrick at centre and co-captain Bob Main at tackle. Other names
we may see up front are Bob Laycoe, Dick Steen, and Charlie
Phipps.
The Junior Varsity schedule consists of trips to Washington
State Reformatory, the University of Puget Sound and to Western
Washington State. At home they start against Wenatchee Jr.
College on September 21, and also hosting Seattle Cavaliers
twice and Western Washington once.
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-State- Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10, 1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Town Fool, films at SCM
STUDENT CHRISTIAN
MOVEMENT
First of film series 7 p.m.
tonight at International House
lounge. Flights of Fancy will
be shown, Town Fool Joachim
Foikis will be present.
VOC
General meeting Wednesday
noon, Angus 104. New members welcome. Until SUB opens
Sept. 23 we're in Brock Ext.
259.
WRESTLING TEAM
Meeting Wednesday noon at
T-Bird stadium wrestling room.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau speaks today
noon, Bu. 100 on The Chemical
or the Philosophical Way
Thursday noon, same time and
room, on Suggestions for UBC
Reform. Friday, What's Wrong
With Canada and What To Do
About It?
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Goutez les jouissances d'u e
autre langue. Venez a parler
Francaise, ou nous offrons
beaucoup d'amusements pour
chaque gout. Notre premier reunion sera Vendredi le 13
septembre a midi et demie a la
Maison International.
CHINESE VARSITY
Emergency meeting of past
members noon Thursday, Bu.
205.
JUDO CLUB
General meeting noon today,
Hennings 201, to discuss fall
activities.
VARSITY ROD AND GUN
Regular meeting noon Thurs
day   Bu.   212.   New   members
welcome.
VOLLEYBALL TEAM
UBC volleyball team now
practising for 1969 Madrid Uni-
sersiade. Players welcome and
needed. Team practices Tuesday and Thursday at 6:30 p.m.,
War gym.
Ryerson students
representation on BoG
TORONTO (CUP) — Two Ryerson students and faculty
members will sit on the institute's board of governors.
W. M. Kelly, chairman of the board announced the representation Sept. 4, saying the board believes it had fallen short of
student and faculty expectations last year because of a lack of
representaton from those groups.
"This is not a reaction to anything," said Kelly. "It's not
because we think the students are going to put bombs under the
president's chair. It fills a need in>the board."
David Maxwell, president of the students' council, was not
impressed with the board's grant of two student seats: "It's a
matter of adding two students to an elite board. They will be
used by the board as mouthpieces-excuses. Whenever students
make demands, they'll be told to take it to their representatives
and will have no more power than we have now."
■" <?£*••'"'"S*? • 'lX'*
Tickets available at Vancouver Ticket Centre
630 Hamilton St., Eaton's Stores t Tomnonse Electronics
Ubyssey librarian
gets fringe benefits
The Ubyssey needs — nay, craves — a librarian.
Our files are falling into a decrepit state of disorder
and confusion.
Save us, please. We'll pay you $1.50 an hour to clip
and file stories from Canada's greatest university paper.
The job should entail about three hours' work each
week. Fringe benefits include the atmosphere and wild
parties.
Come to our North Brock office anytime — this afternoon, for instance — if you have a rudimentary knowledge
of library science and are prepared to work.
Monday traffic flow smooth
No major bottlenecks were experienced on the first
day of classes Monday, said university patrol supervisor
J. H. Kelly.
Traffic on all approaches was moving briskly, except
for a brief slowdown on Southeast Marine Drive, Kelly
said in an interview.
"Construction on campus is not affecting the traffic
pattern though the Brock and Fraser lots are usually filled
first," he said.
Long lineups at the traffic office indicated a heavy
demand on parking facilities, but Kelly said there is no
shortage of space.
Kelly succeeded former supervisor Sir Ouvry Roberts,
who retired earlier this year.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75>*>, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
WHEN PLANNING YOUR NEXT
dance or party, book through our
agency. Exclusive agents for the
Boston Teaparty, Blue Crusade,
Witness, Exotics & many more, Dan
987-6721,
Lost & Found
13
LOST PLAIN GOLD ALPHA OMIC-
son Pi pin last May. Reward. Ph.
733-0155.
LOST BUCH. LOUNGE, BLUE H.R.
motorcycle helmet. Reward offered.
Call Rick at  224-6460.
Rides & Car Pools
14
WANTED RIDE TO UBC FROM
vicinity of North Vancouver Gen-
eral hospital, cal] Fred at 988-2572.
NEED RIDE FROM 4786 W. 6th FOR
9 a.m. in exchange for parking permit  near  Buch.  224-6589.
DRIVERS AND RIDERS WANTED
from Oak and 62nd area. Call 321-
8142, Barry.	
RIDERS NEEDED M. to P. FROM
Arbutus & 25th area, $5.00 month.
Gary,   738-6521.
URGENT RIDE FROM OLD ORCH-
ard Shopping Centre, Burnaby for
8:30's. Phone 435-7260.  	
Special Notices
15
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'58 PONTIAC, 4 DR., 6, STAND. $350
or best offer. Call 988-8500 after
5 p.m. 	
•65 AUSTIN A60. EXCELLENT CON-
dition  $1,300.   Call 738-8131.	
66 V.W. MUST SELL. A. CHRISTIE,
5785  Agronomy   Rd.   Phone  224-9684.
'58 HUMBER HAWK, AUTO. TRANS.
Outstand. condition and very reliable. Private, 261-2826.	
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobile—Parts
23
Automobile—Repairs
24
Boats & Supplies
25
Motorcycles
26
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating  &  Copying
32
Miscelleous
33
DAY NURSERY AT ALMA HOUSE,
(children 3-6 yrs.) 1712 Alma Road
is planned to help working parents.
For  information  call 738-6960.
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice. Upper Tenth Barber — Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue.
224-662a
Photography
34
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscelleous
36
Scandals
37
DIVERS AND WOULD BE'S! PAR-
ticipate in the sport of the space
age with Aqua Society. Learn with
a N.A.U.I. approved course. For in-
fomation phone John Smith, 434-
5143  or  Dave  Tingey,   922-8181.
INSTRUCTION
Sewing 8c Alterations
38
Typewriters 8c Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED AND RELIABLE
typist available for home typing.
Please call 277-5640.
GOOD      EXPERIENCED      TYPIST
available   for   home   typing.   Please.
call 435-0882.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
AMS PUBLICATIONS OFFICE RE-
quires part-time female clerfi>typist,
app. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Mon.-Fri. This
is an interesting job for the right
girl. Apply to Publications Office,
Brock Hall.
Help Wanted—
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female
53
Work Wanted
54
Instruction Wanted
61
Music
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
YOUR    STUDENT    TELEPHONE t
directory.   Buy  pre-sale   tickets  for
75 cents from Bookstore or Publications Office, Brock Hall.
RENTALS  & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Room & Board
82
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
2 ROOM SUITE, FURNISHED, PRI-
vate entrance, near University. Suitable   two   students,   $80   per   month.
224-4256.
Houses  8c  Apis.—
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
Halls For Rent
84
85
Houses For Sale
Other Cities
86
87
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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